2000 Fall Meeting List of Approved Special Sessions


Designators for special sessions belongs to the lead section or committee abbreviation (i.e., A01 denotes Atmospheric Sciences, P01 denotes Planetary Sciences, etc.). Additionally, special sessions are listed under all sections or committees who have agreed to sponsor particular sessions. These sessions are listed after the committee and section primary listing but with the lead section designation. Some technical committees have elected to only cosponsor sessions. For example, if you look under Snow, Ice, and Permafrost you will get a listing of all the sessions that this committee has decided to cosponsor.


#Union (U)
#Atmospheric Science (A)
#Biogeosciences (B)
#Geodesy (G)
#Geomagnetism and Paleomagnetism (GP)
#Hydrology (H)
#Ocean Sciences (O)
#Planetary Sciences (P)
#Seismology (S)
#Space Physics and Aeronomy (SA)
#Solar and Heliospheric Physics (SH)
#Magnetospheric Physics (SM)
#Tectonophysics (T)
#Volcanology, Geochemistry and Petrology (V)
#Committee on Education and Human Resources (CEHR)
#Committee on Public Affairs (COPA)
#Mineral and Rock Physics Committee (MRP)
#Nonlinear Geophysics (NG)
#Snow, Ice Permafrost (SIP)
#Study of the Earth's Deep Interior (SEDI)


Union (U)

U01 Paleoenvironmental Evidence for Prehistoric Natural Hazards and Their Impact on Human Societies

Natural hazards have been a significant factor in cultural development in prehistory, including, for example, the hypothesized impact of prolonged droughts on the sustainability of various cultures in the Americas. In this session we seek examples of paleoenvironmental evidence of droughts, floods, volcanic eruptions, seismicity, etc. and their impact on cultures along the Pole-Equator-Pole I transect (the Americas) and elsewhere. Clear lines of evidence for paleoenvironmental change either in extreme events in or mean state should be presented independent of the evidence for cultural response. To the extent possible, the link between environmental change and the potential cultural response should be established. The objective will be to bring together independent lines of evidence to gauge human response to environmental change both in prehistory and as a guide to the future.

Conveners: Geoffrey Seltzer, Department of Earth Sciences, Syracuse University, 204 Heroy Geology Lab, Syracuse, NY 13244 USA, Tel: +1-315-443-4980, Fax: +1-315-443-3363, E-mail: goseltze@syr.edu Mark Brenner, Department of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32653 USA, Tel: +1-352-392-9617 ext 232, Fax: +1-352-846-1088, E-mail: brenner@ufl.edu

U02 Bringing Geoscience to Bear on Natural Hazards Risks Worldwide

This session will examine how science is, or could be, used to guide public policy decisions to mitigate natural hazards risks. The session's emphasis will be on global risks, including those that occur worldwide (such as floods, earthquakes, volcanoes, and hurricanes) and those that are global in nature (such as space weather and climate change). We will focus on international strategies for alleviating risks, with particular attention to mitigation options for developing countries that have relatively small scientific communities and limited resources. We invite papers from geoscientists, social scientists and policy professionals who have worked on either the relevant scientific research or its application to natural hazards policy. AGU members from developing countries are particularly encouraged to submit abstracts addressing the kinds of scientific research and cooperation they see as most important in helping to make progress against natural hazard destruction.

Convener: Margaret R. Goud Collins, Program Director, U.S. Committee for IIASA, American Academy of Arts and Sciences, Norton's Woods, 136 Irving St., Cambridge, MA 02138 USA, Tel: +1-617-576-5019 or +1-508-548-2502, FAX: +1-508-548-6063, E-mail: mcollins@amacad.org or mcollins@whoi.edu

U03 Current Research Employing Accelerator Mass Spectrometry

The development of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) heralded a new era in the Earth sciences and, in part, has led to the routine measurement of a suite of isotopes (e.g. 10Be, 14C, 26Al, 36Cl, 99Tc, 129I). AMS has to some extent come of age and is now in its third decade. It is considered a necessary analysis tool. The measurement of natural and man-made nuclides has assisted in answering fundamental questions in the Earth sciences. Some of these include the distribution and variability of oceanic radiocarbon to study circulation and carbon cycling; measurement of specific components isolated from dissolved, sedimentary, or soil organic matter to characterize constituents controlling the carbon cycle; in situ cosmogenic nuclide production to date geomorphic surfaces; the study of groundwater flow and recharge; and detailed paleoclimate chronologies. We encourage papers presenting novel methodologies, new data sets, interpretations, and applications across the breadth of the earth sciences.

Conveners: Tom Guilderson, Center for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, L-397, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, CA 94551 USA, Tel: +1-925-422-1753, Fax: +1-925-423-7884, E-mail: guilderson1@popeye.llnl.gov Department of Earth & Planetary Sciences, 20 Oxford Street, Harvard University, Cambridge MA 02138, FAX: +1-617-496-4387, E-mail: guilderson@eps.harvard.edu Susan Trumbore, Department of Earth System Science, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697 USA, Tel: +1- 949-824-6142, Fax: +1-949-824-3256, E-mail: setrumbo@uci.edu Marc W. Caffee, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, L-202, Livermore, CA 94550 USA, Tel: +1-510-423-8395, FAX: +1-510-422-1002, E-mail: caffee1@llnl.gov and Fred Phillips, Department of Earth and Environmental Science, New Mexico Tech, Socorro, NM 87801 USA, Tel: +1-505-835-5634, E-mail: phillips@nmt.edu

U04 Quantifying Predictability in Geophysical Systems I

Quantifying the predictability of nonlinear geophysical systems provides a fundamental bridge between models of geophysical systems and the systems themselves. Uncertainty in the initial condition and errors in model formulation have led to probability forecasts (ensembles) even in deterministic systems. This session will focus on atmospheric and ocean dynamics over hours to centuries (e.g., adaptive observation strategies, Lagrangian and Eulerian approaches, intense short duration events); theoretical aspects of the dynamics of nonlinear systems relevant to predictability and verification (including multiple models, contrasting modeling strategies, data assimilation); and practical issues in the interpretation and likely economic impact of probabilistic forecasts on a timescale of minutes to hours (e.g., precipitation/wind), days to months (e.g., hurricanes), and years to millennia (e.g., earthquakes). This Union session will consist of invited talks. Please direct contributed presentations to the special session of the same title — II. Invited Papers Only

Conveners: Leonard Smith, Oxford University, 24-29 St Giles', Oxford, OX1 3LB, United Kingdom, Tel: +44-1865-270-517, FAX: +44-1865-270-515, E-mail: lenny@maths.ox.ac.uk and James Hansen, Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Ave., Room 54-1721, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA, Tel: +1-617-253-5935, Fax: +1-617-253-6208, E-mail: jhansen@mit.edu

U05 The Discovery of the Sunken Cities of the Alexandria, Egypt, Coast: Archaeology, Earthquakes, Sediments, and Exploration Geophysics

Two ancient sunken cities under the Mediterranean, dating back to Ptolemaic and pharaonic times were recently discovered near Alexandria, Egypt (May 2000). The most spectacular of these was found in the Bay of Aboukir, east of Alexandria. Both cities, under 6–7 m of water and 0.5–1.5 m of sand, were discovered by using exploration geophysics methods: an ultrasensitive magnetometric survey, sidescan sonar survey, and high-resolution subbottom profiling survey. Preliminary excavations under water have revealed numerous collapsed monumental statues, granite columns, and entire walls, strongly suggesting earthquakes as the main cause. The subsidence of the two cities, as well as portions of Alexandria itself, including the ancient Alexandria harbor and Cleopatra's palace, may also be related to these earthquakes, and possibly also to liquefaction and slumping of the sediments of the Nile delta. This session will include invited presentations by the archaeologists and geophysicists who made the discoveries. We solicit also other contributions related and/or relevant to this discovery and similar ruins, earthquakes, and subsidence events.

Convener: Amos Nur, Department of Geophysics, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305-2215 USA, Tel: +1-650-723-9526, FAX: +1-650-723-1188, E-mail: amos.nur@stanford.edu

U06 Plate-Mantle Interaction and Forces That Move Plates

In its original form, plate tectonics describes the motion of rigid plates over the deeper mantle. Plates were assumed to be essentially decoupled from the deeper mantle by the asthenosphere, driven mainly by slab pull and ridge push (i.e., forces acting on the sides of the plates), and resisted slightly by basal drag. This assumption recently has attained increased attention with the suggestion that basal drag may be an important plate-driving mechanism. This session focuses on the kinematic and dynamic nature of the coupling between lithospheric plates and underlying mantle. We solicitate contributions presenting observational evidence and theoretical consideration on global or regional scales to constrain plate-mantle interaction. We anticipate important evidence from stress field constraints, seismic tomography, anisotropy, tectonic studies, gravity, and others. Geodynamic modeling studies are also welcome, in particular, if they study geodynamic implications involving a strong lithosphere.

Conveners: G. H. R. Bokelmann, Department of Geophysics, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305-2215 USA, Tel: +1-650-725-9181, FAX: +1-650-725-7344, E-mail: goetz@pangea.stanford.edu and Eugene Humphreys, Deprartment of Geology, University of Oregon, Eugene, OR 97403 USA, Tel: +1-503-346-5575, FAX: +1-503-346-4692, E-mail: gene@newberry.uoregon.edu

U07 Global Climate Change: Current Challenges in Research and Scientific Leadership

Global climate change is a focus of both broad interdisciplinary research and intense policy debate. As increasing numbers of earth scientists become involved in climate-related research and education, they are challenged not only by the need to expand their scientific expertise beyond traditional disciplines, but also by the demand for delivery of cogent scientific information to the public. New forms of interaction are taking shape. This session will summarize current research challenges in the form of overview presentations on topics that will be considered in more detail in other meeting sessions. The conveners of these sessions, and other leaders in the field, will also present their views on the interactions that are required to move forward in both conducting research and in communicating scientific information to the public.

Convener: Eric T. Sundquist, U.S. Geological Survey, 184 Woods Hole Road, Quissett Campus, Woods Hole, MA 02543 USA, Tel: +1-508-457-2397, Fax: +1-608-457-2310, E-mail: esundqui@usgs.gov

U08 Coping With Uncertainties in Climate Change Research and Policy Activities

Climate change research has become an increasingly complex, interdisciplinary scientific challenge, and many scientists are also working to ensure how scientific advances can be responsive to the needs of policymakers. This session will be examining some of the key scientific issues facing climate change researchers today, the uncertainties associated with that research, and how these advances and uncertainties can best be used by climate change policymakers. Speakers will discuss key scientific and policy climate change challenges and how they deal with uncertainties from both the research and policy perspective.

Conveners: Tim Killeen, National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO 80307 USA, Tel: +1-303-497-1111, E-mail: killeen@ucar.edu and Roger Pielke, Jr., National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO 80307 USA, Tel: +1-303-497-8111, E-mail: rogerp@ucar.edu

U09 Global Change and the Nature of the Earth System

There is increasing evidence that the physical, chemical, and biological cycles of Earth are interlinked and function as a single system, and that human activities are perturbing this system at the global scale. This session presents the key results of a decade of international research on global change and the Earth system, conducted under the auspices of the International Geosphere-Biosphere Programme. The session will feature presentations on our latest understanding of the functional role of the three major compartments of the Earth system (oceans, atmosphere, and land) as well as three more integrative talks on (1) the direct linkages between the land surface and the climate system, (2) the dynamics of the global carbon cycle, with special emphasis on human perturbations, and (3) a paleoperspective on Earth system dynamics. A seventh presentation will point the way toward new, more integrative approaches to Earth system analysis.

Conveners: Berrien Moore III, Institute for the Study of Earth, Oceans and Space, University of New Hampshire, 39 College Rd., 305 Morse Hall, Durham, NH 03824-3524 USA, Tel: +1-603-862-1766, Fax: +1-603-862-1915, E-mail: b.moore@unh.edu and Will Steffen, Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Box 50005, S-10405 Stockholm, Sweden, Tel: +46-8-16-64-48, FAX: +46-8-16-64-05, E-mail: will@igbp.kva.se

U10 Land-Atmosphere Coupling in the Global Climate System

The land-atmosphere interface is one of the most important elements in the global climate system. This interface drives many processes in the troposphere, and generates an upward-directed microwave signal that can be monitored by satellites and a downward-propagating temperature signal that can be observed in the subsurface. Each phenomenon is the outcome of complex coupled physical, chemical, hydrological and biological processes at this interface. All these processes need to be well represented in numerical models of the climate system, as this interface represents the lower boundary condition of such models for almost 30% of the Earth's surface. This special session invites contributions addressing one or more aspects of the land-atmosphere interface: parameterization of land surface processes, coupling to the troposphere, generation of the outward-bound microwave signal, the downward-propagating geothermal signal, and characterization of hydrological, and biological signatures, at the many spatial and temporal scales that govern such processes.

Conveners: Hugo Beltrami, Department of Geology, St. Francis Xavier University, Antigonish, NS, B2G 2W5, Canada, Tel: +1-902-867-2326, Fax: +1-902-867-2457, E-mail: hugo@.stfx.ca or hugo@justine.stfx.ca Roni Avissar, Department of Environmental Sciences, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ 08901-8551 USA, Tel: +1-732-932-9520, Fax: +1-732-932-3562, E-mail: avissar@gaia.rutgers.edu and Henry N. Pollack, Department of Geological Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 USA, Tel: +1-734-763-0084, Fax: +1-734-763-4690, E-mail: hpollack@umich.edu

U11 The Changing Level of the Sea: Paleogeodesy, Space Geodesy, and Global Change

Although the focus of most research on global warming has been quite sharply upon the expected increase of mean surface temperature, other aspects of the climate system response to increased greenhouse gas forcing are expected to be equally important. Of these, global sea level rise is especially deserving of attention, as it integrates the influence of several distinct contributions. Compelling evidence exists that suggests that the expected anthropogenically forced increase of mean sea level is in fact occurring, although the rate at which this is taking place is a continuing subject of debate. Contributing to this observed signal is the influence of the steric effect of the thermal expansion of the oceans. This contribution is augmented by the eustatic effect of the melting of small ice sheets and glaciers, and perhaps also by ablation of the great polar ice sheets on Greenland and Antarctica as well. None of these contributions to the observed signal of global sea level rise is known to sufficiently high accuracy. Next- generation satellite missions such as CHAMP and GRACE (NASA's Gravity and Climate Experiment) are expected to contribute in an extremely important way to the understanding of the sea level impact of global climate change. Substantial input into the interpretation of the time-dependent geoid that will be delivered by these satellite missions will be required from detailed geodynamic analyses of the interactions that occur between ice sheets, oceans, and the Earth's shape as the climate-induced sea level response develops. Similarly, inputs will be required from modern coupled atmosphere-ocean general circulation models that can be directly employed to predict the local and global rates of sea level rise to be expected on the basis of a particular global warming scenario. The satellite observations themselves will require "ground-truthing" against surface tide-gauge observations. We invite contributions to this session on all aspects of the science of global sea level rise that lie on the climate-geodesy interface, especially those that relate to present or future satellite missions.

Conveners: Sydney Levitus, National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service, E/OC5, Bldg. SSMC3, Room 4362, 1315 East-West Hwy., Silver Spring, MD 20910-3282 USA, Tel: +1-301-713-3290 ext. 194, Fax: +1-301-713-3303, E-Mail: Sydney.levitus@noaa.gov Mark Meier, Campus Box 475, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80303 USA, Tel: +1-303-492-6556, E-Mail: Mark.meier@colorado.edu C. K. Shum, Ohio State University, 222A Bolz Hall, 2036 Neil Ave. Mall, Columbus, OH 43210 USA, Tel: +1-614-292-7118, E-Mail: ckshum@osu.edu Carl Wunsch, Department of Earth, Atmospheric and Planetary Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA USA, Tel: +1-617-253-5937, Fax: +1-617-253-4464, E-Mail: cwunsch@mit.edu and Richard Peltier, Department of Physics, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, M5S 1A7, Canada Tel: +1-416-978-2938, Fax: +1-416-978-8905, E-Mail: peltier@atmosp.physics.utoronto.ca

Atmospheric Science (A)

A01 Arctic Ozone Depletion and Air-Snow Interactions in the Boundary Layer

Recent evidence from Alert and Summit indicates that interactions between the snowpack and the atmosphere can have a substantial impact on the phenomenon of ozone depletion in the marine boundary layer, first observed at Alert and Barrow. Specifically, it appears that halogen activation can occur via oxidation of sea salt deposited into the snowpack. It has also been shown that nitrogen oxides, formaldehyde, and other free radical precursors are emitted from the snowpack, with a significant impact on boundary layer composition. To study ozone depletion further, in coordination with GOME satellite data retrieval and in association with other projects such as TOPSE, the ALERT2000 campaign was conducted in February–May 2000 at Alert, Nunavut, Canada. A major focus of ALERT2000 was to investigate air-snow interactions and how they impact on boundary layer composition and chemistry, and the phenomenon of ozone depletion. In the summer of 2000 a campaign was conducted at Summit, Greenland, also focusing on air-snow interactions. This session will focus on the results of these most recent field studies in the Arctic. Contributions from related field studies outside the Arctic, as well as laboratory studies of ice and snow chemistry and physics, and the heterogeneous processes of halogen activation are also solicited.

Conveners: Paul B. Shepson, Purdue University, Departments of Chemistry and Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, 1393 Brown Bldg., West Lafayette, IN 47907-1393 USA, Tel: +1-765-494-7441, Fax: +1-765-494-0239, E-mail: pshepson@purdue.edu. Jan Bottenheim, Meteorological Service of Canada, 4905 Dufferin Street, Downsview Ontario, Canada M3H5T4; Tel: 416-739-4838; E-mail: jan.bottenheim@ex.gc.ca

A02 Evolution of the Atmospheric Methane Budget (Joint With OS)

The IGBP GAIM core project recently initiated an activity to synthesise information on the atmospheric methane budget from all relevant disciplines. A special session at the AGU Fall meeting is proposed to enable existing participants in this activity to exchange results in a structured way and, importantly, to bring this activity to the attention of a wider range of scientists. The proposed session would focus on the evolution of the atmospheric methane budget over time. This covers glacial to interglacial transitions, including both abrupt and gradual changes in methane concentration and isotopic ratios observed in ice cores and firn-air, and the more recent evolution from pre-industrial to present conditions. Papers will be invited to either present new analyses of the methane budget at specific times, or to explicitly address the evolution of the budget over time. Topics to be covered will include, but not be restricted to: records of past changes in atmospheric methane; wetland emissions and their changes over time; release of hydrated methane; changes in atmospheric chemistry relevant to methane; and feedbacks between climate change and atmospheric chemistry.

Conveners: Martin R. Manning, National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research, PO Box 14-901, Wellington New Zealand, (courier address: 301 Evans Bay Parade, Kilbirnie, Wellington), Tel: +64-4- 386-0535, Fax: +64-4-386-2153, E-mail: m.manning@niwa.cri.nz and David M. Etheridge, CSIRO Atmospheric Research, Private Bag 1, Aspendale VIC, 3195, Australia (courier address: 101-107 Station St., Aspendale, Melbourne), Tel: +61- 3-9239-4590, Fax: +61-3-9239-4444, E-mail: david.etheridge@dar.csiro.au

A03 Organic Compounds in Tropospheric Particles and Aqueous Drops (Joint With OS)

Recent field measurements have demonstrated that organic particles are widespread in both continental and marine atmospheres and that they can account for a substantial fraction of the total aerosol number concentration and mass. There are numerous indications that this organic matter has profound effects on the physical and chemical behavior of aerosols, influencing issues such as cloud properties, precipitation climate, and health. Similarly, organic compounds are an important component of tropospheric cloud and fog drops, and can have important effects on both aqueous and gas phase chemistry. It is now clear that reliable modeling of the effects of organic compounds in atmospheric condensed phases must include better field measurements as well as new laboratory data.

Conveners: Cort Anastasio, Department of Land, Air and Water Resources, University of California, One Shields Ave., Davis, CA 95616-8627 USA, (Express mail: add "151 Hoagland Hall" to above address), Tel: +1-530-754-6095, Fax: +1-530-752-1552, E-mail: canastasio@ucdavis.edu and Yinon Rudich, Department of Environmental Sciences, Weizmann Institute, Rehovot 76100, Israel, Tel: +972-8-934 4237, Fax: +972-8-934 4124, E-mail: yinon.rudich@weizmann.ac.il

A04 The Arctic and Antarctic Oscillations: Feedbacks and Connections With the Climate System (Joint With OS)

Topics include the basic structure of the Artic and Antartic oscillations, including their unforced variability, and their development over time on scales from days to decades. Contributions concerning either the hemispheric scale modes or regional modes such as the North Atlantic Oscillation are welcome. Phenomena from the ocean to the mesosphere have been implicated in the generation of these oscillations and their response to external forcings. Papers concerned with response or connections between these patterns and the ocean circulation, sea-ice and the lower and upper atmosphere are therefore especially encouraged.

Conveners: Drew Shindell, NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies, Columbia University, 2880 Broadway, New York, NY 10025 USA, Tel: +1-212-678-5561, Fax: +1-212-678-5561, E-mail: dshindell@giss.nasa.gov and Gavin Schmidt, NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies, 2880 Broadway, New York, NY 10025 USA, Tel: +1-212-678-5627, Fax: +1-212-678-5552, E-mail: gschmidt@giss.nasa.gov

A05 African Dust Over the Tropical North Atlantic (Joint With OS)

There is increasing interest in the role of mineral dust in atmospheric processes. Of particular interest is the interaction of solar radiation with dust because of the possible impact on climate through the scattering and adsorption of radiation and the modification of cloud properties. Over the ocean these processes also affect our ability to use remote sensing techniques to retrieve various ocean properties such as water temperature and color. The tropical North Atlantic is an excellent location to study these processes because of the very high concentrations of African dust that cover large areas of this region during much of the year. For this session we are asking for papers that focus on the role of African dust in atmospheric processes. This includes papers that characterize the temporal and spatial variability of dust with respect to meteorological parameters, the chemical and physical properties of dust that relate to radiative processes, and the possible impact on clouds. This session will also serve as a means to present the initial results from the Puerto Rico Dust Experiment (PRIDE), which will take place in June and July 2000.

Conveners: Joseph M. Prospero, Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences, 4600 Rickenbacker Causeway, Miami, FL 33149 USA, Tel: +1-305-361-4159, Fax: +1-305-361-4457, E-mail: jprospero@rsmas.miami.edu and Jeffrey S. Reid, SPAWAR Systems Center San Diego, Atmospheric Propagation Branch, Code D858, 49170 Propagation Path, San Diego, CA 92152-7385 USA, Tel: +1-619-553-1419; Fax: +1-619-5531417, E-mail: jreid@spawar.navy.mil

A06 Investigation of Atmosphere-Earth Interactions With Cooperative Atmosphere-Surface Exchange Study 97 and 99 Data (Joint With B)

The main goal of the Cooperative Atmosphere Surface Exchange Study (CASES) is to investigate atmosphere-earth interactions in a mesoscale watershed through long-term observations. Two field programs, CASES-97 and CASES-99, took place from April 21to June 17, 1997, and during the month of October 1999, respectively. These programs were conducted to study the role of land-surface processes in the diurnal evolution of the convective boundary layer and the nocturnal boundary layer. The purpose of this session is to discuss the progress and determine issues that need to be addressed for further field experiments. This special session solicits papers on CASES data analysis, development/validation of land-surface and boundary layer models, and application of CASES data in mesoscale and general circulation models. Papers on similar topics are also encouraged.

Conveners: Margaret LeMone, Mesoscale and Microscale Meteorology, National Center for Atmospheric Research, PO Box 3000, Boulder, CO 80307 USA, Tel: +1-303-497-8962, Fax: +1-303-497-8171, E-mail: lemone@ucar.edu Fei Chen, Research Applications Program, National Center for Atmospheric Research, PO Box 3000, Boulder, CO 80307 USA, Tel: +1-303-497-8454, Fax: +1-303-497-8401, E-mail: feichen@ucar.edu and Jielun Sun, Mesoscale and Microscale Meteorology, National Center for Atmospheric Research, PO Box 3000, Boulder, CO 80307 USA, Tel: +1-303-497-8994 Fax: +1-303-497-8171, E-mail: jsun@ucar.edu

A07 Cumulus Convection and Climate

Cumulus convection is one of the most important mechanisms controlling the content and vertical distribution of atmospheric water vapor, the most important greenhouse gas present in the Earth's atmosphere. Despite substantial progress in the development of global climate models (GCMs) during the last three decades, cumulus convection is still one of the least accurate physical processes included in current GCMs. In these models the mean climate and its variability are very sensitive to the parameterization of cumulus convection. Moist convection is also the main atmospheric source of diabatic heating. However, only a small fraction of this heating is converted into kinetic energy and is ultimately consumed by frictional dissipation. The value of this fraction, which represents the thermodynamic efficiency of moist convection, is still controversial. There is evidence that moist convection is more irreversible than dry convection, and that numerical models might be more dissipative than nature. Contributions to this session will cover observational, theoretical, and modeling aspects of cumulus convection and its influence on climate.

Convener: Nilton O. Renno, Atmospheric Science Department, University of Arizona P.O. Box 210081, Tucson, AZ 85721-0081 USA, Tel: +1-520-621-6016, Fax: +1-520-621-6833, E-mail: renno@atmo.arizona.edu

A08 SAGE III Ozone Loss and Validation Experiment (SOLVE) and the Third European Stratospheric Experiment on Ozone-2000 (THESEO-2000) Missions

The SAGE III Ozone Loss and Validation Experiment (SOLVE) was designed to examine the processes controlling ozone levels at mid- to high latitudes. SOLVE was also carefullly coordinated with the Third European Stratospheric Experiment on Ozone–2000 (THESEO–2000) mission. Measurements were made in the Arctic high-latitude region over the course of the 1999–2000 winter using the NASA DC–8 and ER–2 aircraft, as well as balloon platforms and ground-based instruments. The OLVE/THESEO–2000 campaign was the larges polar stratospheric measurement campaign conducted to date. Ozone losses during the Arctic winter of 1999–2000 exceeded 60%. These large losses were obseved by aircraft, balloon, and satellite measurements. Meteorological analyses reveal that the 1999–2000 winter was colder than normal. These temperatures were cold enough to produce extensive layers of polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs). PSCs are key ingredients of the ozone loss process, as they enable the conversion of chlorine from benign forms into reactive forms that can catalytically destroy ozone.

Conveners: Paul A. Newman, Code 916 NASAGoddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 USA, Tel: +1-301-614-5985, Fax: +1-301-614-5903, E-mail: newman@notus.gsfc.nasa.gov

A09 Kinetics and Mechanism of Hydrocarbon Oxidation Reactions

Photochemical oxidation of atmospheric volatile compounds (VOCs) leads to ozone, aerosol, and carbon dioxide formation, with major implications for local and regional air quality and global climate changes. For example, the chemistry of the urban atmosphere is characterized primarily by ozone formation, through the oxidation of hydrocarbons initiated by inorganic oxidants in the presence of nitrogen oxides. Also, the VOC oxidation reactions lead to an increase in atmospheric aerosol loading by gas-to-particle conversion. Currently there are still major uncertainties associated with the VOC chemistry. This session invites papers on kinetic and mechanistic studies relevant to atmospheric photochemical oxidation of VOCs.

Convener: Renyi Zhang, Tel: +1-979-845-7656, Fax: +1-979-862-4466, E-mail: zhang@ariel.tamu.edu

A10 Convective Systems Observed During TRMM Field Campaigns

Recently completed TRMM field campaigns (TEFLUN-1998, SCSMEX-1998, TRMM-LBA-1999, and KWAJEX-1999) have obtained direct measurements of microphysical data associated with convective systems from various geographical locations (Texas/Florida, South China Sea, Amazonia, and Kwajalein, respectively). These TRMM field experiments were designed to contribute to fundamental understanding of cloud dynamics and microphysics, as well as for validation, testing assumptions and error estimates of cloud-resolving models, forward radiative transfer models, algorithms used to estimate rainfall statistics and vertical structure of precipitation and latent heating from both surface-based radar and satellites.

Contributions to this session would encompass all aspects (observational, modeling, and remote sensing) of convective systems associated with TRMM field campaigns. These topics would include descriptions of microphysics, thermodynamics and dynamic structures, radar reflectivity, and rainfall characteristics and statistics. New results on the role of aerosols and CCN in cloud physics and dynamics are also encouraged. The topics also include the sensitivity of microphysical assumptions in the cloud resolving models and forward radiative transfer models, and rainfall comparisons (statistics and errors) between ground based platforms, aircraft, and estimates from TRMM.

Conveners: Edward J. Zipser, Meteorology Department, University of Utah, 135 South 1460 East, Room 819, Salt Lake City, UT 84112-0110 USA, Tel: +1-801-585-9482, Fax: +1-801-585-3681, E-mail: ezipser@met.utah.edu and Wei-Kuo Tao, Laboratory for Atmospheres, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 USA, Tel: +1-301-614-6269, Fax: +1-301-614-5492, E-mail: tao@agnes.gsfc.nasa.gov

A11 NOAA Postdoctoral Program in Climate and Global Change (Joint With B, OS)

The purpose of the program is to help create and train the next generation of researchers needed for climate studies. It was anticipated that several contemporary National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) efforts, such as TOGA and its ambitious field programs (e.g., COARE), would undoubtedly generate a tremendous amount of data that would require the attention of an enlarged research community here and abroad. In the larger view, it was necessary to attract some of the new Ph.D.’s to the community in order to establish the seeds of scientific leadership for the extended programs of the future. Thus, the program endeavors to attract outstanding recent Ph.D.’s in the sciences relevant to the NOAA Climate and Global Change Program. The program supports research on climate variations with timescales of seasons to centuries. This is the 10th year of this very successful fellowship program. We propose to mark the event by holding a half-day afternoon session at the AGU Fall Meeting with a reception immediately following a series of invited talks. We envision that the afternoon would consist of the following: one 20 minute talk that summarizes the history and scope of the program, and nine invited talks (20 minutes each) from past and present participants in the program who gone on to become leaders in various disciplines. The topic of each talk will be influenced heavily by the speaker, so that each talk will be cutting-edge research, with many of the talks likely to be on "hot topics." (The talks are not to be a review of what the speaker did while he/she was a postodc in the program.) Both the reputations of the speakers and the topics should ensure that this will be a very well attended session.

Conveners: David Battisti, Department of Atmospheric Sciences, University of Washington, Box 351640 Seattle, WA 98195-1640 USA, Tel: +1-206-543-2019, Fax: +1-206-543-0308, E-mail: david@atmos.washington.edu Daniel P. Schrag, Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Harvard University, 20 Oxford Street Cambridge, MA 02138 USA, Tel: +1-617-495-7676, Fax: +1-617-496-4387, E-mail: schrag@eps.harvard.edu

A12 Sun-Climate Connections (Joint With SA)

A renewed interest in the study of mechanisms behind possible links between solar variability and climate has taken place in the last half-decade. Study results have been reported in recent meetings, such as the AGU 1998 Fall Meeting and the 1999 annual meeting of the International Union of Geodesy and Geophysics. A National Aeronautics and Space Administration-sponsored workshop was held in March 2000 to examine the breadth of current research and how it might suggest preferred directions and future research strategies (http://www.ispe.arizona.edu/conferences/sunmeet/). Workshop conclusions will be presented in invited presentations, and papers are invited on all aspects of study related to hypothesized mechanisms linking solar variability with climate variability and change.

Convener: William A. Sprigg, Institute for the Study of Planet Earth, University of Arizona, 715 N. Park Ave., Tucson, AZ 85721 USA, Tel: +1-520-622-9062 or 9014, Fax: +1-520-792-8795, E-mail: wsprigg@u.arizona.edu

A13 Air Pollution - Dry Air-Surface Exchange

Dry air-surface exchange addresses both deposition and emission of trace substances. Dry deposition can account for a large portion of the removal of gases and a significant amount of particulate material from the troposphere over regional or larger scales. Biogenic emission of reactive hydrocarbons alters tropospheric chemistry in some areas. The long-term net exchange of greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide regulates their concentrations in the atmosphere. Contributions to this session would encompass all aspect of dry air-surface exchange, including observations made in the field both at the surface and aboard research aircraft, development of chemical instrumentation, parameterization of processes at the surface and aloft, rapid in-air chemical reactions, modeling over scales ranging from urban to global, and scaling up or down between surface elements and landscapes. Special topics of interest include evaluation of methods to measure nighttime fluxes of various substances, including carbon dioxide; the role of lipid solubility in affecting the deposition and possible subsequent remission of organic gases; and particle deposition as a function of particle size, turbulence level, and the geometry and wetness of surface elements.

Conveners: Jie Song, Meteorology Program, Department of Geography, Northern Illinois University, DeKalb, IL 60115 USA, Tel: +1-815-753-6837, Fax: +1-815-753-6872, E-mail: jsong@geog.niu.edu Marvin L. Wesely, Environmental Research Division, Building 203, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 USA, Tel: +1-630-252-5827, Fax: +1-630-252-5498, E-mail: mlwesely@anl.gov

A14 Integration of Ozone and Particle Formation Processes - A Tale of Two Cities

Linkages and synergism among processes and precursors leading to formation of tropospheric ozone and aerosols have been recognized before but rarely studied in an integrated way. During the summer of 1999, more than 200 scientists, engineers, and graduate students from 40-plus institutions in North America and Europe converged on Nashville, Tennessee and Atlanta, Georgia to study these linkages and synergisms. Armed with a small armada of aircraft- and ground-based platforms and one of the most sophisticated arrays of particle-characterization instrumentation ever assembled in the United States, the Southern Oxidants Study (SOS) established an Initial EPA Supersite in Atlanta and completed its second rural-urban exchange study in the 11-state area surrounding Nashville. The SOS summer 1999 field experiments provided a wide diversity of meteorological conditions and a suite of varying anthropogenic and biogenic emissions. The first public presentation of scientific findings from these studies will be made at the AGU Fall Meeting. Issues to be discussed include development and intercomparisons of gas-phase and particulate measurement methods; the diurnal, daily, and week-by-week variability of pollutants in the southeastern United States; the chemical and physical characteristics of millions of single particles, each discretely measured and characterized; model simulations; and analysis of aircraft- and ground-based measurements to better understand processes that control formation and distribution of ozone and fine particles in urban and rural areas. The results from these integrated studies have special significance in light of the Environmental Protection Agency’s recent decisions to tighten the National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS) for ozone and to add a new NAAQS for PM2.5.

Conveners: William Chameides, School of Earth and Aeronomy Laboratory, Georgia Tech, Atlanta, GA 30332-0340 USA, Tel: +1-404-894-1949, Fax: +1-404-894-1106, E-mail: wcham@eas.gatech.edu James Meagher, Aeronomy Laboratory, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Boulder, CO 80303 USA, Tel: +1-303-497-3605, Fax: +1-303-497-5373, E-mail: jmeagher@al.noaa.gov and Ellis Cowling, College of Forest Resources, 1307 Glenwood Ave., Suite 157, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695 USA, Tel: +1-919-515-7564, Fax: +1-919-515-1700, E-mail: ellis_cowling@ncsu.edu

A15 Atmospheric Results From the Terra Spacecraft

The NASA Earth Observing System Terra spacecraft (formerly designated as EOS AM-1) is the first of the larger Earth Observing System spacecraft. It was launched on December 18, 1999, exactly 1 year before this year's Fall Meeting. Four of the instruments, CERES (Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System), MISR (Multi-angle Imaging Spectroradiometer), MODIS (Moderate-Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer), and MOPITT (Measurements of Pollution in the Troposphere), are providing large amounts of new data on the atmosphere. For this session we solicit papers that describe the results of activities to validate the data, and the scientific results of these new observations.

Conveners: John Gille, National Center for Atmospheric Research, PO Box 3000, Boulder, CO 80307-3000 USA, (Express mail: 3300 Mitchell La., Suite 275, Boulder, CO 80301 USA), Tel: +1-303-497-8062, Fax: +1-303-497-2920, E-mail: gille@ucar.edu Yoram Kaufman, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 913, Bldg. 33, Room A308, Greenbelt, MD 20771 USA, Tel: +1-301-614-6189, Fax: +1-614-6307, E-mail: kaufman@climate.gsfc.nasa.gov

A16 Detection and Attribution of Climate Change

Proxy evidence suggests that the 20th century is the warmest of the last millennium. The six warmest years of the last century all occurred in the 1990s. Climate models predict rapid climate change over the next few decades, with a predicted warming of roughly 3 degrees by the end of the 21st century. Climate change during the 20th century was far from uniform: There was a period of rapid warming in the 1920s and 1930s, followed by relatively stable global mean temperatures until the mid 1970s, when warming resumed. Papers documenting observed climate change on continental-to-global scales, techniques to detect and attribute causes of climate change, and studies ascribing causes are all solicited. Also welcome are papers that consider observational and model uncertainty on continental-to-global scales, as well as papers that compare observations with simulation results and use such comparisons to gain information on uncertainties in model-based projections of future climate change.

Conveners: Simon Tett, Hadley Centre for Climate Prediction and Research, Meteorological Office, London Rd., Bracknell RG12 2SY, UK, Tel: +44- 0-1344-856886, Fax: +44-0-1344-854898,E-mail: www.met-office.gov.uk Benjamin D. Santer, Program for Climate Model Diagnosis and Intercomparison, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, PO Box 808, Mail Stop L-264, Livermore, CA 94550 USA, Tel: +1-925-422-7638, Fax: +1-925-422-7675, E-mail: santer1@llnl.gov

A17 Historical Session on Hurricanes: 100 Years Since "Galveston"

Three sessions, anchored historically in the Galveston hurricane of 1900, the greatest natural disaster in United States history, will address the impact of science and technology during the last 100 years on our ability to cope with the hurricane threat in U.S. coastal areas. In the first two sessions, 10 invited speakers will describe and evaluate the progress made in understanding the hurricane, in communicating risks and immediate threats to the public, roadblocks encountered in research, and the outlook for the future.

For the third session, we encourage poster presentations that will provide additional historical accounts, and descriptions of current researches on hurricanes and the expected impacts.

Convener: Robert H. Simpson, 540 N St., SW, #S-803, Washington, DC 20024 USA, Tel: +1-202 479-0052, E-mail: r.h.simpson@worldnet.att.net

B04 Halocarbons: Global Biogeochemistry and Contaminant Transformations (Joint With A, OS)

This special session will broadly cover topics in halocarbon research including sources and sinks of halogenated compounds in oceanic, freshwater and terrestrial environments, biogeochemistry of trace atmospheric halocarbons, and transformations of halogenated contaminants. Abstracts are solicited from all disciplines involved in the study of abiotic or biological processes that influence the fate of halocarbons. Suggested topics include rates and mechanisms of production/consumption in pristine or impacted environments, degradation studies including flowpath modeling, isotopic investigations of source/sink signatures, and examination of processes that control the distribution of halocarbons in the atmosphere.

Conveners: Larry Miller, U.S. Geological Survey, MS 465, 345 Middlefield Rd., Menlo Park, CA 94025 USA, E-mail: lgmiller@usgs.gov Kelly Goodwin, Tel: +1-650-329-4475, Fax: +1-650-329-4327 E-mail: goodwin@aoml.noaa.gov

B09 The Role of Fire in the Boreal Forest and Its Impacts on Climatic Processes (Joint With A, NG)

Boreal forests account for about a third of the carbon sequestered in terrestrial ecosystems, so changes in their functioning or distribution could create important feedbacks to the climate system. Changes in the extent of forest cover could alter regional energy budgets sufficiently to amplify or nullify the expected rapid climatic warming at high latitudes. Warming could cause boreal forests to change from being a component of the "missing sink" of carbon dioxide to being a net source if fire frequency or decomposition increases. The rate of change in boreal forests is governed by fire frequency and severity, with important effects on carbon and energy flows. In the boreal forests several feedback mechanisms must be quantified to fully understand the role of fire in influencing landscape response to a changing climate. Some topics that this session will address are (1) changes in carbon stocks caused by immediate off-site transfer during the fire and by changes in decomposition and production following fire; (2) changes in energy budgets caused by fire; and (3) changes in the structure of the ecosystem, with associated changes in carbon or energy budgets.

Conveners: Larry Hinzman, Water and Environmental Research Center, University of Alaska Fairbanks, Fairbanks, AK 99775-5860 USA, Tel: +1-907-474-7331, Fax: +1-907-474-7979, E-mail: ffldh@uaf.edu F. Stuart Chapin, Institute of Arctic Biology, University of Alaska, Fairbanks, AK 99775 USA, Tel: +1- 907-474-7922, Fax: +1-907-474-6716, E-mail: fschapin@bonanza.lter.uaf.edu

B10 Land-Atmosphere Interactions, I, Arctic Transitions (Joint With A, H)

This session will focus on spatial and temporal patterns and controls over land-atmosphere surface exchange of mass and energy in arctic tundra and in transition regions between arctic tundra and boreal forest. High-latitude ecosystems play an important role in the functioning of the earth system because they occupy a large area; are sensitive to changes in climate; influence the exchanges of water, energy, and radiatively active gases with the atmosphere; and affect regional and global climate. Functional responses of arctic tundra to climate variability and change have the potential to influence global climate through the exchange of radiatively active gases with the atmosphere. Spatial variation in vegetation within arctic tundra has substantial climatic effects that extend beyond tundra. Structural responses, which include treeline changes and vegetation changes associated with fire, may substantially alter water and energy exchange in transitional regions of arctic and boreal vegetation to influence regional climate. Abstracts are solicited on relationships among vegetation, soils, permafrost, snow, and climate in arctic regions that have implications for regional and global climate.

Conveners: A. David McGuire, Institute of Arctic Biology, University of Alaska, Fairbanks, AK 99775 USA, Tel: +1-907-474-6242, Fax: +1-907-474-6716, E-mail: ffadm@uaf.edu Matthew Sturm, U.S. Army Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory, PO Box 35170, Ft. Wainwright, AK 99703-0170 USA, Tel: +1-907-353-5183, Fax: +1-907-353-5142, E-mail: msturm@crrel41.crrel.usace.army.mil

B11 Land-Atmosphere Interactions, II, North Africa (Joint With A, H)

This session focuses on the interactions between the atmosphere and the terrestrial biosphere over north Africa as well as change and variability of the coupled biosphere-atmosphere-ocean system. Relevant topics include, but are not limited to, the natural coevolution of the biosphere-atmosphere system; the influence of the ocean, in particular sea surface temperatures and their variability, on the biosphere-atmosphere interaction; the role of the terrestrial biosphere in both the modern climate and the paleoclimate; reconstruction of paleoclimate; impact of anthropogenic land cover changes.

Conveners: Guiling Wang, Princeton Environmental Institute, 27 Guyot Hall, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544-1003 USA, Tel: +1-609-258-3511, E-mail: gwang@princeton.edu Martin Claussen, Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research, PO Box 601203, 14412 Potsdam, Germany, Tel: +49-331-288-2522, Fax: +49-331-288-2600, E-mail: claussen@pik-potsdam.de

B12 Responses of Soil Processes to Elevated Atmospheric CO2 (Joint With A)

Research on the responses of ecosystems to elevated atmospheric CO2 has resulted in a wealth of information. While some consensus can be found regarding aboveground responses to elevated atmospheric CO2, many questions remain on the magnitude, and even the direction of changes in soil carbon and nutrient cycling and soil microbial feedbacks. Understanding the response of soil processes to elevated CO2 is important, because these processes can strongly influence both the short-term and long-term responses of ecosystems to elevated CO2. Soil processes are difficult to observe, and the variety of measurement techniques often complicates direct comparison of results. Recent studies on understanding responses of belowground processes to elevated atmospheric CO2 are the subject of this session. Some of the important topics that may be addressed include (1) soil microbial feedbacks and microbial biomass turnover; (2) carbon and nutrient cycling and availability, including 15N and 13C isotopic tracer studies; (3) litter decomposition and SOM turnover; (4) changes in soil biology; and (5) trace gas fluxes.

Conveners: Jennifer King, USDA Agricultural Research Service, PO Box E, Fort Collins, CO, 80522 USA, Tel: +1-970-490-8255, Fax: +1-970-490-8213, E-mail: jyking@lamar.colostate.edu Bruce Hungate, Department of Biological Sciences, Northern Arizona University, Box 5640, Flagstaff AZ 86011-5640 USA, Tel: +1-520-523-0925, Fax: +1-520-523-7500, E-mail: bruce.hungate@nau.edu Arvin Mosier, USDA-Agricultural Research Service, PO Box E, Fort Collins, CO 80522 USA, Tel: +1-970-490-8250, Fax: +1-970-490-8213, E-mail: amosier@lamar.colostate.edu

B13 Ecological Component of Large Scale Biosphere-Atmosphere Experiment (LBA) (Joint With A)

This session deals with studies related to the question "How do tropical forest conversion, regrowth, and selective logging influence carbon storage, nutrient dynamics, trace gas fluxes, and the prospect for sustainable land use in the Amazon region?" "Forest conversion" refers to forest clearing and conversion to agricultural uses, especially cattle pasture, and "forest regrowth" refers to forest growth following the abandonment of agricultural lands. The ecological component of the Large Scale Biosphere-Atmosphere Experiment in Amazonia (LBA) includes studies of the effects of these land cover and land use changes on terrestrial carbon and nutrient budgets, the fluxes, of trace gases between the land and the atmosphere, and the exchange of materials between the land and river systems. Implicitly, the understanding effects of land use changes requires an understanding of these budgets, fluxes and exchanges in "primary" or predisturbance forest ecosystems.

Convener: Michael Keller, LBA-Ecology, Complex Systems Research Center, University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH 03824 USA, Tel +1-603-862-4193, Fax +1-603-862-0188, E-mail: lba.ecology@unh.edu

B14 Land Use Change, I, A Paleoenvironmental Perspective on Ecosystem Sustainability (Joint With A)

During the last two millennia, virtually all ecosystems, both managed and quasi-natural, have been subjected to greater fluctuations of climate than are captured by instrumental records. Over the same time span, human impacts on ecosystems have varied and, in many cases, increased dramatically. Documenting, understanding, and distinguishing the role of both types of processes, and the interactions between them, in generating contemporary ecosystems are vital for developing any realistic sense of future sustainability. Case studies from specific ecosystems and regions, as well as model simulations of ecosystem responses, are required. The session will seek to (1) present case studies illustrating the value of paleoecological studies in understanding ecosystem responses to climate change and human impacts; (2) demonstrate appropriate and effective uses of paleoecological data in ecosystem management, conservation, and restoration; and (3) foster development of a robust research and applied framework for maximizing the contribution of paleoecological information to understanding and enhancing future sustainability.

Conveners: Frank Oldfield, PAGES International Project Office, Barenplatz 2,CH-3011 Bern, Switzerland, Tel: +41-31-312-3133, Fax: +41-31-312-3168, E-mail: frank.oldfield@pages.unibe.ch Constance Millar, USDA Forest Service, PSW Research Station, 800 Buchanan St., Albany, CA 94710 USA, Tel: +1-510-559-6435, Fax: +1-510-559-6499, E-mail: cmillar@fs.fed.us

B15 Land Use Change, II, Global Land Use and Land Cover Change Over the Last 300 Years (Joint With A)

Past changes in land use and land cover have impacted climate at regional to continental scale, significantly modified atmospheric carbon concentrations, and created much of the landscape upon which future global change will act. It is therefore becoming increasingly urgent to characterize and quantify these changes, especially for the last 300 years, using all the methods available, ranging from pollen analysis to documentary evidence. The session will summarize recent progress in reconstructing the history of recent land use and cover change resulting from the International Geosphere-Biosphere Programme’s PAGES/LUCC BIOME 300 and other initiatives, and outline the major consequences of the results obtained so far.

Convener: Frank Oldfield, PAGES International Project Office, Barenplatz 2, CH-3011 Bern, Switzerland, Tel: +41-31-312-3133, Fax: +41-31-312-3168, E-mail: frank.oldfield@pages.unibe.ch Rik Leemans, National Institute of Public Health and Environment, Bureau of Environment and Natural Resources, Antonie van Leewenhoeklaan 9, PO Box 1, NL-3720 BA Bilthoven, Netherlands, Tel: +31-30-274-3377, Fax: +31-30-885-7357, E-mail: rik.leemans@rivm.nl

B16 Biospheric Results from Terra, NASA’s Earth Observing System (Joint With A, H, OS)

The launch of National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Earth Observing System (EOS) Terra on December 18, 1999, marked a new phase of climate and global change research, especially for increased understanding of the interaction of the land and ocean biology with climate. Terra has scientific instruments to gain information about the Earth's land, oceans, and atmospheres with unprecedented accuracy. Of the five scientific instruments, three are germane to land and ocean remote sensing: the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), the Multiangle Imaging Spectroradiometer (MISR), and the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER). This session would focus on results of biospheric research utilizing the Terra spacecraft. Invited papers will be concerned with results of using Terra instruments (MODIS, MISR, and ASTER) for land cover and change, vegetation attributes such as leaf area index and absorptance of photosynthetically radiation, and links into ecosystem models. Recent work by the oceans community regarding chlorophyll and productivity will also be solicited to make the session representative of Terra's biospheric science research.

Convener: Jon Ranson, Biospheric Sciences Branch, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 923, Greenbelt, MD 20771 USA, Tel: +1-301-614-6650, Fax: +1-301-614-6695, E-mail: jon.ranson@gsfc.nasa

OS06 Redox Processes in Oxygen Deficient Regions of the Ocean (Joint With A, B)

Recent research cruises to locations such as the Arabian Sea, the eastern tropical North Pacific, and the Cariaco Basin have heightened interest in redox processes occurring in oxygen-deficient regions of the ocean. In particular, these environments are sources of atmospheric greenhouse gases such as nitrous oxide, and their sedimentary records may contain valuable paleo-oceangraphic indicators. This session aims to provide a venue for a wide-ranging discussion of the biogeochemistry of these intriguing environments, their affect on global biogeochemical cycles, and the information that their sediments record.

Conveners: Frank Sansone, Oceanography Department, University of Hawaii, 1000 Pope Rd., Honolulu, HI 96822 USA, Tel: +1-808-956-8370, Fax: +1-808-956-7112, E-mail: sansone@soest.hawaii.edu Mary Scranton, Marine Sciences Research Center, State University of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, NY 11794-5000 USA, Tel: +1-631-632-8735, E-mail: mscranton@notes.cc.sunysb.edu

OS12 Air-Wave-Sea Interaction (Joint With A, NG)

Momentum and energy transfers across the air-sea interface under realistic ocean conditions are important not only in theoretical studies, but also in many applications, including marine and oceanic forecast and climate modeling on all scales. Most difficulties that arise in air-sea coupling studies are at the interface (the surface wave layer) of the two fluids. Surface waves are believed to be an important supplier of turbulent energy, besides shear production of the classical turbulence theory. Recent theoretical and experimental studies have contributed to a better understanding of the complex wind-wave-turbulence-current relationship. Therefore, surface wave parameterization and wave-dependent surface characteristics (roughness length, drag coefficient, turbulent dissipation), taking into account the wind-wave-turbulence-current relationship, have a very important role, not only in small-scale models, but also in larger scale forecast and climate models. Lately, air-wave-sea coupled systems have been developed by various national and international groups using a different coupling physics. This special section will be a forum to exchange ideas and results between marine and oceanic small scale and larger scale coupled modeling and experimental researchers.

Convener: Le Ly, Department of Oceanography, Naval Postgraduate School, Code Oc/Le, Monterey,CA 93943 USA, Tel: +1-831-656-3257, Fax: +1-831-656-2712, E-mail: lely@nps.navy.mil

OS18 Oceanic and Atmospheric Climatologies of the Americas (Joint with A)

This session invites papers reporting on new results in the development of oceanic and atmospheric climatologies. We wish to focus mainly on the question of how these products are used to investigate the climate variability of the Americas.

Conveners: Edgar G. Pavia, CICESE, a.p. 2732, PO Box 434844, Ensenada, B.C. 22800, Mexico, Tel: +526-1745050 x 24060, Fax: +526-1750547, E-mail: epavia@cicese.mx James J. O'Brien, 2035 E. Paul Dirac Dr., R.M. Johnson Bldg., Suite 200, Tallahassee, FL 32310 USA, Tel: +1-850-644-4581, Fax: +1-850-644-4841, E-mail: obrien@coaps.fsu.edu

OS21 Southern Ocean and Climate Change: Past and Future Perspectives (Joint With A)

One of the important new findings in climatology is warming of the ocean, including its abyss, by a rate of a half degree celsius or more per century. This ocean warming over the last several decades reflects the linkage between the ocean thermohaline history and global climate change. Historical observations and paleoclimate data reveal significant climate variability on time-scales of decades to millennia. The North Atlantic and its associated deepwater formation has been the consensus focal point of this variability for decades. However, new analyses indicate that the southern deepwater source can change dramatically (e.g., experience a decrease of as much as two-thirds during the last 800 years). Such changes can substantially alter the millennial pattern of ocean circulation. For example, it is believed that the Little Ice Age was caused by stronger formation of the Antarctic Bottom Water compared to today. It has also recently been discovered that the Southern Hemisphere led Northern Hemisphere changes during parts of the glacial cycles of Pleistocene, implying a seesaw-type oscillation of the global ocean conveyor. Additionally, global warming-related melting of sea ice and ice sheets in Antarctica has the potential to cause a further slowdown of the southern deepwater source. These results demand a better assessment of the role of the Southern Ocean in driving changes of the global ocean circulation and climate. Hence, the Southern Ocean impact on climate is becoming a new focal point of study, presenting new challenges to climatologists, paleoclimatologists, glaciologists, oceanographers, and paleoceanographers in their effort to understand the past and to forecast future alterations of the climate system. This is a high-priority interdisciplinary problem. Observational, proxy data, modeling, and synthesizing papers addressing any aspect of the Southern Hemisphere climate dynamics and Southern Ocean impact on climate in the Late Quaternary, during the Little Ice Age, at present, and in near future will be welcomed.

Conveners: Dan Seidov, Earth System Science Center, Pennsylvania State University, 2217 Earth-Engineering Science Bldg., University Park, PA 16802-6813 USA, Tel: +1-814-865-1921, Fax: +1-814-865-3191, E-mail: dseidov@essc.psu.edu Eric Barron, Earth System Science Center, Pennsylvania State University, 2217 Earth-Engineering Science Bldg., University Park, PA 16802-6813 USA, Tel: +1-814-865-1921, Fax: +1-814-865-3191, E-mail: eric@essc.psu.edu Thomas Stocker, Climate and Environmental Physics, Physics Institute, University of Bern, Sidlerstrasse 5, 3012 Bern, Switzerland, Tel: +41-31-631-44-64, Fax: +41-31-631-87-42, E-mail: stocker@climate.unibe.ch

OS22 Linking Climate Variability and Coastal Processes (Joint With A, B, H)

Climate variability, occurring across a range of time-scales, significantly impacts geologic, hydrologic, hydrodynamic, and biologic processes acting in the coastal zone. As climate varies in the future, changes in the intensity, frequency, and location of storms, distribution of rainfall, rate of sea level rise, and water temperature will drive changes in river discharge, nearshore sediment transport, shoreline erosion, and nutrient supply. This session seeks to explore such links between climate variability and coastal processes across a range of time-scales and disciplines as observed in the past and predicted for the future. Abstracts linking climatic and coastal processes are solicited from all relevant disciplines of the natural sciences. Abstracts exploring the societal impacts of changes in coastal processes driven by climate variability are also welcomed.

Conveners: Laura J. Moore, Geology and Geophysics Department, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, MS 22, Woods Hole, MA 02543 USA, Tel: +1-508-289-3597, Fax: +1-508-457-2187, E-mail: lmoore@whoi.edu; Philip Mote, JISAO/SMA Climate Impacts Group, University of Washington, Box 354235, Seattle WA 98195 USA, Tel: +1-206-616-5346, Fax: +1-206-616-5775, E-mail: philip@atmos.washington.edu

P01 Planetary Atmospheric Processes and Astrobiology (Joint With A, B, SA)

Trace gases in the atmosphere react photochemically with important implications for the origin, evolution, and future of life. Many trace gases are generated by biological processes, and they in turn influence ecosystem interactions in the evolution of living systems. Ideas from strochemistry may benefit planetary atmospheric chemistry. The proposed session, therefore, will bring together planetary scientists, aeronomers, astrochemists, and solar scientists to discuss chemical and physical processes from their respective disciplines that may enhance our understanding of astrobiology. It will emphasize topical matters like our terrestrial biosphere and the present or past life on other worlds, particularly on Mars and Europa.

Conveners: Christopher P. McKay, Space Science Division, NASA Ames Research Center, MS 245-3, Moffett Field, CA 94035 USA, Tel: +1-650-604-6864, Fax: +1-650-604-6779, E-mail: cmckay@cmckay.arc.nasa.gov Sheo S. Prasad, Creative Research Enterprises, 6354 Camino del Lago, Pleasanton, CA 94566 USA, Tel: +1-925-426-9341, Fax: +1-925-426-9417, E-mail: ssp@CreativeResearch.org Edward C. Zipf, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pittsburg, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 USA, Tel: +1-412-624-9263 or 412-963-6493, Fax: +1-412-963-0603 E-mail: Edczipf@aol.com

SA01 The Mesosphere/Lower Thermosphere Region: Structure, Dynamics, Composition, and Emission (Joint With A)

The Mesosphere and Lower Thermosphere (MLT) between 50 and 150 km is a complex region where a variety of processes are important. Papers in this session explore this variety and highlight the interactions between radiative process, chemistry, wave dynamics, turbulence, electrodynamics, and nonlinear processes. Contributions related to MLT coupling from regions above and below are also encouraged.

Conveners: Christian Meyer, Colorado Research Associates, 3380 Mitchell La., Boulder, Colorado 80301 USA, Tel: +1-303-497-8328, Fax: +1-303-497-8328, E-mail: meyerc@ucar.edu Daniel Marsh, National Center for Atmsopheric Research, 3450 Mitchell La., Boulder, Colorado 80301 USA, Tel: +1- 303-497-1566, Fax: +1-303-497-1589, E-mail: marsh@ucar.edu

V05 Observation and Modeling of Volcanic Eruptions and Their Atmospheric Effects (Joint With A)

This session aims to bring together noted volcanologists and atmospheric scientists. The topics will span plume behavior with focus on ash deposition, trace gas transport (which may be important, for example, for the tropospheric and stratospheric sulphur budget), interaction of different phases of water with ash and gas, impact of environmental conditions on the plume behavior, and stratospheric injection of trace gases (SO2, H2S, Cl, Br, H2O). Further, we should include the modeling of the fate of these trace gases in the stratosphere (and the troposphere) all the way to chemical (ozone), radiative, and climate effects. Contributions should cover these topics both from the point of observations and modeling, from eruption to atmospheric effects. This opportunity should be used to make clear the big omissions in our understanding of these processes and help overcome the one-sided use of volcanological and atmospheric findings.

Conveners: Hans-F. Graf, Max Planck Institute for Meteorology, Bundesstr. 55, D-20146 Hamburg Germany, Tel: +49-40-41173247, Fax: +49-40-441787, E-mail: graf@dkrz.de Bill Rose, Geological Engineering and Sciences, Michigan Technological University, 1400 Townsend Dr., Houghton, MI 49931 USA, E-mail: raman@mtu.edu Giovanni Macedonio, Osservatorio Vesuviano, Via Diocleziano, 328 Napoli, Italy I-80125, Tel: +39-081-6108-335, Fax: +39-081-6108-351, E-mail: macedon@osve.unina.it

NG01 Nonlinear Space-Time Patterns (Joint With A, B, G, OS, T)

Nonlinear space-time patterns occur in a variety of complex systems. These space-time patterns represent the independent spatial modes of the system in terms of their associated temporal signal, and can provide significant scientific insight into both their sources and relative effects. Examples of systems that exhibit space-time patterns include fault networks, mantle convection, the ocean-atmosphere interface, the human body, and solar activity. Analysis of these patterns reveals information about the characteristics of the system in question. Recent developments resulting in the relative inexpensive accessibility to computational power have greatly improved the ability to analyze these space-time patterns and have yielded a number of important scientific insights. Applications include such widely varying fields as biometrics, seismic tomography, surface deformation, tidal signals, blood flow, and the El Nino-Southern Oscillation. Abstracts that emphasize scientific results based on the analysis of space-time patterns are encouraged. We plan to invite people and solicit contributions across a broad spectrum of sections at AGU.

Conveners: Kristy Tiampo, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences, University of Colorado, Room 318, Boulder, CO 80309-0216 USA, Tel: +1-303-492-4779, Fax: +1-303-492-5070, E-mail: kristy@caldera.colorado.edu Andrea Donnellan, Mail Stop 126-347, Jet Propulsion Laboratory and University of Southern California, 4800 Oak Grove Dr., Pasadena, CA 91109 USA, Tel: +1-818-354-4737, Fax: +1-818-393-4965, E-mail: andrea.donnellan@jpl.nasa.gov

NG02 Geocomplexity: Self-Organizing Systems (Joint With A, GP, OS, S, T)

Self-organizing complex systems are found in many branches of geophysics. The broadest-based example is fluid turbulence. Specific examples include the stochastic variability of climate and the variability of Earth’s magnetic field. Other examples are landforms and seismicity. These systems are generally chaotic, exhibit fractal (power-law) behavior, and may be examples of self-organized criticality. The proposed session will include broad overviews of the current understanding of complex systems as well as more specific recent developments. This session is intended as an overview of the current status of geocomplexity and will include several key invited speakers. Although this is not planned as a Union session, we strongly encourage contributions across a broad spectrum of AGU sections. Contributions that are applicable in more than one area are particularly welcome.

