General Information
Chapman Conference on the Gaia Hypothesis
University of Valencia
Valencia, Spain
June 19-23, 2000
(Monday through Friday)



PROGRAM


2ND CHAPMAN CONFERENCE ON THE GAIA HYPOTHESIS
Valencia, Spain, June 19 - 23, 2000
Universitat de Valencia
PROGRAM SCHEDULE

 
SUNDAY—JUNE 18, 2000
Venue: JARDÍ BOTÀNIC

1630-1930 Registration & Poster set up


MONDAY—JUNE 19, 2000
Venue: JARDÍ BOTÀNIC

0800-1000 Registration & Poster set up

MONDAY—JUNE 19, 2000
Venue: HISTORICAL BUILDING—Aula Magna

1000 - 1015—Opening Remarks
Co-convenors and Local Organizing Committee, Eva Barreno, Penelope Boston, James Miller, Stephen Schneider

1015 - 1030 Stephen D. Schneider–A Brief Personal History of Gaia Science
 

Session 1: THE CORE IDEAS: Defining, Redefining, Affirming and Negating Gaia Theory
Chair: James Lovelock
1030 - 1100 Timothy M. Lenton–Gaia Theory as a Whole: Why is the Earth so Favourable to Life?
1100 - 1130 Andrew J. Watson–Goddess of the Earth, or Lady Luck? Gaia and the Anthropic Principle
1130-1200 Lee F. Klinger–Merging Gaia and Complexity: A Way Forward

1215 - 1345OPENING CEREMONY
Venue: HISTORICAL BUILDING —Paraninfo

Chairs: Excmo. Rector of the University of Valencia, Lynn Margulis, James Lovelock, Sir Crispin Tickell, Juli Pereto, Eva Barreno
Talk:Sir Crispin Tickell–Gaia: Goddess or Thermostat
Talk:James Lovelock–Perspectives on the Science of Gaia in the Year 2000

1345 - 1500 Reception & Buffet
Venue:HISTORICAL BUILDING— Claustre

The participants must return to the BOTANICAL GARDEN.
20 minutes walking
 

Session 1: THE CORE IDEAS: Defining, Redefining, Affirming and Negating Gaia Theory
Chairs: Tyler Volk and Eva Barreno
1600Welcome by: Manuel Costa, Director of the Botanical Garden
Venue: JARDÍ BOTÀNIC

1600 - 1630 David M. Wilkinson–Homeostatic Gaia: an ecologists |perspective on the possibility of regulation
1630 - 1700 Jennifer M. Robinson–From Thermostat to Complexity
1700 - 1730 Peter Westbroek–Strengthening Gaia - A New Category
1730 - 1800—COFFEE BREAK
1800 - 1830 David W. Schwartzman–Is Gaian Evolution Deterministic?
1830 1845 Toby Tyrrell–Biotic Plunder: The Exploitation of Environments by Organisms
1845 - 1900 Tyler Volk–The future of Gaia theory: How to build a
lively biosphere
1900 - 2000——CORE IDEAS PANEL DISCUSSION–(All session speakers are on the panel to take questions from the audience)

 

TUESDAY—JUNE 20, 2000
Venue: JARDÍ BOTÁNIC
 

Session 2: GAIA AND EARTH HISTORY
Chairs: Lee Kump and Juli Pereto
0900 - 0930James F. Kasting–Climate Regulation During the Archean: A Gaian Feedback Mechanism Involving Atmospheric Methane
0930 - 1000 Heinrich Holland–Gaia and the great oxidation event
1000 - 1030 Don E. Canfield–The Evolution of Metabolic Innovations and Their Expression in the Geologic Record
1030 - 1100 Mark McMenamin–Syncitial and Metacellular Organisms: A Gaian Response to Extreme Environmental Disturbance
1100 -1115—COFFEE BREAK
1115 - 1130 Noam M. Bergman–Coupled Predictions of Oxygen and Carbon Dioxide Over Phanerozoic Time
1130 - 1200 Lee R. Kump–High-Resolution Paleoceanography Reveals "Heartbeat" of Gaia
1200 - 1215 W. W. Hay–Climate and the Spread of C4 Plants
1215 - 1230 A. J.Casanovas–A Neural Net Approach to Climate Forcing and Deglaciation Events
1230 - 1245—Break
1245 - 1330–PANEL DISCUSSION GAIA AND EARTH HISTORY
1330 - 1400—Poster Announcements (2 minutes; 2overheads/poster)—C. Fiorilla, V. Gupta, Lenton, I. Sanchez, P. Sperry, C. Still, F. Torrens, J. Turner, J. Whiteside
1400 - 1600—Lunch
 
