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Geophysical Monograph Series

 

Keywords

  • Carbon sequestration
  • Carbon cycle (Biogeochemistry)

Index Terms

  • 1630 Global Change: Impacts of global change

Article

GEOPHYSICAL MONOGRAPH SERIES, VOL. 183, PP. 25-25, 2009

Section 1: Monitoring the global carbon cycle: A tribute to Charles David Keeling

Anonymous


The CO2 concentration of our atmosphere is increasing. This fact was detected by Charles David Keeling after he designed and deployed his program of CO2 measurements at Mauna Loa and Antarctica in the 1950s. These measurements continue to this day in collaboration with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Their cumulative display—updated regularly—is often known as the Keeling Curve. More than any other scientific record, this graph has motivated the growing level of public concern that has now made carbon sequestration a commonly-known concept. Can carbon sequestration help reverse the trend shown in the Keeling Curve? The challenge of this question is the reason this book was assembled.

Citation: Anonymous (2009), Section 1: Monitoring the global carbon cycle: A tribute to Charles David Keeling, in Carbon Sequestration and Its Role in the Global Carbon Cycle, Geophys. Monogr. Ser., vol. 183, edited by B. J. McPherson and E. T. Sundquist, pp. 25–25, AGU, Washington, D. C., doi:10.1029/2009GM000908.

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