Conveners: Donald L. Turcotte, Department of Geological Sciences, Cornell University, Snee Hall, Ithaca, NY 14853 USA, Tel: +1-607-255-7282, Fax: +1-607-254-4780, E-mail: turcotte@geology.cornell.edu John B. Rundle, Colorado Center for Chaos and Complexity and Cooperative Institute Research in Environmental Sciences, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309 USA, Tel: +1-303-492-5642, E-mail: rundle@terra.colorado.edu William Klein, Physics Department and Center for Computational Science, Boston University, 590 Commonwealth Ave., Boston, MA 02215 USA, Tel: +1-617-353-2188, E-mail: klein@buphyc.bu.edu

NG03 Scaling and the Extremes of Geophysical Fields (Joint With A, H, OS, S, T)

From earthquakes to floods, volcanic eruptions to magnetic storms and hurricanes, the extremes of geophysical fields are of prime importance. However, they are still poorly understood, and time series are often too short to yield the clear-cut empirical evidence necessary to distinguish between different theoretical behaviors. Of particular significance is the distinction between standard extreme value distributions and the nonclassical heavy tailed (algebraic) distributions generally associated with space-time scaling processes. This session will be devoted to the most recent theoretical and empirical developments of scaling approaches to understand and to characterize the interrelation between strong nonlinearities over wide ranges of temporal and spatial scales and their consequences for the extremes. Session topics will include recent empirical investigations; techniques to test for the algebraic fall-offs in probability distributions; statistical estimators and data requirements; comparisons of mean and extreme instabilities/events; the statistics and dynamics of the extremes; the relevance of the paradigm of self-organized criticality; cascades, multifractals, and heavy tails; and nonclassical return period statistics and their implications.

Conveners: Daniel Schertzer, Laboratoire de Modelisation en Mecanique, Centre National de la Reserche Scientifique UMR 7607, Case 162, Université P. et M. Curie, 4 Place Jussieu, F-75252 Paris Cedex 05, France, Tel: +33-1-44-27-4963, Fax: +33-1-44-27-5259, E-mail: schertze@ccr.jussieu.fr Shaun M. Lovejoy, Physics Department, McGill University, 3600 University Str., Montreal, QC H3A 2T8, Canada, Tel: +1-514-398-6537, Fax: +1-514-398-8434, E-mail: lovejoy@physics.mcgill.ca Per Bak, Niels Bohr Institute, Blegdamsvej 17, DK-2100 Copenhagen Ø, Denmark, Tel: +45-353-25393, Fax: +45-353-25016, E-mail: bak@nbi.dk Didier Sornette, Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics and Department of Earth and Space Science, University of California, 3845 Slichter Hall, Box 951567, 595 E. Circle Dr., University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 USA, Tel: +1-310-825-2863, Fax: +1-310-206-3051, E-mail: sornette@moho.ess.ucla.edu

NG05 Fractals, Chaos, and Self-Organized Criticality in Natural and Human-Induced Hazards (Joint With A, H, OS, S, T, V)

Natural and human-induced hazards cover a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. They include a large variety and number of interacting components that combine to produce nonlinear power-law behaviors that are often associated with the basic concepts of complexity. Examples of these hazards include floods, landslides, volcanic eruptions, earthquakes, forest fires, cyclonic storms, droughts, global warming, and hazardous waste contamination. Papers that apply the concepts of fractals, chaos, or self-organized criticality to characterize, model, and assess the risk of natural and man-made hazards are solicited. Posters are also very much encouraged.

Conveners: Bruce D. Malamud, Department of Geography, Kings College London, Strand, London WC2R 2LS, UK, E-mail: bruce@malamud.com Didier Sornette, Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics and Department of Earth and Space Science, University of California, 3845 Slichter Hall, Box 951567, 595 E. Circle Dr., Los Angeles, CA 90095 USA, Tel: +1-310-825-2863, Fax: +1-310-206-3051, E-mail: sornette@moho.ess.ucla.edu Christopher Barton, U. S. Geological Survey, 600 4th St. South, St. Petersburg, FL 33701 USA, Tel: +1-727-803-8747 ext. 3014, Fax: +1-727-803-2030, E-mail: barton@usgs.gov

NG06 Quantifying Predictability in Geophysical Systems II (Joint With A, G, H, OS, SH, T, V)

Our ability to quantify the predictability of nonlinear geophysical systems provides a fundamental bridge between models of geophysical systems and the systems themselves. Uncertainty in the initial condition and errors in model formulation have led to probability forecasts (ensembles) even in deterministic systems. This session will focus on atmospheric and ocean dynamics over hours to centuries (e.g., adaptive observation strategies, Lagrangian and Eulerian approaches, intense short-duration events); theoretical aspects of the dynamics of nonlinear systems relevant to predictability and verification (including multiple models, contrasting modeling strategies, data assimilation); and practical issues in the interpretation and likely economic impact of probabilistic forecasts on a timescale minutes to hours (e.g., precipitation/wind), days to months (e.g., hurricanes), and years to millennia (e.g., earthquakes). A mix of oral and poster presentations of both pure and extremely applied contributions are welcome, and may focus on the predictability of geophysical systems other than those noted explicitly above.

Conveners: Leonard Smith, Oxford University, 24-29 St Giles', Oxford, OX1 3LB, UK, Tel: +44-1865-270-517, Fax: +44-1865-270-515, E-mail: lenny@maths.ox.ac.uk James Hansen, Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Ave., Room 54-1721, Cambridge, MA 02139 USA, Tel: +1-617-253-5935, E-mail: jhansen@mit.edu

NG07 Scaling, Multifractals, and Upscaling and Downscaling Techniques in Precipitation and Hydrology (Joint With A, H)

Hydrological processes are highly nonlinear over wide ranges of temporal and spatial scales. Fractal structures and multifractal statistics are ubiquitous. The corresponding scaling properties quantitatively relate statistics and structures at potentially widely different space-time scales and provide a systematic basis for aggregation (upscaling) and disaggregation (downscaling) techniques. In addition, wide-range scaling can be used for space-time hydrological and precipitation modeling, determining intensity-duration relations, and areal reduction factors. In the past several years, there have been many developments of specific techniques in order to handle these nonclassical scaling behaviors that are at best only poorly handled by conventional analysis and models. This session will be devoted to the most recent theoretical and operational developments and applications of scaling and other innovative approaches to characterizing and modeling of (1) precipitation, in situ (e.g., rain gage) and remotely sensed (e.g. radar) rainfall measurements, nowcasting and multifractal techniques, and extreme precipitation, including the relationship of precipitation with other intermittent atmospheric processes; (2) surface processes, including run-off, river flows, river networks. flooding and their relationship with scaling topography; and (3) groundwater and subsurface processes, in particular transport and dispersion in scaling and hierarchical porous media.

Conveners: Shaun M. Lovejoy, Physics Department, McGill University, 3600 University Str., Montreal, QC H3A 2T8, Canada, Tel.: +1-514-398-6537, Fax: +1-514-398-8434, E-mail: lovejoy@physics.mcgill.ca Daniel Schertzer, Laboratoire de Modelisation en Mecanique, Centre National de la Reserche Scientifique, UMR 7607, Case 162, Université P. et M. Curie, 4 Place Jussieu, F-75252 Paris Cedex 05, France, Tel: +33-1-44-27-4963, Fax: +33-1-44-27-5259, E-mail: schertze@ccr.jussieu.fr John Selker, Department of Bioresource Engineering, Gilmore Hall, Room 240, Corvallis, OR 97331-3906 USA, Tel: +1-541-737-6304, Fax: +1-541-737-2082, E-mail: selkerj@engr.orst.edu

NG10 Visual Computing in Nonlinear Geophysical Phenomena (Joint With A, G, GP, H, OS, T)

Researchers in geophysics are being overwhelmed by the huge amount of data generated by natural nonlinear phenomena and high-resolution numerical solutions. In this session we will bring together many of the different practioners using modern analytical and visualization tools (e.g., wavelets, eigenvectors, and EOFs) for treating and analyzing large data sets. We are soliciting examples from all areas in geophysics and at all scales, ranging from the molecular level, such as bacteria growth, to core dynamics. Also of great interest are examples from large data sets, such as SAR, ocean currents, and numerical simulations involving the bridging of scales in nonlinear processes. We foresee interest for this session from both numerical modelers and observation-oriented scientists.

Conveners: Dave Yuen, Minnesota Supercomputer Institute, 1200 Washington Ave., S., Minneapolis, MN 55415 USA, Tel: +1-612-624-1868, E-mail: davey@krissy.msi.umn.edu Bryan J. Travis, Los Alamos National Laboratory, ESS 5, MS F665, Los Alamos, NM 55455 USA, Tel: +1-505-667-1254, E-mail: bjt@vega.lanl.gov

NG11 Anomalous Transport in Inhomogeneous and (Multi-)Fractal Geophysical Media (Joint With A, H, OS, T)

Anomalous transport is ubiquitous in geophysics: mantle convection, subsurface hydrology, atmospheric and oceanographic diffusion, geophysical turbulence, solar wind, etc. It is associated with nonstandard scaling (e.g., non-Fickian diffusion), and has been attracting a renewed interest owing to its importance for environmental applications, a larger availability of data, and several recently proposed theoretical approaches: fractal modeling, continuous time random walks, chaotic advection, fractional transport equations, multifractal dispersion coefficients, and multifractal advection equations. This session will focus on the confrontation between the new available data and the new theoretical developments on anomalous transport in scaling and inhomogeneous geophysical media.

Conveners: Ioulia Tchiguirinskaia, Environmental Engineering and Science Department, Clemson University, 342 Computer Ct., Anderson, SC 29625 USA, Tel: +1-864-656-1462, Fax: +1-864-656-0672, E-mail: iouliat@clemson.edu Brian Berkowitz, Deparment of Environmental Sciences and Energy Research, Weizmann Institute of Science, PO Box 26, Rehovot, 76100, Israel, Tel: +972-8-934-2098, Fax: +972-8-934-4124,E-mail: brian.berkowitz@weizmann.ac.il Jeffrey Duan, Deparment of Applied Mathematics, Illinois Institute of Technology, 10 W. 32nd St., Chicago, IL 60616 USA, Tel: +1-312-655-3282, Fax: +1-312-567-3135, E-mail: duan@iit.edu

Biogeosciences (B)

B01 Remote Detection and Survey in Astrobiology and the Study of Life in Extreme Environments (Joint With P)

The distribution of life in extreme environments on Earth is commonly "patchy," that is sporadic in space (on decimeter to kilometer scales ) and time, because local fluctuations in conditions fragment niches at the edges of habitability. Patchiness may also occur in prospective extraterrestrial habitats. Because sampling in a patchy environment entails risk of choosing poorly, information from a remote detection method can be valuable to focus sampling on promising locations and can provide information that affects the interpretation of data. Within our solar system, such reconnaissance may include searches for habitat (e.g., liquid water using radar or seismic sounding), for evidence of metabolism (e.g., atmospheric trace gas combinations far from chemical equilibrium), or for biochemical structure or molecules indicative of living material (e.g., fluorescence or Raman scattering observations of specific molecules). This session will focus on examples of remote methods for LExEn and astrobiological studies, on insights gained from such methods, and on physical interactions on which new methods may be based. Abstracts are solicited from all relevant fields.

Conveners: Dale P. Winebrenner, Applied Physics Laboratory, University of Washington, Box 355640 Seattle, WA 98195 USA, Tel: +1-206-543-1393, Fax: +1-206-616-3142, E-mail: dpw@apl.washington.edu

B02 Microbial Processes, I, Microbial-Mineral Interactions in Deep Subsurface Environments (Joint With P)

The continued discovery of intraterrestrial microorganisms necessitates the development of new methodology to investigate the impact of microbial-mineral interactions on the terrestrial deep subsurface. This session will focus on recent research exploring the organic-inorganic biogeochemistry of the microbial-mineral interface within deep subsurface rock environments. Interdisciplinary abstracts are solicited from all fields involving microbiology and earth sciences. Relevant topics include, but are not limited to, biologically controlled or induced mineralization, bacterial-mineral precipitation, geochemical reactions and bioavailability, spatial relationships between biofilms and minerals, molecular geomicrobiology, microfossil detection, and possible exobiologic analogs.

Conveners: Mary E. Kauffman, Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, PO Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 USA, Tel: +1- 208-526-2684, E-mail: kaufme@inel.gov. F. Grant Ferris, Department of Geology, Earth Sciences Center, University of Toronto, 22 Russell St., Toronto, ON M5S 3B1, Canada, Tel: +1-416-978-0526, E-mail: ferris@quartz.geology.utoronto.ca

B03 Microbial Processes, II, Constraints on Microbial Survival in Geological Environments (Joint With P)

Microorganisms are distributed in subsurface environments that range from those harboring multicellular and unicellular organisms to those in which extreme conditions allow only for unicellular life. These conditions include low and high temperatures, hydrostatic and hyperbaric pressures, alkaline and acidic pH, oligotrophic chemical systems, tiny pore sizes, low moisture, an overabundance of microbial wastes, and niche environments where microbes depend on unusual physicochemical conditions to survive.

Each microbial environment limits the activity of its inhabitants through some combination of physical and chemical parameters. Descriptions of microbial function in terms of thermodynamic variables, such as free energy, are increasingly common. This session invites papers that explore the physical, chemical, and geologic conditions where subsurface organisms are found, particularly with reference to factors acting as limiting bounds on microbial activity. These papers may include descriptions of microbial communities, their numbers, diversity, or activity. Thermodynamic descriptions of community limitations are especially encouraged.

Conveners: Frederick Colwell, Biotechnology Department, Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID 83415, USA, Tel: +1-208-526-0097, Fax: +1-208-526-0828, E-mail: fxc@inel.gov; James McKinley, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352 USA, Tel: +1-509-375-6841, Fax: +1-509-375-6954, E-mail: james.mckinley@pnl.gov

B04 Halocarbons: Global Biogeochemistry and Contaminant Transformations (Joint With A, OS)

This special session will broadly cover topics in halocarbon research including sources and sinks of halogenated compounds in oceanic, freshwater and terrestrial environments, biogeochemistry of trace atmospheric halocarbons, and transformations of halogenated contaminants. Abstracts are solicited from all disciplines involved in the study of abiotic or biological processes that influence the fate of halocarbons. Suggested topics include rates and mechanisms of production/consumption in pristine or impacted environments, degradation studies including flowpath modeling, isotopic investigations of source/sink signatures, and examination of processes that control the distribution of halocarbons in the atmosphere.

Conveners: Larry Miller, U.S. Geological Survey, MS 465, 345 Middlefield Rd., Menlo Park, CA 94025 USA, E-mail: lgmiller@usgs.gov Kelly Goodwin, Tel: +1-650-329-4475, Fax: +1-650-329-4327 E-mail: goodwin@aoml.noaa.gov

B05 The Influence of Hydrosphere-Biosphere Interactions on the Speciation and Transport of Metals in Surface Waters (Joint With H)

The interplay between transport and reaction processes determines the fate of many metal contaminants in aquatic systems. In most instances, chemical reactions are driven/catalyzed by biological systems that in turn influence the reactivity and speciation of contaminants. In addition, flow regimes exert selective pressures for the establishment of various biotopes. This session will examine how the interplay between hydrologic and biogeochemical processes controls the reactivity, mobility, transport, and fate of metals in surface waters, and how these processes affect biological systems. We especially encourage presentations that examine the interdisciplinary nature of these processes, such as the analysis of feedback mechanisms involving the uptake of metals by biota, biotic control of metal speciation, and the mobility of metals in aquatic systems.

Conveners: Jean-Francois Gaillard, Department of Civil Engineering, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Rd., Evanston, IL 60208-3109 USA, Tel: +1-847-467-1376, Fax: +1-847-491-4011, E-mail: jf-gaillard@northwestern.edu Aaron Packman, Department of Civil and Architectural Engineering, Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA 19104 USA, Tel: +1-215-895-2087, Fax: +1-215-895-1363, E-mail: pack@drexel.edu

B06 Nitrogen-Cycling Processes in Rivers and Streams (Joint With H)

Delivery of nitrogen to coastal waters by rivers and streams is a topic of growing national and international concern. A major aspect of N-loading to coastal environments is the net effect of in-stream processes during transport. Much remains unknown about nitrogen-cycling processes within rivers of any scale, or how these processes interact with the hydrologic cycle and other biogeochemical cycles to affect nitrogen transport. This session will focus on in-stream nitrogen-cycling processes, particularly nitrification and denitrification, and quantitative field studies to assess their impact. Presentations are encouraged that describe factors controlling nitrogen transformation; the extent to which geochemical signals, such as stable isotope ratios and trace constituents (e.g., nitrite and nitrous oxide), can be used to characterize nitrogen-cycling processes; and studies comparing methodologies for assessing these processes in situ.

Conveners: Richard L. Smith, U.S. Geological Survey, 3215 Marine St., Boulder, CO 80303 USA, Tel: +1-303-541-3032, Fax: +1-303-447-2505, E-mail: rlsmith@usgs.gov and Frank J. Triska, U. S. Geological Survey, 345 Middlefield Rd., Mail Stop 439, Menlo Park, CA 94025 USA, Tel: +1-650-329-4437, Fax: +1-650-329-4463, E-mail: fjtriska@usgs.gov

B07 Life in a Turbulent Environment: Primary Production in the Surface Mixed Layer (Joint With OS)

Turbulence impacts upon aquatic ecology over a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. Within the surface mixed layer, large-scale turbulence maintains near-uniform distributions of temperature salinity, nutrients, etc. while small-scale turbulence (or shear flows) reduces the thickness of diffusive boundary layers and impacts upon nutrient uptake, particle encounter frequencies, and motile organisms' abilities to maintain a preferred orientation. As well, the thickness of the surface mixed layer responds to changes in the input of turbulent kinetic energy and this in turn modifies the irradiance experienced by primary producers circulating with in the mixed layer. Contributions are sought regarding the responses of phyto- and zooplankton to environmental turbulence. Reports of interdisciplinary field studies are particularly encouraged. A partial list of topics includes photophysiological responses to changes in irradiance caused by fluctuations in turbulence intensity and/or mixed layer depth; modeling photosynthesis in a turbulent environment; the impact of turbulence on the migration or swimming behavior of buoyant and motile species; and the impact of small-scale turbulence on nutrient uptake, particle flocculation, and predator-prey interactions.

Convener: Bradford Sherman, Aquatic Systems Modelling Group, CSIRO Land and Water, GPO Box 1666, Canberra, ACT 2601, Australia, Tel: +61-2-6246-5579, Fax: +61-2-6246-5560, E-mail: Brad.Sherman@cbr.clw.csiro.au

B08 New Breakthroughs in Field-Scale Bacterial Transport (Joint With H)

Microbial transport in the presence of subsurface physical and chemical heterogeneities is poorly understood due to the limited number of successful field experiments. This lack of understanding hinders the design of bioaugmentation strategies, the modeling of pathogen contamination in the groundwater, and assessment of the hydrodynamic impact of introduced organisms to the subsurface microbial communities. In this session new and innovative field-scale bacterial transport approaches and results will be presented and discussed. This session will highlight results of a field-scale bacterial transport experiment conducted near the town of Oyster, Virginia, including the design optimization of microbial strains, tracer test experimental parameters and instrumentation, multiscale hydrogeological characterization, novel methods for tracking bacteria, the effects of physical and chemical heterogeneity on field-scale bacterial transport, quantification of microbial transport processes for modeling, variations in microbial ecology associated with the experiment, and the effects of predation on bacterial transport. This session should be of interest to a broad audience interested in bioaugmentation strategies for bioremediation, and participation by all researchers working on these issues is encouraged.

Conveners: Susan Hubbard, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Rd., MS 90-1116, Berkeley, CA 94720 USA, Tel: +1- 510-486-5266, E-Mail; sshubbard@lbl.gov: Brian Mailloux, Department of Geosciences, Princeton University, 114 Guyot Hall, Princeton, NJ 08544 USA, Tel: +1-609-258-1622, E-mail: mailloux@geo.princeton.edu Tim Scheibe, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, PO Box 999, MSIN K9-36, 902 Battelle Blvd., Richland, WA 99352 USA, Tel: +1-509-372-6065 E-mail: tim.scheibe@pnl.gov

B09 The Role of Fire in the Boreal Forest and Its Impacts on Climatic Processes (Joint With A, NG)

Boreal forests account for about a third of the carbon sequestered in terrestrial ecosystems, so changes in their functioning or distribution could create important feedbacks to the climate system. Changes in the extent of forest cover could alter regional energy budgets sufficiently to amplify or nullify the expected rapid climatic warming at high latitudes. Warming could cause boreal forests to change from being a component of the "missing sink" of carbon dioxide to being a net source if fire frequency or decomposition increases. The rate of change in boreal forests is governed by fire frequency and severity, with important effects on carbon and energy flows. In the boreal forests several feedback mechanisms must be quantified to fully understand the role of fire in influencing landscape response to a changing climate. Some topics that this session will address are (1) changes in carbon stocks caused by immediate off-site transfer during the fire and by changes in decomposition and production following fire; (2) changes in energy budgets caused by fire; and (3) changes in the structure of the ecosystem, with associated changes in carbon or energy budgets.

Conveners: Larry Hinzman, Water and Environmental Research Center, University of Alaska Fairbanks, Fairbanks, AK 99775-5860 USA, Tel: +1-907-474-7331, Fax: +1-907-474-7979, E-mail: ffldh@uaf.edu F. Stuart Chapin, Institute of Arctic Biology, University of Alaska, Fairbanks, AK 99775 USA, Tel: +1- 907-474-7922, Fax: +1-907-474-6716, E-mail: fschapin@bonanza.lter.uaf.edu

B10 Land-Atmosphere Interactions, I, Arctic Transitions (Joint With A, H)

This session will focus on spatial and temporal patterns and controls over land-atmosphere surface exchange of mass and energy in arctic tundra and in transition regions between arctic tundra and boreal forest. High-latitude ecosystems play an important role in the functioning of the earth system because they occupy a large area; are sensitive to changes in climate; influence the exchanges of water, energy, and radiatively active gases with the atmosphere; and affect regional and global climate. Functional responses of arctic tundra to climate variability and change have the potential to influence global climate through the exchange of radiatively active gases with the atmosphere. Spatial variation in vegetation within arctic tundra has substantial climatic effects that extend beyond tundra. Structural responses, which include treeline changes and vegetation changes associated with fire, may substantially alter water and energy exchange in transitional regions of arctic and boreal vegetation to influence regional climate. Abstracts are solicited on relationships among vegetation, soils, permafrost, snow, and climate in arctic regions that have implications for regional and global climate.

Conveners: A. David McGuire, Institute of Arctic Biology, University of Alaska, Fairbanks, AK 99775 USA, Tel: +1-907-474-6242, Fax: +1-907-474-6716, E-mail: ffadm@uaf.edu Matthew Sturm, U.S. Army Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory, PO Box 35170, Ft. Wainwright, AK 99703-0170 USA, Tel: +1-907-353-5183, Fax: +1-907-353-5142, E-mail: msturm@crrel41.crrel.usace.army.mil

B11 Land-Atmosphere Interactions, II, North Africa (Joint With A, H)

This session focuses on the interactions between the atmosphere and the terrestrial biosphere over north Africa as well as change and variability of the coupled biosphere-atmosphere-ocean system. Relevant topics include, but are not limited to, the natural coevolution of the biosphere-atmosphere system; the influence of the ocean, in particular sea surface temperatures and their variability, on the biosphere-atmosphere interaction; the role of the terrestrial biosphere in both the modern climate and the paleoclimate; reconstruction of paleoclimate; impact of anthropogenic land cover changes.

Conveners: Guiling Wang, Princeton Environmental Institute, 27 Guyot Hall, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544-1003 USA, Tel: +1-609-258-3511, E-mail: gwang@princeton.edu Martin Claussen, Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research, PO Box 601203, 14412 Potsdam, Germany, Tel: +49-331-288-2522, Fax: +49-331-288-2600, E-mail: claussen@pik-potsdam.de

B12 Responses of Soil Processes to Elevated Atmospheric CO2 (Joint With A)

Research on the responses of ecosystems to elevated atmospheric CO2 has resulted in a wealth of information. While some consensus can be found regarding aboveground responses to elevated atmospheric CO2, many questions remain on the magnitude, and even the direction of changes in soil carbon and nutrient cycling and soil microbial feedbacks. Understanding the response of soil processes to elevated CO2 is important, because these processes can strongly influence both the short-term and long-term responses of ecosystems to elevated CO2. Soil processes are difficult to observe, and the variety of measurement techniques often complicates direct comparison of results. Recent studies on understanding responses of belowground processes to elevated atmospheric CO2 are the subject of this session. Some of the important topics that may be addressed include (1) soil microbial feedbacks and microbial biomass turnover; (2) carbon and nutrient cycling and availability, including 15N and 13C isotopic tracer studies; (3) litter decomposition and SOM turnover; (4) changes in soil biology; and (5) trace gas fluxes.

Conveners: Jennifer King, USDA Agricultural Research Service, PO Box E, Fort Collins, CO, 80522 USA, Tel: +1-970-490-8255, Fax: +1-970-490-8213, E-mail: jyking@lamar.colostate.edu Bruce Hungate, Department of Biological Sciences, Northern Arizona University, Box 5640, Flagstaff AZ 86011-5640 USA, Tel: +1-520-523-0925, Fax: +1-520-523-7500, E-mail: bruce.hungate@nau.edu Arvin Mosier, USDA-Agricultural Research Service, PO Box E, Fort Collins, CO 80522 USA, Tel: +1-970-490-8250, Fax: +1-970-490-8213, E-mail: amosier@lamar.colostate.edu

B13 Ecological Component of Large Scale Biosphere-Atmosphere Experiment (LBA) (Joint With A)

This session deals with studies related to the question "How do tropical forest conversion, regrowth, and selective logging influence carbon storage, nutrient dynamics, trace gas fluxes, and the prospect for sustainable land use in the Amazon region?" "Forest conversion" refers to forest clearing and conversion to agricultural uses, especially cattle pasture, and "forest regrowth" refers to forest growth following the abandonment of agricultural lands. The ecological component of the Large Scale Biosphere-Atmosphere Experiment in Amazonia (LBA) includes studies of the effects of these land cover and land use changes on terrestrial carbon and nutrient budgets, the fluxes, of trace gases between the land and the atmosphere, and the exchange of materials between the land and river systems. Implicitly, the understanding effects of land use changes requires an understanding of these budgets, fluxes and exchanges in "primary" or predisturbance forest ecosystems.

Convener: Michael Keller, LBA-Ecology, Complex Systems Research Center, University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH 03824 USA, Tel +1-603-862-4193, Fax +1-603-862-0188, E-mail: lba.ecology@unh.edu

B14 Land Use Change, I, A Paleoenvironmental Perspective on Ecosystem Sustainability (Joint With A)

During the last two millennia, virtually all ecosystems, both managed and quasi-natural, have been subjected to greater fluctuations of climate than are captured by instrumental records. Over the same time span, human impacts on ecosystems have varied and, in many cases, increased dramatically. Documenting, understanding, and distinguishing the role of both types of processes, and the interactions between them, in generating contemporary ecosystems are vital for developing any realistic sense of future sustainability. Case studies from specific ecosystems and regions, as well as model simulations of ecosystem responses, are required. The session will seek to (1) present case studies illustrating the value of paleoecological studies in understanding ecosystem responses to climate change and human impacts; (2) demonstrate appropriate and effective uses of paleoecological data in ecosystem management, conservation, and restoration; and (3) foster development of a robust research and applied framework for maximizing the contribution of paleoecological information to understanding and enhancing future sustainability.

Conveners: Frank Oldfield, PAGES International Project Office, Barenplatz 2,CH-3011 Bern, Switzerland, Tel: +41-31-312-3133, Fax: +41-31-312-3168, E-mail: frank.oldfield@pages.unibe.ch Constance Millar, USDA Forest Service, PSW Research Station, 800 Buchanan St., Albany, CA 94710 USA, Tel: +1-510-559-6435, Fax: +1-510-559-6499, E-mail: cmillar@fs.fed.us

B15 Land Use Change, II, Global Land Use and Land Cover Change Over the Last 300 Years (Joint With A)

Past changes in land use and land cover have impacted climate at regional to continental scale, significantly modified atmospheric carbon concentrations, and created much of the landscape upon which future global change will act. It is therefore becoming increasingly urgent to characterize and quantify these changes, especially for the last 300 years, using all the methods available, ranging from pollen analysis to documentary evidence. The session will summarize recent progress in reconstructing the history of recent land use and cover change resulting from the International Geosphere-Biosphere Programme’s PAGES/LUCC BIOME 300 and other initiatives, and outline the major consequences of the results obtained so far.

Convener: Frank Oldfield, PAGES International Project Office, Barenplatz 2, CH-3011 Bern, Switzerland, Tel: +41-31-312-3133, Fax: +41-31-312-3168, E-mail: frank.oldfield@pages.unibe.ch Rik Leemans, National Institute of Public Health and Environment, Bureau of Environment and Natural Resources, Antonie van Leewenhoeklaan 9, PO Box 1, NL-3720 BA Bilthoven, Netherlands, Tel: +31-30-274-3377, Fax: +31-30-885-7357, E-mail: rik.leemans@rivm.nl

B16 Biospheric Results from Terra, NASA’s Earth Observing System (Joint With A, H, OS)

The launch of National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Earth Observing System (EOS) Terra on December 18, 1999, marked a new phase of climate and global change research, especially for increased understanding of the interaction of the land and ocean biology with climate. Terra has scientific instruments to gain information about the Earth's land, oceans, and atmospheres with unprecedented accuracy. Of the five scientific instruments, three are germane to land and ocean remote sensing: the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), the Multiangle Imaging Spectroradiometer (MISR), and the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER). This session would focus on results of biospheric research utilizing the Terra spacecraft. Invited papers will be concerned with results of using Terra instruments (MODIS, MISR, and ASTER) for land cover and change, vegetation attributes such as leaf area index and absorptance of photosynthetically radiation, and links into ecosystem models. Recent work by the oceans community regarding chlorophyll and productivity will also be solicited to make the session representative of Terra's biospheric science research.

Convener: Jon Ranson, Biospheric Sciences Branch, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 923, Greenbelt, MD 20771 USA, Tel: +1-301-614-6650, Fax: +1-301-614-6695, E-mail: jon.ranson@gsfc.nasa

B17 The Science of Carbon Sequestration (Joint With OS, V)

Several complementary strategies have been proposed to limit the accumulation of anthropogenic carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. It has been proposed that carbon dioxide generated during fossil fuel burning (or as a result of land use changes) could be stored in the terrestrial biosphere, the oceans, or deep geologic reservoirs, effectively sequestering this carbon dioxide away from the atmosphere. The U. S. Department of Energy has set up centers to study these issues in collaboration with the broader community; CSITE for studying terrestrial biosphere options; DOCS for studying ocean sequestration options; and GEO-SEQ for studying geologic sequestration options. Presentations are requested focusing on scientific results that are critical to understanding, evaluating, and addressing issues relevant to proposed carbon sequestration strategies, including research gaps, effectiveness, unintended impacts, and feasibility and cost.

Conveners: Jeff Amthor, CSITE, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, MS 6422, PO Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6422 USA, Tel: +1-865-576-2779, Fax: +1-865-576-9939, E-mail: amthorjs@ornl.gov Sallie Benson, GEO-SEQ, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, MS 90-1116, Berkeley, CA 94720 USA, E-mail: smbenson@lbl.gov Jim Bishop, DOCS, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, MS 90-1116, Berkeley, CA 94720 USA, Tel: +1-510-495-2457, Fax: +1-510-486-5686, E-mail: jkbishop@lbl.gov Ken Caldeira, DOCS, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 7000 East Ave., L-103, Livermore, CA 94550 USA, Tel: +1-925-423-4191, Fax: +1-925-422-6388, E-mail: kenc@llnl.gov

B18 Biogeosciences: Expanding Horizons in Understanding Earth and Planetary Systems

This special session is planned as a showcase for the new Biogeosciences section of AGU, both to provide an overview and to illustrate the many ways that biogeosciences relates to existing AGU disciplines. The new Biogeosciences section was formed to promote the broadest possible understanding of geophysical sciences, especially the interaction of biological and geophysical processes in controlling the Earth and planetary systems. This session highlights exciting research ongoing in the areas of biogeochemistry, biogeophysics, global ecosystems, astrobiology, and evolutionary geobiology, as well as their bearing on the more "traditional" geophysical sciences. The session will include a few key invited speakers, and a major poster session for which abstracts are solicited in any of the fields of biogeosciences. The session will be followed by a reception hosted by the new Biogeosciences section of AGU.

Conveners: Dork Sahagian, IGBP/GAIM, Institute for the Study of Earth, Oceans and Space, University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH 03824 USA, Tel: +1-603-862-3875, Fax: +1-603-962 3874, E-mail: gaim@unh.edu Joe Kirschvink, Division of Geological & Planetary Sciences, California Institute of Technology, 1200 E. California Blvd., MS 170-25, Pasadena, CA 91125 USA, Tel: +1-626-395-6136, Fax: +1-626-568-0935, E-mail: kirschvink@caltech.edu

B19 Iron Cycling in the Natural Environment: Biogeochemistry, Microbial Diversity, and Bioremediation

Microorganisms that reduce Fe(III) or oxidize Fe(II) play important roles in the cycling of C, H, and Fe in low temperature sedimentary environments. They are also the primary players in metal or organic carbon contaminated soils and groundwaters. Furthermore, iron oxidation and reduction may be among the first respiratory processes in the evolution of microbial metabolism. This session will focus on the current knowledge of iron biogeochemistry, diversity and physiology of iron-reducing and iron-oxidizing microorganisms, and new applications for quantifying their roles in biogeochemical processes in natural systems.

Relevant topics will include but are not limited to: Biogeochemical iron cycling in natural environments, species and metabolic pathways of iron-reducing and iron-oxidizing bacteria stable isotopes (C, O, and Fe) and other biomarkers associated with microbial iron reduction, mechanisms of iron biomineralization effect of microbial interactions on iron cycling in natural environments, bioremediation of metal and organic contaminated aquifers and iron reduction by extremophiles.

Conveners: Chuanlun Zhang, Department of Geological Sciences, University of Missouri, 101 Geological Sciences Bldg., Columbia, MO 65211 USA, Tel: +1-573-884-2677, Fax: +1-573-882-5458, E-mail: zhangCL@missouri.edu John Coates, Microbiology, Southern Illinois University, Mailcode: 6508, Carbondale, IL 62901 USA, Tel: +1-618-453-6132, E-mail: jcoates@micro.siu.edu

B20 Phosphate Cycling in the Marine and Terrestrial Environments (Joint with OS)

Phosphate is an essential nutrient for organisms at all levels of the food chain both in the terrestrial and marine environments and often it is a limiting nutrient. This session will focus on all aspects of the P cycle in the present and past. Characterization of P pools in seawater and soil, methods to estimate P recycling rates, P sources to different ecosystems, changes in P fluxes with time and space, estuaries and lake eutrophication due to P pollution, new methods and models or quantifying processes involved in the P cycle and other P related topics will be covered. This is a joint ocean and biogeochemistry session.

Conveners: Dr. Adina Paytan, Department of Geological and Environmental Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford CA 94305-2115; Tel: +1-650-724-4073; Fax: +1-650-725-0979; E-mail: apaytan@pangea.stanford.edu: Dr. Barbara Cade-Menun, Geological and Environmental Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305-2115 Tel: +1-650-725-0927; Fax: 1+650-725-0979; E-mail: bjcm@pangea.stanford.edu

A06 Investigation of Atmosphere-Earth Interactions With Cooperative Atmosphere-Surface Exchange Study 97 and 99 Data (Joint With B)

The main goal of the Cooperative Atmosphere Surface Exchange Study (CASES) is to investigate atmosphere-earth interactions in a mesoscale watershed through long-term observations. Two field programs, CASES-97 and CASES-99, took place from April 21to June 17, 1997, and during the month of October 1999, respectively. These programs were conducted to study the role of land-surface processes in the diurnal evolution of the convective boundary layer and the nocturnal boundary layer. The purpose of this session is to discuss the progress and determine issues that need to be addressed for further field experiments. This special session solicits papers on CASES data analysis, development/validation of land-surface and boundary layer models, and application of CASES data in mesoscale and general circulation models. Papers on similar topics are also encouraged.

Conveners: Margaret LeMone, Mesoscale and Microscale Meteorology, National Center for Atmospheric Research, PO Box 3000, Boulder, CO 80307 USA, Tel: +1-303-497-8962, Fax: +1-303-497-8171, E-mail: lemone@ucar.edu Fei Chen, Research Applications Program, National Center for Atmospheric Research, PO Box 3000, Boulder, CO 80307 USA, Tel: +1-303-497-8454, Fax: +1-303-497-8401, E-mail: feichen@ucar.edu and Jielun Sun, Mesoscale and Microscale Meteorology, National Center for Atmospheric Research, PO Box 3000, Boulder, CO 80307 USA, Tel: +1-303-497-8994 Fax: +1-303-497-8171, E-mail: jsun@ucar.edu

A11 NOAA Postdoctoral Program in Climate and Global Change (Joint With B, OS)

The purpose of the program is to help create and train the next generation of researchers needed for climate studies. It was anticipated that several contemporary National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) efforts, such as TOGA and its ambitious field programs (e.g., COARE), would undoubtedly generate a tremendous amount of data that would require the attention of an enlarged research community here and abroad. In the larger view, it was necessary to attract some of the new Ph.D.’s to the community in order to establish the seeds of scientific leadership for the extended programs of the future. Thus, the program endeavors to attract outstanding recent Ph.D.’s in the sciences relevant to the NOAA Climate and Global Change Program. The program supports research on climate variations with timescales of seasons to centuries. This is the 10th year of this very successful fellowship program. We propose to mark the event by holding a half-day afternoon session at the AGU Fall Meeting with a reception immediately following a series of invited talks. We envision that the afternoon would consist of the following: one 20 minute talk that summarizes the history and scope of the program, and nine invited talks (20 minutes each) from past and present participants in the program who gone on to become leaders in various disciplines. The topic of each talk will be influenced heavily by the speaker, so that each talk will be cutting-edge research, with many of the talks likely to be on "hot topics." (The talks are not to be a review of what the speaker did while he/she was a postodc in the program.) Both the reputations of the speakers and the topics should ensure that this will be a very well attended session.

Conveners: David Battisti, Department of Atmospheric Sciences, University of Washington, Box 351640 Seattle, WA 98195-1640 USA, Tel: +1-206-543-2019, Fax: +1-206-543-0308, E-mail: david@atmos.washington.edu Daniel P. Schrag, Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Harvard University, 20 Oxford Street Cambridge, MA 02138 USA, Tel: +1-617-495-7676, Fax: +1-617-496-4387, E-mail: schrag@eps.harvard.edu

H28 Hydrologic and Ecosystem Research and Applications in Long-Term Experimental Watersheds (Joint With B)

This is a poster session designed to highlight the major research efforts and data sets that are available at experimental watersheds in the United States and overseas. We solicit posters from a range of watersheds with long term monitoring including those from the Long Term Ecological Research network, USDA Agricultural Research Service watersheds, the U.S. Geological Survey Wetland Ecology Branch sites, and other U.S. and international sites. Each poster should include information on the major research questions pursued and active research under way, an overview of the data sets that are available, as well as novel and current research findings and resulting applications. The poster session will provide an opportunity for researchers to identify potential synergistic studies and intercomparisons, and familiarize the community with the research and data resources available.

Conveners: Danny Marks, Northwest Watershed Research Center, USDA Agricultural Research Service, 800 Park Blvd., Plaza IV, Suite 105, Boise, ID 83712 USA, Tel: +1-208-422-0700, E-mail: dmarks@nwrc.ars.pn.usbr.gov L. E. Band, Department of Geography, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 USA, Tel: +1-919-962-3921, E-mail: lband@email.unc.edu

H29 Coupled Hydrological and Terrestrial Ecosystem Processes (Joint With B)

Surface and near-surface hydrological and ecosystem processes are intimately coupled in watersheds. An understanding of their interactions is necessary for improved assessment and modeling of water balance, carbon and nutrient cycling, canopy growth, and landscape change and succession. Topics can include the development of distinct terrestrial ecosystem patterns as conditioned by soil water patterns and flowpaths in complex landscapes, the role of these patterns on water balance at the catchment scale, rates of carbon sequestration, and nutrient cycling along topo-edaphic gradients. Topics on the sensitivity of these systems to changes in water balance due to shifts in climate or land cover change are also encouraged. In addition, the session is intended to highlight studies investigating the links between terrestrial ecosystem and hydrological processes. Abstracts are solicited that discuss measurement or modeling studies of ecosystem and hydrological interactions ranging from the plot to watershed scale.

Conveners: D. Scott Mackay, Department of Forest Ecology and Management, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 USA, Tel: +1-608-262-1669, E-mail: dsmackay@facstaff.wisc.edu Brent Newman, Earth and Environmental Sciences Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, MS J495, Los Alamos, NM 87545 USA, Tel: +1-505-667-3021, E-mail: bnewman@lanl.gov Brad Wilcox, Inter-American Institute for Global Change Studies, A.Dos Astronauts 1758, 12227-010 Sáo José dos Campos, SP, Brazil, Tel: +55-12-345-6860, E-mail: bwilcox@dir.iai.int

H33 Dissolved Organic Matter in Surface Water and Groundwater: Characterization, Production, Transport, and Fate (Joint With B)

Recent work suggests that hydrologic flow paths, microbial processes, soil mineralogy, and soil nutrient balance can all affect the concentration and flux of colloidal and dissolved organic matter (DOM) in surface water and groundwater. In many cases physical, chemical, and biological processes are intimately linked, and their relationships may change over time. Understanding this complex set of interactions is an ongoing challenge for biogeochemists. Appropriate topics for this session would include physical and chemical control of DOM concentrations along flow paths; microbial production and consumption of DOM; measurement or prediction of DOM flux at local, regional, or biome scales; photodegradation of DOM; methods to characterize organic matter (fluorescence spectra, physical separations, and NMR); and links between cycling of DOM and dissolved organic nitrogen or other nutrients. Papers are expected to include studies of DOM dynamics at different spatial scales, in a variety of terrestrial and aquatic environments.

Conveners: William H. McDowell, Department of Natural Resources, University of New Hampshire, 219 James Hall, Durham, NH 03824 USA, Tel: +1-603-862-2249, Fax: +1-603-862-4976, E-mail: bill.mcdowell@unh.edu Jacqueline A. Aitkenhead Peterson, Department of Natural Resources, University of New Hampshire, 215 James Bldg., Durham, NH 03824 USA, Tel: +1- 603-862-1020, Fax: +1-603-862-4976, E-mail: jaa@cisunix.unh.edu Elizabeth Boyer, College of Environmental Science and Forestry, State University of New York, 1 Forestry Dr., Syracuse, NY 13210 USA, Tel: +1-315-470-4818, E-mail: boyer@syr.edu

OS06 Redox Processes in Oxygen Deficient Regions of the Ocean (Joint With A, B)

Recent research cruises to locations such as the Arabian Sea, the eastern tropical North Pacific, and the Cariaco Basin have heightened interest in redox processes occurring in oxygen-deficient regions of the ocean. In particular, these environments are sources of atmospheric greenhouse gases such as nitrous oxide, and their sedimentary records may contain valuable paleo-oceangraphic indicators. This session aims to provide a venue for a wide-ranging discussion of the biogeochemistry of these intriguing environments, their affect on global biogeochemical cycles, and the information that their sediments record.

Conveners: Frank Sansone, Oceanography Department, University of Hawaii, 1000 Pope Rd., Honolulu, HI 96822 USA, Tel: +1-808-956-8370, Fax: +1-808-956-7112, E-mail: sansone@soest.hawaii.edu Mary Scranton, Marine Sciences Research Center, State University of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, NY 11794-5000 USA, Tel: +1-631-632-8735, E-mail: mscranton@notes.cc.sunysb.edu

OS07 Geosphere-Biosphere Coupling: Cold Seep Related Carbonate and Mound Formation and Ecology (Joint With B)

Carbonate mounds are prominent reef types during Earth history since Cambrian times. These mounds frequently form giant host rocks for hydrocarbon accumulation. Recent discoveries of spectacular modern carbonate mounds along the United States, African, Asian, and European continental margin provide an outstanding opportunity to study the sedimentary processes of these buildups. Seepage of hydrocarbons may play a role, although a link with fluid expulsion from depth is still poorly understood. As present-day mound provinces occur at or near areas of increased exploration for hydrocarbons, there is an obvious need to better understand their occurrence, origin, and possible relationship to cold seepage or hydrocarbon leakage, as well as to establish their potential impact on seabed stability and relationship to external forcing mechanisms such as climatic change effects.

Conveners: W. C. Dullo, Geomar, Wischhofstrasse 1-3, D-24148 Kiel, Germany, Tel: +49-431-600-2215, Fax: +49-431-600-2925, E-mail: cdullo@geomar.de E. Suess, Geomar, Wischhofstrasse 1-3, D-24148 Kiel, Germany, Tel: +49-431-600-2215, Fax: +49-431-600-2925, E-mail: esuess@geomar.de P. Henriet, Renard Centre of Marine Geology, University of Ghent, Krijgslaan 281 S8, B-9000 Ghent, Belgium, Tel: +32-9-264-45-85, Fax: +32-9-264-49-67, E-mail: jeanpierre.henriet@rug.ac.be C. E. van Weering, Netherlands Institute for Sea Research, PO Box 59, Texel, Netherlands, Tel: +31-222-369395, Fax: +31-222-319674, E-mail: rhaas@nioz.nl William W. Sager, Department of Oceanography, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77843-3146 USA, Tel: +1-979-845-9828, Fax: +1-979-845-6331, E-mail: wsager@ocean.tamu.edu

OS22 Linking Climate Variability and Coastal Processes (Joint With B, H)

Climate variability, occurring across a range of time-scales, significantly impacts geologic, hydrologic, hydrodynamic, and biologic processes acting in the coastal zone. As climate varies in the future, changes in the intensity, frequency, and location of storms, distribution of rainfall, rate of sea level rise, and water temperature will drive changes in river discharge, nearshore sediment transport, shoreline erosion, and nutrient supply. This session seeks to explore such links between climate variability and coastal processes across a range of time-scales and disciplines as observed in the past and predicted for the future. Abstracts linking climatic and coastal processes are solicited from all relevant disciplines of the natural sciences. Abstracts exploring the societal impacts of changes in coastal processes driven by climate variability are also welcomed.

Conveners: Laura J. Moore, Geology and Geophysics Department, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, MS 22, Woods Hole, MA 02543 USA, Tel: +1-508-289-3597, Fax: +1-508-457-2187, E-mail: lmoore@whoi.edu; Philip Mote, JISAO/SMA Climate Impacts Group, University of Washington, Box 354235, Seattle WA 98195 USA, Tel: +1-206-616-5346, Fax: +1-206-616-5775, E-mail: philip@atmos.washington.edu

OS23 The Development and Future of Nanoscale Geoscience (Joint With B, V)

Research to be funded by the Geosciences Directorate as part of the NSE program will be interdisciplinary and will focus on probing nanostructures and processes of relevance in the environment, including such issues as understanding the distribution, composition, origin, and behavior of nanoscale structures under a wide variety of naturally occurring physical, chemical and biological conditions; developing new field and laboratory instrumentation for characterizing the chemical composition and physical/chemical properties of molecular clusters, surface and interface nanostructures, and ultrafine and fine aerosol particles; investigating biogeochemical and physicochemical processes at marine interfaces; understanding the distribution and behavior of nanoscale biogeochemical structures throughout the oceans; and the development and application of earth systems nanosensor technology.

Conveners: David D. Lambert, Division of Earth Sciences, National Science Foundation, Arlington, VA 22230 USA, Tel: +1- 703-306-1554, Fax: +1-703-306-0382, Peter McMurry, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Univeristy of Minnesota, 111 Church Street, SE, Tel: +1-612-624-2817, Fax: +1-612-626-1854, E-mail: mcmurry@me.umn.edu

P01 Planetary Atmospheric Processes and Astrobiology (Joint With A, B, SA)

Trace gases in the atmosphere react photochemically with important implications for the origin, evolution, and future of life. Many trace gases are generated by biological processes, and they in turn influence ecosystem interactions in the evolution of living systems. Ideas from strochemistry may benefit planetary atmospheric chemistry. The proposed session, therefore, will bring together planetary scientists, aeronomers, astrochemists, and solar scientists to discuss chemical and physical processes from their respective disciplines that may enhance our understanding of astrobiology. It will emphasize topical matters like our terrestrial biosphere and the present or past life on other worlds, particularly on Mars and Europa.

Conveners: Christopher P. McKay, Space Science Division, NASA Ames Research Center, MS 245-3, Moffett Field, CA 94035 USA, Tel: +1-650-604-6864, Fax: +1-650-604-6779, E-mail: cmckay@cmckay.arc.nasa.gov Sheo S. Prasad, Creative Research Enterprises, 6354 Camino del Lago, Pleasanton, CA 94566 USA, Tel: +1-925-426-9341, Fax: +1-925-426-9417, E-mail: ssp@CreativeResearch.org Edward C. Zipf, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pittsburg, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 USA, Tel: +1-412-624-9263 or 412-963-6493, Fax: +1-412-963-0603 E-mail: Edczipf@aol.com

T07 Geodynamics in the Late Paleozoic: From Gondwana to Pangaea (Joint With B, GP)

Current difficulties in reconciling apparent polar wander paths, paleontological evidence, and paleoclimatogical indicators lie at the heart of the controversy that surrounds the Paleozoic motions of Gondwana. This session will focus on Gondwanan geodynamics from the Late Devonian to the Permo-Triassic formation of Pangaea. Relevant topics include, but are not restricted to, the significance of attenuation of continental boundaries during breakup and postbreakup intraplate deformation, evidence for terrane migration across intervening oceans and accretion to supercontinents, growing evidence for high drift velocities of Gondwana, reliability of paleoclimatological indicators, critical assessment of paleontological constraints, and signatures of extinction events coupled with rapid paleoclimatic change. Attempts to resolve difficulties using more exotic models (nondipole effects, true polar wander) are also welcome. Contributions from paleomagnetic, paleobiogeographic, and paleoenvironmental researchers are welcome.

Conveners: Jennifer Tait; Institut für Allgemein und Angewandete Geophysik, Ludwig-Maximilians Universitäet, Theresienstrasse 41, D-80333 Muenchen, Germany, E-mail: jenny@geophysik.uni-muenchen.de; Kari Anderson; Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Macquarie University, Sydney NSW 2109, Australia; Tel: 612-9850-6568; Fax: 612-9850-6904; E-Mail: kanderso@laurel.ocs.mq.edu.au

T13 Geochemical, Biological and Tectonic Interactions in the Southern California Borderlands (Joint With B, G, S)

The California continental borderland is part of the distributed Pacific-North American plate boundary, and exhibits complex dextral transpressional and transtensional tectonics superimposed on an older crustal architecture. Faults in the borderland play a poorly known role in both the tectonics and seismic hazards of southern California. The active tectonic regime is manifested in the seismic, geochemical, and biological processes at the seafloor. Research efforts are currently under way focusing on geophysical and biogeochemical processes related to active tectonics in this environment. Seismic and tsunami hazards in this region are the focus of active research on the tectonics of the borderlands addressing both offshore and inshore faults. Fluid seepage associated with the transform faults has been documented along the San Clemente Fault zone and other offshore faults in this system. The fluid transport and discharge support biological communities, alter the rocks they flow through, and affect the chemistry of bottom water in the borderland basins. This session will provide an opportunity to share exciting new results from these ongoing research programs.

Conveners: Chris Goldfinger, College of Oceanic and Atmospheric Sciences, Oregon State University, Ocean Administration Bldg. 104, Corvallis, OR 97331-5503 USA, Tel: +1-503-737-5214, Fax: +1-503- 737-2064, E-mail: gold@oce.orst.edu Marta E. Torres, College of Oceanic and Atmospheric Sciences, Oregon State University, Ocean Administration Bldg. 104, Corvallis, OR 97331-5503 USA, Tel: +1-541- 737-2902, Fax: +1-541-737-2064, E-mail: mtorres@oce.orst.edu Craig R. Smith, Department of Oceanography, University of Hawaii, 1000 Pope Rd., Honolulu, HI 96822 USA, Tel: +1-808-956-8623, Fax: +1-808-956-9516, E-mail: csmith@soest.hawaii.edu

NG01 Nonlinear Space-Time Patterns (Joint With A, B, G, OS, T)

Nonlinear space-time patterns occur in a variety of complex systems. These space-time patterns represent the independent spatial modes of the system in terms of their associated temporal signal, and can provide significant scientific insight into both their sources and relative effects. Examples of systems that exhibit space-time patterns include fault networks, mantle convection, the ocean-atmosphere interface, the human body, and solar activity. Analysis of these patterns reveals information about the characteristics of the system in question. Recent developments resulting in the relative inexpensive accessibility to computational power have greatly improved the ability to analyze these space-time patterns and have yielded a number of important scientific insights. Applications include such widely varying fields as biometrics, seismic tomography, surface deformation, tidal signals, blood flow, and the El Nino-Southern Oscillation. Abstracts that emphasize scientific results based on the analysis of space-time patterns are encouraged. We plan to invite people and solicit contributions across a broad spectrum of sections at AGU.

Conveners: Kristy Tiampo, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences, University of Colorado, Room 318, Boulder, CO 80309-0216 USA, Tel: +1-303-492-4779, Fax: +1-303-492-5070, E-mail: kristy@caldera.colorado.edu Andrea Donnellan, Mail Stop 126-347, Jet Propulsion Laboratory and University of Southern California, 4800 Oak Grove Dr., Pasadena, CA 91109 USA, Tel: +1-818-354-4737, Fax: +1-818-393-4965, E-mail: andrea.donnellan@jpl.nasa.gov

NG08 Scaling Laws and Nonlinear Dynamics in Drainage Basins, Vegetation Patterns, and Geomorphic Processes (Joint With B, H, T)

Drainage basins, stream morphology, the distribution of vegetative communities, and many other landscape features exhibit power functions or other scaling behavior. These scaling laws have long been used in describing drainage basin and stream organization. The availability of digital elevation models of topography and remotely sensed data to obtain topography, vegetation, sedimentation patterns, etc. has expanded our ability to quantify geomorphic and biogeographic patterns and processes. These data can be used to compare the geomorphic and biological organization of landscapes. In addition, some research groups have been measuring sediment transport and other processes so that time series techniques can be used to characterize system behavior. The purpose of this session is to encourage papers that describe and explain scaling characteristics in drainage basins and vegetation patterns. We are also interested in papers that examine nonlinear behavior in geomorphic processes.

Conveners: Karen Prestegaard, Department of Geology, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 USA, Tel: +1-301-405-6982, Fax: +1-301-314-9661, E-mail: kpresto@geol.umd.edu Ralph Dubayah, Deparment of Geography, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 USA, Tel: +1-301-405-4069, Fax: +1-301-314-9299, E-mail: rdubayah@glue.umd.edu Jon Pelletier, Department of Geosciences, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona 85721 USA, Tel: +1-520-626-2126, E-mail: jon@geo.arizona.edu

NG09 Biocomplexity in the Environment (Joint With B, H, OS)

Biocomplexity arises owing to dynamic interactions that occur between biological systems, including humans, and the physical environment. In FY1999 and in FY2000, the National Science Foundation (NSF) held competitions in this area, seeking interdisciplinary projects aimed at understanding the complex behavior observed in such systems. The most recent competition emphasized research that would directly explore nonlinearities, emergent phenomena, or feedbacks within and between biological and environmental systems, or would integrate across multiple components or scales of time and space in order to better understand and predict dynamic behavior. This special session will include an overview of the scientific interests that emerged from the competition and a roundtable discussion, including time for questions from the floor, with some of the grantees about research issues arising in this new area. In addition to the planned overview and roundtable discussion, we actively seek both oral and poster contributions on research in biocomplexity; contributions are not restricted to NSF grantees in the biocomplexity program.

Conveners: Marge Cavanaugh, Office of the Director, National Science Foundation, 4201 Wilson Blvd., Suite 1205, Arlington, VA 22230 USA, Tel.: +1-703-306-1004, Fax: +1-703-306-0109, E-mail: mcavanau@nsf.gov Margaret Leinen, National Science Foundation, 4201 Wilson Blvd., Arlington, VA 22230 USA, Tel.: +1-703-306-1500, Fax: +1-703-306-0372, E-mail: mleinen@nsf.gov Patricia M. Glibert, Horn Point Laboratory, 2020 Horns Point Rd., PO Box 775, Cambridge, MD 21613 USA, Tel: +1-410-221-8422, Fax: +1-410-221-8490, E-mail: glibert@hpl.umces.edu

Geodesy (G)

G01 The New Generation of Gravity Mapping: Early Results from CHAMP and Preparation for GRACE (Joint With H)

In July 2000 we expect the CHAMP spacecraft to be launched, providing pioneering measurements of the Earth's gravity and magnetic fields, plus a useful validation of several GRACE technologies, including the accelerometer, star camera, and basic spacecraft design. The GRACE mission is currently expected to launch in late summer or early fall of 2001. By the end of 2000, most of the data analysis and calibration algorithms and plans are expected to be largely reviewed and in place. This session is an excellent opportunity to provide a full explanation of these algorithms and plans to the scientific user community. We solicit papers relating to oceanographic, hydrological, glaciological, or solid earth interpretation of CHAMP, GRACE, or other gravity data; early results from the CHAMP mission; and the latest detailed descriptions of GRACE analysis algorithms and plans, including such topics as the use of the accelerometer, K-band and GPS data, reducing the effects of tidal and atmospheric aliasing, combination of satellite-based gravity fields with surface gravity, and mean sea surface gravity information.

Conveners: Michael Watkins, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, MS 301-125, 4800 Oak Grove Dr., Pasadena, CA 91109-8099 USA, Tel: +1- 818-354-7514, Fax: +1-818-393-6388, E-mail: Michael.Watkins@jpl.nasa.gov Christoph Reigber, GeoForschungsZentrum Potsdam, Kinematics and Dynamics of the Earth, Telegrafenberg A17, 14473 Potsdam, Germany, Tel: +49-331-288-1100, Fax: +49-331-288-1111, E-mail: reigber@gfz-potsdam.de John Wahr, Department of Physics, University of Colorado, Campus Box 390, Boulder, CO 80309-0390 USA, Tel: +1-303-492-8349, Fax: +1-303-492-3352, E-mail: wahr@lemond.colorado.edu

G02 Geodesy Beyond the Earth (Joint With P)

Recent years have witnessed a proliferation of spacecraft making geodetic measurements of the the planets and other orbiting bodies. Current and future missions collecting geodetic measurements include Lunar Prospector, Mars Global Surveyor, NEAR, MESSENGER, Europa Orbiter, and Pluto-Kuiper Express, among others. These new missions have an important role for geodesy in areas such as precision positioning and landing, mapping, and measurement of topography, gravity, orbit, and orientation, as well as their changes in time. In many instances, geodetic observables are or will be used to study planetary interiors, dynamics, and evolution, and to address important issues such as climate change, abundance of water, and life beyond the Earth. Comparative studies can also help us better understand some long-standing questions about the Earth. The session seeks to broaden the awareness and participation in the challenges and opportunities of planetary geodesy. Presentations on instrumentation, new missions, measurement models, calibration, data analysis, interdisciplinary interpretation or prediction of geodetic signals are encouraged.

Conveners: Xiaoping Wu, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Mail Stop 238-600, 4800 Oak Grove Dr., Pasadena, CA 91109-8099 USA, Tel: +1-818-354-9366, Fax: +1-818-393-4965, E-mail: xiaoping.wu@jpl.nasa.gov R. Steven Nerem, Center for Space Research, University of Texas, 3925 W. Braker La., Suite 200, Austin, TX 78759-5321USA, Tel: +1-512-471-5573, Fax: +1-512-471-3570, E-mail: nerem@csr.utexas.edu

G03 Ice Mass Fluctuations: From Geophysical Observations to Inferences of Earth Rheology (Joint With H, S, T)

Geodesy has emerged as an important technique to monitor ice mass changes (e.g. GPS, gravity, INSAR, altimetry, and Earth orientation measurements). In addition to submissions on these techniques and their application to ice mass studies, we are interested in addressing how glacial fluctuation records can be used to probe the rheology of the crust and mantle. Additional questions this session addresses include, What additional data are needed to better constrain the rheological models? What are the stresses associated with glacial fluctuations and how do they compare with the stresses due to ongoing tectonic processes? How do ice mass fluctuations influence background seismicity and change the probability of a large earthquake?