 
Session 3: BIOGEOCHEMICAL CYCLES: ARE THEY GAIAN?
Chairs: William H. Schlesinger and Paul Falkowski
1600 - 1630 Robert A. Berner–The Rise of Trees in the Paleozoic and their Effects on Atmospheric CO2 and O2
1630 - 1700 Paul Falkowski–The Evolution of Biogeochemical Cycles - Natural Selection or Directed Evolution
1700 - 1730 Lars O. Hedin–The Terrestrial Nitrogen Cycle: Nature of Feedbacks and the Emergence of Macroscopic Patterns
1730 - 1800—COFFEE BREAK
1800 - 1830 William H. Schlesinger–High CO2 Stimulates Plant Growth and Rock Weathering: A Feedback that Regulates Atmospheric CO2
1830 - 1845 Karl B. Follmi–Phosphorus-carbon Feedback Mechanisms and Environmental Change
1845 - 1945—Panel on Biogeochemical Cycles

2000 - 2015 Andrew Wier–NASA Planetary Biology Internships: Gaian Internships in the 21st Century
2015 - 2100 Peter Westbroek–New Center for Gaia Research
 
 

WEDNESDAYJUNE 21, 2000
Venue: JARDÍ BOTÁNIC
 

Session 4: WATER AND GAIA
Chairs: Pedro Marijuan and James Miller
0900 - 0915 Jessie E. Gunnard–Is the Hydrosphere a Gaian Phenomenon?
0915 - 0930 Pedro Marijuan–Water And The Evolutionary Origins Of Nervous Systems
0930 - 0945 Ricardo Amils–The Tinto River: an Extreme Acididc Environment Produced and Regulated by Microorganisms
0945 - 1000 Elfatih A.B. Eltahir–Multiple Climate Equilibria of the Biosphere-Atmosphere System Over West Africa
1000 - 1015 Rafel Simo Gaia and the Oceanic sulphur cycle: the feedback plankton/atmospheric sulphur/climate
1015 - 1030 James Miller–Modeling Feedbacks between Water and Vegetation in the Climate System
1030 - 1100 —COFFEE BREAK
 
 
Session 5: PHILOSOPHY AND HISTORY OF GAIA
Chairs: Mercé Piqueras and Eva Barreno
1100 - 1115 Eileen Crist–"Concerned with Trifles?": A Geophysical Reading of Charles Darwin's Last Book"
1115 - 1130 Peter Horton–Gaia Theory and natural Systems Philosophy: Beyond Morality?
1130 - 1145 Arthur C. Petersen–On the Relation Between Simple and Complex Models in Earth System Science
1145 - 1200 Dorion Sagan–The Goldilocks Paradox: Thermodynamics and GAIA
1200 - 1215 Bruce Scofield–GAIA: The Living Earth 2000 Years of Precedents
1215 - 1230 Andrej V. Lapo– Is IV Vernadsky really known all over the world as a predecessor of the Gaia hypothesis?
1230 - 1245 —Break
1245 - 1330—POSTER SESSION
1330 - 1400—BOOKS SESSION
1400 - 1545 —Lunch
 
 
Session 6: FEEDBACK AND THERMODYNAMICS
Chairs: Eric Schneider and S A L M Kooijman
1545 - 1615 Eric D. Schneider–A Thermodynamics for a Gaian Planet
1615 - 1645 Robert B. Chatfield–Limits on the Super-Greenhouse and Methane-Gas Runaway from the Western Equatorial Pacific: Using Current-Earth Studies to understand planetary habitability and stability
1645 - 1715 J.R. Bates–A Dynamical Stabilizer in the Climate System: a Mechanism Suggested by a Simple Model and Supported by GCM Experiments
1715 - 1745— COFFEE BREAK
1745 - 1815 S.A.L.M. Kooijman–Quantitative aspects of metabolism and their global impact
1815 - 1830 Stephan Harding–Food web complexity enhances community stability and climate regulation in a geophysiological model.
1830 - 1900 Miquel De Renzi–Exchanging Information Between the Biosphere and the Lithosphere: Gaia and the Fossil Record
 