Conveners: Jeanne Sauber, Geodynamics Branch, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 921, Bldg. 33, G310, Greenbelt, MD 20771 USA, Tel: +1-301-614-6465, Fax: +1-301-614-6522, E-mail: jeanne@steller.gsfc.nasa.gov Tonie van Dam, European Centre for Geodynamics and Seismology, 19 rue Josy Welter, L-7256 Walferdange, Luxembourg, Germany, Tel: +35-2-33-14-87, Fax: +35-2-33-61-29, E-mail: tonie@ecgs.lu

G04 Advances in Modeling Volcanic Deformation (Joint With S, T, V)

Over the last decade the proliferation of continuous GPS receivers and the widespread use of INSAR have led to an abundance of very high quality deformation data sets from volcanoes around the world. Rich both spatially and temporally, these data sets provide an excellent opportunity to understand the dynamics of volcanic deformation while simultaneously improving our ability to forecast and address volcanic hazards. The quality and extent of the data now available demand complex models that until recently would have been unjustified because of weak data strength. The aim of this session is to apply volcanic modeling techniques that incorporate more realistic earth and source models and to use those techniques to make detailed inferences about the structure and behavior of volcanic deformation sources. Examples of possible topics include (1) the effect of topography and elastic heterogeneity, (2) deformation sources that go beyond the Mogi or uniform dislocation, (3) efficient inversion methods that can manage the computational burden of complex source and earth models, and (4) the incorporation of other data types such as seismograms and gravity measurements into the modeling process.

Conveners: Paul M. Davis, Department of Earth and Space Sciences, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1567 USA, Tel: +1-310-825-1343, Fax: +1-310-825-2779, E-mail: pdavis@dino.ess.ucla.edu Peter Cervelli, Department of Geophysics, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305-2215 USA, Tel: +1-650-725-5472, Fax: +1-650-725-7344, E-mail: cervelli@pangea.stanford.edu

G05 A Tribute to William Kaula (Joint With P, T)

This session is devoted to the extensive scientific achievements of William Kaula, who died on April 1, 2000, at the age of 73. Kaula was arguably the preeminent and most influential American geodesist of the second half of the 20th century, and a giant in the emerging field of planetary geophysics. Kaula's scientific accomplishments and reputation span the disciplines of geodesy, tectonophysics, and planetary sciences. Talks are solicited that touch on these disciplines as they relate to Kaula's great legacy. Specifically encouraged are personal remembrances of his legendary contributions to science and the unique style in which he approached all of life.

Conveners: Roger J. Phillips, Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics, University of Colorado, Campus Box 392, Boulder, CO 80309-0392 USA, Tel: +1-303-492-4765, Fax: +1-303-492-6946, E-mail: phillips@wustite.wustl.edu Ernst J. O. “Ejo” Schrama, Department of Geodesy, Delft University of Technology, Thijsseweg 11, 2629 JA Delft, Netherlands, Tel: +31-15-278-4975, Fax: +31-15-278-3711, E-mail: e.j.o.schrama@geo.tudelft.nl

G06 Real-Time GPS (Joint With S, T, V)

This session will explore real-time and near-real-time GPS methods, applications, interpretation, and theoretical considerations. Questions of interest include what kinds of GPS hardware and software are currently available for these kinds of applications? How accurate are estimates of deformation? What kind of triggering algorithms are being used to infer "real" signals? Applications spanning the real-time to near real-time spectrum from navigation, structure monitoring, landslide mitigation, volcano monitoring, and tectonic deformation are appropriate. We also seek presentations concerning societal needs and how real-time GPS techniques can meet those needs.

Conveners: Ken Hurst, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, 4800 Oak Grove Dr., Mail Stop 238-600, Pasadena, CA 91109-8099 USA, Tel: +1-818-354-6637, Fax: +1-818-393-4965, E-mail: hurst@cobra.jpl.nasa.gov Elliot Endo, U.S. Geological Survey, 5400 MacArthur Blvd., Vancouver, WA 98661 USA, Tel: +1-360- 993-8911, Fax: +1-360-993-8980, E-mail: etendo@usgs.gov

G07 Plate and Microplate Motion and Intraplate Deformation (Joint With GP, S, T)

Geodetic observations from the growing network of sites are bringing new information on the motion of the plate interiors and the continental deformation belts. At the same time, an expanding set of geophysical observations, including seismicity, earthquake fault plane solutions, marine magnetic observations of sea floor spreading, and high-resolution mapping of transforms and fracture zones, are constraining the motion between plates along their boundaries. The geodetic data are beginning to constrain both intraplate deformation and that produced by glacial isostatic adjustment. The geodetic data are also identifying large portions of lithosphere that may be behaving nearly rigidly, such as the Amurian and Sundaland plates. We invite studies using geodetic and other geophysical observations to better understand the kinematics and dynamics of motions at the Earth's surface. We also seek studies using the predictive power of the plate model to constrain deformation integrated across active tectonic structures separating plates.

Conveners: Donald F Argus, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, 4800 Oak Grove Dr., Mail Stop 238-600 Pasadena, CA 91109-8099 USA, Tel : +1-818-354-3380, Fax: +1-818-393-4965, E-mail: argus@cobra.jpl.nasa.gov Eric Calais, Centre National de la Researche Scientifique — Geosciences Azur, 250 rue Albert Einstein, 06560 Valbonne, France, Tel: +33-4-92-94-26-28, Fax: +33-4-92-94-26-10 E-mail: calais@faille.unice.fr

G08 Advances in Geodetic Instrumentation

Recent improvements in electronic instrumentation and personal computers have resulted in the development of powerful new tools for obtaining improved spatial and temporal resolution measurements of the Earth's shape and its gravity field. Airborne laser swath mapping, interferometric synthetic aperture radar, hyperspectral scanners, high-resolution digital photography, absolute gravimeters, and gravity gradiometers are rapidly redefining geodesy to include measurements and activities formerly considered remote sensing or mapping. Common characteristics shared by these new geodetic technologies include the collection of very large sets of data (often many millions of observations) in short periods of time (typically seconds to hours), on geographical scales (tens of kilometers or less) smaller than have traditionally been associated with geodesy. Presentations may also include capabilities and current applications of newly emerging geodetic techniques.

Conveners: William E. Carter, Department of Civil and Coastal Engineering, University of Florida 345 Weil Hall, Gainesville, FL 32611 USA, Tel: +1-352-392-5003, Fax: +1-352-392-5032, E-mail: bcarter@ce.ufl.edu Grady H. Tuell, National Geodetic Survey, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, 1305 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD 20910 USA, Tel: +1-301-713-2669 Fax: +1-301-713-4572, E-mail: grady.tuell@noaa.gov

G09 Crustal Deformation (Joint With S, T)

Space geodetic techniques (GPS, INSAR, VLBI, SLR, DORIS) as well as precise ground-based techniques (strainmeters, tiltmeters, leveling, gravity, EDM) have revolutionized our ability to accurately measure crustal deformation around the world. We solicit papers on crustal deformation results and models from a variety of techniques, at any scale from local to global. We also seek papers that compare techniques or show improvements in modeling the geodetic observables.

Conveners: Rosanne Nikolaidis, University of California, MC 0225, 9500 Gilman Dr., La Jolla, CA 92093-0225 USA, Tel: +1-858-822-0557, Fax: +1-858-534-9873, E-mail: rosanne@ucsd.edu Kristine Larson, Department of Aerospace Engineering Sciences, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309-0429 USA, Tel: +1-303-492-6583, Fax: +1-303-492-7881, E-mail: kristine.larson@colorado.edu

OS19 Nontraditional Oceanographic Applications for Oceanographic Data (Joint With G, NG)

Today, oceanographers, geophysicists, geodesists, and climate researchers are using a large amount of oceanographic data (i.e., numerical models, satellite observations, and in-situ measurements) to conduct non-traditional oceanographic research. This session will provide a forum for expanding the dialogue between these communities by addressing the following two issues. The first issue the session will address is the advances in instrumentation and modeling, and future oceanographic related studies. The second issue this session will emphasize is the application of these datasets to non-traditional oceanographic research and how this non-traditional research can enhance our understanding of large-scale and mesoscale oceanic variability.

Conveners: Thomas Johnson, U.S. Naval Observatory, 3450 Massachusetts Ave. NW, Washington DC 20392-5420 USA, Tel: +1-202-762-1518, Fax: +1-202-762-1563, E-mail: tj@CasA.usno.navy.mil Richard Gross, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, M/S 238-332, Pasadena, CA 91109 USA, Tel: +1-818-354-4010, Fax: +1-818-393-6890, E-mail: rsg@logos.jpl.nasa.gov

S01 The Landers and Hector Mine Earthquake Pair (Joint With G, T)

The 1992 M7.3 Landers and 1999 M7.1 Hector Mine, California, earthquakes provide an important opportunity to study the interaction between large crustal events, and to compare their effects on regional seismicity and deformation. This session will focus on the Landers and Hector Mine sequences as a pair. Topics may include, but are not limited to, (1) the relationship between the mainshocks, either through triggering or as results of a common underlying process; (2) similarities and differences between the patterns of mainshock rupture, aftershocks, triggered seismicity, and coseismic or postseismic deformation; and (3) implications for the mechanics of faulting in the Eastern California Shear Zone.

Conveners: Kenneth Hudnut, U.S. Geological Survey, 525 South Wilson Ave., Pasadena, CA 91106-3212 USA, Tel: +1-626-583-7232, Fax: +1-626-583-7827, E-mail: hudnut@usgs.gov Jeanne Hardebeck, Seismological Laboratory, Caltech, MC 252-21, Pasadena, CA 91125 USA, Tel: +1-626-395-6971 Fax: +1-626-564-0715, E-mail: jlh@gps.caltech.edu

S03 The 1999 Chi-Chi, Taiwan, Earthquake (Joint With G, T)

The September 21, 1999, Chi-Chi earthquake (M7.6) and subsequent large aftershocks (M›6) are the best recorded seismic events of recent disastrous earthquakes. The tremendous ground deformation associated with the earthquake faulting caused major destruction to buildings and lifelines across a wide area of Taiwan. The large inland thrust event caused ground deformation of up to 8 meters and slip velocities of up to about 3 m/sec. The wealth of ground motion data collected from this earthquake sequence is likely to substantially influence our understanding of near-field ground motion and ground deformation, fault rupture processes, effects of site and basins, earthquake dynamic triggering, etc., as data are processed and analyzed in the months and years to come. Papers from theoretical and observational seismology, earthquake geology, and earthquake engineering are all welcome.

Conveners: Kuo-Fong Ma, Institute of Geophysics, National Central University, Chung-Li, 320-54, Taiwan, ROC, Tel: +886-3-4262421, Fax: +886-3-4222044, E-mail: fong@sal.gep.ncu.edu.tw Yuehua Zeng, Seismological Laboratory, University of Nevada, Reno, NV 89557 USA, Tel: +1-775-784-4231, Fax: +1-775-784-1833, E-mail: zeng@seismo.unr.edu

S04 Recent Results on the Seismicity and Mechanics of the San Andreas Fault System (Joint With G, P, T, MRP)

The session will provide a forum for diverse studies that bear on the seismological and mechanical workings of the San Andreas fault and other strands of the plate-bounding strike-slip system. Key issues include the spatial and temporal distribution of seismicity, the orientation and magnitude of the stress field around the faults, and the mechanical strength of the faults and interactions with the surrounding crust. Thus, we welcome papers based on seismicity relocations, stress orientations, borehole meaurements, and relevant geological or geomorphological constraints.

Conveners: Heidi Houston, Department of Earth and Spaces Sciences, University of California, 595 Young Dr. E, Los Angeles, CA 90095 USA, Tel: +1-310-206-3896, Fax: +1-310-825-2779, E-mail: heidi@moho.ess.ucla.edu Debi Kilb, Department of Geosciences, Princeton University, Guyot Hall, Princeton, NJ 08544, Tel: +1-609-258-2598, Fax: +1-609-258-1274, E-mail: dkilb@princeton.edu

S05 Subduction Zone Structure and Megathrust Earthquakes (Joint With G, T, MRP)

Many studies have suggested that the size and rupture characteristics of great subduction zone earthquakes are controlled by material properties and structural irregularities near the subduction zone plate boundary. This session is intended to bring together researchers studying such structure and those who study the earthquakes themselves. We encourage contributions ranging from geophysical surveys of subduction zone structure to studies of earthquake rupture in subduction zone environments.

Conveners: Phil Cummins, Frontier Research for Subduction Dynamics, Japan Marine Science and Technology Center, 2-15 Natsushima-cho, Yokosuka 237-0061, Japan, Tel: +81-468-67-3393, Fax: +81-468-67-3409, E-mail: cummins@jamstec.go.jp Shuichi Kodaira, Frontier Research for Subduction Dynamics, Japan Marine Science and Technology Center, 2-15 Natsushima-cho, Yokosuka 237-0061, Japan, Tel: +81-468-67-3407, Fax: +81-468-67-3409, E-mail: kodaira@jamstec.go.jp

S07 Melts and Volatiles in the Deep Mantle (Joint With T, V, MRP, SEDI)

Once believed to be confined to the low-velocity zone and at shallow depths in tectonically active regions, recent seismological results indicate a much greater distribution of partial melts in the mantle with evidence of melts ranging from transition zone depths through the lower mantle to the core-mantle boundary. Concomitant with this is a deepening understanding of the abundance and cycling of volatile components in the Earth's mantle. This session will focus on seismological, laboratory, and theoretical characterization and quantification of partial melts and volatiles in the mantle, their role in mantle dynamics, and their temporal evolution in abundance and mode. We encourage submissions from seismology, mineral physics, geodynamics, geochemistry, and volcanology.

Conveners: Justin Revenaugh, Earth Sciences, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95060 USA Tel: +1-831-459-3055, Fax: +1-831-459-3074, E-mail: jsr@monk.ucsc.edu Lars P. Stixrude, Department of Geology, University of Michigan, 2534 C. C. Little Bldg., 425 E. University Ave., Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1063 USA, Tel: +1-313-647-9071, Fax: +1-313-763-4690, E-mail: stixrude@umich.edu

S08 Thermal and Chemical Structures in the Core-Mantle Boundary Region: Implications for the Evolution of the Deep Interior (Joint With G, GP, T, MRP, SEDI)

Thermal and chemical structures in the core-mantle boundary (CMB) region are shaped by dynamics in the Earth's interior and provide clues to the long-term evolution of the planet. A wide range of processes from large-scale convection to small-scale melting and chemical reactions, are likely to contribute to the complexity of the boundary region. We welcome reports dealing with theoretical, observational, and experimental studies of the boundary region. Topics include, but are not restricted to, the structure and evolution of the thermal boundary layer, chemical stratification at the base of the mantle or top of the core, melting relations and physical properties of mantle minerals, evidence and implications of small-scale structure, effect of boundary layer structure on CMB topography, and observational techniques for discriminating between chemical and thermal boundary layers.

Conveners: Bruce Buffett, Department of Earth and Ocean Sciences, University of British Columbia 2219 Main Mall, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z4 Canada, Tel: +1-604-822-3466, Fax: +1-604-822-6088 E-mail: buffett@geop.ubc.ca Anne M. Hofmeister, Department of Earth and Planetary Science Washington University, Campus Box 1169, 1 Brookings Dr., St. Louis, MO 63130 USA, Tel: +1-314-935-7440, Fax: +1-314-935-7361, E-mail: Hofmeist@levee.wustl.edu Michael Wysession, Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Washington University, Campus Box 1169, 1 Brookings Dr., St. Louis, MO 63130 USA, Tel: +1-314-935-5625, Fax: +1-314-935-7361, E-mail: michael@wucore.wustl.edu

T01 Plate Boundary Deformation: From Kinematics to Dynamics (Joint With G, S, V)

Diffusive deformation in the Himalayan-Tibetan plateau, western North America, the Andes, and other continental plate boundaries deviate significantly from predictions of classical plate tectonics theory and are often associated with strong earthquakes and volcanic eruptions. In addition to seismological and geological observations, recent developments in space geodetic measurements, including the Global Positioning System and satellite Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar, have provided rich kinematic information about plate boundary deformation. Much better constraints on the kinematics can be expected from the proposed Plate Boundary Observatory. The fast accumulating kinematic observations provide unprecedented opportunities for understanding the dynamics of plate boundary deformation. This session aims to facilitate interactions between workers focused on measuring crustal deformation at plate boundaries and modelers focused on investigating the dynamics. Papers using all kinds of kinematic data to illustrate the dynamics of plate boundary deformation are welcome, and studies that integrate geodetic, seismological, and geological data to investigate the large-scale dynamic systems of continental plate boundaries are particularly encouraged.

Conveners: Mian Liu, Department of Geological Science, University of Missouri, 101Geology Bldg., Columbia, MO 65211 USA, Tel: +1-573-882-3784, Fax: +1-573-882-5458, E-mail: lium@missouru.edu William E. Holt, Department of Geosciences, State University of New York, Stony Brook, NY 11794-2100 USA, Tel: +1-631-632-8215, Fax: +1-631-632-8240; E-mail: wholt@horizon.ess.sunysb.edu

T02 Observational Constraints on the Dynamics of Subducting Slabs (Joint With G, S, V, SEDI)

The detailed dynamic evolution of subducting slabs is poorly understood. From a physical point of view, we know that the slab is one component of a complex interacting system of mantle convection and the lithospheric plates. The nature of the coupling between plates and mantle is still strongly debated. It is probable, however, that small scale plate boundary processes play a controlling role in the behavior of the large-scale system, and will certainly need to be included in large-scale models in parameterized form. For this reason, modeling cannot proceed from a purely theoretical viewpoint. Strong observational constraints are required to train the parameterized models. In this session we wish to consider the broadest range of observations that will bear upon the understanding of subducting lithosphere, including those from plate kinematics, seismic tomography, earthquake mechanisms, the subsidence record from oceanic and continental basins, geochemistry, the geological record in island arcs, and active continental margins. We would like to build up a slab taxonomy by considering how subduction zones behave in the wild. Do slabs really look like the pictures we see in textbooks? How often do slabs roll back? What makes slabs tear or break, and how do they behave when this happens? How do slabs evolve in the presence/absence of a nearby continental margin? How can slabs change polarity, and how frequently do they do so? When do slabs flatten under continents, and why? We are particularly keen to foster the involvement of scientists having detailed knowledge of observational constraints with more theoretical modelers. What is the state of the art in modeling of convergent plate boundaries? In what ways are these models still limited? What time-dependent behaviors of subducted slabs are by models, and can observations be used to verify the solutions? What do the models tell us about plate driving forces?

Conveners: L. Moresi, CSIRO Exploration and Mining, PO Box 437, Nedlands, WA 6009, Australia, Tel: +61-8-9389-8421, Fax: +61-8-9389-1906, E-mail: l.moresi@ned.dem.csiro.au R. Dietmar Müller, School of Geosciences, Division of Geology and Geophysics, Bldg. F05, University of Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia, Tel: +61-2-9351-2003, Fax: +61-2-9351-0184, E-mail: dietmar@es.usyd.edu.au

T03 Raising Plateaus (Joint With G, GP, S, V)

Two of the world's highest plateaus, Tibet and the Altiplano, have formed in markedly distinct tectonic settings. Does this require different mechanisms to form them? Models (analytical, numerical, physical) of Tibet and the Altiplano, as well as the wider region surrounding them, remain highly variable because of meager databases. We are interested in geological, geophysical, and geochemical results from current research on all levels (small to large, single to multidiscipline) concerning continent-continent and ocean-continent interactions that could help to improve this position. Earth scientists working in both orogens are few, yet new data are emerging, and therefore the time seems ripe to exchange experience and ideas that are related to uplift, and sustaining uplift, of large expanses of continental crust. How well are models being tested/eliminated? Are there new or revised models arising thereupon? By bringing together a number of disciplines, we look forward to real learning and cross-fertilization leading to wider ideas.

Conveners: Mike Edwards, Asian Tectonics Research Unit, Institut für Geologie, Technische Universitäet Bergakadamie Freiberg, Berhard-von-Cotta Str. 2, D-09596 Freiberg, Germany, Tel: +49- 3731-39-4598 or +49-177-783-2827, Fax: +49-3731-39-3597, E-mail: edwards@geologie.uni-wuerzburg.de S. Gilder, Laboratoire de Paleomagnetisme, Institut de Physique du Globe de Paris, 4 place Jussieu, 75252 Paris Cedex 05, France, Tel: +33-1-44-27-24-32 or +33-1-44-27-24-31, Fax: +33-1-44-27-74-63; Bryan L. Isacks, Department of Geological Sciences, Cornell University, Snee Hall, Ithaca, NY 14853 USA, Tel: +1-607-255-2307, Fax: +1-607-254-4780, E-mail: bli1@cornell.edu Paul Tapponnier, Laboratoire de Tectonophysique, Institut de Physique du Globe de Paris, 4 place Jussieu, 75252 Paris Cedex 05, France, Tel: +33-1-44-27-49-24, Fax: +33-1-44-27-24-40, E-mail: tappon@ipgp.jussieu.fr

T05 Cenozoic Tectonics and Magmatism of the Southeastern Eurasian Margin (Joint With G, S, V)

Southeastern Eurasia (defined here as India, Tibet, China blocks, Indochina and Greater Sundaland, Indonesia, and the Philippines) has been the site of Mesozoic-Cenozoic continent and terrane accretion, suturing, and (potentially) extrusion and disaggregation of continental assemblages. The remnants of these terranes are in the final act of Tethyan closure currently, and the mechanisms by which accretion and extrusion are accomplished are controversial. Complex and often cryptic tectonic boundaries hamper clear understanding of even current tectonics, to say nothing of earlier stages of southeast Eurasia development. Anomalous volcanism throughout the Cenozoic in this region is difficult to place in a well-understood tectonic framework here. We solicit presentations detailing relevant studies of the tectonics and magmatism of southeastern Eurasia, including structural geology, seismology, tectonophysics, paleomagnetism, petrology, and geochemistry.

Conveners: Martin F. J. Flower, Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Illinois at Chicago, 845 W. Taylor St., MC 186, Chicago, Illinois 60607-7059 USA, Tel: +1-312 996-9662, Fax: +1-312 413-2279, E-mail: flower@uic.edu Victor Mocanu, Faculty of Geology and Geophysics, University of Bucharest, 6 Traian Vuia st., Sect. 1, 70139 Bucharest, Romania, Tel: +40-1-2117390, Fax: +40-1-2113120, E-mail: mocanu@gg.unibuc.ro

T08 The Structure and Evolution of the Lithosphere in the Rocky Mountain Region (Joint With G, GP, S, V)

The Rocky Mountain region is part of a broad orogenic plateau that extends along the western margin of the North American plate. This region has experienced a complex tectonic evolution from its formation during the Proterozoic to the present, and understanding this evolution is a key issue in continental tectonics. This evolution began with the formation of a 1500-km-wide Proterozoic orogenic belt that records an episode of rapid accretion of continental materials from mantle sources and their assembly to form southern Laurentia between 1.8 and 1.6 Ga. The Ancestral Rocky Mountains and Laramide orogenies greatly altered the lithosphere of this region. Today the high elevations of the southern Rocky Mountain Rio Grande rift region in particular are the manifestation of Phanerozoic and still ongoing modification and disassembly of Proterozoic lithosphere. A better understanding of this region will require integration of a variety geophysical and geological measurements, and diverse contributions to this session are sought.

Conveners: G. Randy Keller, Department of Geological Sciences, University of Texas, El Paso, TX 79968-0555 USA, Tel: +1-915-747-5850, Fax: +1-915-747-5073, E-mail: keller@geo.utep.edu Karl E. Karlstrom, Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131 USA, Tel: +1-505-277-4346, Fax: +1-505-277-8843, E-mail: kek1@unm.edu

T09 Lithospheric-Scale Vertical Strain Partitioning in Actively Deforming, Wrench-Type Plate Margins (Joint With G, S)

The proposed joint special session will flesh out relationships between upper crustal (surface) velocities, measured geodetically, and exhumed and remotely sensed (e.g., via shear wave splitting) mid-lower crustal and mantle deformational fabrics in actively deforming wrench-type(including transpressional and transtensional) plate margins. Sufficient geodetic (GPS), structural, and seismic data now exist from a number of wrench-type plate margins that specific and perhaps also general relationships may be established. Does the entire lithosphere deform coherently? Does the weak mid-lower crust transfer or detach motion between the strong mantle and strong brittle upper crust? Does mantle flow drive deformation in plate boundary zones from below? Does the degree of vertical strain partitioning vary systematically in pure wrenching, transpressional, and transtensional settings?

Conveners: John Weber, Grand Valley State University, Allendale, MI 49401USA, Tel: +1-616-895-319, E-mail: weberjc@hotmail.com Christian Teyssier, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, Tel: +1-612-624-680, E-mail: teyssier@tc.umn.edu

T11 Integrative Approaches to Caribbean Neotectonics and Seismic Hazard (Joint With G, S, V)

The tectonic complexity, small land areas, political subdivisions, and dense populations of the strike-slip and subduction margins of the Caribbean plate pose special challenges to the earth science community in understanding the neotectonic setting and evaluating seismic hazards in this region. The purpose of this session is to bring together an international group of researchers who are currently integrating a wide variety of methods to better understand the neotectonics and seismic hazards of this region. These methods include paleoseismology of onshore faults, GPS-based geodesy and modeling of geodetic results, paleoseismic studies of liquefaction features, geophysical surveys of offshore faults, earthquake seismology and historical research, strong ground motion studies, geologic and geomorphic studies of major faults, studies of tsunami deposits, and tsunami modeling. The session welcomes original contributions to Caribbean neotectonics using these and other methods.

Conveners: Carol Prentice, U.S. Geological Survey, 345 Middlefield Rd., MS 977, Menlo Park, CA 94025 USA, Tel: +1-650-329-5690, Fax: +1-650-329-5163, E-mail: cprentice@usgs.gov Paul Mann, Institute for Geophysics, University of Texas at Austin, 4412 Spicewood Springs Rd., Bldg. 600, Austin, TX 78759-8500 USA, Tel: +1-512-471-0452, Fax: +1-512-471-8844, E-mail: paulm@utig.ig.utexas.edu

T13 Geochemical, Biological and Tectonic Interactions in the Southern California Borderlands (Joint With B, G, S)

The California continental borderland is part of the distributed Pacific-North American plate boundary, and exhibits complex dextral transpressional and transtensional tectonics superimposed on an older crustal architecture. Faults in the borderland play a poorly known role in both the tectonics and seismic hazards of southern California. The active tectonic regime is manifested in the seismic, geochemical, and biological processes at the seafloor. Research efforts are currently under way focusing on geophysical and biogeochemical processes related to active tectonics in this environment. Seismic and tsunami hazards in this region are the focus of active research on the tectonics of the borderlands addressing both offshore and inshore faults. Fluid seepage associated with the transform faults has been documented along the San Clemente Fault zone and other offshore faults in this system. The fluid transport and discharge support biological communities, alter the rocks they flow through, and affect the chemistry of bottom water in the borderland basins. This session will provide an opportunity to share exciting new results from these ongoing research programs.

Conveners: Chris Goldfinger, College of Oceanic and Atmospheric Sciences, Oregon State University, Ocean Administration Bldg. 104, Corvallis, OR 97331-5503 USA, Tel: +1-503-737-5214, Fax: +1-503- 737-2064, E-mail: gold@oce.orst.edu Marta E. Torres, College of Oceanic and Atmospheric Sciences, Oregon State University, Ocean Administration Bldg. 104, Corvallis, OR 97331-5503 USA, Tel: +1-541- 737-2902, Fax: +1-541-737-2064, E-mail: mtorres@oce.orst.edu Craig R. Smith, Department of Oceanography, University of Hawaii, 1000 Pope Rd., Honolulu, HI 96822 USA, Tel: +1-808-956-8623, Fax: +1-808-956-9516, E-mail: csmith@soest.hawaii.edu

T16 Correlating Geophysical Observations of Fault Behavior and Fault Properties (Joint With G, S)

Geophysical observations of fault behavior are providing an increasingly complex view of fault processes as the resolution of our techniques improves. Seismic, geodetic, and electromagnetic methods enable us to infer temporal and spatial variations in physical properties of faults, and geologic field observations help us tie these remotely sensed observables to actual fault processes. Recent microseismic relocations are indicating detailed structural and temporal variations in fault behavior. Advances in geodetic and seismic methods are allowing us to infer detailed slip distributions on faults throughout the earthquake cycle. All of these methods highlight variations in fault behavior that originate from variations in fault properties along the fault zone. These properties may be structural, such as asperities or complex geometry, or material, such as composition or state conditions. We encourage papers that correlate fault behavior as observed by geophysical techniques with various properties found along the fault surface. This includes studies identifying spatial variations in properties along faults such as between locked and creeping portions of a fault, and temporal changes in behavior of faults such as can be attributed to changes in porosity or loading rate.

Conveners: David Schmidt, Department of Geology and Geophysics, University of California, Berkeley, 307 McCone Hall, Berkeley, CA 94720-4767 USA, Tel: +1-510-643-8328, E-mail: dschmidt@seismo.berkeley.edu Evelyn Price, Department of Geology and Geophysics, University of California, Berkeley, 307 McCone Hall, Berkeley, CA 94720-4767 USA, E-mail: evelyn@seismo.berkeley.edu

T17 Physical Properties of Fault Zones: A Session in Honor of James D. Byerlee (Joint With G, S, MRP)

James Byerlee has devoted his professional career to the understanding of the complex processes that control rock failure and the behavior of fault zone materials. This session, in keeping with Byerlee’s spirit of innovation and creativity, explores the current state of understanding of mechanical and hydrological properties of active fault systems. Contributions are invited in the areas of laboratory and field observations as well as theoretical developments relating to active faults, such as fault zone stability, fault strength and rheology, state of stress, fluid compartmentalization, and rupture nucleation models.

Conveners: David Lockner, U.S. Geological Survey, 345 Middlefield Rd., MS 977, Menlo Park, CA 94025 USA, Tel: +1-650 329-4826, Fax: +1-650 329-5163, E-mail: dlockner@usgs.gov Malcolm Johnston, U.S. Geological Survey, 345 Middlefield Road, MS 977, Menlo Park, CA 94025 USA, Tel: +1-650-329-4812, Fax: +1-650-329-5163, E-mail: mal@usgs.gov

T23 Geology and Geophysics of the Mediterranean, Red and Black Seas, Their Margins and Plate Boundaries (Joint With G)

The session is intended to present a wide range of ideas concerning the active tectonics and sedimentation of the Mediterranean and Red and Black Seas these regions, ranging from plate boundary deformation to basinal subsidence to diapiric ascent to mass wasting and sea level change. The conveners solicit recent results and syntheses from GPS network measurements, multibeam mapping, drilling, seismic profiling, and tomographic modeling. We hope to generate a discussion of how these processes relate to the assessment of geohazards that threaten populations in Mediterranean settings.

Conveners: Y. Mart, Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, Columbia University, Palisades, NY 10964 USA, Tel: +1-914-365-8552, Fax: +1-914-365-8156, E-mail: yossi@ldeo,columbia.edu W. B. F. Ryan, Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, Columbia University, Palisades, NY 10964 USA, Tel: +1-914-365-8312, Fax: +1-914-365-8156, E-mail: billr@ldeo,columbia.edu

T24 Continent-continent Collisions and Intraplate Deformation (Joint With G)

Continent-continent collisions unquestionably induce deformations at significant distances from the original plate boundary and resulting mountain belts represent a major departure from standard concepts of plate tectonics. The type modern examples are the Tien Shan and Altai mountains of central Asia. A great deal of new information has emerged about these regions with increased access brought about by recent political changes. We seek papers from a wide range of people that have been working in this region to facilitate a multidisciplinary understanding of the processes that form intracontinental mountain belts.

Conveners: Gary L. Pavlis, Department of Geological Sciences, Indiana University, 1001 E. 10th Street, Bloomington, IN 47405 USA, Tel: +1-812-855-5141, Fax: +1-812-855-7899, E-mail: pavlis@indiana.edu Frank L. Vernon, Scripps Institute of Oceanography, IGPP, A-025, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093 USA, Tel: +1-858-534-5537, Fax: +1-858-534-6354, E-mail: vernon@epicenter.ucsd.edu Raymond Russo, Department of Geological Sciences, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208 USA, Tel: +1-847-491-7383, Fax: +1-847-491-8060, E-mail: ray@earth.nwu.edu

V06 New Developments in Volcanic Systems of Southern Italy (Joint With G, S, T)

Studies of volcanic areas in southern Italy have been conducted for both academic and societal reasons. Most of these volcanos are sited in areas of moderate to high population density, so research can yield vital, predicative scenarios that could be very beneficial to the affected populations. About 20 years ago, there was a resurgence of research related to southern Italian volcanic areas. This research was conducted by universities especially in southern Italy, but also involved research institutions in the rest of the world. Recently, the research has become more detailed and sophisticated, and especially has involved the use of various isotopic systems. We propose this special session for the AGU Fall Meeting in San Francisco. The purpose of this session is to bring together for a wider audience the recent and very exciting developments related to the volcanic systems of southern Italy. Although southern Italy is a long way from San Francisco, the synergy that can be developed with such a meeting can be very worthwhile. Our tentative structure would consist of a morning session of oral talks, both invited and volunteered, followed by an afternoon poster session. We have been in contact with various researchers involved with southern Italian volcanos and have agreement and support for such a session. The following institutions are represented: Università di Napoli, Italy, Osservatorio Vesuviano, Italy, University of Lancaster, UK; Technische Universität Muenchen, Germany; and in the USA, the University of Maryland, Eastern Washington University, American Museum of Natural History, and U.S. Geological Survey.

Conveners: Harvey E. Belkin, U.S. Geological Survey, 956 National Center, Reston, VA 20192 USA, Tel: +1-703-648-6162, Fax: +1-703-648-6419, E-mail: hbelkin@usgs.gov or hbelkin@mindspring.com Renato Somma, Università degli Studi di Napoli “Federico II,” Napoli, Italy

V10 Rhenium and Osmium Isotope and Elemental Constraints on Mantle and Magmatic Processes (Joint With G, S, P, MRP)

The chalcophile and siderophile elements rhenium and osmium (Re-Os) potentially provide key information on the differentiation of the terrestrial planets, both on the conditions under which core formation took place in the early solar system and on mantle melting and magmatic differentiation in the early Earth and to the present day. This session will focus on applications of the Re-Os system to recent results in these fields, such as, studies of meteorites and other planetary material; records of the early Earth recorded in ancient continental rocks; constraints on the sources of oceanic basalts; experimental constraints on Re and Os partitioning in mantle and magmatic systems; and studies of the distribution and behavior of these elements between natural minerals (silicates, sulphides, and melts). The essential aim is a multidisciplinary discussion that brings together experimental, geochemical, and petrological aspects of the above or related topics.

Conveners: Kevin W. Burton, Department of Earth Sciences, The Open University, Walton Hall, Milton Keynes, MK7 6AA, UK, Tel: +44-1908-652889, Fax: +44-1908-655151, E-mail: k.w.burton@open.ac.uk Pierre Schiano, Laboratoire Magmas et Volcans, Observatoire de Physique du Globe de Clermont-Ferrand-Centre National de la Reserche Scientifique, UMR 6524, Université Blaise-Pascal, 5 Rue Kessler, 63038 Clermont-Ferrand, France, Tel: +33-4-73-34-67-57, Fax: +33-4 73-34 67-44, E-mail: schiano@opgc.univ-bpclermont.fr

V11 Long Valley Caldera: A Natural Laboratory to Study Long-Term Unrest in Complex Volcanic Systems (Joint With G, S, T)

For the past 20 years Long Valley caldera has been the site of persistent unrest and a broad spectrum of studies devoted to understanding the processes driving the unrest in this and other large, Quaternary silicic calderas. The aim of this session is to provide a forum for presenting and discussing both recent results and new perspectives on the earlier unrest. We also encourage contributions focused generally on problems of the geophysical and geochemical processes behind caldera unrest.

Conveners: Maurizio Battaglia, Department of Geophysics, Stanford University, Stanford CA 94305-2215 USA, Tel: +1-650-723-5485, Fax: +1-650-725-7344; E-mail: battag@pangea.stanford.edu. David P. Hill, U. S. Geological Survey, 345 Middlefield Rd., MS 910, Menlo Park, CA 94025 USA, E-mail: hill@usgs.gov

NG01 Nonlinear Space-Time Patterns (Joint With A, B, G, OS, T)

Nonlinear space-time patterns occur in a variety of complex systems. These space-time patterns represent the independent spatial modes of the system in terms of their associated temporal signal, and can provide significant scientific insight into both their sources and relative effects. Examples of systems that exhibit space-time patterns include fault networks, mantle convection, the ocean-atmosphere interface, the human body, and solar activity. Analysis of these patterns reveals information about the characteristics of the system in question. Recent developments resulting in the relative inexpensive accessibility to computational power have greatly improved the ability to analyze these space-time patterns and have yielded a number of important scientific insights. Applications include such widely varying fields as biometrics, seismic tomography, surface deformation, tidal signals, blood flow, and the El Nino-Southern Oscillation. Abstracts that emphasize scientific results based on the analysis of space-time patterns are encouraged. We plan to invite people and solicit contributions across a broad spectrum of sections at AGU.

Conveners: Kristy Tiampo, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences, University of Colorado, Room 318, Boulder, CO 80309-0216 USA, Tel: +1-303-492-4779, Fax: +1-303-492-5070, E-mail: kristy@caldera.colorado.edu Andrea Donnellan, Mail Stop 126-347, Jet Propulsion Laboratory and University of Southern California, 4800 Oak Grove Dr., Pasadena, CA 91109 USA, Tel: +1-818-354-4737, Fax: +1-818-393-4965, E-mail: andrea.donnellan@jpl.nasa.gov

NG06 Quantifying Predictability in Geophysical Systems II (Joint With A, G, H, OS, SH, T, V)

Our ability to quantify the predictability of nonlinear geophysical systems provides a fundamental bridge between models of geophysical systems and the systems themselves. Uncertainty in the initial condition and errors in model formulation have led to probability forecasts (ensembles) even in deterministic systems. This session will focus on atmospheric and ocean dynamics over hours to centuries (e.g., adaptive observation strategies, Lagrangian and Eulerian approaches, intense short-duration events); theoretical aspects of the dynamics of nonlinear systems relevant to predictability and verification (including multiple models, contrasting modeling strategies, data assimilation); and practical issues in the interpretation and likely economic impact of probabilistic forecasts on a timescale minutes to hours (e.g., precipitation/wind), days to months (e.g., hurricanes), and years to millennia (e.g., earthquakes). A mix of oral and poster presentations of both pure and extremely applied contributions are welcome, and may focus on the predictability of geophysical systems other than those noted explicitly above.

Conveners: Leonard Smith, Oxford University, 24-29 St Giles', Oxford, OX1 3LB, UK, Tel: +44-1865-270-517, Fax: +44-1865-270-515, E-mail: lenny@maths.ox.ac.uk James Hansen, Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Ave., Room 54-1721, Cambridge, MA 02139 USA, Tel: +1-617-253-5935, E-mail: jhansen@mit.edu

NG10 Visual Computing in Nonlinear Geophysical Phenomena (Joint With A, G, GP, H, OS, T)

Researchers in geophysics are being overwhelmed by the huge amount of data generated by natural nonlinear phenomena and high-resolution numerical solutions. In this session we will bring together many of the different practioners using modern analytical and visualization tools (e.g., wavelets, eigenvectors, and EOFs) for treating and analyzing large data sets. We are soliciting examples from all areas in geophysics and at all scales, ranging from the molecular level, such as bacteria growth, to core dynamics. Also of great interest are examples from large data sets, such as SAR, ocean currents, and numerical simulations involving the bridging of scales in nonlinear processes. We foresee interest for this session from both numerical modelers and observation-oriented scientists.

Conveners: Dave Yuen, Minnesota Supercomputer Institute, 1200 Washington Ave., S., Minneapolis, MN 55415 USA, Tel: +1-612-624-1868, E-mail: davey@krissy.msi.umn.edu Bryan J. Travis, Los Alamos National Laboratory, ESS 5, MS F665, Los Alamos, NM 55455 USA, Tel: +1-505-667-1254, E-mail: bjt@vega.lanl.gov

Geomagnetism and Paleomagnetism (GP)

GP01 The Orsted High-Precision Geomagnetic Satellite Mission (Joint With SA, SM)

Launched on February 23, 1999, into a low-earth, polar orbit, the Orsted satellite provides a wealth of high-precision vector magnetic field data, measurements of high-energy charged particles, and profiles of the ionospheric densities and atmospheric properties using GPS occultation techniques. The investigations cover a broad range of geophysics topics, including research into core fields, crustal- and induction fields, and external fields from field-aligned and ionospheric currents. While these research topics traditionally have been segmented into separate communities, the experience from the Orsted project shows the advantage of combining the research discussions of these communities. Papers are solicited that are related to the Orsted mission or to the topic of high-precision magnetometry.

Conveners: Torsten Neubert, Solar-Terrestrial Physics Division, Danish Meteorological Institute, Lyngbyvej 100, 2800 Copenhagen O, Denmark, Tel: +45 39-15-74-92, Fax: +45 39-15-74-60, E-mail: neubert@dmi.dk Gauthier Hulot, Département de Géomagnétisme et Paléomagnétisme, Institut de Physique de Globe de Paris, CNRS UA 729, 4 Place Jussieu, B89, Tour 24, 75252 Paris Cedex 05, France, Tél: +33-1-44-27-24-12, Fax: +33-1-44-27-33-73, E-mail: ghulot@ipgp.jussieu.fr Cathy Constable, Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California at San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093-0225 USA, Tel: +1-858-534-3183, Fax: +1-858-534-8090, E-mail: cconstable@ucsd.edu

GP02 The Time-Averaged Geomagnetic Field and Paleosecular Variation (Joint With SEDI)

The availability of compilations of paleomagnetic data has stimulated renewed interest in global paleomagnetic average field and secular variation modeling. However, there remain substantial gaps in both temporal and spatial sampling of the paleomagnetic field. Consequently, there is little consensus on what features are required in the time-averaged field, or whether there exist significant geographic differences in paleosecular variation. Most recent global field modeling has concentrated on the 0-5 Ma time period due to the better spatial and temporal distribution of data; however, local data sets extending beyond 5 Ma can be used to elucidate field behavior over longer time periods. Many studies have focused on stable polarity intervals, but a complicating issue is determining what can be regarded as normal secular variation, and what should be considered excursional or transitional in the continuum of geomagnetic field behavior. In addition to new data sets and associated field models, progress in numerical simulations of the geodynamo has enabled, within the constraints of current modeling capabilities, the investigation of field behavior over paleomagnetic timescales. Suitable contributions for this session include new data sets for use in paleofield modeling, as well as modeling studies, results from geodynamo simulations, and more theoretical papers directed at elucidating the long-term behavior of the geomagnetic field.

Convener: Catherine Johnson, Incorporated Research Institutions for Seismology, 1200 New York Ave., Suite 800, Washington, DC 20005 USA, Tel: +1-202-682-2220, Fax: +1-202-682-2444, E-mail: catherine@iris.edu Neil Opdyke, Department of Geology, B 137 Turlington hall, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611-2036 USA, Tel: +1-904-392-6127, Fax: +1-904-392-9294, E-mail: drno@nersp.nerdc.ufl.edu

GP03 Paleointensity From Archean to the Present (Joint With SEDI)

New methods for estimating paleogeomagnetic field strength in both absolute and relative terms are being introduced at an impressive rate (e.g., using isotopes of various atmospheric components, microwave techniques, numerical simulations, and improved Thellier and pseudo-Thellier techniques). New data resulting from these efforts are challenging long-held beliefs about the long- and short-term behavior of the geomagnetic field. Are these new data converging on a new understanding of geomagnetic field behavior? Abstracts are solicited concerning new data, new techniques, or new interpretations of old data derived from simulated, absolute, or relative paleointensity methods.

Convener: Lisa Tauxe, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California at San Diego La Jolla, CA 92093-0220 USA, Tel: +1- 858-534-6084, Fax: +1-858-534-0784, E-mail: ltauxe@ucsd.edu

GP04 High-Resolution Paleomagnetic Records (Joint With OS)

Recent ocean coring and field studies have improved considerably the spatial and temporal resolution of paleomagnetic observations, providing high-resolution records of Holocene secular variation, Plio-Pleistocene reversals, excursions, and paleointensity variations, and Cenozoic magnetostratigraphy. Until recently paleomagnetic observations of geomagnetic field behavior in the Southern Hemisphere have been few and far between, but there are now a number of such records. This session is proposed to highlight characteristics and applications of high-resolution paleomagnetic records, and encourage comparisons of field behavior in the Northern and Southern Hemispheres.

Conveners: Gary Acton, Ocean Drilling Program, Texas A&M University, 1000 Discovery Dr., College Station, Texas 77845 USA, Tel: +1-979-845-2520, Fax: +1-979-845-0876, E-mail: acton@odpemail.tamu.edu Carl Richter, Ocean Drilling Program, Texas A&M University, 1000 Discovery Dr., College Station, Texas 77845 USA, Tel: +1-979-845-2522, Fax: +1-979-845-0876 E-mail: richter@odpemail.tamu.edu

GP05 Magnetic Anisotropy: New Developments and Applications (Joint With T, V)

Anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) increasingly provides valuable insight into rock fabric with wide applications in igneous petrology (both volcanic and intrusive), sedimentology, tectonics, and other fields. Anisotropy of magnetic remanence (AMR), with its potentially broader applications beyond the reach of AMS is attracting ever greater interest. This session focuses on all aspects of magnetic anisotropy, with emphasis on new techniques and applications.

Conveners: William D. MacDonald, State University of New York at Binghamton, Binghamton, NY 13902 USA, Tel: +1-607-777-2863, E-mail: wdmacdon@binghamton.edu Bernard Housen, Department of Geology, Western Washington University, Bellingham, WA 98225 USA, Tel: +1-360-650-6573 E-mail: bernieh@cc.wwu.edu

GP06 Electromagnetic Investigation of the Earth (Joint With T, MRP, SEDI)

This session solicits contributions on the theory and practice of electromagnetic methods for the examination of structure and properties of Earth’s near-surface, crust, mantle, and core. Papers describing advances in instrumentation, algorithms, and laboratory measurements that improve our understanding of Earth’s internal constitution and the phenomena therein are encouraged.

Conveners: Chester Weiss, Geophysical Technology Division, Sandia National Laboratories, PO Box 5800, MS 0750, Albuquerque, NM 87185-0750 USA, Tel: +1-505-284-6347, Fax: +1-505-844-7354 E-mail: cjweiss@sandia.gov Lee Slater, Department of Geosciences, University of Missouri Kansas City, MO USA, Tel: +1-816-235-5535, Fax: +1-816-235-2978, E-mail: SlaterL@umkc.edu

G07 Plate and Microplate Motion and Intraplate Deformation (Joint With GP, S, T)

Geodetic observations from the growing network of sites are bringing new information on the motion of the plate interiors and the continental deformation belts. At the same time, an expanding set of geophysical observations, including seismicity, earthquake fault plane solutions, marine magnetic observations of sea floor spreading, and high-resolution mapping of transforms and fracture zones, are constraining the motion between plates along their boundaries. The geodetic data are beginning to constrain both intraplate deformation and that produced by glacial isostatic adjustment. The geodetic data are also identifying large portions of lithosphere that may be behaving nearly rigidly, such as the Amurian and Sundaland plates. We invite studies using geodetic and other geophysical observations to better understand the kinematics and dynamics of motions at the Earth's surface. We also seek studies using the predictive power of the plate model to constrain deformation integrated across active tectonic structures separating plates.

Conveners: Donald F Argus, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, 4800 Oak Grove Dr., Mail Stop 238-600 Pasadena, CA 91109-8099 USA, Tel : +1-818-354-3380, Fax: +1-818-393-4965, E-mail: argus@cobra.jpl.nasa.gov Eric Calais, Centre National de la Researche Scientifique - Geosciences Azur, 250 rue Albert Einstein, 06560 Valbonne, France, Tel: +33-4-92-94-26-28, Fax: +33-4-92-94-26-10 E-mail: calais@faille.unice.fr

OS08 Cenozoic Antarctic Glacial Evolution: The Marine Geologic Record (Joint With GP, T, SIP)

In recent years, the Ocean Drilling Program has conducted a series of cruises to the Antarctic continental margin as well as to the Southern Ocean (here broadly defined as the ocean between the southern continents and Antarctica). In addition, research vessels of various nations have conducted geologic investigations in the far reaches of the Southern Ocean and along the Antarctic margin. Studies on cores and geologic samples collected by these expeditions continue to yield exciting results on Cenozoic high-latitude paleoenvironments. The proposed session will bring together scientists involved in Antarctic and sub-Antarctic marine geological research that is focused on Cenozoic Antarctic glacial history and its record in the marine environment. Emphasis will be on geologic sampling of the current and former continental margins of Antarctica and links to deep ocean records of Cenozoic glaciations.

Conveners: Detlef “Dietz”Warnke, Department of Geological Sciences, California State University, Hayward, CA 94542 USA, Tel: +1-510-885-4716, Fax: +1-510-885-2526, E-mail: dwarnke@csuhayward.edu Alan K. Cooper, Department of Geological and Environmental Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 USA, Tel: +1-650-723-0817, Fax: +1-650-725-2199, E-mail: akcooper@pangea.stanford.edu

S08 Thermal and Chemical Structures in the Core-Mantle Boundary Region: Implications for the Evolution of the Deep Interior (Joint With G, GP, T, MRP, SEDI)

Thermal and chemical structures in the core-mantle boundary (CMB) region are shaped by dynamics in the Earth's interior and provide clues to the long-term evolution of the planet. A wide range of processes from large-scale convection to small-scale melting and chemical reactions, are likely to contribute to the complexity of the boundary region. We welcome reports dealing with theoretical, observational, and experimental studies of the boundary region. Topics include, but are not restricted to, the structure and evolution of the thermal boundary layer, chemical stratification at the base of the mantle or top of the core, melting relations and physical properties of mantle minerals, evidence and implications of small-scale structure, effect of boundary layer structure on CMB topography, and observational techniques for discriminating between chemical and thermal boundary layers.

Conveners: Bruce Buffett, Department of Earth and Ocean Sciences, University of British Columbia 2219 Main Mall, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z4 Canada, Tel: +1-604-822-3466, Fax: +1-604-822-6088 E-mail: buffett@geop.ubc.ca Anne M. Hofmeister, Department of Earth and Planetary Science Washington University, Campus Box 1169, 1 Brookings Dr., St. Louis, MO 63130 USA, Tel: +1-314-935-7440, Fax: +1-314-935-7361, E-mail: Hofmeist@levee.wustl.edu Michael Wysession, Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Washington University, Campus Box 1169, 1 Brookings Dr., St. Louis, MO 63130 USA, Tel: +1-314-935-5625, Fax: +1-314-935-7361, E-mail: michael@wucore.wustl.edu

T03 Raising Plateaus (Joint With G, GP, S, V)

Two of the world's highest plateaus, Tibet and the Altiplano, have formed in markedly distinct tectonic settings. Does this require different mechanisms to form them? Models (analytical, numerical, physical) of Tibet and the Altiplano, as well as the wider region surrounding them, remain highly variable because of meager databases. We are interested in geological, geophysical, and geochemical results from current research on all levels (small to large, single to multidiscipline) concerning continent-continent and ocean-continent interactions that could help to improve this position. Earth scientists working in both orogens are few, yet new data are emerging, and therefore the time seems ripe to exchange experience and ideas that are related to uplift, and sustaining uplift, of large expanses of continental crust. How well are models being tested/eliminated? Are there new or revised models arising thereupon? By bringing together a number of disciplines, we look forward to real learning and cross-fertilization leading to wider ideas.

Conveners: Mike Edwards, Asian Tectonics Research Unit, Institut für Geologie, Technische Universitäet Bergakadamie Freiberg, Berhard-von-Cotta Str. 2, D-09596 Freiberg, Germany, Tel: +49- 3731-39-4598 or +49-177-783-2827, Fax: +49-3731-39-3597, E-mail: edwards@geologie.uni-wuerzburg.de S. Gilder, Laboratoire de Paleomagnetisme, Institut de Physique du Globe de Paris, 4 place Jussieu, 75252 Paris Cedex 05, France, Tel: +33-1-44-27-24-32 or +33-1-44-27-24-31, Fax: +33-1-44-27-74-63; Bryan L. Isacks, Department of Geological Sciences, Cornell University, Snee Hall, Ithaca, NY 14853 USA, Tel: +1-607-255-2307, Fax: +1-607-254-4780, E-mail: bli1@cornell.edu Paul Tapponnier, Laboratoire de Tectonophysique, Institut de Physique du Globe de Paris, 4 place Jussieu, 75252 Paris Cedex 05, France, Tel: +33-1-44-27-49-24, Fax: +33-1-44-27-24-40, E-mail: tappon@ipgp.jussieu.fr

T07 Geodynamics in the Late Paleozoic: From Gondwana to Pangaea (Joint With B, GP)

Current difficulties in reconciling apparent polar wander paths, paleontological evidence, and paleoclimatogical indicators lie at the heart of the controversy that surrounds the Paleozoic motions of Gondwana. This session will focus on Gondwanan geodynamics from the Late Devonian to the Permo-Triassic formation of Pangaea. Relevant topics include, but are not restricted to, the significance of attenuation of continental boundaries during breakup and postbreakup intraplate deformation, evidence for terrane migration across intervening oceans and accretion to supercontinents, growing evidence for high drift velocities of Gondwana, reliability of paleoclimatological indicators, critical assessment of paleontological constraints, and signatures of extinction events coupled with rapid paleoclimatic change. Attempts to resolve difficulties using more exotic models (nondipole effects, true polar wander) are also welcome. Contributions from paleomagnetic, paleobiogeographic, and paleoenvironmental researchers are welcome.

Conveners: Jennifer Tait; Institut für Allgemein und Angewandete Geophysik, Ludwig-Maximilians Universitäet, Theresienstrasse 41, D-80333 Muenchen, Germany, E-mail: jenny@geophysik.uni-muenchen.de; Kari Anderson; Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Macquarie University, Sydney NSW 2109, Australia; Tel: 612-9850-6568; Fax: 612-9850-6904; E-Mail: kanderso@laurel.ocs.mq.edu.au

T08 The Structure and Evolution of the Lithosphere in the Rocky Mountain Region (Joint With G, GP, S, V)

The Rocky Mountain region is part of a broad orogenic plateau that extends along the western margin of the North American plate. This region has experienced a complex tectonic evolution from its formation during the Proterozoic to the present, and understanding this evolution is a key issue in continental tectonics. This evolution began with the formation of a 1500-km-wide Proterozoic orogenic belt that records an episode of rapid accretion of continental materials from mantle sources and their assembly to form southern Laurentia between 1.8 and 1.6 Ga. The Ancestral Rocky Mountains and Laramide orogenies greatly altered the lithosphere of this region. Today the high elevations of the southern Rocky Mountain Rio Grande rift region in particular are the manifestation of Phanerozoic and still ongoing modification and disassembly of Proterozoic lithosphere. A better understanding of this region will require integration of a variety geophysical and geological measurements, and diverse contributions to this session are sought.

Conveners: G. Randy Keller, Department of Geological Sciences, University of Texas, El Paso, TX 79968-0555 USA, Tel: +1-915-747-5850, Fax: +1-915-747-5073, E-mail: keller@geo.utep.edu Karl E. Karlstrom, Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131 USA, Tel: +1-505-277-4346, Fax: +1-505-277-8843, E-mail: kek1@unm.edu

V01The Properties of Fe and Fe-Bearing Phases at High Pressures (Joint With GP, S, T, MRP, SEDI)

Iron is the fourth most abundant element in the Earth and, therefore, it plays an important role in most geochemical and petrological processes within the Earth. The fact that Fe can exist in a variety of valence states means that the geochemical character of Fe can vary depending on the reigning oxygen fugacity (fO2). The purpose of this special session is to bring together researchers who are interested in the properties of Fe° and Fe2+- and Fe3+-bearing phases at high pressures and the influence these properties may have on mantle processes and core formation. In addition to experimentally based studies, theoretical aspects and pertinent observations from natural samples are welcome.

Conveners: Alan Woodland, Institute of Mineralogy, University of Heidelberg, Germany E-mail: alan@classic.min.uni-heidelberg.de Dan Frost, Bayerisches Geoinstitut, University of Bayreuth, 95440 Bayreuth, Germany, E-mail: dan.frost@uni-bayreuth.de

V02 Physics of Axial Magma Chambers (Joint With GP, S, T, MRP)

In recent years, the geophysical community has made considerable progress understanding the structure, physical properties, and evolution of axial magma chambers (AMC) at oceanic spreading centers. This special session will involve volcanologists, tectonophysicists, and seismologists and will cover recent progress and upcoming challenges in multidisciplinary approaches to better understanding AMC structure and processes. Topics include (1) seismic, electromagnetic, and gravimetric observations; (2) structural and petrological features; and (3) geodynamic modeling; (4) laboratory characterization of rock properties from AMC regions.

Conveners: Nikolai Bagdassarov, Institut für Meteorologie und Geophysik, J. W. Goethe Universität Frankfurt, Feldbergstraße 47, D-60323 Frankfurt am Main, Germany, Tel: +49-69-798-23376, Fax: +49-69-798-23280, E-mail: nickbagd@geophysik.uni-frankfurt.de Benoît Ildefonse, Laboratoire de Tectonophysique, Institut de Sciences de la Terre, de l’Eau et de l’Espa?e de Montpellier, Université Montpellier II, 34095 Montpellier, cedex 05, France, Tel: +33-4-67-14 38-18/33, Fax: +33-4-67-14-36-03, E-mail: benoit@dstu.univ-montp2.fr William S. D. Wilcock, School of Oceanography, University of Washington, Box 357940, Seattle, WA 98195-7940 USA, Tel: +1-206-543-6043, Fax: +1-206-543-6073, E-mail: wilcock@ocean.washington.edu

V04 The Timescales and Rates of Geological Processes (Joint With GP)

A symposium to honor Ian McDougall's outstanding scientific contributions on the occasion of his 65th birthday and retirement from the Australian National University. Among many other achievements, McDougall led one of the two groups that calibrated the magnetic polarity timescale, a pivotal contribution in the development of the plate tectonic paradigm. This involved both refinements to the K-Ar dating method, then in its infancy, and collateral measurement of rock magnetism on specimens from thoughtfully selected natural laboratories. The bay area has been an important intersection throughout McDougall's career, and the AGU Fall Meeting is the venue for many of the spectacular discoveries of magnetic polarity reversals.

Conveners: Mark Harrison, Department of Earth and Space Sciences and Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Sciences, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1567 USA, Tel: +1-310-825-7970, Fax: +1-310-825-4396; Peter Zeitler, Lehigh University, Bethlehem, PA 18015 USA, E-mail: peter.zeitler@lehigh.edu

NG02 Geocomplexity: Self-Organizing Systems (Joint With A, GP, OS, S, T)

Self-organizing complex systems are found in many branches of geophysics. The broadest-based example is fluid turbulence. Specific examples include the stochastic variability of climate and the variability of Earth’s magnetic field. Other examples are landforms and seismicity. These systems are generally chaotic, exhibit fractal (power-law) behavior, and may be examples of self-organized criticality. The proposed session will include broad overviews of the current understanding of complex systems as well as more specific recent developments. This session is intended as an overview of the current status of geocomplexity and will include several key invited speakers. Although this is not planned as a Union session, we strongly encourage contributions across a broad spectrum of AGU sections. Contributions that are applicable in more than one area are particularly welcome.

Conveners: Donald L. Turcotte, Department of Geological Sciences, Cornell University, Snee Hall, Ithaca, NY 14853 USA, Tel: +1-607-255-7282, Fax: +1-607-254-4780, E-mail: turcotte@geology.cornell.edu John B. Rundle, Colorado Center for Chaos and Complexity and Cooperative Institute Research in Environmental Sciences, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309 USA, Tel: +1-303-492-5642, E-mail: rundle@terra.colorado.edu William Klein, Physics Department and Center for Computational Science, Boston University, 590 Commonwealth Ave., Boston, MA 02215 USA, Tel: +1-617-353-2188, E-mail: klein@buphyc.bu.edu

NG10 Visual Computing in Nonlinear Geophysical Phenomena (Joint With A, G, GP, H, OS, T)

Researchers in geophysics are being overwhelmed by the huge amount of data generated by natural nonlinear phenomena and high-resolution numerical solutions. In this session we will bring together many of the different practioners using modern analytical and visualization tools (e.g., wavelets, eigenvectors, and EOFs) for treating and analyzing large data sets. We are soliciting examples from all areas in geophysics and at all scales, ranging from the molecular level, such as bacteria growth, to core dynamics. Also of great interest are examples from large data sets, such as SAR, ocean currents, and numerical simulations involving the bridging of scales in nonlinear processes. We foresee interest for this session from both numerical modelers and observation-oriented scientists.