2015—Classical Music Concert
by: Olga Guerrero
Venue: HISTORICAL BUILDING —Paraninfo
 

THURSDAYJUNE 22, 2000
Venue: JARDÍ BOTÀNIC
 
Session 7: QUANTIFYING GAIA AND GAIAN PROCESSES
Chairs: Nanne Weber and Stephen Schneider
0900 - 0930 Martin Claussen–Quaternary Biogeophysical Feedbacks - do They Behave Anti-GAIA?
0930 - 0945 F. Santini–Stability and Instability in Ecological Systems
0945 - 1015 Nanne Weber–On Homeostasis in Daisyworld: is it Relevant for the real Earth System?
1015 - 1030—Break
1030 - 1100 Keith L. Downing–Applying Artificial Life Techniques to Gaia Research
1100 - 1130 Axel Kleidon–Strength of Biospheric Feedbacks on Climate affects Simulated Amazonian Biogeography During the Last Ice Age: A Test for GAIA
1130 - 1145—COFFEE BREAK
1145 - 1230—PANEL ON FEEDBACK, THERMODYNAMICS, AND MODELS


Session 8: MICROBES AND GAIA
Chairs: Penelope Boston and Isabel Esteve
1230 - 1300 Penelope Boston– Microbes and Gaia
1300 - 1315 Kurt A. Grimm–The Architecture of Living Systems: Insights from the Phytoplankton Microcosm
1315 - 1345 Ricardo Guerrero–Microbial mats and the search for minimal ecosystems
1345 - 1400 G.V. Zhizhin–About the Possibility of Soliton-like Spreading of Cyanobacterial Mats
1400-1415 J Scott Turner Turner Emergent homeostasis in a symbiotic assemblage: The colonies of Macrotermes michaelseni and their fungal symbiont Termitomyces alba
1415 - 1600—Lunch
 
 
Session 9: GAIA BEYOND EARTH
Chair: Ricardo Amils
1600 - 1630 S. Franck–Extrasolar Planetary Systems and the Number of Other Gaia's in the Milky Way
1630 - 1700 Lee Smolin–Self-organization and Feedback in Astrophysics and Cosmology
1700 - 1730--PANEL ON MICROBES AND GAIA
1730 - 1745—PANEL ON GAIA BEYOND EARTH
1745 - 1800—COFFEE BREAK
 
 
Session 10: CLOSING SESSION
1800 - 1845 Lynn Margulis–GAIA BECOMES RESPECTABLE: Modes of confirmation of GAIA theory
PANEL DISCUSSION/ ALL SESSION SUMMARY
 
CLOSING CEREMONY
Chairs: Lynn Margulis and Stephen Schneider, co-convenors, local organizing committee

2100—Banquet
Venue: JARDÍ BOTÀNIC
Banquet speakers: Excmo. Sr. Rector, Lynn Margulis, Eva Barreno

FRIDAY, June 23, 2000
Venue:JARDÍ BOTÀNIC

1000 - 1200 No Formal Session
Informal discussion and planning for monograph will be arranged for those expressing an interest.


Conveners Stephen H. Schneider
Department of Biological Sciences
Stanford University
Gilbert Building
Stanford, CA 94305
E-mail: shs@Leland.stanford.edu

James R. Miller
Department of Marine and Coastal Sciences
Rutgers University
71 Dudley Road
New Brunswick, NJ 08901-8521
Email: miller@arctic.rutgers.edu

Penelope J. Boston
Complex Systems Research, Inc.
7097 Redwing Place
Longmont, CO 80503-8727
E-mail: pboston@complex.org


Conference Scope This conference will emphasize not only interactions of biota with atmosphere, the hydrosphere, the soils and the sediments, but also the involvement of biota in maintaining the steady states of key biogeochemical cycles, climate acide/base and redox balances. The three interlinked themes will be Gaia in time, the role of the biota in regulating biogeochemical cycles and climate, and dealing with complexity and feedbacks in the earth system.