Conveners: Dave Yuen, Minnesota Supercomputer Institute, 1200 Washington Ave., S., Minneapolis, MN 55415 USA, Tel: +1-612-624-1868, E-mail: davey@krissy.msi.umn.edu Bryan J. Travis, Los Alamos National Laboratory, ESS 5, MS F665, Los Alamos, NM 55455 USA, Tel: +1-505-667-1254, E-mail: bjt@vega.lanl.gov

Hydrology (H)

Erosion and Sedimentation

H01 Predictive Modeling of Geomorphic Processes (Joint With NG)

As geomorphology matures toward being a predictive science, important questions loom. What limits predictability of geomorphic processes? What constitutes adequate model testing? When can we claim that a predictive model is a success? What are the advantages of empirical/statistical models versus mechanistic models? What are the advantages of constructionist models based on rules versus reductionist models derived from physical laws? Contributions are solicited for a poster session that will be held in conjunction with a half-day forum with keynote talks and a 90-minute open discussion.

Conveners: Richard Iverson, U.S. Geological Survey, 5400 MacArthur Blvd., Vancouver, WA 98661 USA, Tel: +1- 360-993-8920, Fax: +1- 360-993-8980, E-mail: riverson@usgs.gov Peter Wilcock, Geography and Environmental Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218 USA, Tel: +1-410-516-5421, Fax: +1-410-516-8996, E-mail: wilcock@jhu.edu

H02 Geomorphology (Poster Only)

Diverse approaches are required to understand the processes of erosion, transport, and deposition of sediment and solutes, and to predict their influence on short- and long-term landscape changes. In this session we solicit poster presentations on geomorphic processes, particularly the influence of wind, water, and ice on the land surface; the behavior of soil, rock, and ice under applied stresses; and the rates of landscape development and the ages of surfaces. We welcome contributions from field or lab experiments, modeling, field monitoring, application of cosmogenic radionuclides, and development of new techniques. Please send one copy of your abstract to AGU and one copy directly to both of the conveners.

Convener: Suzanne P. Anderson, Department of Earth Sciences, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 USA, Fax: +1-831-459-3074, E-mail: spa@es.ucsc.edu Derek Booth, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Washington, Box 352700, Seattle, WA 98195 USA, Fax: +1-206-685-3836, E-mail: dbooth@u.washington.edu

H03 Rehabilitation and Decommissioning of Aging Dams

Dams have long provided electricity, flood control, municipal water supply, recreation, and wildlife habitat. While the environmental effects of dams have been studied, new issues related to dams have emerged. Because of population growth and land use changes through time, sediment pools are filling, some structural components have deteriorated, safety regulations are stricter, and the hazard classification for some dams has changed. In addition, society's perception of dams has also changed. Before any rehabilitation or decommissioning strategy can be designed and implemented, the integrity of structural components must be examined, the quantity and quality of the sediment impounded by these dams must be assessed, and the social, legal, and economic impacts of the proposed action must be addressed. This session seeks to identify important issues of aging watershed projects, to discuss rehabilitation and decommissioning strategies, to present case studies, and to anticipate the impact of such activities on the environment and society.

Conveners: Sean J. Bennett, National Sedimentation Laboratory, USDA Agricultural Research Service, PO Box 1157, Oxford, MS 38655 USA, Tel: +1-662-232-2926, Fax: +1-662-232-2915, E-mail: bennett@sedlab.olemiss.edu C. Ted Yang, U.S. Bureau of Reclamation, PO Box 25007 (D-8540), Denver, CO 80225 USA, Tel: +1-303-445-2550, Fax: +1-303-445-6351, E-mail: tyang@do.usbr.gov

H04 Wildfires and Surficial Processes

The past three years saw an unprecedented increase in the frequency and areal extent of wildfires globally. An unfortunate combination of anthropogenic and climatic driving forces produced highly explosive situations even in very humid areas, such as the Amazon Basin and Southeast Asia. The impact of the recent large-scale fire events on erosion and sedimentation has yet to be assessed. For this session we seek contributions that address the following and related issues: (1) the monitoring and modeling of sediment mobilization and transfer after wildfires at various spatial scales; (2) fire-induced changes in soil magnetic properties; (3) changes in and recovery of streamwater chemistry after wildfires at different spatial scales; (4) the measurement and modeling of runoff processes under fire-induced water-repellent soil conditions; (5) changes in and recovery of soil hydrological properties after wildfires; and (6) the effect of wildfire frequency on surficial processes.

Conveners: Helmut Elsenbeer, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH 45221-0071 USA, Tel: +1-513-556-3696, Fax: +1-513-556-2599, E-mail: helmut.elsenbeer@uc.edu Peter Robichaud, Rocky Mountain Research Station, USDA Forest Service, Moscow, ID 83843 USA, Tel: +1-208-883-2349, Fax: +1-208-883-2318, E-mail: probichaud@fs.fed.us

Groundwater

H05 An Integrated View of Subsurface Heterogeneity: Measurements, Geology, Modeling, and Implications for Contaminant Transport (Joint With NG)

Geologists tend to think about aquifers in terms of geologic deposition and modification, while hydrologists tend to choose a more idealized mathematical approach. If and when the heterogeneity problem is solved, these two approaches may become one. This session attempts to provide an integrated view of the latest developments in the fields of geology and hydrology regarding heterogeneity in the subsurface. Talks are sought in four categories: measuring sediment properties in the lab or field; quantitative hydrofacies models; stochastic methods for representing subsurface heterogeneity, including fractals, multi-fractals, and multi-media concepts; and resulting methods for simulating solute transport in heterogeneous media.

Conveners: Michel C. Boufadel, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering Temple University 1947 N. 12th St., Philadelphia, PA 19122 USA, Tel: +1-215-204-7871, Fax: +1-215-204-4696; E-mail: boufadel@astro.temple.edu. Fred J. Molz III, Department of Environmental Engineering and Science, Clemson University, Clemson, SC 29625 USA, Tel: +1-864-656-1003; Graham E. Fogg, Department of Land, Air and Water Resources, University of California, Davis, CA 95616-8628 USA, Tel: +1-530-752-6810; David A. Benson, Desert Research Institute, 2215 Raggio Pkwy., Reno, NV 89512 USA, Tel: +1-775-673-7496

H06 Noble Gases in Groundwater and Associated Fluids: Origin and Transport Processes (Joint With V)

Noble gases in groundwater provide quantitative information about basin-scale hydrogeologic systems, a paleoclimate resource, and are transferred into nonaqueous phases to preserve a record of multiphase fluid interaction. Inconsistencies exist in our interpretation of these closely related noble gas records. For example, estimates of groundwater residence times estimated using the noble gases are often higher than other tracer systems, whereas fractionation processes affecting noble gases are not fully understood. We encourage papers that address noble gas source and transport, mathematical (analytical and numerical) modeling advances, and the integration of noble gas information with other crustal fluid tracer systems.

Conveners: Maria Clara Castro, Department of Geological Sciences, University of Michigan, 2534 C. C. Little Bldg., 425 E. University Ave., Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1063 USA, Tel: +1-734-615-3812, Fax: +1- 734-763-4690, E-mail: mccastro@umich.edu; Christopher Ballentine, Inst Isotopengeologie, Zurich, Switzerland, Tel: +41-1-632-78-39; Fax: +41-1-632-11-79; E-mail: ballentine@erdw.ethz.ch

H07 Natural Fluctuations of Groundwater Systems

Natural variations in groundwater systems, including varying water levels, flows, chemistry, recharge, and discharge, reflect tidal, barometric, hydroclimatic, ecologic, and geologic forcings at many temporal and spatial scales. Observed and inferred variations provide information about aquifer properties, connections, and forcings that are difficult to obtain otherwise. These variations form the background upon which hydrologic influences from human activities are superimposed, and thus must be properly characterized if human effects are to be delineated. This session solicits papers describing efforts to monitor, interpret, or simulate natural groundwater fluctuations, lasting from days to years, to enhance understanding and accuracy of hydrologic investigations.

Conveners: Michael Dettinger, U.S. Geological Survey, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California, MC 0224, 9500 Gilman Dr., La Jolla, CA 92093 USA, Tel: +1-858-822-1502, Fax: +1-858-534-8561, E-mail: mddettin@usgs.gov Stan Leake, U.S. Geological Survey, 520 N. Park Ave., Tucson, AZ 85716 USA, Tel: +1-520-670-6671 ext. 259, Fax: +1-520-670-5592, E-mail: saleake@usgs.gov

H08 Groundwater in Geologic Systems: Interactions With Heat, Reactions, and Tectonics (Joint With OS, T)

Many processes in Earth's crust can be understood as a combination of groundwater flow and chemical or physical interaction between water and the geologic medium. Groundwater flow is therefore a key factor in the temporal and spatial evolution of geologic systems. The coupling of fluid flow with heat transfer, fluid-rock reactions, and tectonics is essential for the quantitative treatment of many important geologic processes. Posters and talks are invited on quantitative couplings between fluid flow and heat transfer, chemical reactions, and tectonics in natural geologic processes such as in continental and oceanic hydrothermal systems, faults, and ore deposits.

Convener: Roy Haggerty, Department of Geosciences, Oregon State University, 104 Wilkinson Hall, Corvallis, OR 97331-5506 USA, Tel: +1-541-737-1210, Fax: +1-541-737-1200, E-mail: haggertr@geo.orst; Joel Geier, Department of Geosciences, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97331; Tel: 541-928-1829. E-mail: jgeier@attglobal.net; Sebastian Geiger, Isotope Geochemistry and Mineral Resources, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Tel: +41-1-632-6082; E-mail: geiger@erdw.ethz.ch

H09 Quantifying Predictive Uncertainty of Hydrogeologic Flow and Transport Models

Physicochemical processes, multiscale heterogeneity, parameter distribution and values, forcing functions, and initial and boundary conditions are factors that control subsurface flow and transport, but are difficult to identify unambiguously. They constitute major sources of uncertainty in hydrogeologic analysis and prediction. One of the least understood issues of subsurface hydrology is how to quantify prediction uncertainty in calibrated models of such systems. Progress is being made using such methods as Monte Carlo, inferential theory, and moment methods. This session promotes these efforts by focusing on the development, testing, application, and analysis of methods that quantify uncertainty of predicted hydraulic heads, flows, and concentrations.

Conveners: Mary C. Hill, U.S. Geological Survey, 3215 Marine St., Boulder, CO 80303 USA, E-mail: mchill@usgs.gov Shlomo Neuman, Department of Hydrology and Water Resources, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721, E-mail: neuman@hwr.arizona.edu

H10 Tracer Experiments Conducted in Fractured Rock

Field tracer experimentation using forced or natural gradient conditions provides a powerful means by which to investigate the transport properties of fractured rock. Numerous issues related to the performance and interpretation of tracer experiments in such media are unresolved, despite a considerable publication history. We solicit papers that (1) provide novel interpretations of new and existing data sets, (2) present new interpretive models, (3) investigate the role of experimental design, (4) describe the use of multiple tracers to estimate fracture and matrix properties, (5) present new conceptual and mathematical models for mobile-immobile mass exchange, and (6) explore issues of scaling.

Conveners: Kent Novakowski, Department of Earth Sciences, Brock University, St. Catharines, ON L2S 3A1 Canada, Tel: +1-905-688-5550, E-mail: Kent@craton.geol.brocku.ca Allen Shapiro, Water Resources Division, U.S. Geological Survey, 12201 Sunrise Valley Dr., Reston, VA 20192 USA, Tel: +1-703-648-5884, E-mail: ashapiro@usgs.gov

H11 State-of-the-Science in Modeling and Interpreting Three-Dimensional Flow and Transport (Joint With NG)

This session will bring together hydrologists that develop and use three-dimensional models of flow and contaminant transport. Recent developments have produced more accurate and efficient models based on the finite element, finite difference, boundary element and analytic element methods, and dual domain, random walk, and method-of-characteristics techniques. Consequently, the model domain is increasing in size and complexity. Papers are solicited that discuss problems that can be addressed using current technology. Papers are especially encouraged that present new methods and their application; use model results to interpret field and laboratory data; and provide modeling results that delineate future challenges.

Conveners: David R. Steward, Department of Civil Engineering, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 66506-2905 USA, Tel: +1-785-532-1585, Fax: +1-785-532-7717, E-mail: steward@ksu.edu Eileen Poeter, International Ground-Water Modeling Center, Department of Geology and Geological Engineering, Colorado School of Mines, 1500 Illinois St., Golden, CO 80401 USA, Tel: +1-303-273-3829, Fax: +1-303-384-2037 or 303-273-3859, E-mail: epoeter@mines.edu

H12 Environmental Geohydrology

Posters are solicited on environmental hydrogeology topics in laboratory studies, field investigations, and modeling advances. A broad spectrum of topics is appropriate for this session, including modeling of groundwater quality and hydrology; characterization of subsurface heterogeneity; application and development of hydrogeological, geophysical, and stable isotope techniques; understanding of biogeochemical processes; and optimization of groundwater management and remediation strategies.

Convener: Nina D. Rosenberg, Earth and Environmental Sciences, L-204, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94551 USA, Tel: +1-925-424-5212, Fax: +1-925-423-1997, E-mail: rosenberg4@llnl.gov; Barbara A. Benkins, USGS, MS496, 345 Middlefield Road, Menlo Park CA 94025 USA, Tel +1-650-329-4691, E-mail: babekins@usgs.gov; Reed M. Maxwell, Earth and Environmental Sciences, L-204, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94551, USA, Tel: +1-925-422-7436 Fax: +1-925-423-1997, E-mail: maxwell5@llnl.gov

Land-Atmosphere Interactions (Formerly Large Scale Field Experiments)

H13 Can We Predict Mass and Energy Exchange Over Vegetated Landscapes From Seconds to Decades?

The interaction between vegetation and the atmosphere occurs on timescales from fractions of seconds to decades and longer. The present state of the art in modeling mass and energy exchange across this system is intrinsically restricted to discrete bands of timescales (e.g., turbulent eddy motion, stomatal control, and senescence). The objective of this session is to promote the concept of a continuous spectrum of processes and begin to develop means to understand land-atmosphere exchange from seconds to decades. We solicit papers addressing biophysical processes and their coupling across scales.

Conveners: Howard Epstein, Department of Environmental Sciences, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22904-4123 USA, Tel: +1-804-924-4308, Fax: +1-804-982-2137, E-mail: hee2b@virginia.edu Gabriel Katul, School of the Environment, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708-0328 USA, Tel: +1-919-613-8033, Fax: +1-919-684-8741, E-mail: gaby@duke.edu

H14 Progress in Surface Hydrology From Combined Ground-Based and Remote Sensing Observations: SGP97, SGP99, and Similar Experiments

There has been great interest in combining in situ and remote measurements in the context of large-scale field experiments. Papers are solicited that highlight advances in surface hydrology and boundary layer meteorology from such efforts. Research from the recent experiments in the Southern Great Plains (SGP 97 and SGP 99) is of particular interest. Work based on other large-scale field experiments is also welcome.

Conveners: Anthony T. Cahill, Department of Civil Engineering, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX, 77843-3136 USA, Tel: +1-979-862-3858, Fax: +1-979-862-1542, E-mail: tcahill@civilmail.tamu.edu John D. Albertson, Department of Environmental Sciences, Clark Hall, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22903 USA, Tel: +1-804-924-7241, Fax: +1-804-982-2137 E-mail: jdalbertson@virginia.edu

Policy Sciences

H15 Integrated Water Resources Management

The main objective of the session would be to provide a forum for technical and nontechnical personnel to address water resources-related issues, such as: systems thinking and water resources; innovative water resources management; water science and its role in water management; integrated river basin planning; and integrated management of water quality and quantity with ecosystem protection.

Conveners: Miguel A. Marino, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of California, Davis, CA 95616 USA, Tel: +1-530-752-0684, Fax: +1-530-752-5262, E-mail: mamarino@ucdavis.edu: John Tauxe, Neptune and Company, Inc. 1505 15th Street, Suite B, Los Alamos, NM 87544. Tel: +1-505-662-0707; Fax: +1-505-662-0500. E-Mail: jtauxe@neptuneandco.com

H16 Impacts of Climatic Variations on Water Resources: A Focus on Border Regions

As management and control of water resources has become a key economic force in most parts of the world, understanding the potential impacts of current and future climatic variations on water supply has become critically important. However, different communities have developed different expectations for use of available water supplies, placing different valuations on different strategies, such as exploitation versus conservation. Policy considerations are especially complex in geographic areas where political boundaries exist. Although communities on both sides of borders may be influenced by similar weather and climate variability on a broad range of time-scales, their responses to social, economic, or ecological externalities related to water resources management can be (and often is) radically different. This session seeks to bring regional transboundary water management issues together with traditional scientific disciplines of hydrology and climatology. For this session we seek contributions that consider (1) elements of the water cycle (e.g., precipitation, streamflows, water budgets) in the context of human intervention (e.g., land cover changes, water diversion and storage, projected changes in water demand); (2) relationships between climate, water quality, and aquatic ecosystems; (3) societal aspects of water resource management, including demography, economics, and culture; and (4) transboundary regional water management strategies and case studies, especially those that help place natural changes in regional water supplies in an appropriate societal context.

Conveners: Henry Diaz, NOAA Environmental Research Laboratories, 325 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80303 USA, Tel: +1-303-497-6649, Fax: +1-303-497-7013, E-mail: hfd@cdc.noaa.gov Bradford P. Wilcox, Inter-American Institute for Global Change Research, S. J. Campos, Brazil, Tel: +1-55-12-322-8640, E-mail: bwilcox@dir.iai.int

H17 Communicating Scientific Consensus in Hydrology

For many water resources issues, scientific progress has outpaced advancement of institutional capacities. One reason for this situation appears to be misperceptions about the extent of scientific consensus. By its nature, the research community focuses on areas of uncertainty, even where there is broad consensus about core knowledge. However, the public and policy makers often perceive minor disagreements within the research community as major disputes or large uncertainty that precludes significant action on their part. Possible contributors to this confusion include media coverage that presents both sides of scientific issues with equal weight, as well as the intrusion of political sensitivities or policy agendas during creation of scientific consensus documents. Through invited and contributed presentations related to any of the hydrology disciplines or water resource issues, as well as extended discussion, this session seeks to identify common experiences and possible strategies for improved communication of scientific consensus.

Conveners: Holly C. Hartmann, Department of Hydrology and Water Resources, University of Arizona, PO Box 210011, Tucson, AZ 85721 USA, Tel: +1-520-621-3973, Fax: +1-520-621-1422, E-mail: hollyh@hwr.arizona.edu D. Brian Adams, 3850 Holcomb Bridge Rd., Suite 160, Norcross, GA 30092 USA, Tel: +1-770-409-7700, E-mail: dadams@usgs.gov

Precipitation

H18 Nonlinear Propagation of Multiple-Scale Dynamics Through Hydrologic Subsystems (Joint With NG)

Hydrology is the study of the interactions between the atmosphere and the land surface, occurring over the full range of time and space scales. How, for example, the space-time variability in the rainfall interacts with spatial variability of soils, topography, vegetation, network geomorphology, etc. to produce spatially and temporally variable fields of runoff, evapotranspiration, and soil moisture is a rich area of research, with applications to flood estimation, climate change studies, and water quality predictions. This session invites contributions that study the propagation of multiple scale effects/variability/errors, cascading through such hydrologic subsystems via nonlinear dynamical interactions. These may include, but are not limited to, rainfall fields, topography and network geomorphology, soils and vegetation, soil-moisture, and near-surface energy and momentum fluxes.

Conveners: Praveen Kumar, 205 N. Mathews Ave., Department of Civil Engineering, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801 USA, Tel: +1-217-333-4688, Fax: +1-217-333-06872, E-mail: kumar1@uiuc.edu Daniel Harris, St. Anthony Falls Laboratory, University of Minnesota, Mississippi River at 3rd Ave. SE, Minneapolis, MN 55414 USA, Tel: +1-612-627-4597, Fax: +1-612-627-4609, E-mail: dh@macedonia.safhl.umn.edu Seth Veitzer, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309 USA, Tel: +1-303-492-8124, Fax: +1-303-492-5070, E-mail: veitzer@colorado.edu

Remote Sensing

H19 Monitoring, Measuring, and Modeling Snow Processes

The storage and modulated release of water from seasonal snowpacks are major components of hydrologic systems in many parts of the world, particularly in mountainous and boreal areas. In these regions, the seasonal snowcover is a critical component of the annual water cycle, controlling soil moisture, soil temperature, streamflow, and the development and stability of terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. This session will address a broad range of topics that are important to understanding this important resource. We are soliciting poster presentations on all aspects of monitoring, measuring, and modeling snow processes, with emphasis on the following specific topics: investigations into physical properties of snow, linking microscale properties to macroscale processes; snowcover modeling in vegetated and complex terrain; interactions between snowcover, soil, and biotic processes; snow measurement and monitoring techniques and instruments; and remote sensing of snowcover properties and extent.

Conveners: Adam Winstral, Northwest Watershed Research Center, USDA Agricultural Research Service, 800 Park Blvd., Suite 105, Boise, ID 83712 USA, Tel: +1-208-422-0739, Fax: +1-208-334-1502, E-mail: awintra@nwrc.ars.pn.usbr.gov Timothy Link, Environmental Sciences Graduate Program, Oregon State University, 200 SM 35th St., Corvallis, OR 97333 USA, Tel: +1-541-754-4452, Fax: +1-541-754-4799, E-mail: tim@orst.edu

H20 Hydrological Applications of Data From NASA’s Terra Satellite

The launch of NASA's EOS Terra satellite this past December with the MODIS and ASTER sensors provides a new source for space observations of land surface properties/parameters. MODIS with 250-1000 m resolution, provides daily coverage for much of Earth, whereas ASTER provides high-resolution, 15-90 m, coverage for limited areas. Both sensors cover the spectral range from the visible to the thermal infrared, with ASTER providing a unique multispectal thermal infrared coverage. Papers are solicited on the use of these data to observe surface properties, such as emissivity, temperature, vegetative state, and land use.

Conveners: Thomas Schmugge, Hydrology Laboratory, USDA Agricultural Research Service, Bldg.007-BARC West, Beltsville, MD, 20705-2350 USA, Tel: +1-301-504-8554, Fax: +1-301-504-8931, E-mail: schmugge@hydrolab.arsusda.gov; Venkat Lakshmi, Department of Geological Sciences, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC 29208 USA, Tel: +1-803-777-3552, Fax: +1-803-777-6610, E-mail: vlakshmi@geol.sc.edu

Snow, Ice, and Permafrost

H21 Glaciers and Ice Sheets

Glaciers and ice sheets play a vital role in global issues such as past and future climate change, atmospheric and oceanic circulation, and sea level change. To quantify the timing and magnitude of the interaction between Earth's ice masses and global processes, detailed understanding of the mechanical, chemical, and hydrologic processes is required. The purpose of this session is to provide a forum for discussion of recent research on these topics. Recent large calving events on the Ross and Ronne-Filchner ice shelves in west Antarctica and ongoing events around the Antarctic Peninsula have drawn both popular and scientific interest. We especially encourage submissons addressing ice shelf flow, crevasse and rift propagation, shelf-front processes, and the interaction of ice shelves with the ocean and the atmosphere.

Conveners: Doug MacAyeal, Department of Geophysical Sciences, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 USA, Tel: +1-773-702-8027, Fax: +1-773-702-8198, E-mail: drm7@midway.uchicago.edu Christina L. Hulbe, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 971, Greenbelt, MD 20771 USA, Tel: +1-301-614-5911, Fax: +1-301-614-5644, E-mail: chulbe@ice.gsfc.nasa.gov

H22 Hydrology of Ice-Covered Rivers and Lakes

Lake and river ice are important hydrologic variables that increase in significance with latitude and elevation, and produce a diverse array of impacts on physical, chemical, and ecological processes in lentic and lotic systems. In particular, river ice produces dynamic flow conditions that have important implications for erosion, transport, and deposition of sediment; movement of nutrients and contaminants; riparian ecosystems; and aquatic habitat and biota. All lake and river ice processes are influenced by and sensitive to climate variability, and these ice covers provide a record of climate change. Recognition of the importance of freshwater ice covers has started to bring scientific attention to this important field. This session will focus on freshwater systems that are influenced significantly by ice covers. Topics of interest are broad, including the response of river and lake ice to changing climate; the use of river and lake ice records as climate indicators; interpreting the record of hydrological processes through winter from river and lake ice; the significance of river ice to basin hydrology and the production of extremes; dissolved oxygen, sediment transport, and geochemical processes in ice-covered rivers; and the effects of ice cover on riparian and aquatic habitats and fisheries.

Conveners: Michael Ferrick, U.S. Army Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory, 72 Lyme Rd., Hanover, NH 03755-1290 USA, Tel: +1-603-646-4287, Fax: +1-603-646-4785, E-mail: mferrick@crrel.usace.army.mil Terry Prowse, National Water Research Institute, National Hydrology Research Centre, 11 Innovation Blvd., Saskatoon, SK S7N 3H5 Canada, Tel: +1- 306-975-5737, Fax: +1-306-975-5143, E-mail: terry.prowse@ec.gc.ca

Surface Water

H23 Observations and Modeling of Land Surface Hydrological Processes

Numerous studies have resulted in observations from field experiments to study the dynamics of land surface behavior; numerical modeling of the evolution of land surface response to solar heating and precipitation; the comparison of simulations to observed quantities from field experiments; and the use of satellite remote sensing data to both drive and validate hydrological models. It is widely believed that the combination of field observations and satellite data with hydrological models will produce improved estimates of hydrologic fluxes and energy budgets. This session will explore this concept through examination of a broad range of topics: water and energy budgets, soil moisture, runoff, streamflow, surface temperature, and latent, sensible, ground heat, and net radiation fluxes. Papers on the above topics are invited.

Conveners: Venkat Lakshmi, University of South Carolina, USA, E-mail: vlakshmi@geol.sc.edu; John D. Albertson, Department of Environmental Sciences, Clark Hall, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22903 USA, Tel: +1-804-924-7241, Fax: +1-804-982-2137 E-mail: jdalbertson@virginia.edu

H24 Spatially Distributed Measurement Techniques and Approaches for Testing Spatially Distributed Models

There is an increasing need in hydrological research and environmental management to accurately represent and model hydrological processes in a spatial context. For many years now, modeling tools have been available to simulate spatially distributed hydrological processes, but the quality of simulations and process representation have been difficult to assess because of a lack of appropriate field data. There has been renewed interest in field measurements, aimed specifically at testing and improving our understanding and modeling capability of spatial processes in climates from alpine to arid, often involving the use of novel techniques. In addition, some remote sensing techniques have reached the point where they can provide detailed data for model testing. We encourage contributions that illustrate new methods and techniques; use these to critically assess the performance of distributed hydrological models; and develop concepts important to the nature and representation of spatial patterns in hydrological processes.

Conveners: Rodger Grayson, Centre for Environmental Applied Hydrology, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Melbourne, Grattan Street, Room 442, Parkville, VIC 3052 Australia, Tel: +61-417-054-660, Fax: +61-393-446-215, E-mail: r.grayson@civag.unimelb.edu.au Mark Seyfried, USDA Agricultural Research Service, 800 Park Blvd., Boise, ID 83712 USA, Tel: +1-208-422-0175, Fax: +1-208-334-1502, E-mail: mseyfrie@nwrc.ars.pn.usbr.gov Ross Woods, National Institute for Water and Atmosphere, PO Box 8602, Christchurch, New Zealand, Tel: +64-3-343-7803, Fax: +64-3-348-5548 E-mail: r.woods@niwa.cri.nz

H25 Cold Land Processes

This session is concerned with the hydrology and land-atmosphere interactions of the terrestrial cryosphere, cold land areas where water is either seasonally or permanently frozen. Contributions are solicited on the following topics: (1) the role of snow, frozen ground, and vegetation freeze/thaw processes in hydrologic, climate, and weather prediction; (2) the development, operation, and/or validation of basin or larger scale distributed snow/ice models; (3) advances in the understanding and representation of subgrid variability in distributed snow/ice models; (4) advances in observing frozen precipitation, and in discriminating between frozen and liquid precipitation in observations or models; (5) advances in understanding of the evolution of snow albedo, the represention of patchy snow/ice cover, sublimation, snowmelt and refreezing, the retention and transport of melt water, the representation of blowing snow, and the interaction between snow/ice processes and soil and vegetation processes; and (6) new methods, techniques, and instruments (especially remote sensing) for measuring and monitoring key components of the terrestrial cryosphere.

Conveners: Don Cline, National Operational Hydrologic Remote Sensing Center, National Weather Service, 1735 Lake Dr. W., Chanhassen, MN 55317 USA,Tel: +1-952-361-6610, Fax: +1-592-361-6634, E-mail: cline@nohrsc.nws.gov John Baker, USDA/University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55414 USA; E-mail: baker003@umn.edu. Ken Kunkel, Illinois State Water Survery, Champaign, IL 61820-7495; Tel: +1-217-244-1488, E-mail: k-kunkel@uiuc.edu

H26 Advances in Calibration of Watershed Models

There has been much recent progress in the development and calibration of both lumped and distributed watershed models. In particular, considerable advances have been made in developing new calibration methods that take full advantage of new numerical techniques and increase computing power. Also related to this are the expanding sources of high-resolution spatial and temporal hydrologic calibration data sets brought by new observational technologies. This session will explore a broad range of topics related to these developments, with special attention to issues such as (1) how state-of-art calibration methods are developed and applied to watershed models; (2) how parameters of distributed models be calibrated as compared to that of lumped models; (3) how a priori parameter estimates based on land surface characteristics can be used to constrain model calibration; (4) what calibration data are needed, how these data are obtained, and how they are analyzed, in order to obtain reliable parameter values; and (5) what computational procedures are necessary to ensure proper model calibration and meaningful evaluation of model performance. Abstracts dealing with any one or a combination of these and related topics are invited for this special session.

Conveners: Qingyun Duan, Hydrology Laboratory, National Weather Service, 1325 East-West Hwy., Silver Spring, MD 20910 USA, Tel: +1-301-713-1018 ext. 113, Fax: +1-301-713-1051, E-mail: qingyun.duan@noaa.gov Alain Rousseau, Institut National de la Recherch Scientifique-Eau, Universite of Quebec, CP 7500, Sainte Foy, QC G1V 4C7 Canada, Tel: +1-418-654-2621, E-mail: alain_rousseau@inrs-eau.uquebec.ca Richard Turcotte, Institut National de la Recherch Scientifique-Eau, Universite of Quebec, CP 7500, Sainte Foy, QC G1V 4C7 Canada, Tel: +1-418-654-2621, E-mail richard_turcotte@inrs-eau.uquebec.ca Bryson Bates, CSIRO Land and Water, Private Bag No. 5, Wembley, WA 6913, Australia, Tel: +61-8-9333-6330, E-mail: bryson.bates@per.clw.csiro.au

H27 Regional Flood Frequency and the Hydrology of Extreme Events

This session will focus on methods of estimating regional flood frequency and an understanding of the processes that generate extreme events. Regional methods of estimating floods of a given probability both for gauged and ungauged catchments are appealing due to their simplicity and robustness. However, flood frequency analyses at the regional scale are complicated by a number of factors, including limited representativeness of the flood samples of the population statistics, problems with interpreting outliers, difficulties in establishing regional homogeneity and/or similarity, and an often poor correlation between catchment properties and flood probabilities. Papers are solicited that address methodological issues of defining regional hydrologic similarity in the context of flood probabilities; issues of parameter estimation and statistical inference; methods of making the maximum use of catchment properties; use of qualitative (proxy) data such as flood marks; and an assessment of the relative merits of different statistical methods of regional frequency estimation, such as quantile regression methods, index flood methods, and region of influence approaches. An additional focus of this session will be an assessment of the meteorological and land surface processes promoting extreme events and the development of methods that represent hydrological processes related to flooding. Analysis and modeling of the relationships of the processes to flood frequency properties in a regional context and case studies in different climatological regions are also encouraged.

Conveners: Gunter Bloschl, Institut für Hydraulik, Gewasserkunde and Wasserwirtschaft, Technische Universitat Wien, Karlsplatz 13/223, A-104 Wien Austria, Tel: +43-1-58801-22315, Fax: +43-1-58801-22399, E-mail bloeschl@hydro.tuwien.ac.at Ted Endrenyi, College of Environmental Science and Forestry, 207 Marshall Hall, 1 Forestry Dr., Syracuse, NY 13210 USA, Tel: +1-315-470-6565, E-mail: te@esf.edu

H28 Hydrologic and Ecosystem Research and Applications in Long-Term Experimental Watersheds (Joint With B)

This is a poster session designed to highlight the major research efforts and data sets that are available at experimental watersheds in the United States and overseas. We solicit posters from a range of watersheds with long term monitoring including those from the Long Term Ecological Research network, USDA Agricultural Research Service watersheds, the U.S. Geological Survey Wetland Ecology Branch sites, and other U.S. and international sites. Each poster should include information on the major research questions pursued and active research under way, an overview of the data sets that are available, as well as novel and current research findings and resulting applications. The poster session will provide an opportunity for researchers to identify potential synergistic studies and intercomparisons, and familiarize the community with the research and data resources available.

Conveners: Danny Marks, Northwest Watershed Research Center, USDA Agricultural Research Service, 800 Park Blvd., Plaza IV, Suite 105, Boise, ID 83712 USA, Tel: +1-208-422-0700, E-mail: dmarks@nwrc.ars.pn.usbr.gov L. E. Band, Department of Geography, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 USA, Tel: +1-919-962-3921, E-mail: lband@unc.edu

H29 Coupled Hydrological and Terrestrial Ecosystem Processes (Joint With B)

Surface and near-surface hydrological and ecosystem processes are intimately coupled in watersheds. An understanding of their interactions is necessary for improved assessment and modeling of water balance, carbon and nutrient cycling, canopy growth, and landscape change and succession. Topics can include the development of distinct terrestrial ecosystem patterns as conditioned by soil water patterns and flowpaths in complex landscapes, the role of these patterns on water balance at the catchment scale, rates of carbon sequestration, and nutrient cycling along topo-edaphic gradients. Topics on the sensitivity of these systems to changes in water balance due to shifts in climate or land cover change are also encouraged. In addition, the session is intended to highlight studies investigating the links between terrestrial ecosystem and hydrological processes. Abstracts are solicited that discuss measurement or modeling studies of ecosystem and hydrological interactions ranging from the plot to watershed scale.

Conveners: D. Scott Mackay, Department of Forest Ecology and Management, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 USA, Tel: +1-608-262-1669, E-mail: dsmackay@facstaff.wisc.edu Brent Newman, Earth and Environmental Sciences Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, MS J495, Los Alamos, NM 87545 USA, Tel: +1-505-667-3021, E-mail: bnewman@lanl.gov Brad Wilcox, Inter-American Institute for Global Change Studies, A.Dos Astronauts 1758, 12227-010 Sáo José dos Campos, SP, Brazil, Tel: +55-12-345-6860, E-mail: bwilcox@dir.iai.int

Water Quality

H30 Water Quality of Hydrologic Systems

Poster presentations are invited on all aspects of water quality and tracers in hydrology, including field, laboratory, and theoretical work, directed at groundwater or surface water at any spatial scale. Presentations may range from the use of solutes purely as tracers of water movement to investigations focused mainly or solely on geochemical processes/reactions. Research on contaminants and/or naturally occurring chemical species is appropriate for this session.

Convener: Rick Hooper, U.S. Geological Survey, 10 Bearfoot Rd., Northborough, MA 01532 USA, Tel: +1-508-490-5065, Fax: +1-508-490-5068, E-mail: rphooper@usgs.gov David Genereux, Department of Marine, Earth, and Atmospheric Sciences, Box 8208, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695 USA, Tel: +1-919-515-3711, Fax: +1-919-515-7802

H31 Land Use and Climate Controls on Mountain Hydrology and Water Quality

Mountain ecosystems are ideal laboratories for the detection of change related to local, regional, and global anthropogenic impacts. Steep gradients in climate, vegetation, and soils are distinctive characteristics of mountain ecosystems. This natural variability gives rise to dynamic and variable forms of human land use, and the vertical zonation of mountain ecosystems makes them especially sensitive to climate changes. Recognizing the vulnerability of mountain ecosystems to human perturbations and the potential of mountain systems to serve as early warning systems for large-scale changes in climate, the International Geosphere-Biosphere Program recently launched a new initiative, Global Change and Mountain Regions. Here we seek papers that explore strategies for detecting signals of global environmental change in mountain environments, linkages between climate change and water balances, linkages between environmental change and water quality, approaches to analysis of intensive site data or extensive regional data sets, and modeling studies at the plot to regional scale.

Conveners: Jeffrey McDonnell, Department of Forest Engineering, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97331-5706 USA, Tel: +1-541-737-8720, Fax: +1-541-737-4316, E-mail: jeff.mcdonnell@orst.edu Mark Williams, Institute of Arctic and Alpine Research, University of Colorado, Campus Box 450, 1560 30th St., Boulder, CO 80309-0450 USA, Tel: +1-303-492-8830, Fax: +1-303-492-6388, E-mail: markw@snobear.colorado.edu

H32 Water Quality Impacts of Contaminated Sediments (Joint With SEDI)

Sediment contamination is prevalent in U.S. waterways, notably in lakes, rivers, and estuaries near major urban and industrial centers. Investigation of contaminated sediments requires an interdisciplinary approach, because physical processes control bulk sediment mobility, but often the contaminant of interest is a reactive constituent that has become associated with the sediments. This session seeks to explore the interdisciplinary nature of sediment-related environmental problems by examining the mechanisms by which sediments become contaminated, properties of contaminated sediments, and impacts of contaminated sediments on water quality and ecological systems. Appropriate papers could analyze topics such as contaminant interactions with fluvial, lacustrine, estuarine, and marine sediments; the properties, mobility, and transport of contaminated sediments; releases of contaminants from sediments to biota or overlying waters; and remediation strategies for sediment-related contamination.

Conveners: Aaron Packman, Department of Civil and Architectural Engineering, Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA 19104 USA, Tel: +1-215-895-2087, Fax: +1-215-895-1363, E-mail: apack@drexel.edu Karen Prestegaard, Dept. of Geology, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742-0001 USA, Tel: +1-301-405-6982, Fax: +1-301-314-9661, E-mail: kpresto@glue.umd.edu

H33 Dissolved Organic Matter in Surface Water and Groundwater: Characterization, Production, Transport, and Fate (Joint With B)

Recent work suggests that hydrologic flow paths, microbial processes, soil mineralogy, and soil nutrient balance can all affect the concentration and flux of colloidal and dissolved organic matter (DOM) in surface water and groundwater. In many cases physical, chemical, and biological processes are intimately linked, and their relationships may change over time. Understanding this complex set of interactions is an ongoing challenge for biogeochemists. Appropriate topics for this session would include physical and chemical control of DOM concentrations along flow paths; microbial production and consumption of DOM; measurement or prediction of DOM flux at local, regional, or biome scales; photodegradation of DOM; methods to characterize organic matter (fluorescence spectra, physical separations, and NMR); and links between cycling of DOM and dissolved organic nitrogen or other nutrients. Papers are expected to include studies of DOM dynamics at different spatial scales, in a variety of terrestrial and aquatic environments.

Conveners: William H. McDowell, Department of Natural Resources, University of New Hampshire, 219 James Hall, Durham, NH 03824 USA, Tel: +1-603-862-2249, Fax: +1-603-862-4976, E-mail: bill.mcdowell@unh.edu Jacqueline A. Aitkenhead Peterson, Department of Natural Resources, University of New Hampshire, 215 James Bldg., Durham, NH 03824 USA, Tel: +1- 603-862-1020, Fax: +1-603-862-4976, E-mail: jaa@cisunix.unh.edu Elizabeth Boyer, College of Environmental Science and Forestry, State University of New York, 1 Forestry Dr., Syracuse, NY 13210 USA, Tel: +1-315-470-4818, E-mail: boyer@syr.edu

H34 Interactions Between Groundwater and Surface Water: Bridging the Gap Between Theory and Observation

Quantifying water and solute exchange between the groundwater and surface water bodies is increasingly important to improving our understanding of how to manage water use, contaminants, and ecology of environmental systems with significant surface and groundwater resources. Historically, small-scale measurements utilizing minipiezometers and seepage meters were the benchmark of these investigations. More recently the use of environmental and introduced solute tracers has helped to increase the scope of investigations by extending the time and spatial scales. In practice many of the models that are used to interpret data are overly simplified, with too many empirical parameters that must be calibrated, or overly complex to the point that sensitivity analyses are not practical. We encourage contributions that address progress in the field of groundwater-surface water interactions through creative use of field methods and models. Examples include field measurements that highlight the issue of scale, and models that consider spatial or temporal uncertainty, or models that provide novel formulations with an improved physical basis.

Conveners: Michel C. Boufadel, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Temple University, 1947 N. 12th St., Room 517, Philadelphia, PA 19122 USA, Tel: +1-215-204-7871, Fax: +1-215-204-4696, E-mail: boufadel@astro.temple.edu Judson Harvey, U.S. Geology Survey, 430 National Center, Reston, VA 20192 USA, Tel: +1-703-648-5876, Fax: +1-703-648-5484, E-mail: jwharvey@usgs.gov

H35 Arsenic in Natural Waters

Arsenic contamination of ground- and surface water poses a significant threat to public water supplies in the United States and around the world. A 1999 report on health effects of arsenic conducted by the National Research Council has implicated arsenic as a carcinogen, prompting the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to propose a lowered maximum contaminant level for arsenic. Many recent studies have focused on documenting occurrence of arsenic contamination. However, the processes that control arsenic contamination of water are still poorly understood. The focus of this multidisciplinary session will be to explore the hydrologic, geologic, and biogeochemical controls on arsenic mobility in natural waters. We are especially interested in studies that address mechanisms of (1) arsenic release from naturally occurring sources and (2) arsenic transport through subsurface and surface environments. Presentations that focus on identifying processes, in addition to documenting occurrence, are especially encouraged.

Conveners: Madeline Schreiber, Department of Geological Sciences, Virginia Tech, Derring Hall 0420, Blacksburg, VA 24061-0410 USA, Tel: +1-540-231-3377, Fax: +1-540-231-3386, E-mail: mschreib@vt.edu Jim Yount, U.S. Geological Survey, Box 25046, Denver Federal Center MS 980, Denver, CO 80225-0046, Tel: +1-303-236-5397, Fax: +1-303-236-5349, E-mail: jyount@usgs.gov Alan Welch, U.S. Geological Survey, Water Resources Division, 333 W. Nye La., Carson City, NV 89706 USA, Tel: +1-775-887-7609, Fax: +1-775-887-7629, E-mail: ahwelch@usgs.gov

Unsaturated Zone

H36 Radioactive and Mixed Waste in the Vadose Zone: Characterization, Experimental Studies, and Modeling

Vadose zone contamination from radioactive and mixed wastes is present at many Department of Energy sites, including Hanford, the Nevada Test Site, Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Savannah River, and others. Assessing, managing, and remediating the associated environmental hazards requires a holistic and systematic understanding of the conditions and mechanisms that control contaminant behavior in the subsurface. Coordinated programs of research encompassing characterization, experiments, and modeling are being directed to improve the scientific basis for site-specific waste management decisions. This special session is a forum for these hydrologic and biogeochemical investigations of processes, conditions, and features that control the behavior of radioactive and mixed waste in the vadose zone. Topics will focus on (1) field and laboratory characterization of contaminants, material properties, fluid flow, transport, and reactions; (2) modeling of coupled processes in laboratory and field settings; and (3) treatment of uncertainty at the parameter, process, multiprocess, and large-scale simulation levels of detail.

Conveners: Steve Yabusaki, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, PO Box 999, Richland, WA 99352 USA, Tel: +1-509-372-6095, Fax: +1-509-372-6089, E-mail: yabusaki@pnl.gov. John Zachara, PNNL; Tel: +1-509-376-3254; Fax: +1-509-376-3650; E-mail: john.zachara@pnl.gov: Glendon Gee, PNNL, Tel: +1-509-372-6096; Fax: +1-509-372-6089; E-mail: glendon.gee@pnl.gov: Fred Mann, Flour Federal Services, Tel: +1-509-382-9204; fax: +1-509-372-9447; E-mail: Frederick_M_Mann@apimc01.rl.gov

H37 Heat and Mass Transfer in the Vadose Zone: John Philip and His Influence

John R. Philip (1927-1999) was one of the world's foremost environmental physicists/hydrologists. He published over 300 scientific papers in soil science, hydrology, and geophysics, mostly on heat and mass transfer in the biosphere. He is best known for his studies on the infiltration of water into soil, which led to the "Philip infiltration equation." He also published extensively on coupled heat and moisture movement, fluid mechanics in porous media, swelling soils, micrometeorology, and physical ecology. The session will include invited talks on the work and influence in hydrology of John Philip, and contributed presentations on the above topics. Oral and poster presentations are solicited, with an emphasis on the influence of John Philip or on extensions of his work.

Conveners: John Knight, CSIRO Land and Water, GPO Box 1666, Canberra, ACT 2601, Australia, Tel: +61-2-6246-5566, Fax: +61-2-6246-5800, E-mail: john.knight@cbr.clw.csiro.au Stephen Burges, Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Washington, 160 Wilcox Hall, Box 352700, Seattle, WA 98195-2700 USA, Tel: +1-206-543-7135, Fax: +1-206-685-3836, E-mail: sburges@u.washington.edu

H38 Environmental Vadose Zone Hydrology

The vadose zone serves many important environmental roles and is an important link as well as a buffer between the land surface-atmosphere and groundwater. Poster presentations are invited on a broad range of topics in environmental vadose zone hydrology including field investigations, laboratory studies, and modeling analyses. Topics may include unsaturated and multiphase flow and transport processes, plant-soil interaction, evaluation and modeling of heterogeneous systems, assessment of prediction uncertainty, biogeochemical and colloidal matter processes, measurement techniques, and monitoring of vadose zone systems.

Conveners: Thomas Harter, Department of Land, Air, and Water Resources, University of California, Davis, CA 95616 USA, Tel: +1-559-646-6500, Fax: +1-559-646-6593, E-mail: thharter@ucdavis.edu Mike Young, Division of Hydrological Sciences, Desert Research Institute, 755 E. Flamingo Rd., Las Vegas, NV 89119 USA, Tel: +1-702-895-0489, Fax: +1-702-895-0427 E-mail: michael@dri.edu

B05 The Influence of Hydrosphere-Biosphere Interactions on the Speciation and Transport of Metals in Surface Waters (Joint With H)

The interplay between transport and reaction processes determines the fate of many metal contaminants in aquatic systems. In most instances, chemical reactions are driven/catalyzed by biological systems that in turn influence the reactivity and speciation of contaminants. In addition, flow regimes exert selective pressures for the establishment of various biotopes. This session will examine how the interplay between hydrologic and biogeochemical processes controls the reactivity, mobility, transport, and fate of metals in surface waters, and how these processes affect biological systems. We especially encourage presentations that examine the interdisciplinary nature of these processes, such as the analysis of feedback mechanisms involving the uptake of metals by biota, biotic control of metal speciation, and the mobility of metals in aquatic systems.

Conveners: Jean-Francois Gaillard, Department of Civil Engineering, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Rd., Evanston, IL 60208-3109 USA, Tel: +1-847-467-1376, Fax: +1-847-491-4011, E-mail: jf-gaillard@northwestern.edu Aaron Packman, Department of Civil and Architectural Engineering, Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA 19104 USA, Tel: +1-215-895-2087, Fax: +1-215-895-1363, E-mail: pack@drexel.edu

B06 Nitrogen-Cycling Processes in Rivers and Streams (Joint With H)

Delivery of nitrogen to coastal waters by rivers and streams is a topic of growing national and international concern. A major aspect of N-loading to coastal environments is the net effect of in-stream processes during transport. Much remains unknown about nitrogen-cycling processes within rivers of any scale, or how these processes interact with the hydrologic cycle and other biogeochemical cycles to affect nitrogen transport. This session will focus on in-stream nitrogen-cycling processes, particularly nitrification and denitrification, and quantitative field studies to assess their impact. Presentations are encouraged that describe factors controlling nitrogen transformation; the extent to which geochemical signals, such as stable isotope ratios and trace constituents (e.g., nitrite and nitrous oxide), can be used to characterize nitrogen-cycling processes; and studies comparing methodologies for assessing these processes in situ.

Conveners: Richard L. Smith, U.S. Geological Survey, 3215 Marine St., Boulder, CO 80303 USA, Tel: +1-303-541-3032, Fax: +1-303-447-2505, E-mail: rlsmith@usgs.gov and Frank J. Triska, U. S. Geological Survey, 345 Middlefield Rd., Mail Stop 439, Menlo Park, CA 94025 USA, Tel: +1-650-329-4437, Fax: +1-650-329-4463, E-mail: fjtriska@usgs.gov

B08 New Breakthroughs in Field-Scale Bacterial Transport (Joint With H)

Microbial transport in the presence of subsurface physical and chemical heterogeneities is poorly understood due to the limited number of successful field experiments. This lack of understanding hinders the design of bioaugmentation strategies, the modeling of pathogen contamination in the groundwater, and assessment of the hydrodynamic impact of introduced organisms to the subsurface microbial communities. In this session new and innovative field-scale bacterial transport approaches and results will be presented and discussed. This session will highlight results of a field-scale bacterial transport experiment conducted near the town of Oyster, Virginia, including the design optimization of microbial strains, tracer test experimental parameters and instrumentation, multiscale hydrogeological characterization, novel methods for tracking bacteria, the effects of physical and chemical heterogeneity on field-scale bacterial transport, quantification of microbial transport processes for modeling, variations in microbial ecology associated with the experiment, and the effects of predation on bacterial transport. This session should be of interest to a broad audience interested in bioaugmentation strategies for bioremediation, and participation by all researchers working on these issues is encouraged.

Conveners: Susan Hubbard, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Rd., MS 90-1116, Berkeley, CA 94720 USA, Tel: +1- 510-486-5266, E-Mail; sshubbard@lbl.gov: Brian Mailloux, Department of Geosciences, Princeton University, 114 Guyot Hall, Princeton, NJ 08544 USA, Tel: +1-609-258-1622, E-mail: mailloux@geo.princeton.edu Tim Scheibe, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, PO Box 999, MSIN K9-36, 902 Battelle Blvd., Richland, WA 99352 USA, Tel: +1-509-372-6065 E-mail: tim.scheibe@pnl.gov

B10 Land-Atmosphere Interactions, I, Arctic Transitions (Joint With A, H)

This session will focus on spatial and temporal patterns and controls over land-atmosphere surface exchange of mass and energy in arctic tundra and in transition regions between arctic tundra and boreal forest. High-latitude ecosystems play an important role in the functioning of the earth system because they occupy a large area; are sensitive to changes in climate; influence the exchanges of water, energy, and radiatively active gases with the atmosphere; and affect regional and global climate. Functional responses of arctic tundra to climate variability and change have the potential to influence global climate through the exchange of radiatively active gases with the atmosphere. Spatial variation in vegetation within arctic tundra has substantial climatic effects that extend beyond tundra. Structural responses, which include treeline changes and vegetation changes associated with fire, may substantially alter water and energy exchange in transitional regions of arctic and boreal vegetation to influence regional climate. Abstracts are solicited on relationships among vegetation, soils, permafrost, snow, and climate in arctic regions that have implications for regional and global climate.

Conveners: A. David McGuire, Institute of Arctic Biology, University of Alaska, Fairbanks, AK 99775 USA, Tel: +1-907-474-6242, Fax: +1-907-474-6716, E-mail: ffadm@uaf.edu Matthew Sturm, U.S. Army Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory, PO Box 35170, Ft. Wainwright, AK 99703-0170 USA, Tel: +1-907-353-5183, Fax: +1-907-353-5142, E-mail: msturm@crrel41.crrel.usace.army.mil

B11 Land-Atmosphere Interactions, II, North Africa (Joint With A, H)

This session focuses on the interactions between the atmosphere and the terrestrial biosphere over north Africa as well as change and variability of the coupled biosphere-atmosphere-ocean system. Relevant topics include, but are not limited to, the natural coevolution of the biosphere-atmosphere system; the influence of the ocean, in particular sea surface temperatures and their variability, on the biosphere-atmosphere interaction; the role of the terrestrial biosphere in both the modern climate and the paleoclimate; reconstruction of paleoclimate; impact of anthropogenic land cover changes.

Conveners: Guiling Wang, Princeton Environmental Institute, 27 Guyot Hall, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544-1003 USA, Tel: +1-609-258-3511, E-mail: gwang@princeton.edu Martin Claussen, Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research, PO Box 601203, 14412 Potsdam, Germany, Tel: +49-331-288-2522, Fax: +49-331-288-2600, E-mail: claussen@pik-potsdam.de

B16 Biospheric Results from Terra, NASA’s Earth Observing System (Joint With A, H, OS)

The launch of National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Earth Observing System (EOS) Terra on December 18, 1999, marked a new phase of climate and global change research, especially for increased understanding of the interaction of the land and ocean biology with climate. Terra has scientific instruments to gain information about the Earth's land, oceans, and atmospheres with unprecedented accuracy. Of the five scientific instruments, three are germane to land and ocean remote sensing: the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), the Multiangle Imaging Spectroradiometer (MISR), and the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER). This session would focus on results of biospheric research utilizing the Terra spacecraft. Invited papers will be concerned with results of using Terra instruments (MODIS, MISR, and ASTER) for land cover and change, vegetation attributes such as leaf area index and absorptance of photosynthetically radiation, and links into ecosystem models. Recent work by the oceans community regarding chlorophyll and productivity will also be solicited to make the session representative of Terra's biospheric science research.

Convener: Jon Ranson, Biospheric Sciences Branch, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 923, Greenbelt, MD 20771 USA, Tel: +1-301-614-6650, Fax: +1-301-614-6695, E-mail: jon.ranson@gsfc.nasa

G01 The New Generation of Gravity Mapping: Early Results from CHAMP and Preparation for GRACE (Joint With H)

In July 2000 we expect the CHAMP spacecraft to be launched, providing pioneering measurements of the Earth's gravity and magnetic fields, plus a useful validation of several GRACE technologies, including the accelerometer, star camera, and basic spacecraft design. The GRACE mission is currently expected to launch in late summer or early fall of 2001. By the end of 2000, most of the data analysis and calibration algorithms and plans are expected to be largely reviewed and in place. This session is an excellent opportunity to provide a full explanation of these algorithms and plans to the scientific user community. We solicit papers relating to oceanographic, hydrological, glaciological, or solid earth interpretation of CHAMP, GRACE, or other gravity data; early results from the CHAMP mission; and the latest detailed descriptions of GRACE analysis algorithms and plans, including such topics as the use of the accelerometer, K-band and GPS data, reducing the effects of tidal and atmospheric aliasing, combination of satellite-based gravity fields with surface gravity, and mean sea surface gravity information.

Conveners: Michael Watkins, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, MS 301-125, 4800 Oak Grove Dr., Pasadena, CA 91109-8099 USA, Tel: +1- 818-354-7514, Fax: +1-818-393-6388, E-mail: Michael.Watkins@jpl.nasa.gov Christoph Reigber, GeoForschungsZentrum Potsdam, Kinematics and Dynamics of the Earth, Telegrafenberg A17, 14473 Potsdam, Germany, Tel: +49-331-288-1100, Fax: +49-331-288-1111, E-mail: reigber@gfz-potsdam.de John Wahr, Department of Physics, University of Colorado, Campus Box 390, Boulder, CO 80309-0390 USA, Tel: +1-303-492-8349, Fax: +1-303-492-3352, E-mail: wahr@lemond.colorado.edu

G03 Ice Mass Fluctuations: From Geophysical Observations to Inferences of Earth Rheology (Joint With H, S, T)

Geodesy has emerged as an important technique to monitor ice mass changes (e.g. GPS, gravity, INSAR, altimetry, and Earth orientation measurements). In addition to submissions on these techniques and their application to ice mass studies, we are interested in addressing how glacial fluctuation records can be used to probe the rheology of the crust and mantle. Additional questions this session addresses include, What additional data are needed to better constrain the rheological models? What are the stresses associated with glacial fluctuations and how do they compare with the stresses due to ongoing tectonic processes? How do ice mass fluctuations influence background seismicity and change the probability of a large earthquake?

Conveners: Jeanne Sauber, Geodynamics Branch, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 921, Bldg. 33, G310, Greenbelt, MD 20771 USA, Tel: +1-301-614-6465, Fax: +1-301-614-6522, E-mail: jeanne@steller.gsfc.nasa.gov Tonie van Dam, European Centre for Geodynamics and Seismology, 19 rue Josy Welter, L-7256 Walferdange, Luxembourg, Germany, Tel: +35-2-33-14-87, Fax: +35-2-33-61-29, E-mail: tonie@ecgs.lu

OS22 Linking Climate Variability and Coastal Processes (Joint With B, H)

Climate variability, occurring across a range of time-scales, significantly impacts geologic, hydrologic, hydrodynamic, and biologic processes acting in the coastal zone. As climate varies in the future, changes in the intensity, frequency, and location of storms, distribution of rainfall, rate of sea level rise, and water temperature will drive changes in river discharge, nearshore sediment transport, shoreline erosion, and nutrient supply. This session seeks to explore such links between climate variability and coastal processes across a range of time-scales and disciplines as observed in the past and predicted for the future. Abstracts linking climatic and coastal processes are solicited from all relevant disciplines of the natural sciences. Abstracts exploring the societal impacts of changes in coastal processes driven by climate variability are also welcomed.

Conveners: Laura J. Moore, Geology and Geophysics Department, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, MS 22, Woods Hole, MA 02543 USA, Tel: +1-508-289-3597, Fax: +1-508-457-2187, E-mail: lmoore@whoi.edu; Philip Mote, JISAO/SMA Climate Impacts Group, University of Washington, Box 354235, Seattle WA 98195 USA, Tel: +1-206-616-5346, Fax: +1-206-616-5775, E-mail: philip@atmos.washington.edu

T06 Interactions Between Tectonics and Surface Processes (Joint With H, S, NG)

Rapid new advances are now being made in our understanding of surface processes operating in active tectonic settings. Yet there remains a need for greater integration with the latest findings of how faults grow through time. Recently, structural geologists and geophysicists have made significant progress in mapping and modeling spatial and temporal rates of propagation and displacement along tectonic structures. This information is only just beginning to filter through to the geomorphology and sedimentology communities. The manner in which surface processes respond to a fluctuating tectonic signal will play a first-order role in determining the subsequent landscape evolution, as well as the size and location of sediment entry points into basins and the nature and distribution of syntectonic strata. This topic represents an outstanding problem in nonlinear dynamics and is of fundamental importance to our understanding of how coupled geologic processes work. Furthermore, the structural geology and paleoseismology communities can gain useful insights into interpreting the temporal record of active faulting by considering geomorphological and sedimentological evidence. This session is an attempt to fill these needs by bringing together structural geologists, paleoseismologists, geophysicists, geomorphologists, and sedimentologists to discuss the state of the art in understanding coupled structural-geomorphic-sedimentary systems. We welcome interdisciplinary contributions to this session that deal with field observations (structural, paleoseismological, and sedimentological/geomorphological), landscape evolution modeling, fault growth modeling, and theoretical work on the physics of erosion/transport/deposition at different scales in active tectonic settings.

Conveners: Patience Cowie, Department of Geology and Geophysics, Edinburgh University, Edinburgh EH9 3J, UK, Tel: +44-131-650-5886, Fax: +44-131-668-3184, E-mail: cowie@glg.ed.ac.uk Ruth Robinson, School of Geography and Geosciences, University of St Andrews, St Andrews, Fife KY16 9ST, UK, Tel: +01334-463996, E-mail: rajr@st-andrews.ac.uk Gregory E. Tucker, Deparment of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Institute of Technology, Room 48-429 Cambridge, MA 02139 USA, Tel: +1-617-253-7475, E-mail: greg.tucker@geography.oxford.ac.uk

T19 Honoring the Geothermal Work of John H. Sass: From Drilling, Logging, and Laboratory Measurement to Heat Flow and Geodynamics (Joint With H, V, MRP)

John Sass has determined terrestrial heat flow extensively in the conterminous western United States, in Alaska, Canada, Central America, Australia, Liberia, Jordan, Germany, Greenland, and Wales. His interpretations address geodynamic aspects such as stress (e.g., in the San Andreas Fault), extension (e.g., in the Basin and Range province), volcanism (e.g., in Long Valley Caldera), sedimentation (e.g., in the Salton Trough), and metamorphism (e.g., in the Basin and Range province). He is involved in the application of geothermal studies in geothermal energy systems (e.g., in the Geysers), and using temperature as a tracer for fluid flow in waste management applications (e.g., in Yucca Mountain). Sass is an expert in drilling and temperature logging techniques, and has had a major impact on improving laboratory measurements of thermophysical rock properties. We invite contributions that are related to these topics underlining the dualism of making geothermal field measurements and interpreting the results at local, regional and global scales.

Conveners: Daniel Pribnow, Institute for Joint Geoscientific Research, Stilleweg 2, 30655 Hannover, Germany, Tel: +49-511-643-3513, Fax: +49-511-643-3665, E-mail: dan.pribnow@gga-hannover.de David S. Chapman, Department of Geology and Geophysics, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112-9016 USA, Tel: +1-801-581-7642, Fax: +1-801-585-6749, E-mail: dchapman@mines.utah.edu

T20 Basin-Scale Hydrodynamic Systems: Stress State, Pore Pressure, Fluid Flow, and Deformation (Joint With H, OS)

Fluids play a critical role in rock deformation. Similarly, rock and sediment deformation history affect the distribution and magnitude of stress and pore pressure, as well as the migration of fluids. The influence of fluid pressure in controlling deformation and stress state has been observed or inferred in a range of geologic settings, from plate margins to passive margin basins, and at scales from a single fault zone to entire orogenic belts. The effects of fluid flow also extend to the transport and redistribution of heat and chemical species. In both cases, localization of fluid flow and pore pressure is of key importance. This session will explore recent advances in understanding the role of poroelastic stresses in deformation and the effects of high-permeability pathways on fluid flow, slope stability, and advective transport in basin-scale systems. We welcome submissions based on field, modeling (numerical and physical), or experimental work.

Conveners: Brandon Dugan, Department of Geosciences, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 USA, Tel: +1-814-863-9663, E-mail: dugan@geosc.psu.edu Demian Saffer, U.S. Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA 94025 USA, Tel: +1-650-329-5523, E-mail: dsaffer@usgs.gov

NG03 Scaling and the Extremes of Geophysical Fields (Joint With A, H, OS, S, T)

From earthquakes to floods, volcanic eruptions to magnetic storms and hurricanes, the extremes of geophysical fields are of prime importance. However, they are still poorly understood, and time series are often too short to yield the clear-cut empirical evidence necessary to distinguish between different theoretical behaviors. Of particular significance is the distinction between standard extreme value distributions and the nonclassical heavy tailed (algebraic) distributions generally associated with space-time scaling processes. This session will be devoted to the most recent theoretical and empirical developments of scaling approaches to understand and to characterize the interrelation between strong nonlinearities over wide ranges of temporal and spatial scales and their consequences for the extremes. Session topics will include recent empirical investigations; techniques to test for the algebraic fall-offs in probability distributions; statistical estimators and data requirements; comparisons of mean and extreme instabilities/events; the statistics and dynamics of the extremes; the relevance of the paradigm of self-organized criticality; cascades, multifractals, and heavy tails; and nonclassical return period statistics and their implications.

Conveners: Daniel Schertzer, Laboratoire de Modelisation en Mecanique, Centre National de la Reserche Scientifique UMR 7607, Case 162, Université P. et M. Curie, 4 Place Jussieu, F-75252 Paris Cedex 05, France, Tel: +33-1-44-27-4963, Fax: +33-1-44-27-5259, E-mail: schertze@ccr.jussieu.fr Shaun M. Lovejoy, Physics Department, McGill University, 3600 University Str., Montreal, QC H3A 2T8, Canada, Tel: +1-514-398-6537, Fax: +1-514-398-8434, E-mail: lovejoy@physics.mcgill.ca Per Bak, Niels Bohr Institute, Blegdamsvej 17, DK-2100 Copenhagen Ø, Denmark, Tel: +45-353-25393, Fax: +45-353-25016, E-mail: bak@nbi.dk Didier Sornette, Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics and Department of Earth and Space Science, University of California, 3845 Slichter Hall, Box 951567, 595 E. Circle Dr., University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 USA, Tel: +1-310-825-2863, Fax: +1-310-206-3051, E-mail: sornette@moho.ess.ucla.edu

NG05 Fractals, Chaos, and Self-Organized Criticality in Natural and Human-Induced Hazards (Joint With A, H, OS, S, T, V)

Natural and human-induced hazards cover a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. They include a large variety and number of interacting components that combine to produce nonlinear power-law behaviors that are often associated with the basic concepts of complexity. Examples of these hazards include floods, landslides, volcanic eruptions, earthquakes, forest fires, cyclonic storms, droughts, global warming, and hazardous waste contamination. Papers that apply the concepts of fractals, chaos, or self-organized criticality to characterize, model, and assess the risk of natural and man-made hazards are solicited. Posters are also very much encouraged.

Conveners: Bruce D. Malamud, Department of Geography, Kings College London, Strand, London WC2R 2LS, UK, E-mail: bruce@malamud.com Didier Sornette, Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics and Department of Earth and Space Science, University of California, 3845 Slichter Hall, Box 951567, 595 E. Circle Dr., Los Angeles, CA 90095 USA, Tel: +1-310-825-2863, Fax: +1-310-206-3051, E-mail: sornette@moho.ess.ucla.edu Christopher Barton, U. S. Geological Survey, 600 4th St. South, St. Petersburg, FL 33701 USA, Tel: +1-727-803-8747 ext. 3014, Fax: +1-727-803-2030, E-mail: barton@usgs.gov

NG06 Quantifying Predictability in Geophysical Systems II (Joint With A, G, H, OS, SH, T, V)

Our ability to quantify the predictability of nonlinear geophysical systems provides a fundamental bridge between models of geophysical systems and the systems themselves. Uncertainty in the initial condition and errors in model formulation have led to probability forecasts (ensembles) even in deterministic systems. This session will focus on atmospheric and ocean dynamics over hours to centuries (e.g., adaptive observation strategies, Lagrangian and Eulerian approaches, intense short-duration events); theoretical aspects of the dynamics of nonlinear systems relevant to predictability and verification (including multiple models, contrasting modeling strategies, data assimilation); and practical issues in the interpretation and likely economic impact of probabilistic forecasts on a timescale minutes to hours (e.g., precipitation/wind), days to months (e.g., hurricanes), and years to millennia (e.g., earthquakes). A mix of oral and poster presentations of both pure and extremely applied contributions are welcome, and may focus on the predictability of geophysical systems other than those noted explicitly above.

Conveners: Leonard Smith, Oxford University, 24-29 St Giles', Oxford, OX1 3LB, UK, Tel: +44-1865-270-517, Fax: +44-1865-270-515, E-mail: lenny@maths.ox.ac.uk James Hansen, Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Ave., Room 54-1721, Cambridge, MA 02139 USA, Tel: +1-617-253-5935, E-mail: jhansen@mit.edu

NG07 Scaling, Multifractals, and Upscaling and Downscaling Techniques in Precipitation and Hydrology (Joint With A, H)

Hydrological processes are highly nonlinear over wide ranges of temporal and spatial scales. Fractal structures and multifractal statistics are ubiquitous. The corresponding scaling properties quantitatively relate statistics and structures at potentially widely different space-time scales and provide a systematic basis for aggregation (upscaling) and disaggregation (downscaling) techniques. In addition, wide-range scaling can be used for space-time hydrological and precipitation modeling, determining intensity-duration relations, and areal reduction factors. In the past several years, there have been many developments of specific techniques in order to handle these nonclassical scaling behaviors that are at best only poorly handled by conventional analysis and models. This session will be devoted to the most recent theoretical and operational developments and applications of scaling and other innovative approaches to characterizing and modeling of (1) precipitation, in situ (e.g., rain gage) and remotely sensed (e.g. radar) rainfall measurements, nowcasting and multifractal techniques, and extreme precipitation, including the relationship of precipitation with other intermittent atmospheric processes; (2) surface processes, including run-off, river flows, river networks. flooding and their relationship with scaling topography; and (3) groundwater and subsurface processes, in particular transport and dispersion in scaling and hierarchical porous media.

Conveners: Shaun M. Lovejoy, Physics Department, McGill University, 3600 University Str., Montreal, QC H3A 2T8, Canada, Tel.: +1-514-398-6537, Fax: +1-514-398-8434, E-mail: lovejoy@physics.mcgill.ca Daniel Schertzer, Laboratoire de Modelisation en Mecanique, Centre National de la Reserche Scientifique, UMR 7607, Case 162, Université P. et M. Curie, 4 Place Jussieu, F-75252 Paris Cedex 05, France, Tel: +33-1-44-27-4963, Fax: +33-1-44-27-5259, E-mail: schertze@ccr.jussieu.fr John Selker, Department of Bioresource Engineering, Gilmore Hall, Room 240, Corvallis, OR 97331-3906 USA, Tel: +1-541-737-6304, Fax: +1-541-737-2082, E-mail: selkerj@engr.orst.edu

NG08 Scaling Laws and Nonlinear Dynamics in Drainage Basins, Vegetation Patterns, and Geomorphic Processes (Joint With B, H, T)

Drainage basins, stream morphology, the distribution of vegetative communities, and many other landscape features exhibit power functions or other scaling behavior. These scaling laws have long been used in describing drainage basin and stream organization. The availability of digital elevation models of topography and remotely sensed data to obtain topography, vegetation, sedimentation patterns, etc. has expanded our ability to quantify geomorphic and biogeographic patterns and processes. These data can be used to compare the geomorphic and biological organization of landscapes. In addition, some research groups have been measuring sediment transport and other processes so that time series techniques can be used to characterize system behavior. The purpose of this session is to encourage papers that describe and explain scaling characteristics in drainage basins and vegetation patterns. We are also interested in papers that examine nonlinear behavior in geomorphic processes.

Conveners: Karen Prestegaard, Department of Geology, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 USA, Tel: +1-301-405-6982, Fax: +1-301-314-9661, E-mail: kpresto@geol.umd.edu Ralph Dubayah, Deparment of Geography, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 USA, Tel: +1-301-405-4069, Fax: +1-301-314-9299, E-mail: rdubayah@glue.umd.edu Jon Pelletier, Department of Geosciences, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona 85721 USA, Tel: +1-520-626-2126, E-mail: jon@geo.arizona.edu

NG09 Biocomplexity in the Environment (Joint With B, H, OS)

Biocomplexity arises owing to dynamic interactions that occur between biological systems, including humans, and the physical environment. In FY1999 and in FY2000, the National Science Foundation (NSF) held competitions in this area, seeking interdisciplinary projects aimed at understanding the complex behavior observed in such systems. The most recent competition emphasized research that would directly explore nonlinearities, emergent phenomena, or feedbacks within and between biological and environmental systems, or would integrate across multiple components or scales of time and space in order to better understand and predict dynamic behavior. This special session will include an overview of the scientific interests that emerged from the competition and a roundtable discussion, including time for questions from the floor, with some of the grantees about research issues arising in this new area. In addition to the planned overview and roundtable discussion, we actively seek both oral and poster contributions on research in biocomplexity; contributions are not restricted to NSF grantees in the biocomplexity program.

Conveners: Marge Cavanaugh, Office of the Director, National Science Foundation, 4201 Wilson Blvd., Suite 1205, Arlington, VA 22230 USA, Tel.: +1-703-306-1004, Fax: +1-703-306-0109, E-mail: mcavanau@nsf.gov Margaret Leinen, National Science Foundation, 4201 Wilson Blvd., Arlington, VA 22230 USA, Tel.: +1-703-306-1500, Fax: +1-703-306-0372, E-mail: mleinen@nsf.gov Patricia M. Glibert, Horn Point Laboratory, 2020 Horns Point Rd., PO Box 775, Cambridge, MD 21613 USA, Tel: +1-410-221-8422, Fax: +1-410-221-8490, E-mail: glibert@hpl.umces.edu

NG10 Visual Computing in Nonlinear Geophysical Phenomena (Joint With A, G, GP, H, OS, T)

Researchers in geophysics are being overwhelmed by the huge amount of data generated by natural nonlinear phenomena and high-resolution numerical solutions. In this session we will bring together many of the different practioners using modern analytical and visualization tools (e.g., wavelets, eigenvectors, and EOFs) for treating and analyzing large data sets. We are soliciting examples from all areas in geophysics and at all scales, ranging from the molecular level, such as bacteria growth, to core dynamics. Also of great interest are examples from large data sets, such as SAR, ocean currents, and numerical simulations involving the bridging of scales in nonlinear processes. We foresee interest for this session from both numerical modelers and observation-oriented scientists.

Conveners: Dave Yuen, Minnesota Supercomputer Institute, 1200 Washington Ave., S., Minneapolis, MN 55415 USA, Tel: +1-612-624-1868, E-mail: davey@krissy.msi.umn.edu Bryan J. Travis, Los Alamos National Laboratory, ESS 5, MS F665, Los Alamos, NM 55455 USA, Tel: +1-505-667-1254, E-mail: bjt@vega.lanl.gov

NG11 Anomalous Transport in Inhomogeneous and (Multi-)Fractal Geophysical Media (Joint With A, H, OS, T)

Anomalous transport is ubiquitous in geophysics: mantle convection, subsurface hydrology, atmospheric and oceanographic diffusion, geophysical turbulence, solar wind, etc. It is associated with nonstandard scaling (e.g., non-Fickian diffusion), and has been attracting a renewed interest owing to its importance for environmental applications, a larger availability of data, and several recently proposed theoretical approaches: fractal modeling, continuous time random walks, chaotic advection, fractional transport equations, multifractal dispersion coefficients, and multifractal advection equations. This session will focus on the confrontation between the new available data and the new theoretical developments on anomalous transport in scaling and inhomogeneous geophysical media.

Conveners: Ioulia Tchiguirinskaia, Environmental Engineering and Science Department, Clemson University, 342 Computer Ct., Anderson, SC 29625 USA, Tel: +1-864-656-1462, Fax: +1-864-656-0672, E-mail: iouliat@clemson.edu Brian Berkowitz, Deparment of Environmental Sciences and Energy Research, Weizmann Institute of Science, PO Box 26, Rehovot, 76100, Israel, Tel: +972-8-934-2098, Fax: +972-8-934-4124,E-mail: brian.berkowitz@weizmann.ac.il Jeffrey Duan, Deparment of Applied Mathematics, Illinois Institute of Technology, 10 W. 32nd St., Chicago, IL 60616 USA, Tel: +1-312-655-3282, Fax: +1-312-567-3135, E-mail: duan@iit.edu

NG12 Dynamical Structure and Persistence: Nonlinear Analysis of Superposed Natural Processes With Different Characteristic Times (Joint With H)

Nature has complex structure and dynamics, with many different temporal and spatial scales. Therefore, it is often difficult to find reliable descriptions for process dynamics in real systems, even when using modern nonlinear time series tools. If the system dynamics are more complex than periodic, quasi-periodic, or low-dimensional chaos, deterministic prediction of their behavior becomes impossible, even when using observed patterns. At the same time, processes are not always random and often have some nonlinear dynamical structure (high- or low-dimensional). A major challenge is the description and quantification of these process dynamics, examining overall randomness and deterministic chaos by modern methods through their decomposition into constituents, reliable filtration, and noise reduction without distortion of inherent dynamical structure, etc. For example, there is evidence that complex, highly nonlinear processes are characterized by linear long- or short-range correlations (persistence). Linear and nonlinear tools are needed to investigate real dynamics (for example, to accomplish evaluation of nonlinear structure and discriminating statistics, together with the study of the extent of persistence in time series). Recent applications include geophysics, hydrology, climatology, medicine, and economics. We solicit papers that apply decomposition concepts for studying the complex dynamics in atmospheric, geomagnetic, hydrologic, and seismic data and models. Concepts include the use of characteristic times, evaluation of nonlinear structure and/or the use of persistent characteristics for the differentiation of processes, modeling,and looking for new markers for forecasting natural disasters.

Conveners: Tamaz L. Chelidze; Teimuraz N. Matcharashvili, Institute of Geophysics, 1 Alexidze Str., Tbilisi 380093, Georgia, Tel: +995-32-94-35-91, Fax: +995-32-33-28-67, E-mail: tnmat@hotmail.com or root@)geophy.acnet.ge

Ocean Sciences (O)

OS01 The History of Physical Oceanography

In the last 60 years our information about the ocean has increased enormously. Compared to the data available in Sverdrup's day, we are very well off. Observations and descriptions of the ocean, including the deep and abyssal domains, are much more complete and more accurate. Theory has advanced since the time of Wust and Deacon, and we believe we understand far more than the earlier investigators. This session is devoted to providing a historical overview of the advances made since the work of the early pioneers.

Convener: Joseph L. Reid, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California, San Diego, 9500 Gilman Dr., La Jolla, CA 92093-0230 USA, Tel: +1-858-534-2055, Fax: +1-858-534-0704, E-mail: jreid@ucsd.edu

OS02 Nearshore Processes

This special session concerns the dynamics and interactions of wind, waves, currents, sediment transport, and seabed morphology in nearshore waters. Although papers on all aspects of nearshore research are solicited, topics of particular interest include (1) fluid and sediment processes in the swash zone; (2) breaking waves, bottom boundary layers, and associated turbulence; (3) wave- and breaking-wave-induced currents; (4) nearshore sediment transport; (5) and morphology. Papers may discuss small-scale dynamics, intermediate-scale processes, or large-scale coastal behavior. The work may be theoretical, numerical, or experimental in nature. When submitting an abstract for this session, please send a copy to both of the conveners.

Conveners: Britt Raubenheimer, Applied Ocean Physics and Engineering Department, MS 12, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, 266 Woods Hole Rd., Woods Hole, MA 02543 USA, Tel: +1-508-289-3427, Fax: +1-703-997-5891, E-mail: britt@whoi.edu Peter Ruggiero, Coastal Monitoring and Analysis Program, Washington Department of Ecology, PO Box 47600, Olympia, WA 98504 USA, express mail: 300 Desmond Drive, Lacey, WA 98503, Tel: +1-360-407-6230, Fax: +1-360-407-6902, E-mail: prug461@ecy.wa.gov

OS03 Frontiers of Marine Sediment Transport and Continental Margin Geology: A Tribute to Dr. Joe Kravitz

The marine geosciences has seen significant advancement in the 15 years of Joe Kravitz's leadership as an Office of Naval Research G&G division program manager. During his tenure, Kravitz has steered major advances in the field of sediment transport through individual research and through programs such as HEBBLE, STRESS, STRATAFORM, and CMO, to name a few. His leadership in research on marine geology of the continental margin has helped refine investigative techniques, and led to new insights in sequence stratigraphy, sediment history, and evolution of seafloor morphology. Besides invited papers, contributed papers in this session will highlight the advances enabled by Kravitz's sponsorship as well as recent developments in the field.

Conveners: Y. C. Agrawal, Sequoia Scientific, Inc., Westpark Technical Center 15317, NE 90th St., Redmond, WA 98052 USA, Tel: +1-425-867-2464 ext 106, Fax: +1-425-867-5506, E-mail: yogi@sequoiasci.com David A. Cacchione, West Coast Office, Woods Hole Group, 1167 Oddstad Dr., Redwood City, CA 94063 USA, Tel: +1-650-298-0520, Fax: +1-650-298-0523 E-mail: dcacchione@whgrp.com Michael E. Field, U.S. Geological Survey Pacific Science Center, University of California, 1156 High St., Santa Cruz, CA 95064 USA, Tel: +1-831-459-3428, Fax: +1-831-459-3707, E-mail: mef@octopus.wr.usgs.gov Charles A. Nittrouer, School of Oceanography, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 USA, Tel: +1-206-543-5099, Fax: +1-206-543-6073, E-mail: nittroue@ocean.washington.edu

OS04 Sedimentary Records from Semi-Isolated Basins: Amplified Paleoceanographic and Paleoclimatic Histories (Joint With T)

Oceanic subbasins and adjacent seas are often sensitive recorders of paleoclimatic changes because of their smaller size and partial isolation relative to the global ocean. The smaller basins can act as responsive monitors and even amplifiers of global processes. This session invites descriptions of sedimentary records that monitor or magnify global paleoceanographic and paleoclimatic changes from semi-isolated basins such as the Mediterranean Sea, the Sea of Japan, the Cariaco Trench, and the Santa Barbara Basin.

Conveners: Philip A. Meyers, University of Michigan, 3514 C. C. Little Bldg., 425 E. University, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1063 USA, E-mail: pameyers@umich.edu Visiting Fellow (until July 16, 2000): Hanse Wissenschaftskolleg, Lehmkuhlenbusch 4, D-27753 Delmenhorst, Germany; Timothy Herbert, Department of Geological Sciences, Brown University, Box 1846, Providence, RI 02912 USA, Tel: +1-401-863-1207, Fax: +1-401-863-2058, E-mail: timothy_herbert@brown.edu

OS05 IMAGES: Rapid Climatic Changes and Ice Sheets-Ocean-Climate Interactions (Joint With SIP)

IMAGES (International Marine Past Global Change) is an international program with the Institut de Physique du Globe de Paris’s PAGES (Past Global Change) initiative. A critical component of the IMAGES research is the employment of the French research vessel Marion Dufresne, "armed" with the Calypso giant piston coring system. This system has taken suites of piston cores in the range of 20-60 m from a variety of sites from continental margins to deep-sea basins, with the view of recovering sediments that will allow the reconstruction of ocean variability on decadal to millennial timescales. In 1999 an ambitious international cruise was developed as part of the IMAGES program (IMAGES V) with a general research theme of "North Atlantic high resolution study of the variability of surface and deep water hydrology in relation to local and global climate." The cruise consisted of five legs, with changes of researchers in the Caribbean (starting point), Quebec City, Reykjavik, Tromso, Reykjavik, Brest, and ending in Marseilles. Dr E. Jansen from the University of Bergen was the overall Chief Scientist. Canada, the United States, Norway, Germany, United Kingdom, and other countries contributed to ship costs, although the cruise was heavily subsidized by the French government. A major focus was on the retrieval of sediments from sites that would have very high rates of sediment accumulation. Examples of such sites were fjords and shelf-troughs and sediment drifts from sites on the east and northeast Canadian margin, southwest and north Iceland, Norway, Spitsbergen, and East Greenland. Initial AMS 14C dates from these sites indicate that sediment accumulation rates range from 1 to 4 m/ky! Other sites from this and earlier IMAGES cruises have slower rates, but are sufficient to capture ocean variability during MIS 3, 4, and 5 at the same scale as the Greenland Summit ice cores.

Conveners: John T. Andrews, Institute for Arctic and Alpine Research and Department of Geological Sciences, University of Colorado, Box 450, Boulder, CO 80309 USA, Tel: +1-303-492-5183, Fax: +1-303-492-6388, E-mail: andrewsj@spot.colorado.edu Eystein Jansen, Department of Geology, University of Bergen, Allégaten 4, N-5007 Bergen, Norway, Tel: +47-55-583491, Fax: +47-55-584330, E-mail: eystein.jansen@geol.uib.no Laurent Labeyrie, Department des Sciences de la Terre, l'Universite Paris-Sud Orsay, Bt 504, 91405 Orsay, et Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l'Environnement, Unité Mixte CEA-CNRS, Bat 12, Domaine du CNRS, Av. de la Terrasse, F-91198 Gif/Yvette Cedex, France, Tel: +33-1-69-82-35-36, Fax: +33-1-69-82-35-68 E-mail: labeyrie@mailhost.lsce.cnrs-gif.fr

OS06 Redox Processes in Oxygen Deficient Regions of the Ocean (Joint With A, B)

Recent research cruises to locations such as the Arabian Sea, the eastern tropical North Pacific, and the Cariaco Basin have heightened interest in redox processes occurring in oxygen-deficient regions of the ocean. In particular, these environments are sources of atmospheric greenhouse gases such as nitrous oxide, and their sedimentary records may contain valuable paleo-oceangraphic indicators. This session aims to provide a venue for a wide-ranging discussion of the biogeochemistry of these intriguing environments, their affect on global biogeochemical cycles, and the information that their sediments record.

Conveners: Frank Sansone, Oceanography Department, University of Hawaii, 1000 Pope Rd., Honolulu, HI 96822 USA, Tel: +1-808-956-8370, Fax: +1-808-956-7112, E-mail: sansone@soest.hawaii.edu Mary Scranton, Marine Sciences Research Center, State University of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, NY 11794-5000 USA, Tel: +1-631-632-8735, E-mail: mscranton@notes.cc.sunysb.edu

OS07 Geosphere-Biosphere Coupling: Cold Seep Related Carbonate and Mound Formation and Ecology (Joint With B)

Carbonate mounds are prominent reef types during Earth history since Cambrian times. These mounds frequently form giant host rocks for hydrocarbon accumulation. Recent discoveries of spectacular modern carbonate mounds along the United States, African, Asian, and European continental margin provide an outstanding opportunity to study the sedimentary processes of these buildups. Seepage of hydrocarbons may play a role, although a link with fluid expulsion from depth is still poorly understood. As present-day mound provinces occur at or near areas of increased exploration for hydrocarbons, there is an obvious need to better understand their occurrence, origin, and possible relationship to cold seepage or hydrocarbon leakage, as well as to establish their potential impact on seabed stability and relationship to external forcing mechanisms such as climatic change effects.

Conveners: W. C. Dullo, Geomar, Wischhofstrasse 1-3, D-24148 Kiel, Germany, Tel: +49-431-600-2215, Fax: +49-431-600-2925, E-mail: cdullo@geomar.de E. Suess, Geomar, Wischhofstrasse 1-3, D-24148 Kiel, Germany, Tel: +49-431-600-2215, Fax: +49-431-600-2925, E-mail: esuess@geomar.de P. Henriet, Renard Centre of Marine Geology, University of Ghent, Krijgslaan 281 S8, B-9000 Ghent, Belgium, Tel: +32-9-264-45-85, Fax: +32-9-264-49-67, E-mail: jeanpierre.henriet@rug.ac.be Tjeerd C. E. van Weering, NIOZ, PO Box 59, Texel, 1790 AB Den Burg, The Netherlands, Tel: +31-222-369395, Fax: +31-222-319674, E-mail: tjeerd@nioz.nl William W. Sager, Department of Oceanography, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77843-3146 USA, Tel: +1-979-845-9828, Fax: +1-979-845-6331, E-mail: wsager@ocean.tamu.edu

OS08 Cenozoic Antarctic Glacial Evolution: The Marine Geologic Record (Joint With GP, T, SIP)

In recent years, the Ocean Drilling Program has conducted a series of cruises to the Antarctic continental margin as well as to the Southern Ocean (here broadly defined as the ocean between the southern continents and Antarctica). In addition, research vessels of various nations have conducted geologic investigations in the far reaches of the Southern Ocean and along the Antarctic margin. Studies on cores and geologic samples collected by these expeditions continue to yield exciting results on Cenozoic high-latitude paleoenvironments. The proposed session will bring together scientists involved in Antarctic and sub-Antarctic marine geological research that is focused on Cenozoic Antarctic glacial history and its record in the marine environment. Emphasis will be on geologic sampling of the current and former continental margins of Antarctica and links to deep ocean records of Cenozoic glaciations.

Conveners: Detlef “Dietz”Warnke, Department of Geological Sciences, California State University, Hayward, CA 94542 USA, Tel: +1-510-885-4716, Fax: +1-510-885-2526, E-mail: dwarnke@csuhayward.edu Alan K. Cooper, Department of Geological and Environmental Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 USA, Tel: +1-650-723-0817, Fax: +1-650-725-2199, E-mail: akcooper@pangea.stanford.edu

OS09 Ocean Observations: A Session in Celebration of Russ Davis's 60th Birthday

Russ Davis is one of the most influential oceanographers of his era. His work has focused on ocean observations and the novel use of data to address important oceanographic problems. This session will be a celebration of Russ's legacy in physical oceanography. Contributions are invited in any of the many topics that make up observational oceanography. Observations from microscales to basin scales, surface waves to abyssal flow, are of interest. Contributions on measurement techniques and instrument development are welcome. Presentations using novel methods of data analysis are particularly encouraged.

Convener: Daniel L. Rudnick, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California, San Diego, Mail Code 0230, La Jolla, CA 92093-0230 USA, Tel: +1-858-534-7669, Fax: +1-858-534-9820, E-mail: drudnick@ucsd.edu

OS10 Timing and Effects of the Opening of the Drake Passage (Joint With T)

The evolution of the cryosphere during the Cenozoic has been linked to the opening of the Drake Passage and the development of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current. These events would have greatly impacted global thermohaline circulation, regional and global climates, nutrient distributions, and water mass characteristics. Precise timing of the opening of the passage is essential to understanding the controls on paleoceanographic and paleoclimatic events; however, there is little agreement on the age and character of the opening to both shallow and deep water flow. For this session we welcome papers addressing the timing of the opening of the Drake Passage or the influence of the passageway on paleoceanography or paleoclimatology. Contributions utilizing tectonic, geophysical, sedimentological, paleontological, and geochemical data are welcome.

Conveners: Ellen E. Martin, Department of Geological Sciences, University of Florida, 241 Williamson Hall, PO Box 112120, Gainesville, FL 32611 USA, Tel: +1-352-392-2141, Fax: +1-352-392-9294, E-mail: emartin@geology.ufl.edu Mark Pagani, Earth Sciences Department, Earth and Marine Sciences Bldg., University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 USA, Tel: +1-831-459-5207, Fax: +1-831-459-3074, E-mail: pagani@es.ucsc.edu

OS11 Sediment Rafting by Marine, Fluvial, and Lacustrine Ice (Joint With SIP)

Sediment that is entrained into seasonal ice can be widely dispersed if the ice is mobile. The ice buoyancy carries entrained sediment past normal (hydraulic) sediment transport barriers. This is a cause of concern in the Arctic Ocean, where potentially contaminated sediment may be dispersed throughout the basin by drifting ice. Sediment-laden seasonal ice has been documented in oceans, rivers, and lakes. For this session we solicit presentations of field observations, modeling efforts, and laboratory studies that elucidate ice rafting in diverse environments. Topics of particular interest include (1) observations or models of environmental conditions that lead to sediment entrainment into the ice cover, including interactions of frazil and anchor ice with sediment; (2) descriptions of sediment entrained into ice covers (mineralogy, grain size, grain surface characteristics, sorbed contaminants, etc.); (3) observations or models that identify sources and fates of ice-rafted material in different environments; and (4) studies that assess the relative importance of ice rafting to other sediment transport mechanisms. The goal of this session is to come to a better understanding sediment transport by ice in all aqueous environments.

Conveners: Ed Kempema, Geology and Geophysics, University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY 82072 USA, Tel: +1-307-766-2885, Fax: +1-307-766-6679, E-Mail: kempema@uwyo.edu Erk Reimnitz, Geomar Wischhofstrasse 1-3, Geb. 4, D-24148 Kiel, Germany, Tel: +1-650-329-5285, E-Mail: erk@octopus.wr.usgs.gov

OS12 Air-Wave-Sea Interaction (Joint With A, NG)

Momentum and energy transfers across the air-sea interface under realistic ocean conditions are important not only in theoretical studies, but also in many applications, including marine and oceanic forecast and climate modeling on all scales. Most difficulties that arise in air-sea coupling studies are at the interface (the surface wave layer) of the two fluids. Surface waves are believed to be an important supplier of turbulent energy, besides shear production of the classical turbulence theory. Recent theoretical and experimental studies have contributed to a better understanding of the complex wind-wave-turbulence-current relationship. Therefore, surface wave parameterization and wave-dependent surface characteristics (roughness length, drag coefficient, turbulent dissipation), taking into account the wind-wave-turbulence-current relationship, have a very important role, not only in small-scale models, but also in larger scale forecast and climate models. Lately, air-wave-sea coupled systems have been developed by various national and international groups using a different coupling physics. This special section will be a forum to exchange ideas and results between marine and oceanic small scale and larger scale coupled modeling and experimental researchers.

Convener: Le Ly, Department of Oceanography, Naval Postgraduate School, Code Oc/Le, Monterey,CA 93943 USA, Tel: +1-831-656-3257, Fax: +1-831-656-2712, E-mail: lely@nps.navy.mil

OS13 Estuarine Circulation, Mixing, and Modeling

Recent advances in high-resolution observational tools such as ADCP and ToYo-CTD surveys have shed new light on estuarine physical processes, particularly the detailed spatial structure of currents and stratification within a single tidal cycle. Turbulence measurements being made with profiling and moored instruments have begun to map out the crucial fields of diapycnal property fluxes. At the same time, 3-D numerical modeling has become a routine tool in most major estuaries, and model-data comparisons can be made with much greater confidence than in the past. Nonetheless the proper measurement and modeling of mixing processes is the source of greatest uncertainty as we move into an era of understanding biophysical interactions in estuaries. Contributions are invited that examine these issues, whether observationally, using realistic models, or theoretically. Contributions are also strongly encouraged from those studying biological-physical interactions in estuaries.

Conveners: Parker MacCready, Oceanography, University of Washington, Box 357940, Seattle, WA 98195-7940 USA, Tel: +1-206-685-9588, E-mail: parker@ocean.washington.edu Rocky Geyer, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute, Mail Stop 12, Woods Hole, MA 02543 USA, Tel: +1-508-289-2868, E-mail: rgeyer@whoi.edu

OS14 High-Resolution Plio-Pleistocene Climatic Variability in Southern High Latitudes

We propose a session focusing on Plio-Pleistocene climatic variability in southern-high latitudes on centennial to millennial scales as documented in Southern Ocean sediment records and in continental ice. We like to discuss the role of southern high latitudes in the global climate system during this session. This will include results obtained from Ocean Drilling Program Leg 177 sites with high temporal resolution drilled in the Atlantic sector of the Southern Ocean. Of all the sectors of the Southern Ocean, the South Atlantic is perhaps the most tightly coupled to high-latitude North Atlantic climate change, because of its geographic proximity and the fact that it represents the initial entry point of North Atlantic Deep Water into the Antarctic Circumpolar Current. Anticipated topics include southern high-latitude centennial-millennial-scale climate variability and its relationship to climatic change in other latitudes, marine sediment and ice core record correlation, stability of Antarctic continental ice, high-resolution Plio-Pleistocene paleoceanography (e.g., surface water temperature, productivity, sea ice distribution, water mass structure and circulation, wind fields) and modeling of southern high-latitude-related paleoclimatic processes.

Convenors: Rainer Gersonde, Alfred-Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine Research, PO 120161, D-27515 Bremerhaven, Germany, E-mail: rgersonde@awi-bremerhaven.de David Hodell, Department of Geology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 USA, E-mail: hodell@nersp.nerdc.ufl.edu

OS15 The Ocean Carbon Cycle: Basin-to Global-Scale Observations and Models

Recent analyses based on observations from the World Ocean Circulation Experiment/Joint Global Ocean Flux Study (JGOFS)/National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration global survey cruises are yielding new insights into the global distribution of natural and anthropogenic carbon as well as other important biogeochemical tracers (e.g., CFCs, radiocarbon, nutrients). Recent model intercomparison efforts, such as the Ocean Carbon-cycle Model Intercomparison Project (OCMIP), are helping to improve our understanding of how differing model characteristics affect predicted distributions of carbon and other tracers. A close interaction between observationalists and modelers, like that promoted by the JGOFS Synthesis and Modeling Project, is required to better understand and accurately predict the behavior of the global ocean carbon cycle. We invite the contribution of papers analyzing observations or model results in the context of the basin- to global-scale ocean carbon cycle. Contributions on noncarbon tracers are encouraged if they relate to processes or relations that are important to the carbon cycle. Papers may focus on past, present, or future functioning of the carbon cycle, and may employ any level of model complexity or model/data association.

Conveners: Christopher Sabine, NOAA/Pacific MarineEnvironmental Laboratory, 7600 Sand Point Way NE, Seattle, WA 98115 USA, Tel: +1-206-526-4809, Fax: +1-206-526-6744, E-mail: sabine@pmel.noaa.gov Ken Caldeira, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Ave., L-103, Livermore, CA 94550 USA, Tel: +1-925-423-4191, Fax: +1-925- 422-6388, E-mail: kenc@llnl.gov

OS16 Modeling the Global Climate

This session will focus on use of numerical models to understand human influences on climate. General areas to be examined are evaluation of climate models, comparison of model results to observations, prediction of future climate, and understanding the roles of human activities and natural variability in recent climate changes. Examples of suitable topics include effects of human activities (increased greenhouse gases, aerosols, land use change) on mean climate; effects of human activities on El Niño-Southern Oscillation and other models of natural climate variability; evaluation of strategies to mitigate climate change via climate models; feedback between climate change and atmospheric chemistry; detection of anthropogenic climate change; hindcasting the climate of the 20th century; understanding why different climate models give contrasting results; effects of solar variability and volcanoes on climate variability; and effects of grid resolution, model numerics, and physical parameterizations on model results.

Conveners: Philip B. Duffy, Climate and Carbon Cycle Modeling Group, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, L-103, PO Box 808, 7000 East Ave., Livermore, CA 94550 USA, Tel: +1-925-422-3722, Fax: +1-925-422-6388, E-mail: pduffy@llnl.gov Benjamin D. Santer, Program for Climate Model Diagnosis and Intercomparison, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, L-103, PO Box 808, Livermore, CA 94550 USA, E-mail: bsanter@pcmdi.llnl.gov

OS17 Oceanography of the Western Pacific Marginal Seas

The marginal seas of the western Pacific Ocean contain varied circulation and biological systems, with varied impact on the open Pacific, and with importance as relatively small and hence accessible laboratories for understanding general physical and biological processes. Observational and modeling projects have been carried out recently in the Japan (East) Sea, the Okhotsk Sea, the Bering Sea, and the East China Sea. Papers are solicited in all aspects of physical, optical, biological, and chemical oceanography and paleoceanography, including both observational and modeling work. Papers are welcome on both processes inherent to the marginal seas and also on their connection with the Pacific Ocean.

Conveners: Lynne Talley, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California, San Diego, Mail Code 0230, 9500 Gilman Dr., La Jolla, CA 92093-0230 USA, Work: +1-858-534-6610, Fax: +1-858-534-9820, E-mail: ltalley@ucsd.edu Stephen C. Riser, School of Oceanography, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 USA, Tel: +1-206-543-1187, Fax: +1-206-329-0858, E-mail: riser@ocean.washington.edu Steven Ramp, Department of Oceanography, Code OC/Ra, Naval Postgraduate School, Monterey, CA 93943 USA, Tel: +1-831-656-2201, Fax: +1-831-656-2712, E-mail: ramp@oc.nps.navy.mil

OS18 Oceanic and Atmospheric Climatologies of the Americas (Joint with A)

This session invites papers reporting on new results in the development of oceanic and atmospheric climatologies. We wish to focus mainly on the question of how these products are used to investigate the climate variability of the Americas.

Conveners: Edgar G. Pavia, CICESE, a.p. 2732, PO Box 434844, Ensenada, B.C. 22800, Mexico, Tel: +526-1745050 x 24060, Fax: +526-1750547, E-mail: epavia@cicese.mx James J. O'Brien, 2035 E. Paul Dirac Dr., R.M. Johnson Bldg., Suite 200, Tallahassee, FL 32310 USA, Tel: +1-850-644-4581, Fax: +1-850-644-4841, E-mail: obrien@coaps.fsu.edu

OS19 Nontraditional Oceanographic Applications for Oceanographic Data (Joint With G, NG)

Today, oceanographers, geophysicists, geodesists, and climate researchers are using a large amount of oceanographic data (i.e., numerical models, satellite observations, and in-situ measurements) to conduct non-traditional oceanographic research. This session will provide a forum for expanding the dialogue between these communities by addressing the following two issues. The first issue the session will address is the advances in instrumentation and modeling, and future oceanographic related studies. The second issue this session will emphasize is the application of these datasets to non-traditional oceanographic research and how this non-traditional research can enhance our understanding of large-scale and mesoscale oceanic variability.

Conveners: Thomas Johnson, U.S. Naval Observatory, 3450 Massachusetts Ave. NW, Washington DC 20392-5420 USA, Tel: +1-202-762-1518, Fax: +1-202-762-1563, E-mail: tj@CasA.usno.navy.mil Richard Gross, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, M/S 238-332, Pasadena, CA 91109 USA, Tel: +1-818-354-4010, Fax: +1-818-393-6890, E-mail: rsg@logos.jpl.nasa.gov

OS20 Paleoceanography and Paleoclimatology: Observations and Modeling

This general session seeks contributed papers on all topics within the fields of paleoceanography and paleoclimatology. Studies focusing on any combination of data interpretation, proxy calibration, and modeling are welcome. Spatial scales of interest for this session will include regional- and basin-scale studies to global, and temporal scales of interest will range from the Holocene to the Precambrian.

Conveners: Robert B. Dunbar, Geological and Environmental Sciences, Stanford University, Braun Hall, Bldg. 320, Stanford, CA 94305 USA, Tel: +1-650-725-6830, Fax: +1-650-725-0979, E-mail: dunbar@stanford.edu Larry C. Peterson, Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science, University of Miami, 4600 Rickenbacker Causeway, Miami, FL 33149 USA, Tel: +1- 305-361-4692, Fax: +1-305-361-4632, E-mail: lpeterson@rsmas.miami.edu

OS21 Southern Ocean and Climate Change: Past and Future Perspectives (Joint With A)

One of the important new findings in climatology is warming of the ocean, including its abyss, by a rate of a half degree celsius or more per century. This ocean warming over the last several decades reflects the linkage between the ocean thermohaline history and global climate change. Historical observations and paleoclimate data reveal significant climate variability on time-scales of decades to millennia. The North Atlantic and its associated deepwater formation has been the consensus focal point of this variability for decades. However, new analyses indicate that the southern deepwater source can change dramatically (e.g., experience a decrease of as much as two-thirds during the last 800 years). Such changes can substantially alter the millennial pattern of ocean circulation. For example, it is believed that the Little Ice Age was caused by stronger formation of the Antarctic Bottom Water compared to today. It has also recently been discovered that the Southern Hemisphere led Northern Hemisphere changes during parts of the glacial cycles of Pleistocene, implying a seesaw-type oscillation of the global ocean conveyor. Additionally, global warming-related melting of sea ice and ice sheets in Antarctica has the potential to cause a further slowdown of the southern deepwater source. These results demand a better assessment of the role of the Southern Ocean in driving changes of the global ocean circulation and climate. Hence, the Southern Ocean impact on climate is becoming a new focal point of study, presenting new challenges to climatologists, paleoclimatologists, glaciologists, oceanographers, and paleoceanographers in their effort to understand the past and to forecast future alterations of the climate system. This is a high-priority interdisciplinary problem. Observational, proxy data, modeling, and synthesizing papers addressing any aspect of the Southern Hemisphere climate dynamics and Southern Ocean impact on climate in the Late Quaternary, during the Little Ice Age, at present, and in near future will be welcomed.

Conveners: Dan Seidov, Earth System Science Center, Pennsylvania State University, 2217 Earth-Engineering Science Bldg., University Park, PA 16802-6813 USA, Tel: +1-814-865-1921, Fax: +1-814-865-3191, E-mail: dseidov@essc.psu.edu Eric Barron, Earth System Science Center, Pennsylvania State University, 2217 Earth-Engineering Science Bldg., University Park, PA 16802-6813 USA, Tel: +1-814-865-1921, Fax: +1-814-865-3191, E-mail: eric@essc.psu.edu Thomas Stocker, Climate and Environmental Physics, Physics Institute, University of Bern, Sidlerstrasse 5, 3012 Bern, Switzerland, Tel: +41-31-631-44-64, Fax: +41-31-631-87-42, E-mail: stocker@climate.unibe.ch

OS22 Linking Climate Variability and Coastal Processes (Joint With A, B, H)

Climate variability, occurring across a range of time-scales, significantly impacts geologic, hydrologic, hydrodynamic, and biologic processes acting in the coastal zone. As climate varies in the future, changes in the intensity, frequency, and location of storms, distribution of rainfall, rate of sea level rise, and water temperature will drive changes in river discharge, nearshore sediment transport, shoreline erosion, and nutrient supply. This session seeks to explore such links between climate variability and coastal processes across a range of time-scales and disciplines as observed in the past and predicted for the future. Abstracts linking climatic and coastal processes are solicited from all relevant disciplines of the natural sciences. Abstracts exploring the societal impacts of changes in coastal processes driven by climate variability are also welcomed.

Conveners: Laura J. Moore, Geology and Geophysics Department, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, MS 22, Woods Hole, MA 02543 USA, Tel: +1-508-289-3597, Fax: +1-508-457-2187, E-mail: lmoore@whoi.edu; Philip Mote, JISAO/SMA Climate Impacts Group, University of Washington, Box 354235, Seattle WA 98195 USA, Tel: +1-206-616-5346, Fax: +1-206-616-5775, E-mail: philip@atmos.washington.edu

OS23 The Development and Future of Nanoscale Geoscience (Joint With B, V)

Research to be funded by the Geosciences Directorate as part of the NSE program will be interdisciplinary and will focus on probing nanostructures and processes of relevance in the environment, including such issues as understanding the distribution, composition, origin, and behavior of nanoscale structures under a wide variety of naturally occurring physical, chemical and biological conditions; developing new field and laboratory instrumentation for characterizing the chemical composition and physical/chemical properties of molecular clusters, surface and interface nanostructures, and ultrafine and fine aerosol particles; investigating biogeochemical and physicochemical processes at marine interfaces; understanding the distribution and behavior of nanoscale biogeochemical structures throughout the oceans; and the development and application of earth systems nanosensor technology.

Conveners: David D. Lambert, Division of Earth Sciences, National Science Foundation, Arlington, VA 22230 USA, Tel: +1- 703-306-1554, Fax: +1-703-306-0382, Peter McMurry, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Univeristy of Minnesota, 111 Church Street, SE, Tel: +1-612-624-2817, Fax: +1-612-626-1854, E-mail: mcmurry@me.umn.edu

OS24 Predicting Submarine Mass Failure and Tsunami Hazards (Joint with S, T)

Society needs to assess accurate underwater landslide and slump hazards, attempt to predict their occurrence following a nearby earthquake, evaluate their tsunamigenic potential, and hopefully warn coastal communities of imminent danger. Underwater landslides and slumps pose a continuous threat to US coastal economic activity, including valuable offshore structures and port facilities. Some of the largest and most deadly tsunamis this decade (e.g., Papua New Guinea, Flores Island) probably involved wave generation by nearshore underwater landslides or slumps. These events generated tsunami runup reaching 30 m above sea level, far surpassing most previous predictions of maximum tsunami amplitude for such moderate earthquakes, and calling into question the preparedness of US coastal communities for a similar event. An interdisciplinary approach to underwater landslide and slump hazard assessment can yield deterministic or probabilistic predictions of failure occurrence, size and location. These predictions would enhance both underwater landslide and slump hazard assessment and tsunami warning capabilities. The Special Session provides an interactive forum of experts from various fields of engineering and science to critically evaluate existing work, provide important new sources of information, and further the state of the art.

Conveners: Philip Watts, Applied Fluids Engineering, Inc., e-mail: phil.watts@appliedfluids.com, phone: +1-562-498-9407, fax: +1-562-498-9407; Homa Lee, US Geological Survey, e-mail: homa@octopus.wr.usgs.gov, phone: +1-650-329-5485, fax: +1-650-329-5411

A02 Evolution of the Atmospheric Methane Budget (Joint With OS)

The IGBP GAIM core project recently initiated an activity to synthesise information on the atmospheric methane budget from all relevant disciplines. A special session at the AGU Fall meeting is proposed to enable existing participants in this activity to exchange results in a structured way and, importantly, to bring this activity to the attention of a wider range of scientists. The proposed session would focus on the evolution of the atmospheric methane budget over time. This covers glacial to interglacial transitions, including both abrupt and gradual changes in methane concentration and isotopic ratios observed in ice cores and firn-air, and the more recent evolution from pre-industrial to present conditions. Papers will be invited to either present new analyses of the methane budget at specific times, or to explicitly address the evolution of the budget over time. Topics to be covered will include, but not be restricted to: records of past changes in atmospheric methane; wetland emissions and their changes over time; release of hydrated methane; changes in atmospheric chemistry relevant to methane; and feedbacks between climate change and atmospheric chemistry.

Conveners: Martin R. Manning, National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research, PO Box 14-901, Wellington New Zealand, (courier address: 301 Evans Bay Parade, Kilbirnie, Wellington), Tel: +64-4- 386-0535, Fax: +64-4-386-2153, E-mail: m.manning@niwa.cri.nz and David M. Etheridge, CSIRO Atmospheric Research, Private Bag 1, Aspendale VIC, 3195, Australia (courier address: 101-107 Station St., Aspendale, Melbourne), Tel: +61- 3-9239-4590, Fax: +61-3-9239-4444, E-mail: david.etheridge@dar.csiro.au

A03 Organic Compounds in Tropospheric Particles and Aqueous Drops (Joint With OS)

Recent field measurements have demonstrated that organic particles are widespread in both continental and marine atmospheres and that they can account for a substantial fraction of the total aerosol number concentration and mass. There are numerous indications that this organic matter has profound effects on the physical and chemical behavior of aerosols, influencing issues such as cloud properties, precipitation climate, and health. Similarly, organic compounds are an important component of tropospheric cloud and fog drops, and can have important effects on both aqueous and gas phase chemistry. It is now clear that reliable modeling of the effects of organic compounds in atmospheric condensed phases must include better field measurements as well as new laboratory data.

Conveners: Cort Anastasio, Department of Land, Air and Water Resources, University of California, One Shields Ave., Davis, CA 95616-8627 USA, (Express mail: add "151 Hoagland Hall" to above address), Tel: +1-530-754-6095, Fax: +1-530-752-1552, E-mail: canastasio@ucdavis.edu and Yinon Rudich, Department of Environmental Sciences, Weizmann Institute, Rehovot 76100, Israel, Tel: +972-8-934 4237, Fax: +972-8-934 4124, E-mail: yinon.rudich@weizmann.ac.il

A04 The Arctic and Antarctic Oscillations: Feedbacks and Connections With the Climate System (Joint With OS)

Topics include the basic structure of the Artic and Antartic oscillations, including their unforced variability, and their development over time on scales from days to decades. Contributions concerning either the hemispheric scale modes or regional modes such as the North Atlantic Oscillation are welcome. Phenomena from the ocean to the mesosphere have been implicated in the generation of these oscillations and their response to external forcings. Papers concerned with response or connections between these patterns and the ocean circulation, sea-ice and the lower and upper atmosphere are therefore especially encouraged.

Conveners: Drew Shindell, NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies, Columbia University, 2880 Broadway, New York, NY 10025 USA, Tel: +1-212-678-5561, Fax: +1-212-678-5561, E-mail: dshindell@giss.nasa.gov and Gavin Schmidt, NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies, 2880 Broadway, New York, NY 10025 USA, Tel: +1-212-678-5627, Fax: +1-212-678-5552, E-mail: gschmidt@giss.nasa.gov

A05 African Dust Over the Tropical North Atlantic (Joint With OS)

There is increasing interest in the role of mineral dust in atmospheric processes. Of particular interest is the interaction of solar radiation with dust because of the possible impact on climate through the scattering and adsorption of radiation and the modification of cloud properties. Over the ocean these processes also affect our ability to use remote sensing techniques to retrieve various ocean properties such as water temperature and color. The tropical North Atlantic is an excellent location to study these processes because of the very high concentrations of African dust that cover large areas of this region during much of the year. For this session we are asking for papers that focus on the role of African dust in atmospheric processes. This includes papers that characterize the temporal and spatial variability of dust with respect to meteorological parameters, the chemical and physical properties of dust that relate to radiative processes, and the possible impact on clouds. This session will also serve as a means to present the initial results from the Puerto Rico Dust Experiment (PRIDE), which will take place in June and July 2000.

Conveners: Joseph M. Prospero, Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences, 4600 Rickenbacker Causeway, Miami, FL 33149 USA, Tel: +1-305-361-4159, Fax: +1-305-361-4457, E-mail: jprospero@rsmas.miami.edu and Jeffrey S. Reid, SPAWAR Systems Center San Diego, Atmospheric Propagation Branch, Code D858, 49170 Propagation Path, San Diego, CA 92152-7385 USA, Tel: +1-619-553-1419; Fax: +1-619-5531417, E-mail: jreid@spawar.navy.mil

A11 NOAA Postdoctoral Program in Climate and Global Change (Joint With B, OS)

The purpose of the program is to help create and train the next generation of researchers needed for climate studies. It was anticipated that several contemporary National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) efforts, such as TOGA and its ambitious field programs (e.g., COARE), would undoubtedly generate a tremendous amount of data that would require the attention of an enlarged research community here and abroad. In the larger view, it was necessary to attract some of the new Ph.D.'s to the community in order to establish the seeds of scientific leadership for the extended programs of the future. Thus, the program endeavors to attract outstanding recent Ph.D.'s in the sciences relevant to the NOAA Climate and Global Change Program. The program supports research on climate variations with timescales of seasons to centuries. This is the 10th year of this very successful fellowship program. We propose to mark the event by holding a half-day afternoon session at the AGU Fall Meeting with a reception immediately following a series of invited talks. We envision that the afternoon would consist of the following: one 20 minute talk that summarizes the history and scope of the program, and nine invited talks (20 minutes each) from past and present participants in the program who gone on to become leaders in various disciplines. The topic of each talk will be influenced heavily by the speaker, so that each talk will be cutting-edge research, with many of the talks likely to be on "hot topics." (The talks are not to be a review of what the speaker did while he/she was a postodc in the program.) Both the reputations of the speakers and the topics should ensure that this will be a very well attended session.

Conveners: David Battisti, Department of Atmospheric Sciences, University of Washington, Box 351640 Seattle, WA 98195-1640 USA, Tel: +1-206-543-2019, Fax: +1-206-543-0308, E-mail: david@atmos.washington.edu Daniel P. Schrag, Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Harvard University, 20 Oxford Street Cambridge, MA 02138 USA, Tel: +1-617-495-7676, Fax: +1-617-496-4387, E-mail: schrag@eps.harvard.edu

B03 Microbial Processes, II, Constraints on Microbial Survival in Geological Environments (Joint With P)

Microorganisms are distributed in subsurface environments that range from those harboring multicellular and unicellular organisms to those in which extreme conditions allow only for unicellular life. These conditions include low and high temperatures, hydrostatic and hyperbaric pressures, alkaline and acidic pH, oligotrophic chemical systems, tiny pore sizes, low moisture, an overabundance of microbial wastes, and niche environments where microbes depend on unusual physicochemical conditions to survive.

Each microbial environment limits the activity of its inhabitants through some combination of physical and chemical parameters. Descriptions of microbial function in terms of thermodynamic variables, such as free energy, are increasingly common. This session invites papers that explore the physical, chemical, and geologic conditions where subsurface organisms are found, particularly with reference to factors acting as limiting bounds on microbial activity. These papers may include descriptions of microbial communities, their numbers, diversity, or activity. Thermodynamic descriptions of community limitations are especially encouraged.

Conveners: Frederick Colwell, Biotechnology Department, Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID 83415, USA, Tel: +1-208-526-0097, Fax: +1-208-526-0828, E-mail: fxc@inel.gov; James McKinley, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352 USA, Tel: +1-509-375-6841, Fax: +1-509-375-6954, E-mail: james.mckinley@pnl.gov

B04 Halocarbons: Global Biogeochemistry and Contaminant Transformations (Joint With A, OS)

This special session will broadly cover topics in halocarbon research including sources and sinks of halogenated compounds in oceanic, freshwater and terrestrial environments, biogeochemistry of trace atmospheric halocarbons, and transformations of halogenated contaminants. Abstracts are solicited from all disciplines involved in the study of abiotic or biological processes that influence the fate of halocarbons. Suggested topics include rates and mechanisms of production/consumption in pristine or impacted environments, degradation studies including flowpath modeling, isotopic investigations of source/sink signatures, and examination of processes that control the distribution of halocarbons in the atmosphere.

Conveners: Larry Miller, U.S. Geological Survey, MS 465, 345 Middlefield Rd., Menlo Park, CA 94025 USA, E-mail: lgmiller@usgs.gov Kelly Goodwin, Tel: +1-650-329-4475, Fax: +1-650-329-4327 E-mail: goodwin@aoml.noaa.gov

B07 Life in a Turbulent Environment: Primary Production in the Surface Mixed Layer (Joint With OS)

Turbulence impacts upon aquatic ecology over a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. Within the surface mixed layer, large-scale turbulence maintains near-uniform distributions of temperature salinity, nutrients, etc. while small-scale turbulence (or shear flows) reduces the thickness of diffusive boundary layers and impacts upon nutrient uptake, particle encounter frequencies, and motile organisms' abilities to maintain a preferred orientation. As well, the thickness of the surface mixed layer responds to changes in the input of turbulent kinetic energy and this in turn modifies the irradiance experienced by primary producers circulating with in the mixed layer. Contributions are sought regarding the responses of phyto- and zooplankton to environmental turbulence. Reports of interdisciplinary field studies are particularly encouraged. A partial list of topics includes photophysiological responses to changes in irradiance caused by fluctuations in turbulence intensity and/or mixed layer depth; modeling photosynthesis in a turbulent environment; the impact of turbulence on the migration or swimming behavior of buoyant and motile species; and the impact of small-scale turbulence on nutrient uptake, particle flocculation, and predator-prey interactions.

Convener: Bradford Sherman, Aquatic Systems Modelling Group, CSIRO Land and Water, GPO Box 1666, Canberra, ACT 2601, Australia, Tel: +61-2-6246-5579, Fax: +61-2-6246-5560, E-mail: Brad.Sherman@cbr.clw.csiro.au

B16 Biospheric Results from Terra, NASA’s Earth Observing System (Joint With A, H, OS)

The launch of National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Earth Observing System (EOS) Terra on December 18, 1999, marked a new phase of climate and global change research, especially for increased understanding of the interaction of the land and ocean biology with climate. Terra has scientific instruments to gain information about the Earth's land, oceans, and atmospheres with unprecedented accuracy. Of the five scientific instruments, three are germane to land and ocean remote sensing: the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), the Multiangle Imaging Spectroradiometer (MISR), and the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER). This session would focus on results of biospheric research utilizing the Terra spacecraft. Invited papers will be concerned with results of using Terra instruments (MODIS, MISR, and ASTER) for land cover and change, vegetation attributes such as leaf area index and absorptance of photosynthetically radiation, and links into ecosystem models. Recent work by the oceans community regarding chlorophyll and productivity will also be solicited to make the session representative of Terra's biospheric science research.

Convener: Jon Ranson, Biospheric Sciences Branch, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 923, Greenbelt, MD 20771 USA, Tel: +1-301-614-6650, Fax: +1-301-614-6695, E-mail: jon.ranson@gsfc.nasa

B17 The Science of Carbon Sequestration (Joint With OS, V)

Several complementary strategies have been proposed to limit the accumulation of anthropogenic carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. It has been proposed that carbon dioxide generated during fossil fuel burning (or as a result of land use changes) could be stored in the terrestrial biosphere, the oceans, or deep geologic reservoirs, effectively sequestering this carbon dioxide away from the atmosphere. The U. S. Department of Energy has set up centers to study these issues in collaboration with the broader community; CSITE for studying terrestrial biosphere options; DOCS for studying ocean sequestration options; and GEO-SEQ for studying geologic sequestration options. Presentations are requested focusing on scientific results that are critical to understanding, evaluating, and addressing issues relevant to proposed carbon sequestration strategies, including research gaps, effectiveness, unintended impacts, and feasibility and cost.

Conveners: Jeff Amthor, CSITE, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, MS 6422, PO Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6422 USA, Tel: +1-865-576-2779, Fax: +1-865-576-9939, E-mail: amthorjs@ornl.gov Sallie Benson, GEO-SEQ, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, MS 90-1116, Berkeley, CA 94720 USA, E-mail: smbenson@lbl.gov Jim Bishop, DOCS, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, MS 90-1116, Berkeley, CA 94720 USA, Tel: +1-510-495-2457, Fax: +1-510-486-5686, E-mail: jkbishop@lbl.gov Ken Caldeira, DOCS, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 7000 East Ave., L-103, Livermore, CA 94550 USA, Tel: +1-925-423-4191, Fax: +1-925-422-6388, E-mail: kenc@llnl.gov

B20 Phosphate Cycling in the Marine and Terrestrial Environments (Joint with OS)

Phosphate is an essential nutrient for organisms at all levels of the food chain both in the terrestrial and marine environments and often it is a limiting nutrient. This session will focus on all aspects of the P cycle in the present and past. Characterization of P pools in seawater and soil, methods to estimate P recycling rates, P sources to different ecosystems, changes in P fluxes with time and space, estuaries and lake eutrophication due to P pollution, new methods and models or quantifying processes involved in the P cycle and other P related topics will be covered. This is a joint ocean and biogeochemistry session.

Conveners: Dr. Adina Paytan, Department of Geological and Environmental Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford CA 94305-2115; Tel: +1-650-724-4073; Fax: +1-650-725-0979; E-mail: apaytan@pangea.stanford.edu: Dr. Barbara Cade-Menun, Geological and Environmental Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305-2115 Tel: +1-650-725-0927; Fax: 1+650-725-0979; E-mail: bjcm@pangea.stanford.edu

GP04 High-Resolution Paleomagnetic Records (Joint With OS)

Recent ocean coring and field studies have improved considerably the spatial and temporal resolution of paleomagnetic observations, providing high-resolution records of Holocene secular variation, Plio-Pleistocene reversals, excursions, and paleointensity variations, and Cenozoic magnetostratigraphy. Until recently paleomagnetic observations of geomagnetic field behavior in the Southern Hemisphere have been few and far between, but there are now a number of such records. This session is proposed to highlight characteristics and applications of high-resolution paleomagnetic records, and encourage comparisons of field behavior in the Northern and Southern Hemispheres.