Topics to be discussed A. How has the global biogeochemical/climate system called Gaia changed in time? What is its history? Can Gaia maintain stability of the system at one time scale but still undergo vectorial change at longer time scales? How can the geologic record be used to examine questions?

B. What is the structure of Gaia? Are the feedbacks sufficiently strong to influence the evolution of climate? Are there parts of the system determined pragmatically by whatever disciplinary study is being undertaken at any given time or are there a set of parts that should be taken as most true for understanding Gaia as containing evolving organisms over time? What are the feedbacks among these different parts of the Gaian system, and what does the near closure of matter mean for the structure of Gaia as a global ecosystem and for the productivity of life?

C. How do models of Gaian processes and phenomena relate to reality and how do they help address and understand Gaia? How do results from Daisyworld transfer to the real world? What are the main candidates for "daisies"? Does it matter for Gaia theory whether we find daisies or not? How should we be searching for daisies, and should we intensify the search? How can Gaian mechanisms be investigated using process models or global models of the climate system which include the biota and allow for chemical cycling?


Abstract Submission Information

General Information

ABSTRACT DEADLINE: February 15, 2000 EXTENDED TO MARCH 20, 2000


ABSTRACT SUBMISSIONS BY E-MAIL:

Compose your abstract on your E-mail software exactly as you would a normal message, using a MAXIMUM of 75 standard ASCII characters per line. Re-set your margins, if necessary, so that the text wraps from line to line, to avoid the insertion of hard returns. Follow the instructions below. A sample E-MAIL abstract is provided at the end.

I) TITLE - The title of the abstract should be composed in a standard title format, capitalizing the first letter of all words of four or more letters. Insert one blank line after title.

II)AUTHOR BLOCK- The author block should contain the name of a presenting author that should be enclosed in brackets and asterisks, like so: [*I M First*]. If there is no presenting author, then input [*!*] at the beginning of the author block. Input your author block by typing the author's name, then putting their address, phone, fax,
and e-mail information in parentheses, ( ).
Do not put each author on a separate line, but rather, separate each author's information with a semi-colon (;). Leave one blank line after the author block.

III)ABSTRACT TEXT - Special symbols or graphics should not be used in composing the abstract. Leave one blank line between paragraphs and after the body.

IV)SUBMITTAL INFORMATION - This section is to record information about which meeting the abstract is being submitted to and to obtain contact information. Please provide the following:

1. Title of meeting (Chapman Conference on The Gaia Hypothesis) (VERY IMPORTANT!)
2. Indicate INVITED, CONTRIBUTED, or POSTER.
3a. Corresponding address: Give name, affiliation,
and mailing address of the author to whom all correspondence regarding this abstract should be sent.
3b. Corresponding author's telephone number.
3c. Corresponding author's fax number
3d. Corresponding author's E-mail address.
4. Indicate whether the first author is a student.

V) SUBMIT YOUR ABSTRACT - Send the abstract to the following Internet address: abstracts@agu.org
VI) CONFIRMATIONS - Confirmations of received abstracts will be sent via electronic mail within one business day of submission. If you have not received confirmation, please call the AGU at +1-202-777-7340 or fax: +1-202-328-0566.


SAMPLE E-MAIL ABSTRACT SUBMISSION:

Remote Sensing of Alpine Snow Properties: A
Review of Techniques and Accomplishments
Using the Visible Wavelengths Through the
Microwave

[*J S Smith*] (Department of Geology, University
of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106-3060; ph.
805-893-2308; fax 805-893-2578; e-mail:
imfirst@Eos.ucsb.edu); A C Cohen (Hydrology
Department, Watertown University, Watertown,
MA 02172; ph. 413-789-1234; fax 413-789-1256;
e-mail: ursecond@ocean.hydro.edu)

Topography causes wide variations in the
properties of alpine snow within small areas, and
a knowledge of the spatial variation of many
properties is essential for the application of
distributed hydrologic models and for establishing
the surface boundary condition for regional
climate models. However, the topography affects
the electromagnetic remote sensing signal by
shadowing some terrain and by modifying the
angles of incidence, emission, and reflection of
the signal, and our knowledge of the elevation
model is usually not precise enough to allow
a priori calculation of the geometric relationships
between the surface, sensor, and the Sun. Hence
remote sensing algorithms must be robust to such
uncertainties, except in areas where topographic
knowledge is especially good.