Conveners: Gary Acton, Ocean Drilling Program, Texas A&M University, 1000 Discovery Dr., College Station, Texas 77845 USA, Tel: +1-979-845-2520, Fax: +1-979-845-0876, E-mail: acton@odpemail.tamu.edu Carl Richter, Ocean Drilling Program, Texas A&M University, 1000 Discovery Dr., College Station, Texas 77845 USA, Tel: +1-979-845-2522, Fax: +1-979-845-0876 E-mail: richter@odpemail.tamu.edu

H08 Groundwater in Geologic Systems: Interactions With Heat, Reactions, and Tectonics (Joint With OS, T)

Many processes in Earth's crust can be understood as a combination of groundwater flow and chemical or physical interaction between water and the geologic medium. Groundwater flow is therefore a key factor in the temporal and spatial evolution of geologic systems. The coupling of fluid flow with heat transfer, fluid-rock reactions, and tectonics is essential for the quantitative treatment of many important geologic processes. Posters and talks are invited on quantitative couplings between fluid flow and heat transfer, chemical reactions, and tectonics in natural geologic processes such as in continental and oceanic hydrothermal systems, faults, and ore deposits.

Convener: Roy Haggerty, Department of Geosciences, Oregon State University, 104 Wilkinson Hall, Corvallis, OR 97331-5506 USA, Tel: +1-541-737-1210, Fax: +1-541-737-1200, E-mail: haggertr@geo.orst GEIER and GEIGER contact info to follow

S06 Broadband Seismology in the Oceans (Joint With OS)

Significant advances toward a global network of broadband seafloor seismic stations have been made in the past year. Topics to be addressed in this session include reviews or analysis of data from past experiments; preliminary results from recent experiments; plans for future experiments; examples of problems that can be or have been addressed with broadband OSN data; and technical problems presented by long-term seafloor seismic installations.

Conveners: Ralph Stephen, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, 360 Woods Hole Rd., MS 24, Woods Hole, MA 02543-1542 USA, Tel: +1-508-289-2583, Fax: +1-508-457-2150, E-mail: rstephen@whoi.edu Kiyoshi Suyehiro, Deep Sea Research Department, Japan Marine Science and Technology Center, 2-15 Natsushima-cho, Yokosuka 237-0061, Japan, Tel: +81-468-67-3827 Fax: +81-468-66-5541, E-mail: suyehiro@jamstec.go.jp

T12 Pacific and Indian Ocean Trenches and Indian Ocean Ridges: A Session Honoring Robert L. Fisher (Joint With OS, V)

This is a session devoted to honoring Bob Fisher in his 75th year. Fisher has contributed over the past 50 years (1) to determining the depth and structure of the Pacific and Indian Ocean trenches, (2) to a better understanding of the petrologic structure of Indian Ocean Ridge system, and (3) to providing the bathymetric framework for the plate tectonic interpretation of the Indian Ocean. He is still active scientifically, and his publications span six decades.

Conveners: John G. Sclater, Geosciences Research Division, Scripps Insititution of Oceanography, University of California, San Diego, MC 0215, La Jolla, CA 92093-0215 USA, Tel: +1-858-534-3051, Fax: +1-858-534-0784, E-mail: jsclater@ucsd.edu Roland Schlich, Ecole et Observatoire des Sciences de la Terre, Université de Strasbourg 1, 5 rue Rene Descartes, 67084 Strasbourg Cedex, France, Tel: +33-3-88-416393, Fax: +33-3-88-603887, E-mail: Roland.Schlich@eost.u-strasbg.fr Sherman H. Bloomer, College of Science, Oregon State University, 128 Kidder Hall, Corvallis, OR 97331 USA, Tel: +1-541-737-3877, Fax: +1-541-737-1007, E-mail: sherman.bloomer@orst.edu

T14 Seismogenic Zone Studies of the Nankai Trough Subduction Margin (Joint With OS, S)

Subduction zone thrusts produce some of Earth's largest and most destructive earthquakes and tsunamis. The 1997 MARGINS SEIZE workshop was held to initiate investigations into the relationship between earthquakes, deformation, and fluid flow in subduction zones. At the workshop, the Nankai Trough subduction zone was identified as a prime setting for examining the controls on seismogenic rupture because of its well-recorded history of great earthquakes and its unusually shallow and relatively accessible seismogenic zone. In the past 3 years, new interest in examining characteristics of the seismogenic zone along subduction thrusts has inspired a wide variety of field experiments across the Nankai Trough. These experiments range from passive seismicity studies, active geophysical surveys, submersible dives, and Ocean Drilling Program drilling. We solicit contributions to this session that will present results of recent field, theoretical, or laboratory experiments relevant to the structure, seismicity, and physical properties along subduction thrusts, especially in the Nankai Trough subduction zone.

Conveners: Nathan Bangs, Institute for Geophysics, University of Texas, 4412 Spicewood Springs Rd., Bldg. 600, Austin, TX 78795 USA, Tel: +1-512-471-0424, Fax: +1-512-475-6338, E-mail: nathan@utig.ig.utexas.edu Shin'ichi Kuramoto, Marine Geology Department, Geological Survey of Japan, 1-1-3 Higashi, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8567, Japan, Tel/Fax: +81-298-61-3767, E-mail: kuramoto@gsj.go.jp

T20 Basin-Scale Hydrodynamic Systems: Stress State, Pore Pressure, Fluid Flow, and Deformation (Joint With H, OS)

Fluids play a critical role in rock deformation. Similarly, rock and sediment deformation history affect the distribution and magnitude of stress and pore pressure, as well as the migration of fluids. The influence of fluid pressure in controlling deformation and stress state has been observed or inferred in a range of geologic settings, from plate margins to passive margin basins, and at scales from a single fault zone to entire orogenic belts. The effects of fluid flow also extend to the transport and redistribution of heat and chemical species. In both cases, localization of fluid flow and pore pressure is of key importance. This session will explore recent advances in understanding the role of poroelastic stresses in deformation and the effects of high-permeability pathways on fluid flow, slope stability, and advective transport in basin-scale systems. We welcome submissions based on field, modeling (numerical and physical), or experimental work.

Conveners: Brandon Dugan, Department of Geosciences, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 USA, Tel: +1-814-863-9663, E-mail: dugan@geosc.psu.edu Demian Saffer, U.S. Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA 94025 USA, Tel: +1-650-329-5523, E-mail: dsaffer@usgs.gov

T21 Measurements and Modeling of Marine Sediments (Joint With OS, S, MRP)

The special session targets experimental (laboratory and in situ) measurements as well as modeling results of marine sediments. We would like to see papers covering both modeling and measurements of compaction, porosity decrease, diagenesis, and physical properties of marine sediments. Of great interest is the link between physical properties and indirect field (e.g., seismic) measurements as well as relationships between static and dynamic moduli.

Conveners: Manika Prasad, Geophysics Department, Stanford University, 397 Panama Mall, Code 322GG, Stanford, CA 94305-2215 USA, Tel: +1-650-723-8547, Fax: +1-650-723-1188, E-mail: manika.prasad@stanford.edu Roy H. Wilkens, Office of Naval Research, 800 N. Quincy Street, Code 322GG, Arlington, VA 22217-5660 USA, Tel: +1-703-696-7237, Fax: +1-703-696-2710, E-mail: roy_wilkens@onr.navy.mil

ED05 Special Session on Graduate and Undergraduate Education in Ocean Sciences (Joint With OS)

The continuing evolution of reforms and innovations in K-12 and undergraduate education in sciences, mathematics, and technology has been explored and discussed in special sessions at AGU. It is natural and important that AGU should expand this series of sessions to include graduate education. This session will focus on current graduate education in ocean sciences (physical, geological, chemical, biological, and interdisciplinary), innovations in progress, innovations needed, and connectivity of undergraduate education in earth sciences and ocean sciences and graduate education in ocean sciences. The early overview report from the biennial Ocean Science Educators Retreat of October 2000 (sponsored by the Consortium for Ocean Research and Education), including assessment of various application, enrollment, and graduation demographics for the 40 participating graduate education programs in ocean sciences in the United States and issues evolving from the retreat, will be one of the keynote presentations. The conveners will present a paper on the opportunities for innovation in connectivity between graduate education in ocean sciences and undergraduate education in earth sciences. Other invited presentations will be by Robert B. Gagosian, director, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (with several co-authors), on the connectivity between graduate education and future educators and spokespersons for ocean sciences; and Ken Melville, head of the graduate program at Scripps Institution of Oceanography, on future challenges in graduate education with the advent of the Global Ocean Observing System; among others.

Conveners: John W. Farrington, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Woods Hole, MA 02543 USA, Edward P. Laine, Environmental Studies Department, Bowdoin College, Brunswick, ME 04011 USA

NG01 Nonlinear Space-Time Patterns (Joint With A, B, G, OS, T)

Nonlinear space-time patterns occur in a variety of complex systems. These space-time patterns represent the independent spatial modes of the system in terms of their associated temporal signal, and can provide significant scientific insight into both their sources and relative effects. Examples of systems that exhibit space-time patterns include fault networks, mantle convection, the ocean-atmosphere interface, the human body, and solar activity. Analysis of these patterns reveals information about the characteristics of the system in question. Recent developments resulting in the relative inexpensive accessibility to computational power have greatly improved the ability to analyze these space-time patterns and have yielded a number of important scientific insights. Applications include such widely varying fields as biometrics, seismic tomography, surface deformation, tidal signals, blood flow, and the El Nino-Southern Oscillation. Abstracts that emphasize scientific results based on the analysis of space-time patterns are encouraged. We plan to invite people and solicit contributions across a broad spectrum of sections at AGU.

Conveners: Kristy Tiampo, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences, University of Colorado, Room 318, Boulder, CO 80309-0216 USA, Tel: +1-303-492-4779, Fax: +1-303-492-5070, E-mail: kristy@caldera.colorado.edu Andrea Donnellan, Mail Stop 126-347, Jet Propulsion Laboratory and University of Southern California, 4800 Oak Grove Dr., Pasadena, CA 91109 USA, Tel: +1-818-354-4737, Fax: +1-818-393-4965, E-mail: andrea.donnellan@jpl.nasa.gov

NG02 Geocomplexity: Self-Organizing Systems (Joint With A, GP, OS, S, T)

Self-organizing complex systems are found in many branches of geophysics. The broadest-based example is fluid turbulence. Specific examples include the stochastic variability of climate and the variability of Earth’s magnetic field. Other examples are landforms and seismicity. These systems are generally chaotic, exhibit fractal (power-law) behavior, and may be examples of self-organized criticality. The proposed session will include broad overviews of the current understanding of complex systems as well as more specific recent developments. This session is intended as an overview of the current status of geocomplexity and will include several key invited speakers. Although this is not planned as a Union session, we strongly encourage contributions across a broad spectrum of AGU sections. Contributions that are applicable in more than one area are particularly welcome.

Conveners: Donald L. Turcotte, Department of Geological Sciences, Cornell University, Snee Hall, Ithaca, NY 14853 USA, Tel: +1-607-255-7282, Fax: +1-607-254-4780, E-mail: turcotte@geology.cornell.edu John B. Rundle, Colorado Center for Chaos and Complexity and Cooperative Institute Research in Environmental Sciences, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309 USA, Tel: +1-303-492-5642, E-mail: rundle@terra.colorado.edu William Klein, Physics Department and Center for Computational Science, Boston University, 590 Commonwealth Ave., Boston, MA 02215 USA, Tel: +1-617-353-2188, E-mail: klein@buphyc.bu.edu

NG03 Scaling and the Extremes of Geophysical Fields (Joint With A, H, OS, S, T)

From earthquakes to floods, volcanic eruptions to magnetic storms and hurricanes, the extremes of geophysical fields are of prime importance. However, they are still poorly understood, and time series are often too short to yield the clear-cut empirical evidence necessary to distinguish between different theoretical behaviors. Of particular significance is the distinction between standard extreme value distributions and the nonclassical heavy tailed (algebraic) distributions generally associated with space-time scaling processes. This session will be devoted to the most recent theoretical and empirical developments of scaling approaches to understand and to characterize the interrelation between strong nonlinearities over wide ranges of temporal and spatial scales and their consequences for the extremes. Session topics will include recent empirical investigations; techniques to test for the algebraic fall-offs in probability distributions; statistical estimators and data requirements; comparisons of mean and extreme instabilities/events; the statistics and dynamics of the extremes; the relevance of the paradigm of self-organized criticality; cascades, multifractals, and heavy tails; and nonclassical return period statistics and their implications.

Conveners: Daniel Schertzer, Laboratoire de Modelisation en Mecanique, Centre National de la Reserche Scientifique UMR 7607, Case 162, Université P. et M. Curie, 4 Place Jussieu, F-75252 Paris Cedex 05, France, Tel: +33-1-44-27-4963, Fax: +33-1-44-27-5259, E-mail: schertze@ccr.jussieu.fr Shaun M. Lovejoy, Physics Department, McGill University, 3600 University Str., Montreal, QC H3A 2T8, Canada, Tel: +1-514-398-6537, Fax: +1-514-398-8434, E-mail: lovejoy@physics.mcgill.ca Per Bak, Niels Bohr Institute, Blegdamsvej 17, DK-2100 Copenhagen Ø, Denmark, Tel: +45-353-25393, Fax: +45-353-25016, E-mail: bak@nbi.dk Didier Sornette, Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics and Department of Earth and Space Science, University of California, 3845 Slichter Hall, Box 951567, 595 E. Circle Dr., University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 USA, Tel: +1-310-825-2863, Fax: +1-310-206-3051, E-mail: sornette@moho.ess.ucla.edu

NG05 Fractals, Chaos, and Self-Organized Criticality in Natural and Human-Induced Hazards (Joint With A, H, OS, S, T, V)

Natural and human-induced hazards cover a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. They include a large variety and number of interacting components that combine to produce nonlinear power-law behaviors that are often associated with the basic concepts of complexity. Examples of these hazards include floods, landslides, volcanic eruptions, earthquakes, forest fires, cyclonic storms, droughts, global warming, and hazardous waste contamination. Papers that apply the concepts of fractals, chaos, or self-organized criticality to characterize, model, and assess the risk of natural and man-made hazards are solicited. Posters are also very much encouraged.

Conveners: Bruce D. Malamud, Department of Geography, Kings College London, Strand, London WC2R 2LS, UK, E-mail: bruce@malamud.com Didier Sornette, Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics and Department of Earth and Space Science, University of California, 3845 Slichter Hall, Box 951567, 595 E. Circle Dr., Los Angeles, CA 90095 USA, Tel: +1-310-825-2863, Fax: +1-310-206-3051, E-mail: sornette@moho.ess.ucla.edu Christopher Barton, U. S. Geological Survey, 600 4th St. South, St. Petersburg, FL 33701 USA, Tel: +1-727-803-8747 ext. 3014, Fax: +1-727-803-2030, E-mail: barton@usgs.gov

NG06 Quantifying Predictability in Geophysical Systems II (Joint With A, G, H, OS, SH, T, V)

Our ability to quantify the predictability of nonlinear geophysical systems provides a fundamental bridge between models of geophysical systems and the systems themselves. Uncertainty in the initial condition and errors in model formulation have led to probability forecasts (ensembles) even in deterministic systems. This session will focus on atmospheric and ocean dynamics over hours to centuries (e.g., adaptive observation strategies, Lagrangian and Eulerian approaches, intense short-duration events); theoretical aspects of the dynamics of nonlinear systems relevant to predictability and verification (including multiple models, contrasting modeling strategies, data assimilation); and practical issues in the interpretation and likely economic impact of probabilistic forecasts on a timescale minutes to hours (e.g., precipitation/wind), days to months (e.g., hurricanes), and years to millennia (e.g., earthquakes). A mix of oral and poster presentations of both pure and extremely applied contributions are welcome, and may focus on the predictability of geophysical systems other than those noted explicitly above.

Conveners: Leonard Smith, Oxford University, 24-29 St Giles', Oxford, OX1 3LB, UK, Tel: +44-1865-270-517, Fax: +44-1865-270-515, E-mail: lenny@maths.ox.ac.uk James Hansen, Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Ave., Room 54-1721, Cambridge, MA 02139 USA, Tel: +1-617-253-5935, E-mail: jhansen@mit.edu

NG09 Biocomplexity in the Environment (Joint With B, H, OS)

Biocomplexity arises owing to dynamic interactions that occur between biological systems, including humans, and the physical environment. In FY1999 and in FY2000, the National Science Foundation (NSF) held competitions in this area, seeking interdisciplinary projects aimed at understanding the complex behavior observed in such systems. The most recent competition emphasized research that would directly explore nonlinearities, emergent phenomena, or feedbacks within and between biological and environmental systems, or would integrate across multiple components or scales of time and space in order to better understand and predict dynamic behavior. This special session will include an overview of the scientific interests that emerged from the competition and a roundtable discussion, including time for questions from the floor, with some of the grantees about research issues arising in this new area. In addition to the planned overview and roundtable discussion, we actively seek both oral and poster contributions on research in biocomplexity; contributions are not restricted to NSF grantees in the biocomplexity program.

Conveners: Marge Cavanaugh, Office of the Director, National Science Foundation, 4201 Wilson Blvd., Suite 1205, Arlington, VA 22230 USA, Tel.: +1-703-306-1004, Fax: +1-703-306-0109, E-mail: mcavanau@nsf.gov Margaret Leinen, National Science Foundation, 4201 Wilson Blvd., Arlington, VA 22230 USA, Tel.: +1-703-306-1500, Fax: +1-703-306-0372, E-mail: mleinen@nsf.gov Patricia M. Glibert, Horn Point Laboratory, 2020 Horns Point Rd., PO Box 775, Cambridge, MD 21613 USA, Tel: +1-410-221-8422, Fax: +1-410-221-8490, E-mail: glibert@hpl.umces.edu

NG10 Visual Computing in Nonlinear Geophysical Phenomena (Joint With A, G, GP, H, OS, T)

Researchers in geophysics are being overwhelmed by the huge amount of data generated by natural nonlinear phenomena and high-resolution numerical solutions. In this session we will bring together many of the different practioners using modern analytical and visualization tools (e.g., wavelets, eigenvectors, and EOFs) for treating and analyzing large data sets. We are soliciting examples from all areas in geophysics and at all scales, ranging from the molecular level, such as bacteria growth, to core dynamics. Also of great interest are examples from large data sets, such as SAR, ocean currents, and numerical simulations involving the bridging of scales in nonlinear processes. We foresee interest for this session from both numerical modelers and observation-oriented scientists.

Conveners: Dave Yuen, Minnesota Supercomputer Institute, 1200 Washington Ave., S., Minneapolis, MN 55415 USA, Tel: +1-612-624-1868, E-mail: davey@krissy.msi.umn.edu Bryan J. Travis, Los Alamos National Laboratory, ESS 5, MS F665, Los Alamos, NM 55455 USA, Tel: +1-505-667-1254, E-mail: bjt@vega.lanl.gov

NG11 Anomalous Transport in Inhomogeneous and (Multi-)Fractal Geophysical Media (Joint With A, H, OS, T)

Anomalous transport is ubiquitous in geophysics: mantle convection, subsurface hydrology, atmospheric and oceanographic diffusion, geophysical turbulence, solar wind, etc. It is associated with nonstandard scaling (e.g., non-Fickian diffusion), and has been attracting a renewed interest owing to its importance for environmental applications, a larger availability of data, and several recently proposed theoretical approaches: fractal modeling, continuous time random walks, chaotic advection, fractional transport equations, multifractal dispersion coefficients, and multifractal advection equations. This session will focus on the confrontation between the new available data and the new theoretical developments on anomalous transport in scaling and inhomogeneous geophysical media.

Conveners: Ioulia Tchiguirinskaia, Environmental Engineering and Science Department, Clemson University, 342 Computer Ct., Anderson, SC 29625 USA, Tel: +1-864-656-1462, Fax: +1-864-656-0672, E-mail: iouliat@clemson.edu Brian Berkowitz, Deparment of Environmental Sciences and Energy Research, Weizmann Institute of Science, PO Box 26, Rehovot, 76100, Israel, Tel: +972-8-934-2098, Fax: +972-8-934-4124,E-mail: brian.berkowitz@weizmann.ac.il Jeffrey Duan, Deparment of Applied Mathematics, Illinois Institute of Technology, 10 W. 32nd St., Chicago, IL 60616 USA, Tel: +1-312-655-3282, Fax: +1-312-567-3135, E-mail: duan@iit.edu

Planetary Sciences (P)

P01 Planetary Atmospheric Processes and Astrobiology (Joint With A, B, SA)

Trace gases in the atmosphere react photochemically with important implications for the origin, evolution, and future of life. Many trace gases are generated by biological processes, and they in turn influence ecosystem interactions in the evolution of living systems. Ideas from strochemistry may benefit planetary atmospheric chemistry. The proposed session, therefore, will bring together planetary scientists, aeronomers, astrochemists, and solar scientists to discuss chemical and physical processes from their respective disciplines that may enhance our understanding of astrobiology. It will emphasize topical matters like our terrestrial biosphere and the present or past life on other worlds, particularly on Mars and Europa.

Conveners: Christopher P. McKay, Space Science Division, NASA Ames Research Center, MS 245-3, Moffett Field, CA 94035 USA, Tel: +1-650-604-6864, Fax: +1-650-604-6779, E-mail: cmckay@cmckay.arc.nasa.gov Sheo S. Prasad, Creative Research Enterprises, 6354 Camino del Lago, Pleasanton, CA 94566 USA, Tel: +1-925-426-9341, Fax: +1-925-426-9417, E-mail: ssp@CreativeResearch.org Edward C. Zipf, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pittsburg, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 USA, Tel: +1-412-624-9263 or 412-963-6493, Fax: +1-412-963-0603 E-mail: Edczipf@aol.com

P02 NEAR at Eros: Latest Results From Low-Altitude Orbits

The NEAR-Shoemaker spacecraft is currently executing its 1-year global mapping mission of the near-Earth asteroid 433 Eros, and is providing unprecedented insights about the surface evolution and geologic structure of a solar system small body. This session will consist of invited and contributed talks that feature the latest results of the mapping mission, with emphasis on observations obtained "up close and personal" as the spacecraft orbits at distances of 35 km and 50 km from the center of the asteroid.

Conveners: Maria T. Zuber, 54-518, Earth, Atmosphere, and Planetary Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge MA USA, Tel: +1-627-253-6397, E-mail: zuber@mit.edu Andrew F. Cheng, Applied Physics Laboratory, Johns Hopkins University, Johns Hopkins Rd., Laurel, MD 20723-6099 USA, Tel: +1-301-953-5415, Fax: +1-301-953-1093, E-mail: andrew.cheng@jhuapl.edu

P03 Water on Mars

Water on Mars in all its forms and reservoirs (atmosphere, surface, subsurface) in the present and past provides fundamental clues to planetary evolution and the development of conditions that might have been conducive to life. Recent exploration results have provided key new data on the characteristics and evolution of water reservoirs on Mars, on the martian hydrologic cycle, and how they might have changed with time. This session will provide a forum for the discussion of these results and their implications.

Convenors: Michael Carr, U.S. Geological Survey, 345 Middlefield Rd., MS 946, Menlo Park, CA 94025 USA, Tel: +1-650-329-5174, Fax: +1-650-329-4936; James W. Head, Department of Geological Sciences, Brown University, Box 1846, Providence, RI 02912 USA, Tel: +1-401-863-2526, Fax: +1-401-863-3978, E-mail: james_head_III@brown.edu

P04 Impact Craters From Geophysical Exploration to Deep Drilling (Joint With T, V, MRP)

This session brings together the whole range of disciplines focusing on understanding the formation of large craters on Earth, such as detection/study of impact structures using geophysical methods, the petrology/geochemistry of impactites, the production and distribution of ejecta material, shock metamorphism, and computer modeling of impact cratering events. Contributions from researchers interested in drilling crater-fill sediments as indicators of climate changes are also welcome. This session is well timed, as the International Continental Scientific Drilling Program’s deep drilling of the Chicxulub crater is planned for the end of 2000 and subsequent offshore drilling is being considered by Ocean Drilling Program.

Conveners: Philippe Claeys, Institute of Mineralogy, Museum of Natural History, D-10099, Berlin, Germany, Tel: +49-30-2093-8857, Fax: +49-30-2093-5865, E-mail: philippe.claeys@rz.hu-berlin.de Joanna Morgan, T. H. Huxley School, Imperial College, Prince Consort Rd., London, SW7 2BP, United Kingdom, Tel: +44-171-594-64-23, Fax: +44-171-594-65-29, E-mail: j.v.morgan@ic.ac.uk

P05 The Galilean Satellite System From Galileo (Joint With SA)

The Galilean satellites represent a system of planet-scale bodies orbiting Jupiter and have become much more well known through the results of experiments flown on the Galileo spacecraft. This session is designed to synthesize the results of the last several years on the formation and evolution of these satellites and the nature of the field and particle environments, and to present new results from the most recent encounters with Io and Ganymede.

Conveners: Margaret Kivelson, Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics, University of California, 6843 Slichter Hall, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1567 USA, Tel: +1-310-825-3435, Fax: +1-310-206-8042 E-mail: mkivelson@igpp.ucla.edu Robert Pappalardo, Department of Geological Sciences, Brown University, Box 1846, Providence, RI 02912 USA, Tel: +1-401-863-2526, Fax: +1-401-863-3978 E-mail: robert_pappalardo@brown.edu

B01 Remote Detection and Survey in Astrobiology and the Study of Life in Extreme Environments (Joint With P)

The distribution of life in extreme environments on Earth is commonly “patchy,” that is sporadic in space (on decimeter to kilometer scales ) and time, because local fluctuations in conditions fragment niches at the edges of habitability. Patchiness may also occur in prospective extraterrestrial habitats. Because sampling in a patchy environment entails risk of choosing poorly, information from a remote detection method can be valuable to focus sampling on promising locations and can provide information that affects the interpretation of data. Within our solar system, such reconnaissance may include searches for habitat (e.g., liquid water using radar or seismic sounding), for evidence of metabolism (e.g., atmospheric trace gas combinations far from chemical equilibrium), or for biochemical structure or molecules indicative of living material (e.g., fluorescence or Raman scattering observations of specific molecules). This session will focus on examples of remote methods for LExEn and astrobiological studies, on insights gained from such methods, and on physical interactions on which new methods may be based. Abstracts are solicited from all relevant fields.

Conveners: Dale P. Winebrenner, Applied Physics Laboratory, University of Washington, Box 355640 Seattle, WA 98195 USA, Tel: +1-206-543-1393, Fax: +1-206-616-3142, E-mail: dpw@apl.washington.edu

B02 Microbial Processes, I, Microbial-Mineral Interactions in Deep Subsurface Environments (Joint With P)

The continued discovery of intraterrestrial microorganisms necessitates the development of new methodology to investigate the impact of microbial-mineral interactions on the terrestrial deep subsurface. This session will focus on recent research exploring the organic-inorganic biogeochemistry of the microbial-mineral interface within deep subsurface rock environments. Interdisciplinary abstracts are solicited from all fields involving microbiology and earth sciences. Relevant topics include, but are not limited to, biologically controlled or induced mineralization, bacterial-mineral precipitation, geochemical reactions and bioavailability, spatial relationships between biofilms and minerals, molecular geomicrobiology, microfossil detection, and possible exobiologic analogs.

Conveners: Mary E. Kauffman, Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, PO Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 USA, Tel: +1- 208-526-2684, E-mail: kaufme@inel.gov F. Grant Ferris, Department of Geology, Earth Sciences Center, University of Toronto, 22 Russell St., Toronto, ON M5S 3B1, Canada, Tel: +1-416-978-0526, E-mail: ferris@quartz.geology.utoronto.ca

B03 Microbial Processes, II, Constraints on Microbial Survival in Geological Environments (Joint With P)

Microorganisms are distributed in subsurface environments that range from those harboring multicellular and unicellular organisms to those in which extreme conditions allow only for unicellular life. These conditions include low and high temperatures, hydrostatic and hyperbaric pressures, alkaline and acidic pH, oligotrophic chemical systems, tiny pore sizes, low moisture, an overabundance of microbial wastes, and niche environments where microbes depend on unusual physicochemical conditions to survive.

Each microbial environment limits the activity of its inhabitants through some combination of physical and chemical parameters. Descriptions of microbial function in terms of thermodynamic variables, such as free energy, are increasingly common. This session invites papers that explore the physical, chemical, and geologic conditions where subsurface organisms are found, particularly with reference to factors acting as limiting bounds on microbial activity. These papers may include descriptions of microbial communities, their numbers, diversity, or activity. Thermodynamic descriptions of community limitations are especially encouraged.

Conveners: Frederick Colwell, Biotechnology Department, Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID 83415, USA, Tel: +1-208-526-0097, Fax: +1-208-526-0828, E-mail: fxc@inel.gov; James McKinley, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352 USA, Tel: +1-509-375-6841, Fax: +1-509-375-6954, E-mail: james.mckinley@pnl.gov

G02 Geodesy Beyond the Earth (Joint With P)

Recent years have witnessed a proliferation of spacecraft making geodetic measurements of the the planets and other orbiting bodies. Current and future missions collecting geodetic measurements include Lunar Prospector, Mars Global Surveyor, NEAR, MESSENGER, Europa Orbiter, and Pluto-Kuiper Express, among others. These new missions have an important role for geodesy in areas such as precision positioning and landing, mapping, and measurement of topography, gravity, orbit, and orientation, as well as their changes in time. In many instances, geodetic observables are or will be used to study planetary interiors, dynamics, and evolution, and to address important issues such as climate change, abundance of water, and life beyond the Earth. Comparative studies can also help us better understand some long-standing questions about the Earth. The session seeks to broaden the awareness and participation in the challenges and opportunities of planetary geodesy. Presentations on instrumentation, new missions, measurement models, calibration, data analysis, interdisciplinary interpretation or prediction of geodetic signals are encouraged.

Conveners: Xiaoping Wu, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Mail Stop 238-600, 4800 Oak Grove Dr., Pasadena, CA 91109-8099 USA, Tel: +1-818-354-9366, Fax: +1-818-393-4965, E-mail: xiaoping.wu@jpl.nasa.gov R. Steven Nerem, Center for Space Research, University of Texas, 3925 W. Braker La., Suite 200, Austin, TX 78759-5321USA, Tel: +1-512-471-5573, Fax: +1-512-471-3570, E-mail: nerem@csr.utexas.edu

G05 A Tribute to William Kaula (Joint With P, T)

This session is devoted to the extensive scientific achievements of William Kaula, who died on April 1, 2000, at the age of 73. Kaula was arguably the preeminent and most influential American geodesist of the second half of the 20th century, and a giant in the emerging field of planetary geophysics. Kaula's scientific accomplishments and reputation span the disciplines of geodesy, tectonophysics, and planetary sciences. Talks are solicited that touch on these disciplines as they relate to Kaula's great legacy. Specifically encouraged are personal remembrances of his legendary contributions to science and the unique style in which he approached all of life.

Conveners: Roger J. Phillips, Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics, University of Colorado, Campus Box 392, Boulder, CO 80309-0392 USA, Tel: +1-303-492-4765, Fax: +1-303-492-6946, E-mail: phillips@wustite.wustl.edu Ernst J. O. “Ejo” Schrama, Department of Geodesy, Delft University of Technology, Thijsseweg 11, 2629 JA Delft, Netherlands, Tel: +31-15-278-4975, Fax: +31-15-278-3711, E-mail: e.j.o.schrama@geo.tudelft.nl

S04 Recent Results on the Seismicity and Mechanics of the San Andreas Fault System (Joint With G, P, T, MRP)

The session will provide a forum for diverse studies that bear on the seismological and mechanical workings of the San Andreas fault and other strands of the plate-bounding strike-slip system. Key issues include the spatial and temporal distribution of seismicity, the orientation and magnitude of the stress field around the faults, and the mechanical strength of the faults and interactions with the surrounding crust. Thus, we welcome papers based on seismicity relocations, stress orientations, borehole meaurements, and relevant geological or geomorphological constraints.

Conveners: Heidi Houston, Department of Earth and Spaces Sciences, University of California, 595 Young Dr. E, Los Angeles, CA 90095 USA, Tel: +1-310-206-3896, Fax: +1-310-825-2779, E-mail: heidi@moho.ess.ucla.edu Debi Kilb, Department of Geosciences, Princeton University, Guyot Hall, Princeton, NJ 08544, Tel: +1-609-258-2598, Fax: +1-609-258-1274, E-mail: dkilb@princeton.edu

V07 Earth's First Billion Years: New Discoveries in Old Rocks (Joint With P, T)

Recent progress in understanding the first billion years of Earth history has been driven by investigations of the geological record preserved from the earliest times. These records suggest that during the time of life's emergence, early Earth was dominated by very different hydrospheric and atmospheric conditions. There was higher heat flow through the crust than at present, but there is debate whether that is reflected in differing tectonic styles. New methods developed to investigate the first billion years of Earth history as well as new discoveries from the oldest rocks will be highlighted.

Conveners: Stephen J. Mojzsis, Department of Earth and Space Sciences, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1567 USA, E-mail: sjm@argon.ess.ucla.edu James L. Crowley, Department of Earth Sciences, Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John's, NF A1B 3X5 Canada, E-mail: jcrowley@sparky2.esd.mun.ca Peter W. U. Appel, Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland, Thoravej 8, DK 2400, NV Copenhagen K, Denmark; E-mail: pa@geus.dk

V10 Rhenium and Osmium Isotope and Elemental Constraints on Mantle and Magmatic Processes (Joint With G, S, P, MRP)

The chalcophile and siderophile elements rhenium and osmium (Re-Os) potentially provide key information on the differentiation of the terrestrial planets, both on the conditions under which core formation took place in the early solar system and on mantle melting and magmatic differentiation in the early Earth and to the present day. This session will focus on applications of the Re-Os system to recent results in these fields, such as, studies of meteorites and other planetary material; records of the early Earth recorded in ancient continental rocks; constraints on the sources of oceanic basalts; experimental constraints on Re and Os partitioning in mantle and magmatic systems; and studies of the distribution and behavior of these elements between natural minerals (silicates, sulphides, and melts). The essential aim is a multidisciplinary discussion that brings together experimental, geochemical, and petrological aspects of the above or related topics.

Conveners: Kevin W. Burton, Department of Earth Sciences, The Open University, Walton Hall, Milton Keynes, MK7 6AA, UK, Tel: +44-1908-652889, Fax: +44-1908-655151, E-mail: k.w.burton@open.ac.uk Pierre Schiano, Laboratoire Magmas et Volcans, Observatoire de Physique du Globe de Clermont-Ferrand-Centre National de la Reserche Scientifique, UMR 6524, Université Blaise-Pascal, 5 Rue Kessler, 63038 Clermont-Ferrand, France, Tel: +33-4-73-34-67-57, Fax: +33-4 73-34 67-44, E-mail: schiano@opgc.univ-bpclermont.fr

Seismology (S)

S01 The Landers and Hector Mine Earthquake Pair (Joint With G, T)

The 1992 M7.3 Landers and 1999 M7.1 Hector Mine, California, earthquakes provide an important opportunity to study the interaction between large crustal events, and to compare their effects on regional seismicity and deformation. This session will focus on the Landers and Hector Mine sequences as a pair. Topics may include, but are not limited to, (1) the relationship between the mainshocks, either through triggering or as results of a common underlying process; (2) similarities and differences between the patterns of mainshock rupture, aftershocks, triggered seismicity, and coseismic or postseismic deformation; and (3) implications for the mechanics of faulting in the Eastern California Shear Zone.

Conveners: Kenneth Hudnut, U.S. Geological Survey, 525 South Wilson Ave., Pasadena, CA 91106-3212 USA, Tel: +1-626-583-7232, Fax: +1-626-583-7827, E-mail: hudnut@usgs.gov Jeanne Hardebeck, Seismological Laboratory, Caltech, MC 252-21, Pasadena, CA 91125 USA, Tel: +1-626-395-6971 Fax: +1-626-564-0715, E-mail: jlh@gps.caltech.edu

S02 Advances From Studying the 1999 M=7.4 Izmit and M=7.1 Duzce Earthquakes, North Anatolian Fault Zone, Turkey

More than a year has passed since the devastating August 17, 1999 Izmit and November 12, 1999, Duzce earthquakes struck northwest Turkey. Results from interdisciplinary study of these earthquakes will add significantly to our understanding of complex, interacting fault zones. This session seeks to bring together the state of knowledge on the process of these events before, during, and after their occurrence. Theoretical and observational papers are sought, including, but not restricted to, seismotectonics, seismicity, rupture dynamics, geodesy, deformation, earthquake geology, stress change, strong ground motion, building performance and engineering, and earthquake hazard forecasts.

Conveners: Tom Parsons, U.S. Geological Survey, MS-999, 345 Middlefield Rd., Menlo Park, CA 94025 USA, Tel: +1-650-329-5074, E-mail: tparsons@usgs.gov S?leyman S. Nalbant, Geophysics Department, Engineering Faculty, Istanbul University, 34850 Avcilar, Istanbul, Turkey, Tel: +90-212-591-19-98 ext. 145, E-mail: snalbant@istanbul.edu.tr

S03 The 1999 Chi-Chi, Taiwan, Earthquake (Joint With G, T)

The September 21, 1999, Chi-Chi earthquake (M7.6) and subsequent large aftershocks (M›6) are the best recorded seismic events of recent disastrous earthquakes. The tremendous ground deformation associated with the earthquake faulting caused major destruction to buildings and lifelines across a wide area of Taiwan. The large inland thrust event caused ground deformation of up to 8 meters and slip velocities of up to about 3 m/sec. The wealth of ground motion data collected from this earthquake sequence is likely to substantially influence our understanding of near-field ground motion and ground deformation, fault rupture processes, effects of site and basins, earthquake dynamic triggering, etc., as data are processed and analyzed in the months and years to come. Papers from theoretical and observational seismology, earthquake geology, and earthquake engineering are all welcome.

Conveners: Kuo-Fong Ma, Institute of Geophysics, National Central University, Chung-Li, 320-54, Taiwan, ROC, Tel: +886-3-4262421, Fax: +886-3-4222044, E-mail: fong@sal.gep.ncu.edu.tw Yuehua Zeng, Seismological Laboratory, University of Nevada, Reno, NV 89557 USA, Tel: +1-775-784-4231, Fax: +1-775-784-1833, E-mail: zeng@seismo.unr.edu

S04 Recent Results on the Seismicity and Mechanics of the San Andreas Fault System (Joint With G, P, T, MRP)

The session will provide a forum for diverse studies that bear on the seismological and mechanical workings of the San Andreas fault and other strands of the plate-bounding strike-slip system. Key issues include the spatial and temporal distribution of seismicity, the orientation and magnitude of the stress field around the faults, and the mechanical strength of the faults and interactions with the surrounding crust. Thus, we welcome papers based on seismicity relocations, stress orientations, borehole meaurements, and relevant geological or geomorphological constraints.

Conveners: Heidi Houston, Department of Earth and Spaces Sciences, University of California, 595 Young Dr. E, Los Angeles, CA 90095 USA, Tel: +1-310-206-3896, Fax: +1-310-825-2779, E-mail: heidi@moho.ess.ucla.edu Debi Kilb, Department of Geosciences, Princeton University, Guyot Hall, Princeton, NJ 08544, Tel: +1-609-258-2598, Fax: +1-609-258-1274, E-mail: dkilb@princeton.edu

S05 Subduction Zone Structure and Megathrust Earthquakes (Joint With G, T, MRP)

Many studies have suggested that the size and rupture characteristics of great subduction zone earthquakes are controlled by material properties and structural irregularities near the subduction zone plate boundary. This session is intended to bring together researchers studying such structure and those who study the earthquakes themselves. We encourage contributions ranging from geophysical surveys of subduction zone structure to studies of earthquake rupture in subduction zone environments.

Conveners: Phil Cummins, Frontier Research for Subduction Dynamics, Japan Marine Science and Technology Center, 2-15 Natsushima-cho, Yokosuka 237-0061, Japan, Tel: +81-468-67-3393, Fax: +81-468-67-3409, E-mail: cummins@jamstec.go.jp Shuichi Kodaira, Frontier Research for Subduction Dynamics, Japan Marine Science and Technology Center, 2-15 Natsushima-cho, Yokosuka 237-0061, Japan, Tel: +81-468-67-3407, Fax: +81-468-67-3409, E-mail: kodaira@jamstec.go.jp

S06 Broadband Seismology in the Oceans (Joint With OS)

Significant advances toward a global network of broadband seafloor seismic stations have been made in the past year. Topics to be addressed in this session include reviews or analysis of data from past experiments; preliminary results from recent experiments; plans for future experiments; examples of problems that can be or have been addressed with broadband OSN data; and technical problems presented by long-term seafloor seismic installations.

Conveners: Ralph Stephen, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, 360 Woods Hole Rd., MS 24, Woods Hole, MA 02543-1542 USA, Tel: +1-508-289-2583, Fax: +1-508-457-2150, E-mail: rstephen@whoi.edu Kiyoshi Suyehiro, Deep Sea Research Department, Japan Marine Science and Technology Center, 2-15 Natsushima-cho, Yokosuka 237-0061, Japan, Tel: +81-468-67-3827 Fax: +81-468-66-5541, E-mail: suyehiro@jamstec.go.jp

S07 Melts and Volatiles in the Deep Mantle (Joint With T, V, MRP, SEDI)

Once believed to be confined to the low-velocity zone and at shallow depths in tectonically active regions, recent seismological results indicate a much greater distribution of partial melts in the mantle with evidence of melts ranging from transition zone depths through the lower mantle to the core-mantle boundary. Concomitant with this is a deepening understanding of the abundance and cycling of volatile components in the Earth's mantle. This session will focus on seismological, laboratory, and theoretical characterization and quantification of partial melts and volatiles in the mantle, their role in mantle dynamics, and their temporal evolution in abundance and mode. We encourage submissions from seismology, mineral physics, geodynamics, geochemistry, and volcanology.

Conveners: Justin Revenaugh, Earth Sciences, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95060 USA Tel: +1-831-459-3055, Fax: +1-831-459-3074, E-mail: jsr@monk.ucsc.edu Lars P. Stixrude, Department of Geology, University of Michigan, 2534 C. C. Little Bldg., 425 E. University Ave., Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1063 USA, Tel: +1-313-647-9071, Fax: +1-313-763-4690, E-mail: stixrude@umich.edu

S08 Thermal and Chemical Structures in the Core-Mantle Boundary Region: Implications for the Evolution of the Deep Interior (Joint With G, GP, T, MRP, SEDI)

Thermal and chemical structures in the core-mantle boundary (CMB) region are shaped by dynamics in the Earth's interior and provide clues to the long-term evolution of the planet. A wide range of processes from large-scale convection to small-scale melting and chemical reactions, are likely to contribute to the complexity of the boundary region. We welcome reports dealing with theoretical, observational, and experimental studies of the boundary region. Topics include, but are not restricted to, the structure and evolution of the thermal boundary layer, chemical stratification at the base of the mantle or top of the core, melting relations and physical properties of mantle minerals, evidence and implications of small-scale structure, effect of boundary layer structure on CMB topography, and observational techniques for discriminating between chemical and thermal boundary layers.

Conveners: Bruce Buffett, Department of Earth and Ocean Sciences, University of British Columbia 2219 Main Mall, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z4 Canada, Tel: +1-604-822-3466, Fax: +1-604-822-6088 E-mail: buffett@geop.ubc.ca Anne M. Hofmeister, Department of Earth and Planetary Science Washington University, Campus Box 1169, 1 Brookings Dr., St. Louis, MO 63130 USA, Tel: +1-314-935-7440, Fax: +1-314-935-7361, E-mail: Hofmeist@levee.wustl.edu Michael Wysession, Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Washington University, Campus Box 1169, 1 Brookings Dr., St. Louis, MO 63130 USA, Tel: +1-314-935-5625, Fax: +1-314-935-7361, E-mail: michael@wucore.wustl.edu

S09 New Challenges in Data Analysis With Large Dense Seismic Arrays

The massive quantity of seismic data that will be produced by new generations of dense seismograph networks e.g., USArray, a proposed dense, continent-scale, real-time seismic array) will soon render conventional techniques for data processing and analysis inadequate. USArray will record many times more data than the IRIS GSN and PASSCAL combined, and all data will be available in near-real-time. To anticipate these developments, the seismology community is beginning to develop new software and techniques, not only for data flow between sensors, data centers, and to individual scientists, but also for efficient data analysis and interpretation. Previous prototype experiments with dense broadband arrays have shown that the new data will be recorded densely enough to permit analysis methods that are routinely applied in exploration seismology, such as multichannel data processing for noise suppression and signal enhancement, 3-D migration, and waveform inversion. Such methods are being adapted and redeveloped to make optimal use of the three-component wavefield, the Earth's spherical geometry, and the source-receiver geometries imposed by the earthquake experiment. However, new theoretical developments and applications are necessary, particularly those that exploit the vector wavefield in image formation. In this session we invite papers that will explore the capabilities of dense seismograph networks, such as those envisaged as part of USArray, for both structural and earthquake source imaging. We are particularly interested in novel data processing and analysis methods, and creative theories for the interpretation of the densely sampled, three-component, broadband wavefield. Lastly we encourage contributions that consider the larger earth science data handling problem: how nonseismic Earth science data can be combined with seismic data to make best use of all available information, both as constraints in seismic image formation and during interpretation after seismic images have been formed.

Conveners: Alan Levander, Department of Geology and Geophysics, Rice University, 6100 Main Street Houston, TX 77005 USA, Tel: +1-713-348-6064, Fax: +1-713-348-5214, E-mail: alan@geophysics.rice.edu Karen M. Fischer, Department of Geological Sciences, Brown University, Box 1846, Providence, RI 02912 USA, Tel: +1-401-863-1360, Fax: +1-401-863-2058, E-mail: karen_fischer@brown.edu

G03 Ice Mass Fluctuations: From Geophysical Observations to Inferences of Earth Rheology (Joint With H, S, T)

Geodesy has emerged as an important technique to monitor ice mass changes (e.g. GPS, gravity, INSAR, altimetry, and Earth orientation measurements). In addition to submissions on these techniques and their application to ice mass studies, we are interested in addressing how glacial fluctuation records can be used to probe the rheology of the crust and mantle. Additional questions this session addresses include, What additional data are needed to better constrain the rheological models? What are the stresses associated with glacial fluctuations and how do they compare with the stresses due to ongoing tectonic processes? How do ice mass fluctuations influence background seismicity and change the probability of a large earthquake?

Conveners: Jeanne Sauber, Geodynamics Branch, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 921, Bldg. 33, G310, Greenbelt, MD 20771 USA, Tel: +1-301-614-6465, Fax: +1-301-614-6522, E-mail: jeanne@steller.gsfc.nasa.gov Tonie van Dam, European Centre for Geodynamics and Seismology, 19 rue Josy Welter, L-7256 Walferdange, Luxembourg, Germany, Tel: +35-2-33-14-87, Fax: +35-2-33-61-29, E-mail: tonie@ecgs.lu

G04 Advances in Modeling Volcanic Deformation (Joint With S, T, V)

Over the last decade the proliferation of continuous GPS receivers and the widespread use of INSAR have led to an abundance of very high quality deformation data sets from volcanoes around the world. Rich both spatially and temporally, these data sets provide an excellent opportunity to understand the dynamics of volcanic deformation while simultaneously improving our ability to forecast and address volcanic hazards. The quality and extent of the data now available demand complex models that until recently would have been unjustified because of weak data strength. The aim of this session is to apply volcanic modeling techniques that incorporate more realistic earth and source models and to use those techniques to make detailed inferences about the structure and behavior of volcanic deformation sources. Examples of possible topics include (1) the effect of topography and elastic heterogeneity, (2) deformation sources that go beyond the Mogi or uniform dislocation, (3) efficient inversion methods that can manage the computational burden of complex source and earth models, and (4) the incorporation of other data types such as seismograms and gravity measurements into the modeling process.

Conveners: Paul M. Davis, Department of Earth and Space Sciences, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1567 USA, Tel: +1-310-825-1343, Fax: +1-310-825-2779, E-mail: pdavis@dino.ess.ucla.edu Peter Cervelli, Department of Geophysics, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305-2215 USA, Tel: +1-650-725-5472, Fax: +1-650-725-7344, E-mail: cervelli@pangea.stanford.edu

G06 Real-Time GPS (Joint With S, T, V)

This session will explore real-time and near-real-time GPS methods, applications, interpretation, and theoretical considerations. Questions of interest include what kinds of GPS hardware and software are currently available for these kinds of applications? How accurate are estimates of deformation? What kind of triggering algorithms are being used to infer "real" signals? Applications spanning the real-time to near real-time spectrum from navigation, structure monitoring, landslide mitigation, volcano monitoring, and tectonic deformation are appropriate. We also seek presentations concerning societal needs and how real-time GPS techniques can meet those needs.

Conveners: Ken Hurst, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, 4800 Oak Grove Dr., Mail Stop 238-600, Pasadena, CA 91109-8099 USA, Tel: +1-818-354-6637, Fax: +1-818-393-4965, E-mail: hurst@cobra.jpl.nasa.gov Elliot Endo, U.S. Geological Survey, 5400 MacArthur Blvd., Vancouver, WA 98661 USA, Tel: +1-360- 993-8911, Fax: +1-360-993-8980, E-mail: etendo@usgs.gov

G07 Plate and Microplate Motion and Intraplate Deformation (Joint With GP, S, T)

Geodetic observations from the growing network of sites are bringing new information on the motion of the plate interiors and the continental deformation belts. At the same time, an expanding set of geophysical observations, including seismicity, earthquake fault plane solutions, marine magnetic observations of sea floor spreading, and high-resolution mapping of transforms and fracture zones, are constraining the motion between plates along their boundaries. The geodetic data are beginning to constrain both intraplate deformation and that produced by glacial isostatic adjustment. The geodetic data are also identifying large portions of lithosphere that may be behaving nearly rigidly, such as the Amurian and Sundaland plates. We invite studies using geodetic and other geophysical observations to better understand the kinematics and dynamics of motions at the Earth's surface. We also seek studies using the predictive power of the plate model to constrain deformation integrated across active tectonic structures separating plates.

Conveners: Donald F Argus, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, 4800 Oak Grove Dr., Mail Stop 238-600 Pasadena, CA 91109-8099 USA, Tel : +1-818-354-3380, Fax: +1-818-393-4965, E-mail: argus@cobra.jpl.nasa.gov Eric Calais, Centre National de la Researche Scientifique - Geosciences Azur, 250 rue Albert Einstein, 06560 Valbonne, France, Tel: +33-4-92-94-26-28, Fax: +33-4-92-94-26-10 E-mail: calais@faille.unice.fr

G09 Crustal Deformation (Joint With S, T)

Space geodetic techniques (GPS, INSAR, VLBI, SLR, DORIS) as well as precise ground-based techniques (strainmeters, tiltmeters, leveling, gravity, EDM) have revolutionized our ability to accurately measure crustal deformation around the world. We solicit papers on crustal deformation results and models from a variety of techniques, at any scale from local to global. We also seek papers that compare techniques or show improvements in modeling the geodetic observables.

Conveners: Rosanne Nikolaidis, University of California, MC 0225, 9500 Gilman Dr., La Jolla, CA 92093-0225 USA, Tel: +1-858-822-0557, Fax: +1-858-534-9873, E-mail: rosanne@ucsd.edu Kristine Larson, Department of Aerospace Engineering Sciences, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309-0429 USA, Tel: +1-303-492-6583, Fax: +1-303-492-7881, E-mail: kristine.larson@colorado.edu

OS24 Predicting Submarine Mass Failure and Tsunami Hazards (Joint with S, T)

Society needs to assess accurate underwater landslide and slump hazards, attempt to predict their occurrence following a nearby earthquake, evaluate their tsunamigenic potential, and hopefully warn coastal communities of imminent danger. Underwater landslides and slumps pose a continuous threat to US coastal economic activity, including valuable offshore structures and port facilities. Some of the largest and most deadly tsunamis this decade (e.g., Papua New Guinea, Flores Island) probably involved wave generation by nearshore underwater landslides or slumps. These events generated tsunami runup reaching 30 m above sea level, far surpassing most previous predictions of maximum tsunami amplitude for such moderate earthquakes, and calling into question the preparedness of US coastal communities for a similar event. An interdisciplinary approach to underwater landslide and slump hazard assessment can yield deterministic or probabilistic predictions of failure occurrence, size and location. These predictions would enhance both underwater landslide and slump hazard assessment and tsunami warning capabilities. The Special Session provides an interactive forum of experts from various fields of engineering and science to critically evaluate existing work, provide important new sources of information, and further the state of the art.

Conveners: Philip Watts, Applied Fluids Engineering, Inc., e-mail: phil.watts@appliedfluids.com, phone: +1-562-498-9407, fax: +1-562-498-9407; Homa Lee, US Geological Survey, e-mail: homa@octopus.wr.usgs.gov, phone: +1-650-329-5485, fax: +1-650-329-5411

T01 Plate Boundary Deformation: From Kinematics to Dynamics (Joint With G, S, V)

Diffusive deformation in the Himalayan-Tibetan plateau, western North America, the Andes, and other continental plate boundaries deviate significantly from predictions of classical plate tectonics theory and are often associated with strong earthquakes and volcanic eruptions. In addition to seismological and geological observations, recent developments in space geodetic measurements, including the Global Positioning System and satellite Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar, have provided rich kinematic information about plate boundary deformation. Much better constraints on the kinematics can be expected from the proposed Plate Boundary Observatory. The fast accumulating kinematic observations provide unprecedented opportunities for understanding the dynamics of plate boundary deformation. This session aims to facilitate interactions between workers focused on measuring crustal deformation at plate boundaries and modelers focused on investigating the dynamics. Papers using all kinds of kinematic data to illustrate the dynamics of plate boundary deformation are welcome, and studies that integrate geodetic, seismological, and geological data to investigate the large-scale dynamic systems of continental plate boundaries are particularly encouraged.

Conveners: Mian Liu, Department of Geological Science, University of Missouri, 101Geology Bldg., Columbia, MO 65211 USA, Tel: +1-573-882-3784, Fax: +1-573-882-5458, E-mail: lium@missouru.edu William E. Holt, Department of Geosciences, State University of New York, Stony Brook, NY 11794-2100 USA, Tel: +1-631-632-8215, Fax: +1-631-632-8240; E-mail: wholt@horizon.ess.sunysb.edu

T02 Observational Constraints on the Dynamics of Subducting Slabs (Joint With G, S, V, SEDI)

The detailed dynamic evolution of subducting slabs is poorly understood. From a physical point of view, we know that the slab is one component of a complex interacting system of mantle convection and the lithospheric plates. The nature of the coupling between plates and mantle is still strongly debated. It is probable, however, that small scale plate boundary processes play a controlling role in the behavior of the large-scale system, and will certainly need to be included in large-scale models in parameterized form. For this reason, modeling cannot proceed from a purely theoretical viewpoint. Strong observational constraints are required to train the parameterized models. In this session we wish to consider the broadest range of observations that will bear upon the understanding of subducting lithosphere, including those from plate kinematics, seismic tomography, earthquake mechanisms, the subsidence record from oceanic and continental basins, geochemistry, the geological record in island arcs, and active continental margins. We would like to build up a slab taxonomy by considering how subduction zones behave in the wild. Do slabs really look like the pictures we see in textbooks? How often do slabs roll back? What makes slabs tear or break, and how do they behave when this happens? How do slabs evolve in the presence/absence of a nearby continental margin? How can slabs change polarity, and how frequently do they do so? When do slabs flatten under continents, and why? We are particularly keen to foster the involvement of scientists having detailed knowledge of observational constraints with more theoretical modelers. What is the state of the art in modeling of convergent plate boundaries? In what ways are these models still limited? What time-dependent behaviors of subducted slabs are by models, and can observations be used to verify the solutions? What do the models tell us about plate driving forces?

Conveners: L. Moresi, CSIRO Exploration and Mining, PO Box 437, Nedlands, WA 6009, Australia, Tel: +61-8-9389-8421, Fax: +61-8-9389-1906, E-mail: l.moresi@ned.dem.csiro.au R. Dietmar Müller, School of Geosciences, Division of Geology and Geophysics, Bldg. F05, University of Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia, Tel: +61-2-9351-2003, Fax: +61-2-9351-0184, E-mail: dietmar@es.usyd.edu.au

T03 Raising Plateaus (Joint With G, GP, S, V)

Two of the world's highest plateaus, Tibet and the Altiplano, have formed in markedly distinct tectonic settings. Does this require different mechanisms to form them? Models (analytical, numerical, physical) of Tibet and the Altiplano, as well as the wider region surrounding them, remain highly variable because of meager databases. We are interested in geological, geophysical, and geochemical results from current research on all levels (small to large, single to multidiscipline) concerning continent-continent and ocean-continent interactions that could help to improve this position. Earth scientists working in both orogens are few, yet new data are emerging, and therefore the time seems ripe to exchange experience and ideas that are related to uplift, and sustaining uplift, of large expanses of continental crust. How well are models being tested/eliminated? Are there new or revised models arising thereupon? By bringing together a number of disciplines, we look forward to real learning and cross-fertilization leading to wider ideas.

Conveners: Mike Edwards, Asian Tectonics Research Unit, Institut für Geologie, Technische Universitäet Bergakadamie Freiberg, Berhard-von-Cotta Str. 2, D-09596 Freiberg, Germany, Tel: +49- 3731-39-4598 or +49-177-783-2827, Fax: +49-3731-39-3597, E-mail: edwards@geologie.uni-wuerzburg.de S. Gilder, Laboratoire de Paleomagnetisme, Institut de Physique du Globe de Paris, 4 place Jussieu, 75252 Paris Cedex 05, France, Tel: +33-1-44-27-24-32 or +33-1-44-27-24-31, Fax: +33-1-44-27-74-63; Bryan L. Isacks, Department of Geological Sciences, Cornell University, Snee Hall, Ithaca, NY 14853 USA, Tel: +1-607-255-2307, Fax: +1-607-254-4780, E-mail: bli1@cornell.edu Paul Tapponnier, Laboratoire de Tectonophysique, Institut de Physique du Globe de Paris, 4 place Jussieu, 75252 Paris Cedex 05, France, Tel: +33-1-44-27-49-24, Fax: +33-1-44-27-24-40, E-mail: tappon@ipgp.jussieu.fr

T05 Cenozoic Tectonics and Magmatism of the Southeastern Eurasian Margin (Joint With G, S, V)

Southeastern Eurasia (defined here as India, Tibet, China blocks, Indochina and Greater Sundaland, Indonesia, and the Philippines) has been the site of Mesozoic-Cenozoic continent and terrane accretion, suturing, and (potentially) extrusion and disaggregation of continental assemblages. The remnants of these terranes are in the final act of Tethyan closure currently, and the mechanisms by which accretion and extrusion are accomplished are controversial. Complex and often cryptic tectonic boundaries hamper clear understanding of even current tectonics, to say nothing of earlier stages of southeast Eurasia development. Anomalous volcanism throughout the Cenozoic in this region is difficult to place in a well-understood tectonic framework here. We solicit presentations detailing relevant studies of the tectonics and magmatism of southeastern Eurasia, including structural geology, seismology, tectonophysics, paleomagnetism, petrology, and geochemistry.

Conveners: Martin F. J. Flower, Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Illinois at Chicago, 845 W. Taylor St., MC 186, Chicago, Illinois 60607-7059 USA, Tel: +1-312 996-9662, Fax: +1-312 413-2279, E-mail: flower@uic.edu Victor Mocanu, Faculty of Geology and Geophysics, University of Bucharest, 6 Traian Vuia st., Sect. 1, 70139 Bucharest, Romania, Tel: +40-1-2117390, Fax: +40-1-2113120, E-mail: mocanu@gg.unibuc.ro

T06 Interactions Between Tectonics and Surface Processes (Joint With H, S, NG)

Rapid new advances are now being made in our understanding of surface processes operating in active tectonic settings. Yet there remains a need for greater integration with the latest findings of how faults grow through time. Recently, structural geologists and geophysicists have made significant progress in mapping and modeling spatial and temporal rates of propagation and displacement along tectonic structures. This information is only just beginning to filter through to the geomorphology and sedimentology communities. The manner in which surface processes respond to a fluctuating tectonic signal will play a first-order role in determining the subsequent landscape evolution, as well as the size and location of sediment entry points into basins and the nature and distribution of syntectonic strata. This topic represents an outstanding problem in nonlinear dynamics and is of fundamental importance to our understanding of how coupled geologic processes work. Furthermore, the structural geology and paleoseismology communities can gain useful insights into interpreting the temporal record of active faulting by considering geomorphological and sedimentological evidence. This session is an attempt to fill these needs by bringing together structural geologists, paleoseismologists, geophysicists, geomorphologists, and sedimentologists to discuss the state of the art in understanding coupled structural-geomorphic-sedimentary systems. We welcome interdisciplinary contributions to this session that deal with field observations (structural, paleoseismological, and sedimentological/geomorphological), landscape evolution modeling, fault growth modeling, and theoretical work on the physics of erosion/transport/deposition at different scales in active tectonic settings.

Conveners: Patience Cowie, Department of Geology and Geophysics, Edinburgh University, Edinburgh EH9 3J, UK, Tel: +44-131-650-5886, Fax: +44-131-668-3184, E-mail: cowie@glg.ed.ac.uk Ruth Robinson, School of Geography and Geosciences, University of St Andrews, St Andrews, Fife KY16 9ST, UK, Tel: +01334-463996, E-mail: rajr@st-andrews.ac.uk Gregory E. Tucker, Deparment of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Institute of Technology, Room 48-429 Cambridge, MA 02139 USA, Tel: +1-617-253-7475, E-mail: greg.tucker@geography.oxford.ac.uk

T08 The Structure and Evolution of the Lithosphere in the Rocky Mountain Region (Joint With G, GP, S, V)

The Rocky Mountain region is part of a broad orogenic plateau that extends along the western margin of the North American plate. This region has experienced a complex tectonic evolution from its formation during the Proterozoic to the present, and understanding this evolution is a key issue in continental tectonics. This evolution began with the formation of a 1500-km-wide Proterozoic orogenic belt that records an episode of rapid accretion of continental materials from mantle sources and their assembly to form southern Laurentia between 1.8 and 1.6 Ga. The Ancestral Rocky Mountains and Laramide orogenies greatly altered the lithosphere of this region. Today the high elevations of the southern Rocky Mountain Rio Grande rift region in particular are the manifestation of Phanerozoic and still ongoing modification and disassembly of Proterozoic lithosphere. A better understanding of this region will require integration of a variety geophysical and geological measurements, and diverse contributions to this session are sought.

Conveners: G. Randy Keller, Department of Geological Sciences, University of Texas, El Paso, TX 79968-0555 USA, Tel: +1-915-747-5850, Fax: +1-915-747-5073, E-mail: keller@geo.utep.edu Karl E. Karlstrom, Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131 USA, Tel: +1-505-277-4346, Fax: +1-505-277-8843, E-mail: kek1@unm.edu

T09 Lithospheric-Scale Vertical Strain Partitioning in Actively Deforming, Wrench-Type Plate Margins (Joint With G, S)

The proposed joint special session will flesh out relationships between upper crustal (surface) velocities, measured geodetically, and exhumed and remotely sensed (e.g., via shear wave splitting) mid-lower crustal and mantle deformational fabrics in actively deforming wrench-type(including transpressional and transtensional) plate margins. Sufficient geodetic (GPS), structural, and seismic data now exist from a number of wrench-type plate margins that specific and perhaps also general relationships may be established. Does the entire lithosphere deform coherently? Does the weak mid-lower crust transfer or detach motion between the strong mantle and strong brittle upper crust? Does mantle flow drive deformation in plate boundary zones from below? Does the degree of vertical strain partitioning vary systematically in pure wrenching, transpressional, and transtensional settings?

Conveners: John Weber, Grand Valley State University, Allendale, MI 49401USA, Tel: +1-616-895-319, E-mail: weberjc@hotmail.com Christian Teyssier, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, Tel: +1-612-624-680, E-mail: teyssier@tc.umn.edu

T11 Integrative Approaches to Caribbean Neotectonics and Seismic Hazard (Joint With G, S, V)

The tectonic complexity, small land areas, political subdivisions, and dense populations of the strike-slip and subduction margins of the Caribbean plate pose special challenges to the earth science community in understanding the neotectonic setting and evaluating seismic hazards in this region. The purpose of this session is to bring together an international group of researchers who are currently integrating a wide variety of methods to better understand the neotectonics and seismic hazards of this region. These methods include paleoseismology of onshore faults, GPS-based geodesy and modeling of geodetic results, paleoseismic studies of liquefaction features, geophysical surveys of offshore faults, earthquake seismology and historical research, strong ground motion studies, geologic and geomorphic studies of major faults, studies of tsunami deposits, and tsunami modeling. The session welcomes original contributions to Caribbean neotectonics using these and other methods.

Conveners: Carol Prentice, U.S. Geological Survey, 345 Middlefield Rd., MS 977, Menlo Park, CA 94025 USA, Tel: +1-650-329-5690, Fax: +1-650-329-5163, E-mail: cprentice@usgs.gov Paul Mann, Institute for Geophysics, University of Texas at Austin, 4412 Spicewood Springs Rd., Bldg. 600, Austin, TX 78759-8500 USA, Tel: +1-512-471-0452, Fax: +1-512-471-8844, E-mail: paulm@utig.ig.utexas.edu

T13 Geochemical, Biological and Tectonic Interactions in the Southern California Borderlands (Joint With B, G, S)

The California continental borderland is part of the distributed Pacific-North American plate boundary, and exhibits complex dextral transpressional and transtensional tectonics superimposed on an older crustal architecture. Faults in the borderland play a poorly known role in both the tectonics and seismic hazards of southern California. The active tectonic regime is manifested in the seismic, geochemical, and biological processes at the seafloor. Research efforts are currently under way focusing on geophysical and biogeochemical processes related to active tectonics in this environment. Seismic and tsunami hazards in this region are the focus of active research on the tectonics of the borderlands addressing both offshore and inshore faults. Fluid seepage associated with the transform faults has been documented along the San Clemente Fault zone and other offshore faults in this system. The fluid transport and discharge support biological communities, alter the rocks they flow through, and affect the chemistry of bottom water in the borderland basins. This session will provide an opportunity to share exciting new results from these ongoing research programs.

Conveners: Chris Goldfinger, College of Oceanic and Atmospheric Sciences, Oregon State University, Ocean Administration Bldg. 104, Corvallis, OR 97331-5503 USA, Tel: +1-503-737-5214, Fax: +1-503- 737-2064, E-mail: gold@oce.orst.edu Marta E. Torres, College of Oceanic and Atmospheric Sciences, Oregon State University, Ocean Administration Bldg. 104, Corvallis, OR 97331-5503 USA, Tel: +1-541- 737-2902, Fax: +1-541-737-2064, E-mail: mtorres@oce.orst.edu Craig R. Smith, Department of Oceanography, University of Hawaii, 1000 Pope Rd., Honolulu, HI 96822 USA, Tel: +1-808-956-8623, Fax: +1-808-956-9516, E-mail: csmith@soest.hawaii.edu

T14 Seismogenic Zone Studies of the Nankai Trough Subduction Margin (Joint With OS, S)

Subduction zone thrusts produce some of Earth's largest and most destructive earthquakes and tsunamis. The 1997 MARGINS SEIZE workshop was held to initiate investigations into the relationship between earthquakes, deformation, and fluid flow in subduction zones. At the workshop, the Nankai Trough subduction zone was identified as a prime setting for examining the controls on seismogenic rupture because of its well-recorded history of great earthquakes and its unusually shallow and relatively accessible seismogenic zone. In the past 3 years, new interest in examining characteristics of the seismogenic zone along subduction thrusts has inspired a wide variety of field experiments across the Nankai Trough. These experiments range from passive seismicity studies, active geophysical surveys, submersible dives, and Ocean Drilling Program drilling. We solicit contributions to this session that will present results of recent field, theoretical, or laboratory experiments relevant to the structure, seismicity, and physical properties along subduction thrusts, especially in the Nankai Trough subduction zone.

Conveners: Nathan Bangs, Institute for Geophysics, University of Texas, 4412 Spicewood Springs Rd., Bldg. 600, Austin, TX 78795 USA, Tel: +1-512-471-0424, Fax: +1-512-475-6338, E-mail: nathan@utig.ig.utexas.edu Shin'ichi Kuramoto, Marine Geology Department, Geological Survey of Japan, 1-1-3 Higashi, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8567, Japan, Tel/Fax: +81-298-61-3767, E-mail: kuramoto@gsj.go.jp

T15 In Situ Studies of Mechanical and Structural Properties of Fault Zones and the Crust (Joint With S)

Recent and planned borehole projects (e.g., water-injection experiment in Nojima fault, Japan; deep KTB in Germany, San Andreas Fault Drilling in the United States), large earthquake ruptures (e.g., Izmit and Duzce M › 7 events in Turkey, Landers and Hector Mine M›7 events in California, Chi-Chi M›7 event in Taiwan), detailed field studies of exhumed faults, and research in mining seismology provide new opportunities to obtain in situ information on stress at seismogenic depth, earthquake source processes, and geometrical, seismic, and rheological properties of fault zones and the crust. This session will focus on such in situ observational studies, with an emphasis on high-resolution imaging of active fault structures and evolving features of earthquake cycles (e.g., permeability, healing). Presentations based on geophysical and seismic field experiments, rock mining seismology, and geological studies are welcomed.

Conveners: Kin'ya Nishigami, Disaster Prevention Research Institute, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011, Japan, Tel: +81-774-38-4279, Fax: +81-774-31-8294, E-mail: nishigam@drs.dpri.kyoto-u.ac.jp Yehuda Ben-Zion, Department of Earth Sciences, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90089-0740 USA, Tel: +1-213-740-6734, Fax: +1-213-740-8801 E-mail: benzion@terra.usc.edu

T16 Correlating Geophysical Observations of Fault Behavior and Fault Properties (Joint With G, S)

Geophysical observations of fault behavior are providing an increasingly complex view of fault processes as the resolution of our techniques improves. Seismic, geodetic, and electromagnetic methods enable us to infer temporal and spatial variations in physical properties of faults, and geologic field observations help us tie these remotely sensed observables to actual fault processes. Recent microseismic relocations are indicating detailed structural and temporal variations in fault behavior. Advances in geodetic and seismic methods are allowing us to infer detailed slip distributions on faults throughout the earthquake cycle. All of these methods highlight variations in fault behavior that originate from variations in fault properties along the fault zone. These properties may be structural, such as asperities or complex geometry, or material, such as composition or state conditions. We encourage papers that correlate fault behavior as observed by geophysical techniques with various properties found along the fault surface. This includes studies identifying spatial variations in properties along faults such as between locked and creeping portions of a fault, and temporal changes in behavior of faults such as can be attributed to changes in porosity or loading rate.

Conveners: David Schmidt, Department of Geology and Geophysics, University of California, Berkeley, 307 McCone Hall, Berkeley, CA 94720-4767 USA, Tel: +1-510-643-8328, E-mail: dschmidt@seismo.berkeley.edu Evelyn Price, Department of Geology and Geophysics, University of California, Berkeley, 307 McCone Hall, Berkeley, CA 94720-4767 USA, E-mail: evelyn@seismo.berkeley.edu

T17 Physical Properties of Fault Zones: A Session in Honor of James D. Byerlee (Joint With G, S, MRP)

James Byerlee has devoted his professional career to the understanding of the complex processes that control rock failure and the behavior of fault zone materials. This session, in keeping with Byerlee’s spirit of innovation and creativity, explores the current state of understanding of mechanical and hydrological properties of active fault systems. Contributions are invited in the areas of laboratory and field observations as well as theoretical developments relating to active faults, such as fault zone stability, fault strength and rheology, state of stress, fluid compartmentalization, and rupture nucleation models.

Conveners: David Lockner, U.S. Geological Survey, 345 Middlefield Rd., MS 977, Menlo Park, CA 94025 USA, Tel: +1-650 329-4826, Fax: +1-650 329-5163, E-mail: dlockner@usgs.gov Malcolm Johnston, U.S. Geological Survey, 345 Middlefield Road, MS 977, Menlo Park, CA 94025 USA, Tel: +1-650-329-4812, Fax: +1-650-329-5163, E-mail: mal@usgs.gov

T18 Dynamic Rupture of Rocks and Other Brittle Materials (Joint With S, V, MRP)

Rock failure in the crust is frequently unstable, producing earthquakes, tremors, and rockbursts. Unstable rupture is also generated by impacts and other rapid loadings. This session focuses on descriptions and analyses of nucleation, propagation, and arrest of dynamic rupture in rocks and other brittle materials under tensile and shear conditions. Advances in these subjects could provide tools for deducing growth velocity and other properties of dynamic failure from observed in situ features of faults, dikes, and joints. Presentations of field, experimental, and modeling results are welcomed.

Conveners: Yehuda Ben-Zion, Department of Earth Sciences, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90089-0740 USA, Tel: +1-213-740-6734, Fax: +1-213-740-8801, E-mail: benzion@terra.usc.edu Ze'ev Reches, Institute of Earth Sciences, Hebrew University, Jerusalem 91904, Israel, Tel: +972-2-658-4669, Fax: +972-2-566-2581, E-mail: reches@earth.es.huji.ac.il

T21 Measurements and Modeling of Marine Sediments (Joint With OS, S, MRP)

The special session targets experimental (laboratory and in situ) measurements as well as modeling results of marine sediments. We would like to see papers covering both modeling and measurements of compaction, porosity decrease, diagenesis, and physical properties of marine sediments. Of great interest is the link between physical properties and indirect field (e.g., seismic) measurements as well as relationships between static and dynamic moduli.

Conveners: Manika Prasad, Geophysics Department, Stanford University, 397 Panama Mall, Code 322GG, Stanford, CA 94305-2215 USA, Tel: +1-650-723-8547, Fax: +1-650-723-1188, E-mail: manika.prasad@stanford.edu Roy H. Wilkens, Office of Naval Research, 800 N. Quincy Street, Code 322GG, Arlington, VA 22217-5660 USA, Tel: +1-703-696-7237, Fax: +1-703-696-2710, E-mail: roy_wilkens@onr.navy.mil

V01The Properties of Fe and Fe-Bearing Phases at High Pressures (Joint With GP, S, T, MRP, SEDI)

Iron is the fourth most abundant element in the Earth and, therefore, it plays an important role in most geochemical and petrological processes within the Earth. The fact that Fe can exist in a variety of valence states means that the geochemical character of Fe can vary depending on the reigning oxygen fugacity (fO2). The purpose of this special session is to bring together researchers who are interested in the properties of Fe° and Fe2+- and Fe3+-bearing phases at high pressures and the influence these properties may have on mantle processes and core formation. In addition to experimentally based studies, theoretical aspects and pertinent observations from natural samples are welcome.

Conveners: Alan Woodland, Institute of Mineralogy, University of Heidelberg, Germany E-mail: alan@classic.min.uni-heidelberg.de Dan Frost, Bayerisches Geoinstitut, University of Bayreuth, 95440 Bayreuth, Germany, E-mail: dan.frost@uni-bayreuth.de

V02 Physics of Axial Magma Chambers (Joint With GP, S, T, MRP)

In recent years, the geophysical community has made considerable progress understanding the structure, physical properties, and evolution of axial magma chambers (AMC) at oceanic spreading centers. This special session will involve volcanologists, tectonophysicists, and seismologists and will cover recent progress and upcoming challenges in multidisciplinary approaches to better understanding AMC structure and processes. Topics include (1) seismic, electromagnetic, and gravimetric observations; (2) structural and petrological features; and (3) geodynamic modeling; (4) laboratory characterization of rock properties from AMC regions.

Conveners: Nikolai Bagdassarov, Institut für Meteorologie und Geophysik, J. W. Goethe Universität Frankfurt, Feldbergstraße 47, D-60323 Frankfurt am Main, Germany, Tel: +49-69-798-23376, Fax: +49-69-798-23280, E-mail: nickbagd@geophysik.uni-frankfurt.de Benoît Ildefonse, Laboratoire de Tectonophysique, Institut de Sciences de la Terre, de l’Eau et de l’Espa?e de Montpellier, Université Montpellier II, 34095 Montpellier, cedex 05, France, Tel: +33-4-67-14 38-18/33, Fax: +33-4-67-14-36-03, E-mail: benoit@dstu.univ-montp2.fr William S. D. Wilcock, School of Oceanography, University of Washington, Box 357940, Seattle, WA 98195-7940 USA, Tel: +1-206-543-6043, Fax: +1-206-543-6073, E-mail: wilcock@ocean.washington.edu

V06 New Developments in Volcanic Systems of Southern Italy (Joint With G, S, T)

Studies of volcanic areas in southern Italy have been conducted for both academic and societal reasons. Most of these volcanos are sited in areas of moderate to high population density, so research can yield vital, predicative scenarios that could be very beneficial to the affected populations. About 20 years ago, there was a resurgence of research related to southern Italian volcanic areas. This research was conducted by universities especially in southern Italy, but also involved research institutions in the rest of the world. Recently, the research has become more detailed and sophisticated, and especially has involved the use of various isotopic systems. We propose this special session for the AGU Fall Meeting in San Francisco. The purpose of this session is to bring together for a wider audience the recent and very exciting developments related to the volcanic systems of southern Italy. Although southern Italy is a long way from San Francisco, the synergy that can be developed with such a meeting can be very worthwhile. Our tentative structure would consist of a morning session of oral talks, both invited and volunteered, followed by an afternoon poster session. We have been in contact with various researchers involved with southern Italian volcanos and have agreement and support for such a session. The following institutions are represented: Università di Napoli, Italy, Osservatorio Vesuviano, Italy, University of Lancaster, UK; Technische Universität Muenchen, Germany; and in the USA, the University of Maryland, Eastern Washington University, American Museum of Natural History, and U.S. Geological Survey.

Conveners: Harvey E. Belkin, U.S. Geological Survey, 956 National Center, Reston, VA 20192 USA, Tel: +1-703-648-6162, Fax: +1-703-648-6419, E-mail: hbelkin@usgs.gov or hbelkin@mindspring.com Renato Somma, Università degli Studi di Napoli “Federico II,” Napoli, Italy

V09 Subduction Zone Devolatilization (Joint With S, T)

Subduction zone devolatilization is vital to deep earthquakes, magma genesis, and volatile recycling. This special session will focus on the release of fluids from subducted lithologies and the effect of slab devolatilization on the mantle wedge. Major volatile components (H2O and CO2), minor and trace element geochemistry, and isotopes are an integral part of this theme session. The convener encourages contributions from a variety of disciplines (geochemistry, petrology, tectonics, and seismicity).

Convener: Derrill M. Kerrick, Pennsylvania State University, 243 Deike Bldg., University Park, PA 16802 USA, Tel: +1-814-865-7574, Fax: +1-814-865-3191, Web site: http://www.geosc.psu.edu/~kerrick/

V10 Rhenium and Osmium Isotope and Elemental Constraints on Mantle and Magmatic Processes (Joint With G, S, P, MRP)

The chalcophile and siderophile elements rhenium and osmium (Re-Os) potentially provide key information on the differentiation of the terrestrial planets, both on the conditions under which core formation took place in the early solar system and on mantle melting and magmatic differentiation in the early Earth and to the present day. This session will focus on applications of the Re-Os system to recent results in these fields, such as, studies of meteorites and other planetary material; records of the early Earth recorded in ancient continental rocks; constraints on the sources of oceanic basalts; experimental constraints on Re and Os partitioning in mantle and magmatic systems; and studies of the distribution and behavior of these elements between natural minerals (silicates, sulphides, and melts). The essential aim is a multidisciplinary discussion that brings together experimental, geochemical, and petrological aspects of the above or related topics.

Conveners: Kevin W. Burton, Department of Earth Sciences, The Open University, Walton Hall, Milton Keynes, MK7 6AA, UK, Tel: +44-1908-652889, Fax: +44-1908-655151, E-mail: k.w.burton@open.ac.uk Pierre Schiano, Laboratoire Magmas et Volcans, Observatoire de Physique du Globe de Clermont-Ferrand-Centre National de la Reserche Scientifique, UMR 6524, Université Blaise-Pascal, 5 Rue Kessler, 63038 Clermont-Ferrand, France, Tel: +33-4-73-34-67-57, Fax: +33-4 73-34 67-44, E-mail: schiano@opgc.univ-bpclermont.fr

V11 Long Valley Caldera: A Natural Laboratory to Study Long-Term Unrest in Complex Volcanic Systems (Joint With G, S, T)

For the past 20 years Long Valley caldera has been the site of persistent unrest and a broad spectrum of studies devoted to understanding the processes driving the unrest in this and other large, Quaternary silicic calderas. The aim of this session is to provide a forum for presenting and discussing both recent results and new perspectives on the earlier unrest. We also encourage contributions focused generally on problems of the geophysical and geochemical processes behind caldera unrest.

Conveners: Maurizio Battaglia, Department of Geophysics, Stanford University, Stanford CA 94305-2215 USA, Tel: +1-650-723-5485, Fax: +1-650-725-7344; E-mail: battag@pangea.stanford.edu. David P. Hill, U. S. Geological Survey, 345 Middlefield Rd., MS 910, Menlo Park, CA 94025 USA, E-mail: hill@usgs.gov

V12 Dynamics of Lower Crustal Processes (Joint With S, T, MRP)

This special session is designed to attract different disciplines together to discuss recent research on a variety of lower crustal processes. These include basaltic underplating, partial melting of the lower crust, MASH (mixing, assimilation, storage, and homogenization) processes, delamination of eclogitic lower crust, etc. Questions to address include Is the lower crust fundamentally more mafic than the upper crust? Is this true at continental arcs? Where is this not the case? What processes control or strongly influence the creation of continental crust at subduction zones? How important are magmatic processes that occur in the lower versus upper crust? We hope to address these issues by attracting papers on lower crustal xenoliths, the seismic structure of continental crust, as well as isotopic, geochemical, and petrologic studies of arc volcanoes and batholiths.

Conveners: John Chesley, E-mail: jchesley@geo.arizona.edu Rebecca Lange, E-mail: becky@umich.edu

NG01 Nonlinear Space-Time Patterns (Joint With A, B, G, OS, T)

Nonlinear space-time patterns occur in a variety of complex systems. These space-time patterns represent the independent spatial modes of the system in terms of their associated temporal signal, and can provide significant scientific insight into both their sources and relative effects. Examples of systems that exhibit space-time patterns include fault networks, mantle convection, the ocean-atmosphere interface, the human body, and solar activity. Analysis of these patterns reveals information about the characteristics of the system in question. Recent developments resulting in the relative inexpensive accessibility to computational power have greatly improved the ability to analyze these space-time patterns and have yielded a number of important scientific insights. Applications include such widely varying fields as biometrics, seismic tomography, surface deformation, tidal signals, blood flow, and the El Nino-Southern Oscillation. Abstracts that emphasize scientific results based on the analysis of space-time patterns are encouraged. We plan to invite people and solicit contributions across a broad spectrum of sections at AGU.

Conveners: Kristy Tiampo, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences, University of Colorado, Room 318, Boulder, CO 80309-0216 USA, Tel: +1-303-492-4779, Fax: +1-303-492-5070, E-mail: kristy@caldera.colorado.edu Andrea Donnellan, Mail Stop 126-347, Jet Propulsion Laboratory and University of Southern California, 4800 Oak Grove Dr., Pasadena, CA 91109 USA, Tel: +1-818-354-4737, Fax: +1-818-393-4965, E-mail: andrea.donnellan@jpl.nasa.gov

NG03 Scaling and the Extremes of Geophysical Fields (Joint With A, H, OS, S, T)

From earthquakes to floods, volcanic eruptions to magnetic storms and hurricanes, the extremes of geophysical fields are of prime importance. However, they are still poorly understood, and time series are often too short to yield the clear-cut empirical evidence necessary to distinguish between different theoretical behaviors. Of particular significance is the distinction between standard extreme value distributions and the nonclassical heavy tailed (algebraic) distributions generally associated with space-time scaling processes. This session will be devoted to the most recent theoretical and empirical developments of scaling approaches to understand and to characterize the interrelation between strong nonlinearities over wide ranges of temporal and spatial scales and their consequences for the extremes. Session topics will include recent empirical investigations; techniques to test for the algebraic fall-offs in probability distributions; statistical estimators and data requirements; comparisons of mean and extreme instabilities/events; the statistics and dynamics of the extremes; the relevance of the paradigm of self-organized criticality; cascades, multifractals, and heavy tails; and nonclassical return period statistics and their implications.

Conveners: Daniel Schertzer, Laboratoire de Modelisation en Mecanique, Centre National de la Reserche Scientifique UMR 7607, Case 162, Université P. et M. Curie, 4 Place Jussieu, F-75252 Paris Cedex 05, France, Tel: +33-1-44-27-4963, Fax: +33-1-44-27-5259, E-mail: schertze@ccr.jussieu.fr Shaun M. Lovejoy, Physics Department, McGill University, 3600 University Str., Montreal, QC H3A 2T8, Canada, Tel: +1-514-398-6537, Fax: +1-514-398-8434, E-mail: lovejoy@physics.mcgill.ca Per Bak, Niels Bohr Institute, Blegdamsvej 17, DK-2100 Copenhagen Ø, Denmark, Tel: +45-353-25393, Fax: +45-353-25016, E-mail: bak@nbi.dk Didier Sornette, Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics and Department of Earth and Space Science, University of California, 3845 Slichter Hall, Box 951567, 595 E. Circle Dr., University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 USA, Tel: +1-310-825-2863, Fax: +1-310-206-3051, E-mail: sornette@moho.ess.ucla.edu

NG04 Nonlinearity and Earthquakes (Joint With S, T, MRP)

This session solicits theoretical, experimental, and descriptive papers on nonlinear processes in earthquake science. Topics include comprehensive earthquake modeling; nonlinear deformation phenomena such as creep, afterslip, and fluid flow and diagenesis; the seismic cycle; foreshocks and aftershocks; nonlinear earthquake precursory and triggering mechanisms; nonlinear response to stress perturbations; self-organized intrafault structure; heterogeneities in distribution of physical properties and stresses along faults; and scaling of fracture and friction laboratory measurements to field scales. We anticipate that this session will attract some exciting papers by investigators pursuing research on nonlinear earthquake models and on other nonlinear earthquake-related topics.

Conveners: Chuck Bufe, U.S. Geological Survey, Denver Federal Center, Box 25046, Mail Stop 966, Denver, CO 80225 USA, Tel: +1-303-273-8413, Fax: +1-303-273-8450, E-mail: cbufe@usgs.gov Peter Ortoleva, Department of Geological Sciences, Indiana University, 1001 E. 10th St., Bloomington, IN 47405 USA, Tel: +1-812-855-5582, Fax: +1-812-855-2717, E-mail: ortoleva@indiana.edu Jean Schmittbuhl, Laboratoire de Geologie, Ecole Normale Superieure, 24 rue Lhomond, 75231 Paris Cedex 05, France, Tel: +33-1-44-32-22-18, Fax: +33-1-44-32-22-00, E-mail: Jean.Schmittbuhl@ens.fr

NG05 Fractals, Chaos, and Self-Organized Criticality in Natural and Human-Induced Hazards (Joint With A, H, OS, S, T, V)

Natural and human-induced hazards cover a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. They include a large variety and number of interacting components that combine to produce nonlinear power-law behaviors that are often associated with the basic concepts of complexity. Examples of these hazards include floods, landslides, volcanic eruptions, earthquakes, forest fires, cyclonic storms, droughts, global warming, and hazardous waste contamination. Papers that apply the concepts of fractals, chaos, or self-organized criticality to characterize, model, and assess the risk of natural and man-made hazards are solicited. Posters are also very much encouraged.

Conveners: Bruce D. Malamud, Department of Geography, Kings College London, Strand, London WC2R 2LS, UK, E-mail: bruce@malamud.com Didier Sornette, Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics and Department of Earth and Space Science, University of California, 3845 Slichter Hall, Box 951567, 595 E. Circle Dr., Los Angeles, CA 90095 USA, Tel: +1-310-825-2863, Fax: +1-310-206-3051, E-mail: sornette@moho.ess.ucla.edu Christopher Barton, U. S. Geological Survey, 600 4th St. South, St. Petersburg, FL 33701 USA, Tel: +1-727-803-8747 ext. 3014, Fax: +1-727-803-2030, E-mail: barton@usgs.gov

Space Physics and Aeronomy (SA)

SA01 The Mesosphere/Lower Thermosphere Region: Structure, Dynamics, Composition, and Emission (Joint With A)

The Mesosphere and Lower Thermosphere (MLT) between 50 and 150 km is a complex region where a variety of processes are important. Papers in this session explore this variety and highlight the interactions between radiative process, chemistry, wave dynamics, turbulence, electrodynamics, and nonlinear processes. Contributions related to MLT coupling from regions above and below are also encouraged.

Conveners: Christian Meyer, Colorado Research Associates, 3380 Mitchell La., Boulder, Colorado 80301 USA, Tel: +1-303-497-8328, Fax: +1-303-497-8328, E-mail: meyerc@ucar.edu Daniel Marsh, National Center for Atmsopheric Research, 3450 Mitchell La., Boulder, Colorado 80301 USA, Tel: +1- 303-497-1566, Fax: +1-303-497-1589, E-mail: marsh@ucar.edu

SA02 Characteristics and Dynamics of the F-Region Ionosphere and Thermosphere: A Tribute to Michael J. Buonsanto

Throughout a 25-year career of research and collaboration, Michael Buonsanto contributed to broad areas of understanding of Earth's ionosphere and thermosphere. Beginning and concluding with an emphasis on ionospheric storm effects, Buonsanto’s work covered both mid- and equatorial latitudes and dealt with issues of local aeronomy as well as magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling. Papers are solicited that arise from and extend the investigations and topical areas of ionospheric and thermospheric physics which benefited from Buonsanto's participation. Topics arising from CEDAR Storm Study investigations and past collaborations with Michael Buonsanto are encouraged.

Convener: John C. Foster, MIT Haystack Observatory, Route 40, Westford, MA 01886 USA, Tel: +1- 781-981-5621, Fax: +1-781-981-5766, E-mail: jcf@haystack.mit.edu

SA03 The Aeronomical Impact of Space Weather

The upper atmosphere responds to space weather through changes in neutral and ion composition and dynamics. These changes can, in turn, affect human activities. Examples include changes in atmospheric drag that perturb spacecraft orbits; high-latitude auroral currents that produce ground currents with damaging consequences to conductors; and ionospheric irregularities that affect radio wave propagation. Papers are solicited on the observational, theoretical, modeling, and operational impacts of "space weather" on the various aspects of the chemistry, composition, energetics and dynamics of the ionosphere and upper atmosphere.

Conveners: Maura Hagan, National Center for Atmospheric Research, PO Box 3000, Boulder, CO 80307-3000 USA, Tel: +1-303-497-1537, E-mail: hagan@ucar.edu Rod Heelis, William B. Hanson Center for Space Sciences, University of Texas at Dallas, 2601 N. Floyd Rd., Richardson, TX 75080 USA, Tel: +1-972-883-2822, E-mail: heelis@utdallas.edu Larry Paxton, The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, 11100 Johns Hopkins Rd., Laurel, MD 20723-6099 USA, Tel: +1-240-228- 6871, Fax: +1-240-228-6670, E-mail: larry.paxton@jhuapl.edu

SA04 Data Assimilation in Space Physics and Aeronomy (Joint With SM)

Assimilation of data into physical models provides a way to synthesize diverse observations into a physically consistent framework, and can provide a basis for initializing forecast models. The importance of data assimilation in space physics and aeronomy is rapidly increasing as data sources multiply, models become increasingly sophisticated, and the demand for accurate space weather specification and forecasting grows. Papers are invited on the theory and application of data assimilation in all areas of space physics and aeronomy.

Conveners: Arthur D. Richmond, High Altitude Observatory, National Center for Atmospheric Research, PO Box 3000, Boulder, CO 80307-3000 USA, Tel: +1-303-497-1570, Fax: +1-303-497-1589, E-mail: richmond@hao.ucar.edu Robert W. Schunk, Center for Atmospheric and Space Sciences, Utah State University, Logan, UT 84322-4405 USA, Tel: +1-435-797-2978, Fax: +1-435-797-2992, E-mail: schunk@cc.usu.edu Richard A. Wolf, Department of Space Physics and Astronomy, MS 108, Rice University, Houston, TX 77251 USA, Tel: +1-713-527-8101, E-mail: wolf@spacvax.rice.edu

A12 Sun-Climate Connections (Joint With SA)

A renewed interest in the study of mechanisms behind possible links between solar variability and climate has taken place in the last half-decade. Study results have been reported in recent meetings, such as the AGU 1998 Fall Meeting and the 1999 annual meeting of the International Union of Geodesy and Geophysics. A National Aeronautics and Space Administration-sponsored workshop was held in March 2000 to examine the breadth of current research and how it might suggest preferred directions and future research strategies (http://www.ispe.arizona.edu/conferences/sunmeet/). Workshop conclusions will be presented in invited presentations, and papers are invited on all aspects of study related to hypothesized mechanisms linking solar variability with climate variability and change.

Convener: William A. Sprigg, Institute for the Study of Planet Earth, University of Arizona, 715 N. Park Ave., Tucson, AZ 85721 USA, Tel: +1-520-622-9062 or 9014, Fax: +1-520-792-8795, E-mail: wsprigg@u.arizona.edu

GP01 The Orsted High-Precision Geomagnetic Satellite Mission (Joint With SA, SM)

Launched on February 23, 1999, into a low-earth, polar orbit, the Orsted satellite provides a wealth of high-precision vector magnetic field data, measurements of high-energy charged particles, and profiles of the ionospheric densities and atmospheric properties using GPS occultation techniques. The investigations cover a broad range of geophysics topics, including research into core fields, crustal- and induction fields, and external fields from field-aligned and ionospheric currents. While these research topics traditionally have been segmented into separate communities, the experience from the Orsted project shows the advantage of combining the research discussions of these communities. Papers are solicited that are related to the Orsted mission or to the topic of high-precision magnetometry.

Conveners: Torsten Neubert, Solar-Terrestrial Physics Division, Danish Meteorological Institute, Lyngbyvej 100, 2800 Copenhagen O, Denmark, Tel: +45 39-15-74-92, Fax: +45 39-15-74-60, E-mail: neubert@dmi.dk Gauthier Hulot, Département de Géomagnétisme et Paléomagnétisme, Institut de Physique de Globe de Paris, CNRS UA 729, 4 Place Jussieu, B89, Tour 24, 75252 Paris Cedex 05, France, Tél: +33-1-44-27-24-12, Fax: +33-1-44-27-33-73, E-mail: ghulot@ipgp.jussieu.fr Cathy Constable, Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California at San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093-0225 USA, Tel: +1-858-534-3183, Fax: +1-858-534-8090, E-mail: cconstable@ucsd.edu

P01 Planetary Atmospheric Processes and Astrobiology (Joint With A, B, SA)

Trace gases in the atmosphere react photochemically with important implications for the origin, evolution, and future of life. Many trace gases are generated by biological processes, and they in turn influence ecosystem interactions in the evolution of living systems. Ideas from strochemistry may benefit planetary atmospheric chemistry. The proposed session, therefore, will bring together planetary scientists, aeronomers, astrochemists, and solar scientists to discuss chemical and physical processes from their respective disciplines that may enhance our understanding of astrobiology. It will emphasize topical matters like our terrestrial biosphere and the present or past life on other worlds, particularly on Mars and Europa.

Conveners: Christopher P. McKay, Space Science Division, NASA Ames Research Center, MS 245-3, Moffett Field, CA 94035 USA, Tel: +1-650-604-6864, Fax: +1-650-604-6779, E-mail: cmckay@cmckay.arc.nasa.gov Sheo S. Prasad, Creative Research Enterprises, 6354 Camino del Lago, Pleasanton, CA 94566 USA, Tel: +1-925-426-9341, Fax: +1-925-426-9417, E-mail: ssp@CreativeResearch.org Edward C. Zipf, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pittsburg, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 USA, Tel: +1-412-624-9263 or 412-963-6493, Fax: +1-412-963-0603 E-mail: Edczipf@aol.com

P05 The Galilean Satellite System From Galileo (Joint With SA)

The Galilean satellites represent a system of planet-scale bodies orbiting Jupiter and have become much more well known through the results of experiments flown on the Galileo spacecraft. This session is designed to synthesize the results of the last several years on the formation and evolution of these satellites and the nature of the field and particle environments, and to present new results from the most recent encounters with Io and Ganymede.

Conveners: Margaret Kivelson, Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics, University of California, 6843 Slichter Hall, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1567 USA, Tel: +1-310-825-3435, Fax: +1-310-206-8042 E-mail: mkivelson@igpp.ucla.edu Robert Pappalardo, Department of Geological Sciences, Brown University, Box 1846, Providence, RI 02912 USA, Tel: +1-401-863-2526, Fax: +1-401-863-3978 E-mail: robert_pappalardo@brown.edu

SH06 Living With a Star: Space Science Addressing Societal Needs (Joint With SA, SM)

The National Aeronautics and Space Administration, is presently formulating a new space science program, Living with a Star (LWS). The purpose of this new initiative is to develop a comprehensive picture of the behavior of the coupled Sun-Earth system and identify the critical physics linking this system. A further goal is to investigate those aspects that directly affect life and society. The results of the LWS formulation effort will be presented with an emphasis on the gaps in knowledge and the measurements needed to close them. Papers are invited on observational and theoretical approaches to describing the various aspects of space weather and the effects of solar variability upon the heliosphere and our planet's atmosphere, ionosphere, and magnetosphere. Papers are invited on observational and theoretical approaches for better understanding the sources and behavior of (1) those energetic particles important to the radiation exposure of humans in space, (2) those aspects of the space environment that impact technology, and (3) solar influences on global climate change.

Conveners: Richard Fisher, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 USA, Tel: +1- 301-286-8701, Fax: +1-301-286-1617, E-mail: fisher@stars.gsfc.nasa.gov James R. Sharber, NASA Headquarters-Code SR, 300 E Street, SW, Washington, DC 20546 USA, Tel: +1-202-358-0894, Fax: +1-202-358-3097, E-mail: sharber@hq.nasa.gov

SH07 Operational Space Weather Products and Models (Joint With SA, SM)

A variety of space weather data and models are used as tools or direct drivers for operational products that, in their totality, encompass all venues (solar, interplanetary, magnetosphere, ionosphere, and neutral atmosphere) of the space environment. These "operationally utilized" data, models, and products often represent the "bottom line" of what many researchers, analysts, and engineers have accomplished. It is important to understand the difference between the tools and the true end-user (customer) products, and to know which are truly operational. This special session seeks to promote such distinction, along with information on current operational product use, development, and validation efforts; ultimately pointing out which space environmental variables should be scrutinized for potential quantitative, qualitative, or timeliness improvement. Papers are invited on current or imminent operational space weather products or tools, their direct use, indications of their accuracy (validation), ideas on how to make them better, and potential competitors.

Conveners: Stephen Quigley, Space Vehicles Directorate, Air Force Research Laboratory, 29 Randolph Rd., Hanscom AFB, MA 01731 USA, Tel: +1-781-377-9666, Fax: +1-781-377-3160, E-mail: stephen.quigley@hanscom.af.mil Kelly Prendergast, Space Environment Center, 325 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80303 USA, Tel: +1-303-497-5697, Fax: +1-303-497-3067, E-mail: kellyp@sec.noaa.gov

SH08 The Bastille Day 2000 Solar Storm (Joint with SA, SM)

A large solar flare occurred on July 14, 2000, Bastille day. The X-ray flux peaked at X5.7 at 10:24UT. At approximately the same time, the LASCO instruments on SOHO observed a bright, fast, halo CME (coronal mass ejection). A very large Solar Energetic Particle (SEP) began about 30 minutes after the flare. The ejecta impacted the Earth at approximately 14UT on July 15 and produced a very geoeffective magnetic storm and aurora which extended as far south as Georgia. This was the largest auroral response since the great storm of March 1989 which was responsible for the Hydro-Quebec power grid failure. Papers are invited on any aspect of this massive event.

Conveners: Michael D. Andrews, Computational Physics Inc, NRL Code 7660, Washington DC 20375, Tel: 202-404-7805, Fax: 202-767-5636, E-mail: andrews@louis14.nrl.navy.mil; Nicola Fox, Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Lab, 11100 Johns Hopkins Road, Laurel, MD, Tel: 240-228-3529, Fax: 240-228-6670: E-mail: nicola.fox@jhuapl.edu

SM01 First Light From IMAGE (Joint With SA)

IMAGE (Imager for Magnetopause-to-Aurora Global Exploration) is the first National Aeronautics and Space Administration MIDEX mission and the first mission dedicated to imaging the Earth's magnetosphere. IMAGE is now obtaining images of the ionospheric ion outflow, the inner plasma sheet, the cusp, and the ring current with three neutral atom imagers operating in different energy ranges. It is obtaining global extreme ultraviolet images of the helium ion component of the plasmasphere and far ultraviolet images of the electron and proton auroras. Finally, it is using a radio sounder to image total plasma densities from the ionosphere out to the dayside magnetopause. This session will cover initial data and image inversion results from all the IMAGE instruments. A unique aspect of the mission is its completely open data set, and procedures for accessing, processing, and analyzing the IMAGE data will be described.

Convener: James L. Burch, Southwest Research Institute, PO Drawer 28510, San Antonio, TX 78228-0510 USA, Tel: +1-210-522-2526, Fax: +1-210-520-9935, E-mail: jburch@swri.edu

SM02 Multi- and Cross-Scale Processes in Space Plasmas (Joint With SA, SH, and NG)

Research activity in space plasma physics is now arriving at an interesting juncture that becomes apparent when we look back at what has been accomplished in the past and look forward to what will be required in the future. In this regard, we note that considerable observational and theoretical attention has been devoted toward the understanding of local point observations from spacecraft and sounding rockets. On the other hand, new and future observations are becoming multispacecraft in scope, and theoretical models are likewise being forced to confront issues of nonlocality. For systems involving nonlocality, we encounter many situations in which multiscale processes such as coupled micro-macro effects, wave-particle interactions, forced and/or self-organized criticality interactions among coherent structures, and intermittent turbulence connected with large- and small-scale fluid motion and electric and magnetic fields are important. There is at present a significant base of useful observations that may be utilized to help resolve some of the basic issues of multi- and cross-scale coupling phenomena in space plasmas. This special session is convened to address these issues. Papers are invited on observational, theoretical, and modeling aspects in such multi- and cross-scale space plasma processes.

Conveners: Tom Chang, Center for Space Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Ave., Room 37-261, Cambridge, MA 02139 USA, Tel: +1-617-253-7523, Fax: +1-617-253-0861, E-mail: tsc@space.mit.edu Nicholas Watkins, Physical Sciences Division, British Antarctic Survey, High Cross, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0ET, UK, Tel: +44-1223-221545, Fax: +44-1223-221226, E-mail: nww@bas.ac.uk

SM03 Electrodynamics of Magnetosphere-Ionosphere Coupling (Joint With SA)

A special session of invited and contributed papers will be devoted to the electrodynamics of the interaction between the magnetosphere and ionosphere, with special emphasis on electromagnetic energy flow, feedback, control, and the plasma structures in the high-latitude ionosphere that result from and influence the dynamic coupling. It is increasingly appreciated that the magnetosphere and ionosphere are closely coupled electrodynamically and that this coupling is mediated and/or controlled by a variety of processes including quasi-steady currents, Alfvén wave propagation and reflection, auroral acceleration processes, ionospheric conductivity structure and variability, and ionospheric plasma dynamics. Papers are solicited that address the role of magnetospheric, auroral and ionospheric processes on this coupling, including Alfvénic processes, electrodynamics involving auroral acceleration regions, ionospheric feedback, regulation and conductivity dynamics, ionospheric plasma structuring, and the impacts of magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling on magnetospheric dynamos.

Conveners: William Lotko, Thayer School of Engineering, Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH 03755 USA, Tel: +1-603-646-3485, Fax: +1-603-646-3856, E-mail: lotko@dartmouth.edu Brian Anderson, Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, Laurel, MD 20723-6099 USA, Tel: +1-240-228-6347, Fax: +1-240-228-6670, E-mail: brian.anderson@jhuapl.edu Lie Zhu, Center for Atmospheric and Space Sciences, Utah State University, 4405 Old Main Hill, SER 246, Logan, UT 84322-4405 USA, Tel: +1-435-797-2967, Fax: +1-435-797-2992, E-mail: zhu@theory.cass.usu.edu

SM04 The New Geospace Missions: Science and Technology (Joint With SA)

The National Aeronautics and Space Administration presently has under formulation or in its strategic plan a number of geospace science missions that require the flight of networks of satellites. Near-term examples of such missions include three Solar Terrestrial Probe missions: Magnetospheric Multi-Scale Mission, Geospace Electrodynamic Connections, and Magnetospheric Constellation. In addition, the New Millennium Program has in formulation as Space Technology 5 the Nano-Satellite Constellation Trailblazer Mission, which will flight-validate new, small satellite technologies. The goal of all these missions is to enable "imaging," with in situ measurements, of fundamental physical processes and interregional coupling from kinetic scale lengths of less than 100 km to dynamics involving major fractions of geospace. Similar multispacecraft missions are also under consideration by individuals responding to announcements of opportunity issued by NASA's Explorer and Discovery Programs. Papers are solicited that address new, innovative approaches to the miniaturization of science instruments, the autonomous operation of intelligent networks of small spacecraft, and the extraction of new scientific results from the measurements that these missions will collect.

Conveners: James A. Slavin, Laboratory for Extraterrestrial Physics, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 USA, Tel: +1-301-286-5839, Fax: +1-301-286-1648, E-mail: james.a.slavin@gsfc.nasa.gov Thomas E. Moore, Laboratory for Extraterrestrial Physics, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 USA, Tel: +1-301-286-5236, Fax: +1-707-988-7835, E-mail: thomas.e.moore@gsfc.nasa.gov

SM05 The Causes of the Aurora (Joint With SA)

Recent satellite missions, including Polar and FAST, and analysis of data from older missions, have provided new insights indicating that the aurora can be produced by several different causes, in some cases dependent upon the local time of the aurora, in other cases dependent upon geospace conditions. Examples are the classical auroral substorm, the morningside precipitation, the postnoon hot spot, pressure pulse aurora, convection bay auroras, strahl aurora, and the cusp aurora. The goal of this session is to provide a clear linkage between observational characteristics of the aurora and magnetospheric and ionospheric processes. Part of this linkage involves the comparison of auroral forms with specific theoretical predictions. Papers are therefore solicited on observations that elucidate the various conditions under which aurora occur, the observational characteristics of the various aurora, and theoretical investigations of the production mechanisms for aurora.

Conveners: Robert A. Hoffman, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 696, Greenbelt, MD 20771 USA, Tel: +1-301-286-7386, Fax: +1- 301-286-1648, E-mail: robert.a.hoffman@gsfc.nasa.gov Robert Strangeway, Institute of Geophysical and Planetary Physics, University of California, 405 Hilgard Ave., Los Angeles, CA 90024 USA, Tel: +1-310-206-6247, Fax: +1-310-206-3051, E-mail: strange@igpp.ucla.edu Barbara L. Giles, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 692, Greenbelt, MD 20771 USA, Tel: +1-301-286-0447, Fax: +1-301-286-1683, E-mail: barbara.giles@gsfc.nasa.gov

Solar and Heliospheric Physics (SH)

SH01 Outer Heliosphere

A special session devoted to theoretical and observational studies of the outer heliosphere is planned. The session will describe the latest results and provide an update of the current status of research addressing the physics of the interaction between the heliosphere and the Local Interstellar Medium. The twin Voyager spacecraft are now operating successfully beyond 60-75 AU. As a result of the analysis and interpretation of the Voyager data and related observations by other spacecraft, such as Ulysses, there is a reasonable expectation that the heliospheric termination shock may be detected in situ during the current cycle of solar activity. This session solicits contributions from the broad set of disciplines involved in the study of this important astrophysical boundary. There will be invited papers that focus on specific aspects of outer heliospheric physics as well as contributed oral and poster papers.

Conveners: Norman F. Ness, Bartol Research Institute, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716-4793 USA, Tel: +1-302-831-8116, Fax: +1-302-831-1843, E-mail: nfness@bartol.udel.edu Alan C. Cummings, Space Radiation Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 USA, Tel: +1-626-395-6708, Fax: +1-626-449-8676, E-mail: ace@srl.caltech.edu

SH02 Bow Shock, Magnetosheath, and Magnetopause: A Tribute to J. R. Spreiter (Joint With SM)

This special session reviews the progress that has been made in studying the location and shape of the bow shock and magnetopause and the properties of the region in between, the magnetosheath, starting with the pioneering work of J. R. Spreiter. The oral session will have both invited and contributed talks.

Conveners: Christopher T. Russell, Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1567 USA, Tel: +1-310-825-3188, E-mail: ctrussell@igpp.ucla.edu Janet Luhmann, Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-7450 USA, Tel: +1-510-642-2545; E-mail: jgluhman@ssl.berkeley.edu Paul Song, Space Physics Research Laboratory, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-3142 USA, Tel: +1-734-764-8327; E-mail: psong@engin.umich.edu

SH03 Origins of Solar Energetic Particle Events

Recent observations of Solar Energetic Particle (SEP) events from ACE and WIND have revealed unexpected complexity. For example, both SEPICA and ULEIS on ACE have observed large gradual events that contained high charge states and 3He enhancements that are usually associated with impulsive events. In addition, observations from WIND/3DP and ACE/EPAM have shown that impulsive onsets of energetic ions and electrons in SEP events sometimes seem to occur later than would be expected from the timing of associated events on the Sun (flares, X-ray and radio bursts, coronal mass ejectionlaunches). For this special session, we solicit papers with observations, theories, and simulations related to the origins of SEP and their acceleration processes.

Conveners: George C. Ho, Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, Laurel, MD 20723 USA, Tel: +1-240-228-7083, Fax: +1-240-228-6670, E-mail: george.ho@jhuapl.edu Christina M. S. Cohen, California Institute of Technology, MC 220-47, Pasadena, CA 91125 USA, Tel: +1-626-395-6614, Fax: +1-626-449-8676; Stephen W. Kahler, Air Force Research Laboratory/VSBS, 29 Randolph Rd., Hanscom AFB, MA 01731 USA, Tel: +1-781-377-9665, Fax: +1-781-377-3160; Eberhard Möbius, Space Science Center and Department of Physics, University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH 03824 USA, Tel: +1-603-862-3097, Fax: +1-603-862-0311; Gary P. Zank, Bartol Research Institute, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19711 USA, Tel: +1-302-831-8700, Fax: +1-302-831-1843

SH04 Results From the Third "Whole Sun Month" Campaign: Solar Corona Structure and Diagnostics, Sigmoids, and Flare Topology

The Whole Sun Month Campaigns continued with a third campaign with observations made from August 18 to September 14, 1999. Investigations in these campaigns include understanding the large-scale structure of the solar corona; connecting in situ observations to their source at the Sun; and the temperature and density structure of the corona. Special observations were also taken of a sigmoid-shaped active region, with analysis concentrating on the regions topology during solar flares and its evolution as it transited the solar disk.

Conveners: Douglas A. Biesecker, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Mail Code 682.3, Greenbelt, MD 20771 USA, Tel: +1-301-286-3116, Fax: +1-301-286-0264, E-mail: doug@sungrazer.nascom.nasa.gov Sarah Gibson, Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics, University of Cambridge, Silver St., Cambridge, CB3 9EW, UK, Tel: +44-0-1223-337-898, Fax: +44-0-1223-337-918, E-mail: s.gibson@damtp.cam.ac.uk

SH05 A 3-D View of the Sun and Heliosphere

In the three decades since the discovery of coronal mass ejections (CMEs), controversies about their true dynamics and dimensions have continued unabated. To try to resolve the major controversies about CMEs, their origins in the corona, and their impact on the heliosphere, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration plans to launch the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory, or STEREO, in 2004. STEREO will open a new dimension in solar and heliospheric research, but it will also present new challenges to data analysis and model development. Papers are invited on how stereoscopic instrumentation, observing and analysis techniques, and physical models can address the central questions of the origin and propagation of interplanetary disturbances and energetic particles. Authors should show how their work helps to determine the three-dimensionality of solar and heliospheric activity.

Conveners: Joseph M. Davila, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 USA, Tel: +1-301-286-6901, E-mail: davila@lindsay.gsfc.nasa.gov David M. Rust, Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, 11100 Johns Hopkins Rd., Laurel, MD 20723 USA, Tel: +1-240-228-5414, E-mail: david.rust@jhuapl.edu. Lika Guhathakurta, NASA, Code SR, NASA Headquarters, 300 E St., SW, Washington, DC 20516,Tel: +1-202-358-1992, Fax: 202-358-3097, E-mail: lika@madhu.gsfc.nasa.gov

SH06 Living With a Star: Space Science Addressing Societal Needs (Joint With SA, SM)

The National Aeronautics and Space Administration, is presently formulating a new space science program, Living with a Star (LWS). The purpose of this new initiative is to develop a comprehensive picture of the behavior of the coupled Sun-Earth system and identify the critical physics linking this system. A further goal is to investigate those aspects that directly affect life and society. The results of the LWS formulation effort will be presented with an emphasis on the gaps in knowledge and the measurements needed to close them. Papers are invited on observational and theoretical approaches to describing the various aspects of space weather and the effects of solar variability upon the heliosphere and our planet's atmosphere, ionosphere, and magnetosphere. Papers are invited on observational and theoretical approaches for better understanding the sources and behavior of (1) those energetic particles important to the radiation exposure of humans in space, (2) those aspects of the space environment that impact technology, and (3) solar influences on global climate change.

Conveners: Richard Fisher, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 USA, Tel: +1- 301-286-8701, Fax: +1-301-286-1617, E-mail: fisher@stars.gsfc.nasa.gov James R. Sharber, NASA Headquarters-Code SR, 300 E Street, SW, Washington, DC 20546 USA, Tel: +1-202-358-0894, Fax: +1-202-358-3097, E-mail: sharber@hq.nasa.gov

SH07 Operational Space Weather Products and Models (Joint With SA, SM)

A variety of space weather data and models are used as tools or direct drivers for operational products that, in their totality, encompass all venues (solar, interplanetary, magnetosphere, ionosphere, and neutral atmosphere) of the space environment. These "operationally utilized" data, models, and products often represent the "bottom line" of what many researchers, analysts, and engineers have accomplished. It is important to understand the difference between the tools and the true end-user (customer) products, and to know which are truly operational. This special session seeks to promote such distinction, along with information on current operational product use, development, and validation efforts; ultimately pointing out which space environmental variables should be scrutinized for potential quantitative, qualitative or timeliness improvement. Papers are invited on current or imminent operational space weather products or tools, their direct use, indications of their accuracy (validation), ideas on how to make them better, and potential competitors.

Conveners: Stephen Quigley, Space Vehicles Directorate, Air Force Research Laboratory, 29 Randolph Rd., Hanscom AFB, MA 01731 USA, Tel: +1-781-377-9666, Fax: +1-781-377-3160, E-mail: stephen.quigley@hanscom.af.mil Kelly Prendergast, Space Environment Center, 325 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80303 USA, Tel: +1-303-497-5697, Fax: +1-303-497-3067, E-mail: kellyp@sec.noaa.gov

SH08 The Bastille Day 2000 Solar Storm (Joint with SA, SM)

A large solar flare occurred on July 14, 2000, Bastille day. The X-ray flux peaked at X5.7 at 10:24UT. At approximately the same time, the LASCO instruments on SOHO observed a bright, fast, halo CME (coronal mass ejection). A very large Solar Energetic Particle (SEP) began about 30 minutes after the flare. The ejecta impacted the Earth at approximately 14UT on July 15 and produced a very geoeffective magnetic storm and aurora which extended as far south as Georgia. This was the largest auroral response since the great storm of March 1989 which was responsible for the Hydro-Quebec power grid failure. Papers are invited on any aspect of this massive event.

Conveners: Michael D. Andrews, Computational Physics Inc, NRL Code 7660, Washington DC 20375, Tel: 202-404-7805, Fax: 202-767-5636, E-mail: andrews@louis14.nrl.navy.mil; Nicola Fox, Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Lab, 11100 Johns Hopkins Road, Laurel, MD, Tel: 240-228-3529, Fax: 240-228-6670: E-mail: nicola.fox@jhuapl.edu

SM02 Multi- and Cross-Scale Processes in Space Plasmas (Joint With SA, SH, and NG)

Research activity in space plasma physics is now arriving at an interesting juncture that becomes apparent when we look back at what has been accomplished in the past and look forward to what will be required in the future. In this regard, we note that considerable observational and theoretical attention has been devoted toward the understanding of local point observations from spacecraft and sounding rockets. On the other hand, new and future observations are becoming multispacecraft in scope, and theoretical models are likewise being forced to confront issues of nonlocality. For systems involving nonlocality, we encounter many situations in which multiscale processes such as coupled micro-macro effects, wave-particle interactions, forced and/or self-organized criticality interactions among coherent structures, and intermittent turbulence connected with large- and small-scale fluid motion and electric and magnetic fields are important. There is at present a significant base of useful observations that may be utilized to help resolve some of the basic issues of multi- and cross-scale coupling phenomena in space plasmas. This special session is convened to address these issues. Papers are invited on observational, theoretical, and modeling aspects in such multi- and cross-scale space plasma processes.

Conveners: Tom Chang, Center for Space Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Ave., Room 37-261, Cambridge, MA 02139 USA, Tel: +1-617-253-7523, Fax: +1-617-253-0861, E-mail: tsc@space.mit.edu Nicholas Watkins, Physical Sciences Division, British Antarctic Survey, High Cross, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0ET, UK, Tel: +44-1223-221545, Fax: +44-1223-221226, E-mail: nww@bas.ac.uk

NG06 Quantifying Predictability in Geophysical Systems II (Joint With A, G, H, OS, SH, T, V)

Our ability to quantify the predictability of nonlinear geophysical systems provides a fundamental bridge between models of geophysical systems and the systems themselves. Uncertainty in the initial condition and errors in model formulation have led to probability forecasts (ensembles) even in deterministic systems. This session will focus on atmospheric and ocean dynamics over hours to centuries (e.g., adaptive observation strategies, Lagrangian and Eulerian approaches, intense short-duration events); theoretical aspects of the dynamics of nonlinear systems relevant to predictability and verification (including multiple models, contrasting modeling strategies, data assimilation); and practical issues in the interpretation and likely economic impact of probabilistic forecasts on a timescale minutes to hours (e.g., precipitation/wind), days to months (e.g., hurricanes), and years to millennia (e.g., earthquakes). A mix of oral and poster presentations of both pure and extremely applied contributions are welcome, and may focus on the predictability of geophysical systems other than those noted explicitly above.

Conveners: Leonard Smith, Oxford University, 24-29 St Giles', Oxford, OX1 3LB, UK, Tel: +44-1865-270-517, Fax: +44-1865-270-515, E-mail: lenny@maths.ox.ac.uk James Hansen, Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Ave., Room 54-1721, Cambridge, MA 02139 USA, Tel: +1-617-253-5935, E-mail: jhansen@mit.edu

Magnetospheric Physics (SM)

SM01 First Light From IMAGE (Joint With SA)

IMAGE (Imager for Magnetopause-to-Aurora Global Exploration) is the first National Aeronautics and Space Administration MIDEX mission and the first mission dedicated to imaging the Earth's magnetosphere. IMAGE is now obtaining images of the ionospheric ion outflow, the inner plasma sheet, the cusp, and the ring current with three neutral atom imagers operating in different energy ranges. It is obtaining global extreme ultraviolet images of the helium ion component of the plasmasphere and far ultraviolet images of the electron and proton auroras. Finally, it is using a radio sounder to image total plasma densities from the ionosphere out to the dayside magnetopause. This session will cover initial data and image inversion results from all the IMAGE instruments. A unique aspect of the mission is its completely open data set, and procedures for accessing, processing, and analyzing the IMAGE data will be described.

Convener: James L. Burch, Southwest Research Institute, PO Drawer 28510, San Antonio, TX 78228-0510 USA, Tel: +1-210-522-2526, Fax: +1-210-520-9935, E-mail: jburch@swri.edu

SM02 Multi- and Cross-Scale Processes in Space Plasmas (Joint With SA, SH, and NG)

Research activity in space plasma physics is now arriving at an interesting juncture that becomes apparent when we look back at what has been accomplished in the past and look forward to what will be required in the future. In this regard, we note that considerable observational and theoretical attention has been devoted toward the understanding of local point observations from spacecraft and sounding rockets. On the other hand, new and future observations are becoming multispacecraft in scope, and theoretical models are likewise being forced to confront issues of nonlocality. For systems involving nonlocality, we encounter many situations in which multiscale processes such as coupled micro-macro effects, wave-particle interactions, forced and/or self-organized criticality interactions among coherent structures, and intermittent turbulence connected with large- and small-scale fluid motion and electric and magnetic fields are important. There is at present a significant base of useful observations that may be utilized to help resolve some of the basic issues of multi- and cross-scale coupling phenomena in space plasmas. This special session is convened to address these issues. Papers are invited on observational, theoretical, and modeling aspects in such multi- and cross-scale space plasma processes.