The most elementary snow property is the
presence or absence of a snow cover, and snow
mapping -- discrimination of snow from other
types of surfaces and from clouds -- is best
accomplished with a combination of visible and
near-infrared wavelengths.

1. Chapman Conference on The Gaia Hypothesis
2. Invited
3. (a) J S Smith
Department of Geology
University of California
Santa Barbara, CA 93106-3060
(b) 805-893-2309
(c) 805-893-2578
(d) imfirst@crseo.ucsb.edu
4. No

If you have questions, please send an email to asinger@agu.org


Abstract Submissions by Mail

General Information

ABSTRACT SUBMISSIONS BY MAIL:

The abstract page is divided into two parts: the submittal information and the abstract itself. Please follow the instructions for both carefully.

Do not exceed the maximum abstract dimensions: standard, 11.8 cm wide x 18 cm long; extended, 11.8 cm wide x 28 cm long. Abstract length is measured from the top line of the title to the last line of the abstract text. An extended abstract must be submitted on legal-size paper (8.5" x 14"). Abstracts exceeding the 11.8 cm width requirement will be returned to you. Abstracts exceeding the 28 cm length limit will be cut off to conform to the appropriate size.

Abstracts are photocopied exactly as they are received, with approximately a 40% reduction in size, for printing in the meeting program that contains all abstracts accepted for the meeting. Therefore copy must be of letter-quality type, and you must use at least 12-pitch type or 11-point font size, or your abstract may not be readable.

Proofread your abstract carefully prior to submission. AGU staff cannot make any changes or corrections to abstracts. Abstracts received are considered final copy.

Do not send copies by fax or telecopier. Please mail one original and two copies for delivery by MARCH 20, 2000, to

Chapman Conference on The Gaia Hypothesis
American Geophysical Union
2000 Florida Avenue, N.W.
Washington, DC 20009

Submittal Information: Numbered sections below refer to the items required in the submittal information area of the abstract. Submittal information must be typed to the right of the abstract copy. Please complete each item.

1. Title of Meeting (Chapman Conference on The Gaia Hypothesis)
2. Indicate INVITED, CONTRIBUTED, or POSTER.
3. a) Corresponding address: Give name, affiliation, and mailing address of the author to whom all correspondence regarding this abstract should be sent.
b) Corresponding author's telephone number.
c) Corresponding author's fax number
d) Corresponding author's E-mail address.
4. Indicate whether the first author is a student.

Preparation of Abstract Copy: Abstract copy must be located on the left side of an 8.5" x 11" page (8.5" x 14" for extended abstracts). Allow for a left margin of 0.5 cm and a top margin of 4 cm. The width of the abstract may not exceed 11.8 cm. Use a minimum 12-pitch type or 11-point font size. A complete abstract must include:

TITLE: The title of the abstract should be in uppercase and lowercase bold type, capitalizing the first letter of all words of four letters or more. Indent second line of title two spaces if it runs over. Leave one blank line after title.

AUTHOR BLOCK: Type names of authors (no punctuation) and addresses in uppercase and lowercase letters. Also include telephone and fax numbers and e-mail addresses. Underline the name of the author who will present the paper. Indent the second and subsequent lines two spaces. Separate author information with a semicolon. Leave one blank line after author block.

ABSTRACT: Leave one blank line between paragraphs. Neatly drawn symbols, Greek letters, or other camera reproducible copy are acceptable, but avoid using in the title if at all possible.

Preparation of Abstract Copy

Abstract copy must be located on the left side of an 8½" x 11" page (8½" x 14" for extended abstracts). Allow for a left margin of ½ cm and a top margin of 4 cm. The width of the abstract may not exceed 11.8 cm. Use a minimum 12-pitch type or 11-point font size. A complete abstract must include (refer to sample abstract):

TITLE: The title of the abstract should be in uppercase and lowercase bold type, capitalizing the first letter of all words of four letters or more. Indent second line of title two spaces if it runs over. Leave one blank line after title.

AUTHOR BLOCK: Type names of authors (no punctuation) and addresses in uppercase and lowercase letters. Also include telephone numbers and e-mail addresses. Underline the name of the author who will present the paper. Indent the second and subsequent lines two spaces. Separate author information with a semicolon. Include sponsor's name if no author is an AGU or ASLO member. Leave one blank line after author block.

ABSTRACT: Leave one blank line between paragraphs. Neatly drawn symbols, Greek letters, or other camera reproducible copy are acceptable, but avoid using in the title if at all possible.

Sample Abstract

--------------------------------------8½" x 11" page--------------------------------------------------

(allow 4 cm margin above abstract)

(allow ½ cm left margin)

------------------- 11.8 cm ---------------------------------


Title of the Abstract Should be in Uppercase
  and Lowercase Bold Type, Capitalizing the First
  Letter of all Words of Four or More Letters

I M First Jr (March University, Ocean Sciences
   Department, Watertown, MA 02172; 413-789-1234;
   e-mail: ifirst@march.osd.edu); H S Second and N Y
   Third (Both at: WHOI, Woods Hole, MA 02543;
   617-999-1111; e-mail: hsecond@whoi.inst);
   (Sponsor: U R Sponsor)

Use minimum of 12-pitch type or 11-point font size. Indent second and subsequent lines of title two spaces if it runs over. Leave one blank line after title.

Type names of authors (no punctuation) and addresses in uppercase and lowercase letters. Indent second and subsequent lines two spaces. Separate author information with a semicolon. Underline the name of the author who will present the paper. Type sponsor's name if no author is an AGU member. Leave one blank line after the author block.

Leave one blank line between paragraphs in the body of the abstract text. Neatly drawn symbols, Greek letters, or other camera reproducible copy are acceptable, but avoid using in the title if at all possible. Mount figures with clear glue or rubber cement, not adhesive tape.

NOTE: Some browsers may not display this sample correctly. Please follow the instructions carefully.
-------------------------------------------------------------

Extended abstract up to 28 cm long available at a cost of (use 14" page)

------------------- 11.8 cm ---------------------------------



Submittal Information must be to the right of the 11.8 cm area.
  1. 2000 Chapman Conference on the Gaia Hypothesis
  2. Invited
  3. (a) H S Second
        WHOI, MS-123
        Woods Hole, MA 02543
    (b) 617-999-1111
    (c) 617-999-4545
    (d) hsecond@whoi.inst
  4. No


University of Valencia ~x~Valencia, Spain

Program Committee Andre Berger
Université Catholique de Louvain
Louvain-la-Nueve, Belgium

Eva Barreno
University of Valencia
Valencia, Spain

Robert Charlson
University of Washington
Seattle, Washington

Ricardo Guerrero
University of Barcelona
Barcelona, Spain

Lee Kump
Pennsylvania State University
University Park, Pennsylvania

William Schlesinger
Duke University
Durham, North Carolina

Tyler Volk
New York University
New York, New York


Accommodations and Housing Form Click here for more information on accommodations and for the Housing Form


Registration Form Click here to link to the Registration Form


Important Dates Abstract Submission Deadline: Extended to March 8, 2000

Housing Deadline: , 2000

Registration Deadline: , 2000

Meeting Date: June 19- 23, 2000


Related Web Sites The Gaia Society

Univ of Valenica's GAIA site


For more information Future information pertaining to this conference (i.e., scientific program, housing, registration) will be sent to those who have either submitted an abstract or have asked to be placed on the mailing list. Those not submitting abstracts who wish to be placed on the mailing list, please contact:

AGU Meetings Department
Gaia Hypothesis Conference
2000 Florida Avenue, N.W.
Washington, DC 20009

Phone: +1-202-777-7334 (outside North America)
1-800-966-2481 (toll free in North America)
Fax: +1-202-328-0566

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