Conveners: Tom Chang, Center for Space Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Ave., Room 37-261, Cambridge, MA 02139 USA, Tel: +1-617-253-7523, Fax: +1-617-253-0861, E-mail: tsc@space.mit.edu Nicholas Watkins, Physical Sciences Division, British Antarctic Survey, High Cross, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0ET, UK, Tel: +44-1223-221545, Fax: +44-1223-221226, E-mail: nww@bas.ac.uk

SM03 Electrodynamics of Magnetosphere-Ionosphere Coupling (Joint With SA)

A special session of invited and contributed papers will be devoted to the electrodynamics of the interaction between the magnetosphere and ionosphere, with special emphasis on electromagnetic energy flow, feedback, control, and the plasma structures in the high-latitude ionosphere that result from and influence the dynamic coupling. It is increasingly appreciated that the magnetosphere and ionosphere are closely coupled electrodynamically and that this coupling is mediated and/or controlled by a variety of processes including quasi-steady currents, Alfvén wave propagation and reflection, auroral acceleration processes, ionospheric conductivity structure and variability, and ionospheric plasma dynamics. Papers are solicited that address the role of magnetospheric, auroral and ionospheric processes on this coupling, including Alfvénic processes, electrodynamics involving auroral acceleration regions, ionospheric feedback, regulation and conductivity dynamics, ionospheric plasma structuring, and the impacts of magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling on magnetospheric dynamos.

Conveners: William Lotko, Thayer School of Engineering, Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH 03755 USA, Tel: +1-603-646-3485, Fax: +1-603-646-3856, E-mail: lotko@dartmouth.edu Brian Anderson, Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, Laurel, MD 20723-6099 USA, Tel: +1-240-228-6347, Fax: +1-240-228-6670, E-mail: brian.anderson@jhuapl.edu Lie Zhu, Center for Atmospheric and Space Sciences, Utah State University, 4405 Old Main Hill, SER 246, Logan, UT 84322-4405 USA, Tel: +1-435-797-2967, Fax: +1-435-797-2992, E-mail: zhu@theory.cass.usu.edu

SM04 The New Geospace Missions: Science and Technology (Joint With SA)

The National Aeronautics and Space Administration presently has under formulation or in its strategic plan a number of geospace science missions that require the flight of networks of satellites. Near-term examples of such missions include three Solar Terrestrial Probe missions: Magnetospheric Multi-Scale Mission, Geospace Electrodynamic Connections, and Magnetospheric Constellation. In addition, the New Millennium Program has in formulation as Space Technology 5 the Nano-Satellite Constellation Trailblazer Mission, which will flight-validate new, small satellite technologies. The goal of all these missions is to enable "imaging," with in situ measurements, of fundamental physical processes and interregional coupling from kinetic scale lengths of less than 100 km to dynamics involving major fractions of geospace. Similar multispacecraft missions are also under consideration by individuals responding to announcements of opportunity issued by NASA's Explorer and Discovery Programs. Papers are solicited that address new, innovative approaches to the miniaturization of science instruments, the autonomous operation of intelligent networks of small spacecraft, and the extraction of new scientific results from the measurements that these missions will collect.

Conveners: James A. Slavin, Laboratory for Extraterrestrial Physics, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 USA, Tel: +1-301-286-5839, Fax: +1-301-286-1648, E-mail: james.a.slavin@gsfc.nasa.gov Thomas E. Moore, Laboratory for Extraterrestrial Physics, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 USA, Tel: +1-301-286-5236, Fax: +1-707-988-7835, E-mail: thomas.e.moore@gsfc.nasa.gov

SM05 The Causes of the Aurora (Joint With SA)

Recent satellite missions, including Polar and FAST, and analysis of data from older missions, have provided new insights indicating that the aurora can be produced by several different causes, in some cases dependent upon the local time of the aurora, in other cases dependent upon geospace conditions. Examples are the classical auroral substorm, the morningside precipitation, the postnoon hot spot, pressure pulse aurora, convection bay auroras, strahl aurora, and the cusp aurora. The goal of this session is to provide a clear linkage between observational characteristics of the aurora and magnetospheric and ionospheric processes. Part of this linkage involves the comparison of auroral forms with specific theoretical predictions. Papers are therefore solicited on observations that elucidate the various conditions under which aurora occur, the observational characteristics of the various aurora, and theoretical investigations of the production mechanisms for aurora.

Conveners: Robert A. Hoffman, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 696, Greenbelt, MD 20771 USA, Tel: +1-301-286-7386, Fax: +1- 301-286-1648, E-mail: robert.a.hoffman@gsfc.nasa.gov Robert Strangeway, Institute of Geophysical and Planetary Physics, University of California, 405 Hilgard Ave., Los Angeles, CA 90024 USA, Tel: +1-310-206-6247, Fax: +1-310-206-3051, E-mail: strange@igpp.ucla.edu Barbara L. Giles, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 692, Greenbelt, MD 20771 USA, Tel: +1-301-286-0447, Fax: +1-301-286-1683, E-mail: barbara.giles@gsfc.nasa.gov

GP01 The Orsted High-Precision Geomagnetic Satellite Mission (Joint With SA, SM)

Launched on February 23, 1999, into a low-earth, polar orbit, the Orsted satellite provides a wealth of high-precision vector magnetic field data, measurements of high-energy charged particles, and profiles of the ionospheric densities and atmospheric properties using GPS occultation techniques. The investigations cover a broad range of geophysics topics, including research into core fields, crustal- and induction fields, and external fields from field-aligned and ionospheric currents. While these research topics traditionally have been segmented into separate communities, the experience from the Orsted project shows the advantage of combining the research discussions of these communities. Papers are solicited that are related to the Orsted mission or to the topic of high-precision magnetometry.

Conveners: Torsten Neubert, Solar-Terrestrial Physics Division, Danish Meteorological Institute, Lyngbyvej 100, 2800 Copenhagen O, Denmark, Tel: +45 39-15-74-92, Fax: +45 39-15-74-60, E-mail: neubert@dmi.dk Gauthier Hulot, Département de Géomagnétisme et Paléomagnétisme, Institut de Physique de Globe de Paris, CNRS UA 729, 4 Place Jussieu, B89, Tour 24, 75252 Paris Cedex 05, France, Tél: +33-1-44-27-24-12, Fax: +33-1-44-27-33-73, E-mail: ghulot@ipgp.jussieu.fr Cathy Constable, Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California at San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093-0225 USA, Tel: +1-858-534-3183, Fax: +1-858-534-8090, E-mail: cconstable@ucsd.edu

SA04 Data Assimilation in Space Physics and Aeronomy (Joint With SM)

Assimilation of data into physical models provides a way to synthesize diverse observations into a physically consistent framework, and can provide a basis for initializing forecast models. The importance of data assimilation in space physics and aeronomy is rapidly increasing as data sources multiply, models become increasingly sophisticated, and the demand for accurate space weather specification and forecasting grows. Papers are invited on the theory and application of data assimilation in all areas of space physics and aeronomy.

Conveners: Arthur D. Richmond, High Altitude Observatory, National Center for Atmospheric Research, PO Box 3000, Boulder, CO 80307-3000 USA, Tel: +1-303-497-1570, Fax: +1-303-497-1589, E-mail: richmond@hao.ucar.edu Robert W. Schunk, Center for Atmospheric and Space Sciences, Utah State University, Logan, UT 84322-4405 USA, Tel: +1-435-797-2978, Fax: +1-435-797-2992, E-mail: schunk@cc.usu.edu Richard A. Wolf, Department of Space Physics and Astronomy, MS 108, Rice University, Houston, TX 77251 USA, Tel: +1-713-527-8101, E-mail: wolf@spacvax.rice.edu

SH02 Bow Shock, Magnetosheath, and Magnetopause: A Tribute to J. R. Spreiter (Joint With SM)

This special session reviews the progress that has been made in studying the location and shape of the bow shock and magnetopause and the properties of the region in between, the magnetosheath, starting with the pioneering work of J. R. Spreiter. The oral session will have both invited and contributed talks.

Conveners: Christopher T. Russell, Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1567 USA, Tel: +1-310-825-3188, E-mail: ctrussell@igpp.ucla.edu Janet Luhmann, Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-7450 USA, Tel: +1-510-642-2545; E-mail: jgluhman@ssl.berkeley.edu Paul Song, Space Physics Research Laboratory, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-3142 USA, Tel: +1-734-764-8327; E-mail: psong@engin.umich.edu

SH06 Living With a Star: Space Science Addressing Societal Needs (Joint With SA, SM)

The National Aeronautics and Space Administration, is presently formulating a new space science program, Living with a Star (LWS). The purpose of this new initiative is to develop a comprehensive picture of the behavior of the coupled Sun-Earth system and identify the critical physics linking this system. A further goal is to investigate those aspects that directly affect life and society. The results of the LWS formulation effort will be presented with an emphasis on the gaps in knowledge and the measurements needed to close them. Papers are invited on observational and theoretical approaches to describing the various aspects of space weather and the effects of solar variability upon the heliosphere and our planet's atmosphere, ionosphere, and magnetosphere. Papers are invited on observational and theoretical approaches for better understanding the sources and behavior of (1) those energetic particles important to the radiation exposure of humans in space, (2) those aspects of the space environment that impact technology, and (3) solar influences on global climate change.

Conveners: Richard Fisher, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 USA, Tel: +1- 301-286-8701, Fax: +1-301-286-1617, E-mail: fisher@stars.gsfc.nasa.gov James R. Sharber, NASA Headquarters-Code SR, 300 E Street, SW, Washington, DC 20546 USA, Tel: +1-202-358-0894, Fax: +1-202-358-3097, E-mail: sharber@hq.nasa.gov

SH07 Operational Space Weather Products and Models (Joint With SA, SM)

A variety of space weather data and models are used as tools or direct drivers for operational products that, in their totality, encompass all venues (solar, interplanetary, magnetosphere, ionosphere, and neutral atmosphere) of the space environment. These "operationally utilized" data, models, and products often represent the "bottom line" of what many researchers, analysts, and engineers have accomplished. It is important to understand the difference between the tools and the true end-user (customer) products, and to know which are truly operational. This special session seeks to promote such distinction, along with information on current operational product use, development, and validation efforts; ultimately pointing out which space environmental variables should be scrutinized for potential quantitative, qualitative or timeliness improvement. Papers are invited on current or imminent operational space weather products or tools, their direct use, indications of their accuracy (validation), ideas on how to make them better, and potential competitors.

Conveners: Stephen Quigley, Space Vehicles Directorate, Air Force Research Laboratory, 29 Randolph Rd., Hanscom AFB, MA 01731 USA, Tel: +1-781-377-9666, Fax: +1-781-377-3160, E-mail: stephen.quigley@hanscom.af.mil Kelly Prendergast, Space Environment Center, 325 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80303 USA, Tel: +1-303-497-5697, Fax: +1-303-497-3067, E-mail: kellyp@sec.noaa.gov

SH08 The Bastille Day 2000 Solar Storm (Joint with SA, SM)

A large solar flare occurred on July 14, 2000, Bastille day. The X-ray flux peaked at X5.7 at 10:24UT. At approximately the same time, the LASCO instruments on SOHO observed a bright, fast, halo CME (coronal mass ejection). A very large Solar Energetic Particle (SEP) began about 30 minutes after the flare. The ejecta impacted the Earth at approximately 14UT on July 15 and produced a very geoeffective magnetic storm and aurora which extended as far south as Georgia. This was the largest auroral response since the great storm of March 1989 which was responsible for the Hydro-Quebec power grid failure. Papers are invited on any aspect of this massive event.

Conveners: Michael D. Andrews, Computational Physics Inc, NRL Code 7660, Washington DC 20375, Tel: 202-404-7805, Fax: 202-767-5636, E-mail: andrews@louis14.nrl.navy.mil; Nicola Fox, Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Lab, 11100 Johns Hopkins Road, Laurel, MD, Tel: 240-228-3529, Fax: 240-228-6670: E-mail: nicola.fox@jhuapl.edu

Tectonophysics (T)

T01 Plate Boundary Deformation: From Kinematics to Dynamics (Joint With G, S, V)

Diffusive deformation in the Himalayan-Tibetan plateau, western North America, the Andes, and other continental plate boundaries deviate significantly from predictions of classical plate tectonics theory and are often associated with strong earthquakes and volcanic eruptions. In addition to seismological and geological observations, recent developments in space geodetic measurements, including the Global Positioning System and satellite Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar, have provided rich kinematic information about plate boundary deformation. Much better constraints on the kinematics can be expected from the proposed Plate Boundary Observatory. The fast accumulating kinematic observations provide unprecedented opportunities for understanding the dynamics of plate boundary deformation. This session aims to facilitate interactions between workers focused on measuring crustal deformation at plate boundaries and modelers focused on investigating the dynamics. Papers using all kinds of kinematic data to illustrate the dynamics of plate boundary deformation are welcome, and studies that integrate geodetic, seismological, and geological data to investigate the large-scale dynamic systems of continental plate boundaries are particularly encouraged.

Conveners: Mian Liu, Department of Geological Science, University of Missouri, 101Geology Bldg., Columbia, MO 65211 USA, Tel: +1-573-882-3784, Fax: +1-573-882-5458, E-mail: lium@missouru.edu William E. Holt, Department of Geosciences, State University of New York, Stony Brook, NY 11794-2100 USA, Tel: +1-631-632-8215, Fax: +1-631-632-8240; E-mail: wholt@horizon.ess.sunysb.edu

T02 Observational Constraints on the Dynamics of Subducting Slabs (Joint With G, S, V, SEDI)

The detailed dynamic evolution of subducting slabs is poorly understood. From a physical point of view, we know that the slab is one component of a complex interacting system of mantle convection and the lithospheric plates. The nature of the coupling between plates and mantle is still strongly debated. It is probable, however, that small scale plate boundary processes play a controlling role in the behavior of the large-scale system, and will certainly need to be included in large-scale models in parameterized form. For this reason, modeling cannot proceed from a purely theoretical viewpoint. Strong observational constraints are required to train the parameterized models. In this session we wish to consider the broadest range of observations that will bear upon the understanding of subducting lithosphere, including those from plate kinematics, seismic tomography, earthquake mechanisms, the subsidence record from oceanic and continental basins, geochemistry, the geological record in island arcs, and active continental margins. We would like to build up a slab taxonomy by considering how subduction zones behave in the wild. Do slabs really look like the pictures we see in textbooks? How often do slabs roll back? What makes slabs tear or break, and how do they behave when this happens? How do slabs evolve in the presence/absence of a nearby continental margin? How can slabs change polarity, and how frequently do they do so? When do slabs flatten under continents, and why? We are particularly keen to foster the involvement of scientists having detailed knowledge of observational constraints with more theoretical modelers. What is the state of the art in modeling of convergent plate boundaries? In what ways are these models still limited? What time-dependent behaviors of subducted slabs are by models, and can observations be used to verify the solutions? What do the models tell us about plate driving forces?

Conveners: L. Moresi, CSIRO Exploration and Mining, PO Box 437, Nedlands, WA 6009, Australia, Tel: +61-8-9389-8421, Fax: +61-8-9389-1906, E-mail: l.moresi@ned.dem.csiro.au R. Dietmar Müller, School of Geosciences, Division of Geology and Geophysics, Bldg. F05, University of Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia, Tel: +61-2-9351-2003, Fax: +61-2-9351-0184, E-mail: dietmar@es.usyd.edu.au

T03 Raising Plateaus (Joint With G, GP, S, V)

Two of the world's highest plateaus, Tibet and the Altiplano, have formed in markedly distinct tectonic settings. Does this require different mechanisms to form them? Models (analytical, numerical, physical) of Tibet and the Altiplano, as well as the wider region surrounding them, remain highly variable because of meager databases. We are interested in geological, geophysical, and geochemical results from current research on all levels (small to large, single to multidiscipline) concerning continent-continent and ocean-continent interactions that could help to improve this position. Earth scientists working in both orogens are few, yet new data are emerging, and therefore the time seems ripe to exchange experience and ideas that are related to uplift, and sustaining uplift, of large expanses of continental crust. How well are models being tested/eliminated? Are there new or revised models arising thereupon? By bringing together a number of disciplines, we look forward to real learning and cross-fertilization leading to wider ideas.

Conveners: Mike Edwards, Asian Tectonics Research Unit, Institut für Geologie, Technische Universitäet Bergakadamie Freiberg, Berhard-von-Cotta Str. 2, D-09596 Freiberg, Germany, Tel: +49- 3731-39-4598 or +49-177-783-2827, Fax: +49-3731-39-3597, E-mail: edwards@geologie.uni-wuerzburg.de S. Gilder, Laboratoire de Paleomagnetisme, Institut de Physique du Globe de Paris, 4 place Jussieu, 75252 Paris Cedex 05, France, Tel: +33-1-44-27-24-32 or +33-1-44-27-24-31, Fax: +33-1-44-27-74-63; Bryan L. Isacks, Department of Geological Sciences, Cornell University, Snee Hall, Ithaca, NY 14853 USA, Tel: +1-607-255-2307, Fax: +1-607-254-4780, E-mail: bli1@cornell.edu Paul Tapponnier, Laboratoire de Tectonophysique, Institut de Physique du Globe de Paris, 4 place Jussieu, 75252 Paris Cedex 05, France, Tel: +33-1-44-27-49-24, Fax: +33-1-44-27-24-40, E-mail: tappon@ipgp.jussieu.fr

T04 Quantifying Orogenic Exhumation (Joint With V)

Orogenic development is fundamentally driven by the exhumation of rock. This session focuses on assessing rates and processes of orogenic exhumation. We welcome papers that address methods of assessing long- and short-term rates of exhumation in either the rocks in the orogenic system itself or by evaluating the sedimentary record of orogenisis. Of interest are studies that integrate different methodologies so that rates can be evaluated at different time-scales. Papers in this session will also address mechanisms of exhumation, including normal faulting, erosion, and ductile thinning, and how these processes may affect rates. Therefore, this session will have two components: one that addresses rates of exhumation and methods that quantify these rates; the other that addresses mechanisms, processes, and controls on exhuming rocks in orogenic belts. We hope that this interdisciplinary session brings together a number of approaches that give us a better understanding orogenic development.

Conveners: John I. Garver, Department of Geology, Union College, Schenectady, NY 12308-2311 USA, Tel: +1-518-388-6517 or 388-6770, Fax: +1-518-388-6417, E-mail: garverj@union.edu Mark T. Brandon, Department of Geology and Geophysics, Yale University, PO Box 208109, 210 Whitney Ave., New Haven, CT 06520-8109 USA, Tel: +1-203-432-3135, Fax: +1-203-432-3134, E-mail: mark.brandon@yale.edu

T05 Cenozoic Tectonics and Magmatism of the Southeastern Eurasian Margin (Joint With G, S, V)

Southeastern Eurasia (defined here as India, Tibet, China blocks, Indochina and Greater Sundaland, Indonesia, and the Philippines) has been the site of Mesozoic-Cenozoic continent and terrane accretion, suturing, and (potentially) extrusion and disaggregation of continental assemblages. The remnants of these terranes are in the final act of Tethyan closure currently, and the mechanisms by which accretion and extrusion are accomplished are controversial. Complex and often cryptic tectonic boundaries hamper clear understanding of even current tectonics, to say nothing of earlier stages of southeast Eurasia development. Anomalous volcanism throughout the Cenozoic in this region is difficult to place in a well-understood tectonic framework here. We solicit presentations detailing relevant studies of the tectonics and magmatism of southeastern Eurasia, including structural geology, seismology, tectonophysics, paleomagnetism, petrology, and geochemistry.

Conveners: Martin F. J. Flower, Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Illinois at Chicago, 845 W. Taylor St., MC 186, Chicago, Illinois 60607-7059 USA, Tel: +1-312 996-9662, Fax: +1-312 413-2279, E-mail: flower@uic.edu Victor Mocanu, Faculty of Geology and Geophysics, University of Bucharest, 6 Traian Vuia st., Sect. 1, 70139 Bucharest, Romania, Tel: +40-1-2117390, Fax: +40-1-2113120, E-mail: mocanu@gg.unibuc.ro

T06 Interactions Between Tectonics and Surface Processes (Joint With H, S, NG)

Rapid new advances are now being made in our understanding of surface processes operating in active tectonic settings. Yet there remains a need for greater integration with the latest findings of how faults grow through time. Recently, structural geologists and geophysicists have made significant progress in mapping and modeling spatial and temporal rates of propagation and displacement along tectonic structures. This information is only just beginning to filter through to the geomorphology and sedimentology communities. The manner in which surface processes respond to a fluctuating tectonic signal will play a first-order role in determining the subsequent landscape evolution, as well as the size and location of sediment entry points into basins and the nature and distribution of syntectonic strata. This topic represents an outstanding problem in nonlinear dynamics and is of fundamental importance to our understanding of how coupled geologic processes work. Furthermore, the structural geology and paleoseismology communities can gain useful insights into interpreting the temporal record of active faulting by considering geomorphological and sedimentological evidence. This session is an attempt to fill these needs by bringing together structural geologists, paleoseismologists, geophysicists, geomorphologists, and sedimentologists to discuss the state of the art in understanding coupled structural-geomorphic-sedimentary systems. We welcome interdisciplinary contributions to this session that deal with field observations (structural, paleoseismological, and sedimentological/geomorphological), landscape evolution modeling, fault growth modeling, and theoretical work on the physics of erosion/transport/deposition at different scales in active tectonic settings.

Conveners: Patience Cowie, Department of Geology and Geophysics, Edinburgh University, Edinburgh EH9 3J, UK, Tel: +44-131-650-5886, Fax: +44-131-668-3184, E-mail: cowie@glg.ed.ac.uk Ruth Robinson, School of Geography and Geosciences, University of St Andrews, St Andrews, Fife KY16 9ST, UK, Tel: +01334-463996, E-mail: rajr@st-andrews.ac.uk Gregory E. Tucker, Deparment of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Institute of Technology, Room 48-429 Cambridge, MA 02139 USA, Tel: +1-617-253-7475, E-mail: greg.tucker@geography.oxford.ac.uk

T07 Geodynamics in the Late Paleozoic: From Gondwana to Pangaea (Joint With B, GP)

Current difficulties in reconciling apparent polar wander paths, paleontological evidence, and paleoclimatogical indicators lie at the heart of the controversy that surrounds the Paleozoic motions of Gondwana. This session will focus on Gondwanan geodynamics from the Late Devonian to the Permo-Triassic formation of Pangaea. Relevant topics include, but are not restricted to, the significance of attenuation of continental boundaries during breakup and postbreakup intraplate deformation, evidence for terrane migration across intervening oceans and accretion to supercontinents, growing evidence for high drift velocities of Gondwana, reliability of paleoclimatological indicators, critical assessment of paleontological constraints, and signatures of extinction events coupled with rapid paleoclimatic change. Attempts to resolve difficulties using more exotic models (nondipole effects, true polar wander) are also welcome. Contributions from paleomagnetic, paleobiogeographic, and paleoenvironmental researchers are welcome.

Conveners: Jennifer Tait; Institut für Allgemein und Angewandete Geophysik, Ludwig-Maximilians Universitäet, Theresienstrasse 41, D-80333 Muenchen, Germany, E-mail: jenny@geophysik.uni-muenchen.de; Kari Anderson; Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Macquarie University, Sydney NSW 2109, Australia; Tel: 612-9850-6568; Fax: 612-9850-6904; E-Mail: kanderso@laurel.ocs.mq.edu.au

T08 The Structure and Evolution of the Lithosphere in the Rocky Mountain Region (Joint With G, GP, S, V)

The Rocky Mountain region is part of a broad orogenic plateau that extends along the western margin of the North American plate. This region has experienced a complex tectonic evolution from its formation during the Proterozoic to the present, and understanding this evolution is a key issue in continental tectonics. This evolution began with the formation of a 1500-km-wide Proterozoic orogenic belt that records an episode of rapid accretion of continental materials from mantle sources and their assembly to form southern Laurentia between 1.8 and 1.6 Ga. The Ancestral Rocky Mountains and Laramide orogenies greatly altered the lithosphere of this region. Today the high elevations of the southern Rocky Mountain Rio Grande rift region in particular are the manifestation of Phanerozoic and still ongoing modification and disassembly of Proterozoic lithosphere. A better understanding of this region will require integration of a variety geophysical and geological measurements, and diverse contributions to this session are sought.

Conveners: G. Randy Keller, Department of Geological Sciences, University of Texas, El Paso, TX 79968-0555 USA, Tel: +1-915-747-5850, Fax: +1-915-747-5073, E-mail: keller@geo.utep.edu Karl E. Karlstrom, Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131 USA, Tel: +1-505-277-4346, Fax: +1-505-277-8843, E-mail: kek1@unm.edu

T09 Lithospheric-Scale Vertical Strain Partitioning in Actively Deforming, Wrench-Type Plate Margins (Joint With G, S)

The proposed joint special session will flesh out relationships between upper crustal (surface) velocities, measured geodetically, and exhumed and remotely sensed (e.g., via shear wave splitting) mid-lower crustal and mantle deformational fabrics in actively deforming wrench-type(including transpressional and transtensional) plate margins. Sufficient geodetic (GPS), structural, and seismic data now exist from a number of wrench-type plate margins that specific and perhaps also general relationships may be established. Does the entire lithosphere deform coherently? Does the weak mid-lower crust transfer or detach motion between the strong mantle and strong brittle upper crust? Does mantle flow drive deformation in plate boundary zones from below? Does the degree of vertical strain partitioning vary systematically in pure wrenching, transpressional, and transtensional settings?

Conveners: John Weber, Grand Valley State University, Allendale, MI 49401USA, Tel: +1-616-895-319, E-mail: weberjc@hotmail.com Christian Teyssier, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, Tel: +1-612-624-680, E-mail: teyssier@tc.umn.edu

T10 The Middle America Convergent Margin, From the Cocos Plate to the Volcanic Arc: Similar Tectonic Styles and Segmentation of the Upper and Lower Plate

This symposium is structured to explore observations along the Middle America margin that help explain convergent margin processes. Marine surveys, geological studies, compilations of seismicity, and arc volcanism indicate certain similarities in division or segmentation of both the upper and lower plates. In the Middle America convergent margin system, ocean crust character, subduction zone configuration, upper plate tectonics, and geochemistry of the volcanic arc display similarly distributed spatial variability. A comparison of structure, seismicity, and geology between segments provides opportunities to study relations between upper and lower plate tectonic and geological processes.

Conveners: Marino Protti, Observatorio Vulcanologico y Sismologico de Costa Rica, Universidad Nacional, Apartado 86, Heredia 3000, Costa Rica, Tel: +506-2610881, E-mail: jprotti@samara.una.ac.cr Hans Roeser, Bundesanstalt für Geowissenschaften u Rohstoffe, Stilleweg 2, 30655 Hannover, Germany, Tel: +49-511-643-2799, E-mail: hans.roeser@bgr.de David Scholl, Department of Geophysics, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 USA, Tel: +1-650-329-5163, E-mail: scholl@pangea.stanford.edu

T11 Integrative Approaches to Caribbean Neotectonics and Seismic Hazard (Joint With G, S, V)

The tectonic complexity, small land areas, political subdivisions, and dense populations of the strike-slip and subduction margins of the Caribbean plate pose special challenges to the earth science community in understanding the neotectonic setting and evaluating seismic hazards in this region. The purpose of this session is to bring together an international group of researchers who are currently integrating a wide variety of methods to better understand the neotectonics and seismic hazards of this region. These methods include paleoseismology of onshore faults, GPS-based geodesy and modeling of geodetic results, paleoseismic studies of liquefaction features, geophysical surveys of offshore faults, earthquake seismology and historical research, strong ground motion studies, geologic and geomorphic studies of major faults, studies of tsunami deposits, and tsunami modeling. The session welcomes original contributions to Caribbean neotectonics using these and other methods.

Conveners: Carol Prentice, U.S. Geological Survey, 345 Middlefield Rd., MS 977, Menlo Park, CA 94025 USA, Tel: +1-650-329-5690, Fax: +1-650-329-5163, E-mail: cprentice@usgs.gov Paul Mann, Institute for Geophysics, University of Texas at Austin, 4412 Spicewood Springs Rd., Bldg. 600, Austin, TX 78759-8500 USA, Tel: +1-512-471-0452, Fax: +1-512-471-8844, E-mail: paulm@utig.ig.utexas.edu

T12 Pacific and Indian Ocean Trenches and Indian Ocean Ridges: A Session Honoring Robert L. Fisher (Joint With OS, V)

This is a session devoted to honoring Bob Fisher in his 75th year. Fisher has contributed over the past 50 years (1) to determining the depth and structure of the Pacific and Indian Ocean trenches, (2) to a better understanding of the petrologic structure of Indian Ocean Ridge system, and (3) to providing the bathymetric framework for the plate tectonic interpretation of the Indian Ocean. He is still active scientifically, and his publications span six decades.

Conveners: John G. Sclater, Geosciences Research Division, Scripps Insititution of Oceanography, University of California, San Diego, MC 0215, La Jolla, CA 92093-0215 USA, Tel: +1-858-534-3051, Fax: +1-858-534-0784, E-mail: jsclater@ucsd.edu Roland Schlich, Ecole et Observatoire des Sciences de la Terre, Université de Strasbourg 1, 5 rue Rene Descartes, 67084 Strasbourg Cedex, France, Tel: +33-3-88-416393, Fax: +33-3-88-603887, E-mail: Roland.Schlich@eost.u-strasbg.fr Sherman H. Bloomer, College of Science, Oregon State University, 128 Kidder Hall, Corvallis, OR 97331 USA, Tel: +1-541-737-3877, Fax: +1-541-737-1007, E-mail: sherman.bloomer@orst.edu

T13 Geochemical, Biological and Tectonic Interactions in the Southern California Borderlands (Joint With B, G, S)

The California continental borderland is part of the distributed Pacific-North American plate boundary, and exhibits complex dextral transpressional and transtensional tectonics superimposed on an older crustal architecture. Faults in the borderland play a poorly known role in both the tectonics and seismic hazards of southern California. The active tectonic regime is manifested in the seismic, geochemical, and biological processes at the seafloor. Research efforts are currently under way focusing on geophysical and biogeochemical processes related to active tectonics in this environment. Seismic and tsunami hazards in this region are the focus of active research on the tectonics of the borderlands addressing both offshore and inshore faults. Fluid seepage associated with the transform faults has been documented along the San Clemente Fault zone and other offshore faults in this system. The fluid transport and discharge support biological communities, alter the rocks they flow through, and affect the chemistry of bottom water in the borderland basins. This session will provide an opportunity to share exciting new results from these ongoing research programs.

Conveners: Chris Goldfinger, College of Oceanic and Atmospheric Sciences, Oregon State University, Ocean Administration Bldg. 104, Corvallis, OR 97331-5503 USA, Tel: +1-503-737-5214, Fax: +1-503- 737-2064, E-mail: gold@oce.orst.edu Marta E. Torres, College of Oceanic and Atmospheric Sciences, Oregon State University, Ocean Administration Bldg. 104, Corvallis, OR 97331-5503 USA, Tel: +1-541- 737-2902, Fax: +1-541-737-2064, E-mail: mtorres@oce.orst.edu Craig R. Smith, Department of Oceanography, University of Hawaii, 1000 Pope Rd., Honolulu, HI 96822 USA, Tel: +1-808-956-8623, Fax: +1-808-956-9516, E-mail: csmith@soest.hawaii.edu

T14 Seismogenic Zone Studies of the Nankai Trough Subduction Margin (Joint With OS, S)

Subduction zone thrusts produce some of Earth's largest and most destructive earthquakes and tsunamis. The 1997 MARGINS SEIZE workshop was held to initiate investigations into the relationship between earthquakes, deformation, and fluid flow in subduction zones. At the workshop, the Nankai Trough subduction zone was identified as a prime setting for examining the controls on seismogenic rupture because of its well-recorded history of great earthquakes and its unusually shallow and relatively accessible seismogenic zone. In the past 3 years, new interest in examining characteristics of the seismogenic zone along subduction thrusts has inspired a wide variety of field experiments across the Nankai Trough. These experiments range from passive seismicity studies, active geophysical surveys, submersible dives, and Ocean Drilling Program drilling. We solicit contributions to this session that will present results of recent field, theoretical, or laboratory experiments relevant to the structure, seismicity, and physical properties along subduction thrusts, especially in the Nankai Trough subduction zone.

Conveners: Nathan Bangs, Institute for Geophysics, University of Texas, 4412 Spicewood Springs Rd., Bldg. 600, Austin, TX 78795 USA, Tel: +1-512-471-0424, Fax: +1-512-475-6338, E-mail: nathan@utig.ig.utexas.edu Shin'ichi Kuramoto, Marine Geology Department, Geological Survey of Japan, 1-1-3 Higashi, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8567, Japan, Tel/Fax: +81-298-61-3767, E-mail: kuramoto@gsj.go.jp

T15 In Situ Studies of Mechanical and Structural Properties of Fault Zones and the Crust (Joint With S)

Recent and planned borehole projects (e.g., water-injection experiment in Nojima fault, Japan; deep KTB in Germany, San Andreas Fault Drilling in the United States), large earthquake ruptures (e.g., Izmit and Duzce M › 7 events in Turkey, Landers and Hector Mine M›7 events in California, Chi-Chi M›7 event in Taiwan), detailed field studies of exhumed faults, and research in mining seismology provide new opportunities to obtain in situ information on stress at seismogenic depth, earthquake source processes, and geometrical, seismic, and rheological properties of fault zones and the crust. This session will focus on such in situ observational studies, with an emphasis on high-resolution imaging of active fault structures and evolving features of earthquake cycles (e.g., permeability, healing). Presentations based on geophysical and seismic field experiments, rock mining seismology, and geological studies are welcomed.

Conveners: Kin'ya Nishigami, Disaster Prevention Research Institute, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011, Japan, Tel: +81-774-38-4279, Fax: +81-774-31-8294, E-mail: nishigam@drs.dpri.kyoto-u.ac.jp Yehuda Ben-Zion, Department of Earth Sciences, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90089-0740 USA, Tel: +1-213-740-6734, Fax: +1-213-740-8801 E-mail: benzion@terra.usc.edu

T16 Correlating Geophysical Observations of Fault Behavior and Fault Properties (Joint With G, S)

Geophysical observations of fault behavior are providing an increasingly complex view of fault processes as the resolution of our techniques improves. Seismic, geodetic, and electromagnetic methods enable us to infer temporal and spatial variations in physical properties of faults, and geologic field observations help us tie these remotely sensed observables to actual fault processes. Recent microseismic relocations are indicating detailed structural and temporal variations in fault behavior. Advances in geodetic and seismic methods are allowing us to infer detailed slip distributions on faults throughout the earthquake cycle. All of these methods highlight variations in fault behavior that originate from variations in fault properties along the fault zone. These properties may be structural, such as asperities or complex geometry, or material, such as composition or state conditions. We encourage papers that correlate fault behavior as observed by geophysical techniques with various properties found along the fault surface. This includes studies identifying spatial variations in properties along faults such as between locked and creeping portions of a fault, and temporal changes in behavior of faults such as can be attributed to changes in porosity or loading rate.

Conveners: David Schmidt, Department of Geology and Geophysics, University of California, Berkeley, 307 McCone Hall, Berkeley, CA 94720-4767 USA, Tel: +1-510-643-8328, E-mail: dschmidt@seismo.berkeley.edu Evelyn Price, Department of Geology and Geophysics, University of California, Berkeley, 307 McCone Hall, Berkeley, CA 94720-4767 USA, E-mail: evelyn@seismo.berkeley.edu

T17 Physical Properties of Fault Zones: A Session in Honor of James D. Byerlee (Joint With G, S, MRP)

James Byerlee has devoted his professional career to the understanding of the complex processes that control rock failure and the behavior of fault zone materials. This session, in keeping with Byerlee’s spirit of innovation and creativity, explores the current state of understanding of mechanical and hydrological properties of active fault systems. Contributions are invited in the areas of laboratory and field observations as well as theoretical developments relating to active faults, such as fault zone stability, fault strength and rheology, state of stress, fluid compartmentalization, and rupture nucleation models.

Conveners: David Lockner, U.S. Geological Survey, 345 Middlefield Rd., MS 977, Menlo Park, CA 94025 USA, Tel: +1-650 329-4826, Fax: +1-650 329-5163, E-mail: dlockner@usgs.gov Malcolm Johnston, U.S. Geological Survey, 345 Middlefield Road, MS 977, Menlo Park, CA 94025 USA, Tel: +1-650-329-4812, Fax: +1-650-329-5163, E-mail: mal@usgs.gov

T18 Dynamic Rupture of Rocks and Other Brittle Materials (Joint With S, V, MRP)

Rock failure in the crust is frequently unstable, producing earthquakes, tremors, and rockbursts. Unstable rupture is also generated by impacts and other rapid loadings. This session focuses on descriptions and analyses of nucleation, propagation, and arrest of dynamic rupture in rocks and other brittle materials under tensile and shear conditions. Advances in these subjects could provide tools for deducing growth velocity and other properties of dynamic failure from observed in situ features of faults, dikes, and joints. Presentations of field, experimental, and modeling results are welcomed.

Conveners: Yehuda Ben-Zion, Department of Earth Sciences, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90089-0740 USA, Tel: +1-213-740-6734, Fax: +1-213-740-8801, E-mail: benzion@terra.usc.edu Ze'ev Reches, Institute of Earth Sciences, Hebrew University, Jerusalem 91904, Israel, Tel: +972-2-658-4669, Fax: +972-2-566-2581, E-mail: reches@earth.es.huji.ac.il

T19 Honoring the Geothermal Work of John H. Sass: From Drilling, Logging, and Laboratory Measurement to Heat Flow and Geodynamics (Joint With H, V, MRP)

John Sass has determined terrestrial heat flow extensively in the conterminous western United States, in Alaska, Canada, Central America, Australia, Liberia, Jordan, Germany, Greenland, and Wales. His interpretations address geodynamic aspects such as stress (e.g., in the San Andreas Fault), extension (e.g., in the Basin and Range province), volcanism (e.g., in Long Valley Caldera), sedimentation (e.g., in the Salton Trough), and metamorphism (e.g., in the Basin and Range province). He is involved in the application of geothermal studies in geothermal energy systems (e.g., in the Geysers), and using temperature as a tracer for fluid flow in waste management applications (e.g., in Yucca Mountain). Sass is an expert in drilling and temperature logging techniques, and has had a major impact on improving laboratory measurements of thermophysical rock properties. We invite contributions that are related to these topics underlining the dualism of making geothermal field measurements and interpreting the results at local, regional and global scales.

Conveners: Daniel Pribnow, Institute for Joint Geoscientific Research, Stilleweg 2, 30655 Hannover, Germany, Tel: +49-511-643-3513, Fax: +49-511-643-3665, E-mail: dan.pribnow@gga-hannover.de David S. Chapman, Department of Geology and Geophysics, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112-9016 USA, Tel: +1-801-581-7642, Fax: +1-801-585-6749, E-mail: dchapman@mines.utah.edu

T20 Basin-Scale Hydrodynamic Systems: Stress State, Pore Pressure, Fluid Flow, and Deformation (Joint With H, OS)

Fluids play a critical role in rock deformation. Similarly, rock and sediment deformation history affect the distribution and magnitude of stress and pore pressure, as well as the migration of fluids. The influence of fluid pressure in controlling deformation and stress state has been observed or inferred in a range of geologic settings, from plate margins to passive margin basins, and at scales from a single fault zone to entire orogenic belts. The effects of fluid flow also extend to the transport and redistribution of heat and chemical species. In both cases, localization of fluid flow and pore pressure is of key importance. This session will explore recent advances in understanding the role of poroelastic stresses in deformation and the effects of high-permeability pathways on fluid flow, slope stability, and advective transport in basin-scale systems. We welcome submissions based on field, modeling (numerical and physical), or experimental work.

Conveners: Brandon Dugan, Department of Geosciences, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 USA, Tel: +1-814-863-9663, E-mail: dugan@geosc.psu.edu Demian Saffer, U.S. Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA 94025 USA, Tel: +1-650-329-5523, E-mail: dsaffer@usgs.gov

T21 Measurements and Modeling of Marine Sediments (Joint With OS, S, MRP)

The special session targets experimental (laboratory and in situ) measurements as well as modeling results of marine sediments. We would like to see papers covering both modeling and measurements of compaction, porosity decrease, diagenesis, and physical properties of marine sediments. Of great interest is the link between physical properties and indirect field (e.g., seismic) measurements as well as relationships between static and dynamic moduli.

Conveners: Manika Prasad, Geophysics Department, Stanford University, 397 Panama Mall, Code 322GG, Stanford, CA 94305-2215 USA, Tel: +1-650-723-8547, Fax: +1-650-723-1188, E-mail: manika.prasad@stanford.edu Roy H. Wilkens, Office of Naval Research, 800 N. Quincy Street, Code 322GG, Arlington, VA 22217-5660 USA, Tel: +1-703-696-7237, Fax: +1-703-696-2710, E-mail: roy_wilkens@onr.navy.mil

T22 Planetary-Interior Research: A New Frontier in Geophysics (Joint With MRP)

The evolution of Earth and other planets is a process of vast proportions, involving huge amounts of matter (crystalline and molten silicates, metals, and volatile constituents), temperatures from near-absolute zero to several thousand degrees, and pressures from a fraction to millions of atmospheres. Despite this complexity, the present state of these bodies, as well as their evolution through time, is governed by the properties of the constituent materials and their chemical interactions. The past 10 years have seen a revolution in Earth- and planetary-materials science and the simulation of planetary processes, ignited by technical developments that allowed higher pressures and temperatures to be attained for sustained periods, larger sample volumes in experiments, new in situ and microanalytical tools, and access to national synchrotron facilities for critical experiments. This session will focus on the recent and near-future advances in material studies and the impact of these studies on our understanding of planetary interiors. This session also aims to bring together laboratory experimentalists with researchers who model planetary interiors, such as seismologists, dynamicists, and geochemists.

Conveners: Donald J. Weidner, Department of Geosciences, State University of New York, Stony Brook, NY 11794 USA, E-mail: dweidner@sunysb.edu Jay D. Bass, Department of Geology, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, 235 Natural History Bldg., MC 102, 1301 W. Green, Urbana, IL 61801 USA, E-mail: Bass@hercules.geology.uiuc.edu

T23 Geology and Geophysics of the Mediterranean, Red and Black Seas, Their Margins and Plate Boundaries (Joint With G)

The session is intended to present a wide range of ideas concerning the active tectonics and sedimentation of the Mediterranean and Red and Black Seas these regions, ranging from plate boundary deformation to basinal subsidence to diapiric ascent to mass wasting and sea level change. The conveners solicit recent results and syntheses from GPS network measurements, multibeam mapping, drilling, seismic profiling, and tomographic modeling. We hope to generate a discussion of how these processes relate to the assessment of geohazards that threaten populations in Mediterranean settings.

Conveners: Y. Mart, Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, Columbia University, Palisades, NY 10964 USA, Tel: +1-914-365-8552, Fax: +1-914-365-8156, E-mail: yossi@ldeo,columbia.edu W. B. F. Ryan, Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, Columbia University, Palisades, NY 10964 USA, Tel: +1-914-365-8312, Fax: +1-914-365-8156, E-mail: billr@ldeo,columbia.edu

T24 Continent-continent Collisions and Intraplate Deformation (Joint With G)

Continent-continent collisions unquestionably induce deformations at significant distances from the original plate boundary and resulting mountain belts represent a major departure from standard concepts of plate tectonics. The type modern examples are the Tien Shan and Altai mountains of central Asia. A great deal of new information has emerged about these regions with increased access brought about by recent political changes. We seek papers from a wide range of people that have been working in this region to facilitate a multidisciplinary understanding of the processes that form intracontinental mountain belts.

Conveners: Gary L. Pavlis, Department of Geological Sciences, Indiana University, 1001 E. 10th Street, Bloomington, IN 47405 USA, Tel: +1-812-855-5141, Fax: +1-812-855-7899, E-mail: pavlis@indiana.edu Frank L. Vernon, Scripps Institute of Oceanography, IGPP, A-025, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093 USA, Tel: +1-858-534-5537, Fax: +1-858-534-6354 E-mail: vernon@epicenter.ucsd.edu Raymond Russo, Department of Geological Sciences, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208 USA, Tel: +1-847-491-7383, Fax: +1-847-491-8060, E-mail: ray@earth.nwu.edu

G03 Ice Mass Fluctuations: From Geophysical Observations to Inferences of Earth Rheology (Joint With H, S, T)

Geodesy has emerged as an important technique to monitor ice mass changes (e.g. GPS, gravity, INSAR, altimetry, and Earth orientation measurements). In addition to submissions on these techniques and their application to ice mass studies, we are interested in addressing how glacial fluctuation records can be used to probe the rheology of the crust and mantle. Additional questions this session addresses include, What additional data are needed to better constrain the rheological models? What are the stresses associated with glacial fluctuations and how do they compare with the stresses due to ongoing tectonic processes? How do ice mass fluctuations influence background seismicity and change the probability of a large earthquake?

Conveners: Jeanne Sauber, Geodynamics Branch, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 921, Bldg. 33, G310, Greenbelt, MD 20771 USA, Tel: +1-301-614-6465, Fax: +1-301-614-6522, E-mail: jeanne@steller.gsfc.nasa.gov Tonie van Dam, European Centre for Geodynamics and Seismology, 19 rue Josy Welter, L-7256 Walferdange, Luxembourg, Germany, Tel: +35-2-33-14-87, Fax: +35-2-33-61-29, E-mail: tonie@ecgs.lu

G04 Advances in Modeling Volcanic Deformation (Joint With S, T, V)

Over the last decade the proliferation of continuous GPS receivers and the widespread use of INSAR have led to an abundance of very high quality deformation data sets from volcanoes around the world. Rich both spatially and temporally, these data sets provide an excellent opportunity to understand the dynamics of volcanic deformation while simultaneously improving our ability to forecast and address volcanic hazards. The quality and extent of the data now available demand complex models that until recently would have been unjustified because of weak data strength. The aim of this session is to apply volcanic modeling techniques that incorporate more realistic earth and source models and to use those techniques to make detailed inferences about the structure and behavior of volcanic deformation sources. Examples of possible topics include (1) the effect of topography and elastic heterogeneity, (2) deformation sources that go beyond the Mogi or uniform dislocation, (3) efficient inversion methods that can manage the computational burden of complex source and earth models, and (4) the incorporation of other data types such as seismograms and gravity measurements into the modeling process.

Conveners: Paul M. Davis, Department of Earth and Space Sciences, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1567 USA, Tel: +1-310-825-1343, Fax: +1-310-825-2779, E-mail: pdavis@dino.ess.ucla.edu Peter Cervelli, Department of Geophysics, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305-2215 USA, Tel: +1-650-725-5472, Fax: +1-650-725-7344, E-mail: cervelli@pangea.stanford.edu

G05 A Tribute to William Kaula (Joint With P, T)

This session is devoted to the extensive scientific achievements of William Kaula, who died on April 1, 2000, at the age of 73. Kaula was arguably the preeminent and most influential American geodesist of the second half of the 20th century, and a giant in the emerging field of planetary geophysics. Kaula's scientific accomplishments and reputation span the disciplines of geodesy, tectonophysics, and planetary sciences. Talks are solicited that touch on these disciplines as they relate to Kaula's great legacy. Specifically encouraged are personal remembrances of his legendary contributions to science and the unique style in which he approached all of life.

Conveners: Roger J. Phillips, Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics, University of Colorado, Campus Box 392, Boulder, CO 80309-0392 USA, Tel: +1-303-492-4765, Fax: +1-303-492-6946, E-mail: phillips@wustite.wustl.edu Ernst J. O. “Ejo” Schrama, Department of Geodesy, Delft University of Technology, Thijsseweg 11, 2629 JA Delft, Netherlands, Tel: +31-15-278-4975, Fax: +31-15-278-3711, E-mail: e.j.o.schrama@geo.tudelft.nl

G06 Real-Time GPS (Joint With S, T, V)

This session will explore real-time and near-real-time GPS methods, applications, interpretation, and theoretical considerations. Questions of interest include what kinds of GPS hardware and software are currently available for these kinds of applications? How accurate are estimates of deformation? What kind of triggering algorithms are being used to infer "real" signals? Applications spanning the real-time to near real-time spectrum from navigation, structure monitoring, landslide mitigation, volcano monitoring, and tectonic deformation are appropriate. We also seek presentations concerning societal needs and how real-time GPS techniques can meet those needs.

Conveners: Ken Hurst, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, 4800 Oak Grove Dr., Mail Stop 238-600, Pasadena, CA 91109-8099 USA, Tel: +1-818-354-6637, Fax: +1-818-393-4965, E-mail: hurst@cobra.jpl.nasa.gov Elliot Endo, U.S. Geological Survey, 5400 MacArthur Blvd., Vancouver, WA 98661 USA, Tel: +1-360- 993-8911, Fax: +1-360-993-8980, E-mail: etendo@usgs.gov

G07 Plate and Microplate Motion and Intraplate Deformation (Joint With GP, S, T)

Geodetic observations from the growing network of sites are bringing new information on the motion of the plate interiors and the continental deformation belts. At the same time, an expanding set of geophysical observations, including seismicity, earthquake fault plane solutions, marine magnetic observations of sea floor spreading, and high-resolution mapping of transforms and fracture zones, are constraining the motion between plates along their boundaries. The geodetic data are beginning to constrain both intraplate deformation and that produced by glacial isostatic adjustment. The geodetic data are also identifying large portions of lithosphere that may be behaving nearly rigidly, such as the Amurian and Sundaland plates. We invite studies using geodetic and other geophysical observations to better understand the kinematics and dynamics of motions at the Earth's surface. We also seek studies using the predictive power of the plate model to constrain deformation integrated across active tectonic structures separating plates.

Conveners: Donald F Argus, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, 4800 Oak Grove Dr., Mail Stop 238-600 Pasadena, CA 91109-8099 USA, Tel : +1-818-354-3380, Fax: +1-818-393-4965, E-mail: argus@cobra.jpl.nasa.gov Eric Calais, Centre National de la Researche Scientifique - Geosciences Azur, 250 rue Albert Einstein, 06560 Valbonne, France, Tel: +33-4-92-94-26-28, Fax: +33-4-92-94-26-10 E-mail: calais@faille.unice.fr

G09 Crustal Deformation (Joint With S, T)

Space geodetic techniques (GPS, INSAR, VLBI, SLR, DORIS) as well as precise ground-based techniques (strainmeters, tiltmeters, leveling, gravity, EDM) have revolutionized our ability to accurately measure crustal deformation around the world. We solicit papers on crustal deformation results and models from a variety of techniques, at any scale from local to global. We also seek papers that compare techniques or show improvements in modeling the geodetic observables.

Conveners: Rosanne Nikolaidis, University of California, MC 0225, 9500 Gilman Dr., La Jolla, CA 92093-0225 USA, Tel: +1-858-822-0557, Fax: +1-858-534-9873, E-mail: rosanne@ucsd.edu Kristine Larson, Department of Aerospace Engineering Sciences, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309-0429 USA, Tel: +1-303-492-6583, Fax: +1-303-492-7881, E-mail: kristine.larson@colorado.edu

GP05 Magnetic Anisotropy: New Developments and Applications (Joint With T, V)

Anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) increasingly provides valuable insight into rock fabric with wide applications in igneous petrology (both volcanic and intrusive), sedimentology, tectonics, and other fields. Anisotropy of magnetic remanence (AMR), with its potentially broader applications beyond the reach of AMS is attracting ever greater interest. This session focuses on all aspects of magnetic anisotropy, with emphasis on new techniques and applications.

Conveners: William D. MacDonald, State University of New York at Binghamton, Binghamton, NY 13902 USA, Tel: +1-607-777-2863, E-mail: wdmacdon@binghamton.edu Bernard Housen, Department of Geology, Western Washington University, Bellingham, WA 98225 USA, Tel: +1-360-650-6573 E-mail: bernieh@cc.wwu.edu

GP06 Electromagnetic Investigation of the Earth (Joint With T, MRP, SEDI)

This session solicits contributions on the theory and practice of electromagnetic methods for the examination of structure and properties of Earth’s near-surface, crust, mantle, and core. Papers describing advances in instrumentation, algorithms, and laboratory measurements that improve our understanding of Earth’s internal constitution and the phenomena therein are encouraged.

Conveners: Chester Weiss, Geophysical Technology Division, Sandia National Laboratories, PO Box 5800, MS 0750, Albuquerque, NM 87185-0750 USA, Tel: +1-505-284-6347, Fax: +1-505-844-7354 E-mail: cjweiss@sandia.gov Lee Slater, Department of Geosciences, University of Missouri Kansas City, MO USA, Tel: +1-816-235-5535, Fax: +1-816-235-2978, E-mail: SlaterL@umkc.edu

H08 Groundwater in Geologic Systems: Interactions With Heat, Reactions, and Tectonics (Joint With OS, T)

Many processes in Earth's crust can be understood as a combination of groundwater flow and chemical or physical interaction between water and the geologic medium. Groundwater flow is therefore a key factor in the temporal and spatial evolution of geologic systems. The coupling of fluid flow with heat transfer, fluid-rock reactions, and tectonics is essential for the quantitative treatment of many important geologic processes. Posters and talks are invited on quantitative couplings between fluid flow and heat transfer, chemical reactions, and tectonics in natural geologic processes such as in continental and oceanic hydrothermal systems, faults, and ore deposits.

Convener: Roy Haggerty, Department of Geosciences, Oregon State University, 104 Wilkinson Hall, Corvallis, OR 97331-5506 USA, Tel: +1-541-737-1210, Fax: +1-541-737-1200, E-mail: haggertr@geo.orst GEIER and GEIGER contact info to follow

OS04 Sedimentary Records from Semi-Isolated Basins: Amplified Paleoceanographic and Paleoclimatic Histories (Joint With T)

Oceanic subbasins and adjacent seas are often sensitive recorders of paleoclimatic changes because of their smaller size and partial isolation relative to the global ocean. The smaller basins can act as responsive monitors and even amplifiers of global processes. This session invites descriptions of sedimentary records that monitor or magnify global paleoceanographic and paleoclimatic changes from semi-isolated basins such as the Mediterranean Sea, the Sea of Japan, the Cariaco Trench, and the Santa Barbara Basin.

Conveners: Philip A. Meyers, University of Michigan, 3514 C. C. Little Bldg., 425 E. University, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1063 USA, E-mail: pameyers@umich.edu Visiting Fellow (until July 16, 2000): Hanse Wissenschaftskolleg, Lehmkuhlenbusch 4, D-27753 Delmenhorst, Germany; Timothy Herbert, Department of Geological Sciences, Brown University, Box 1846, Providence, RI 02912 USA, Tel: +1-401-863-1207, Fax: +1-401-863-2058, E-mail: timothy_herbert@brown.edu

OS08 Cenozoic Antarctic Glacial Evolution: The Marine Geologic Record (Joint With GP, T, SIP)

In recent years, the Ocean Drilling Program has conducted a series of cruises to the Antarctic continental margin as well as to the Southern Ocean (here broadly defined as the ocean between the southern continents and Antarctica). In addition, research vessels of various nations have conducted geologic investigations in the far reaches of the Southern Ocean and along the Antarctic margin. Studies on cores and geologic samples collected by these expeditions continue to yield exciting results on Cenozoic high-latitude paleoenvironments. The proposed session will bring together scientists involved in Antarctic and sub-Antarctic marine geological research that is focused on Cenozoic Antarctic glacial history and its record in the marine environment. Emphasis will be on geologic sampling of the current and former continental margins of Antarctica and links to deep ocean records of Cenozoic glaciations.

Conveners: Detlef “Dietz”Warnke, Department of Geological Sciences, California State University, Hayward, CA 94542 USA, Tel: +1-510-885-4716, Fax: +1-510-885-2526, E-mail: dwarnke@csuhayward.edu Alan K. Cooper, Department of Geological and Environmental Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 USA, Tel: +1-650-723-0817, Fax: +1-650-725-2199, E-mail: akcooper@pangea.stanford.edu

OS10 Timing and Effects of the Opening of the Drake Passage (Joint With T)

The evolution of the cryosphere during the Cenozoic has been linked to the opening of the Drake Passage and the development of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current. These events would have greatly impacted global thermohaline circulation, regional and global climates, nutrient distributions, and water mass characteristics. Precise timing of the opening of the passage is essential to understanding the controls on paleoceanographic and paleoclimatic events; however, there is little agreement on the age and character of the opening to both shallow and deep water flow. For this session we welcome papers addressing the timing of the opening of the Drake Passage or the influence of the passageway on paleoceanography or paleoclimatology. Contributions utilizing tectonic, geophysical, sedimentological, paleontological, and geochemical data are welcome.

Conveners: Ellen E. Martin, Department of Geological Sciences, University of Florida, 241 Williamson Hall, PO Box 112120, Gainesville, FL 32611 USA, Tel: +1-352-392-2141, Fax: +1-352-392-9294, E-mail: emartin@geology.ufl.edu Mark Pagani, Earth Sciences Department, Earth and Marine Sciences Bldg., University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 USA, Tel: +1-831-459-5207, Fax: +1-831-459-3074, E-mail: pagani@es.ucsc.edu

OS24 Predicting Submarine Mass Failure and Tsunami Hazards (Joint with S, T)

Society needs to assess accurate underwater landslide and slump hazards, attempt to predict their occurrence following a nearby earthquake, evaluate their tsunamigenic potential, and hopefully warn coastal communities of imminent danger. Underwater landslides and slumps pose a continuous threat to US coastal economic activity, including valuable offshore structures and port facilities. Some of the largest and most deadly tsunamis this decade (e.g., Papua New Guinea, Flores Island) probably involved wave generation by nearshore underwater landslides or slumps. These events generated tsunami runup reaching 30 m above sea level, far surpassing most previous predictions of maximum tsunami amplitude for such moderate earthquakes, and calling into question the preparedness of US coastal communities for a similar event. An interdisciplinary approach to underwater landslide and slump hazard assessment can yield deterministic or probabilistic predictions of failure occurrence, size and location. These predictions would enhance both underwater landslide and slump hazard assessment and tsunami warning capabilities. The Special Session provides an interactive forum of experts from various fields of engineering and science to critically evaluate existing work, provide important new sources of information, and further the state of the art.

Conveners: Philip Watts, Applied Fluids Engineering, Inc., e-mail: phil.watts@appliedfluids.com, phone: +1-562-498-9407, fax: +1-562-498-9407; Homa Lee, US Geological Survey, e-mail: homa@octopus.wr.usgs.gov, phone: +1-650-329-5485, fax: +1-650-329-5411

P04 Impact Craters From Geophysical Exploration to Deep Drilling (Joint With T, V, MRP)

This session brings together the whole range of disciplines focusing on understanding the formation of large craters on Earth, such as detection/study of impact structures using geophysical methods, the petrology/geochemistry of impactites, the production and distribution of ejecta material, shock metamorphism, and computer modeling of impact cratering events. Contributions from researchers interested in drilling crater-fill sediments as indicators of climate changes are also welcome. This session is well timed, as the International Continental Scientific Drilling Program’s deep drilling of the Chicxulub crater is planned for the end of 2000 and subsequent offshore drilling is being considered by Ocean Drilling Program.

Conveners: Philippe Claeys, Institute of Mineralogy, Museum of Natural History, D-10099, Berlin, Germany, Tel: +49-30-2093-8857, Fax: +49-30-2093-5865, E-mail: philippe.claeys@rz.hu-berlin.de Joanna Morgan, T. H. Huxley School, Imperial College, Prince Consort Rd., London, SW7 2BP, United Kingdom, Tel: +44-171-594-64-23, Fax: +44-171-594-65-29, E-mail: j.v.morgan@ic.ac.uk

S01 The Landers and Hector Mine Earthquake Pair (Joint With G, T)

The 1992 M7.3 Landers and 1999 M7.1 Hector Mine, California, earthquakes provide an important opportunity to study the interaction between large crustal events, and to compare their effects on regional seismicity and deformation. This session will focus on the Landers and Hector Mine sequences as a pair. Topics may include, but are not limited to, (1) the relationship between the mainshocks, either through triggering or as results of a common underlying process; (2) similarities and differences between the patterns of mainshock rupture, aftershocks, triggered seismicity, and coseismic or postseismic deformation; and (3) implications for the mechanics of faulting in the Eastern California Shear Zone.

Conveners: Kenneth Hudnut, U.S. Geological Survey, 525 South Wilson Ave., Pasadena, CA 91106-3212 USA, Tel: +1-626-583-7232, Fax: +1-626-583-7827, E-mail: hudnut@usgs.gov Jeanne Hardebeck, Seismological Laboratory, Caltech, MC 252-21, Pasadena, CA 91125 USA, Tel: +1-626-395-6971 Fax: +1-626-564-0715, E-mail: jlh@gps.caltech.edu

S03 The 1999 Chi-Chi, Taiwan, Earthquake (Joint With G, T)

The September 21, 1999, Chi-Chi earthquake (M7.6) and subsequent large aftershocks (M›6) are the best recorded seismic events of recent disastrous earthquakes. The tremendous ground deformation associated with the earthquake faulting caused major destruction to buildings and lifelines across a wide area of Taiwan. The large inland thrust event caused ground deformation of up to 8 meters and slip velocities of up to about 3 m/sec. The wealth of ground motion data collected from this earthquake sequence is likely to substantially influence our understanding of near-field ground motion and ground deformation, fault rupture processes, effects of site and basins, earthquake dynamic triggering, etc., as data are processed and analyzed in the months and years to come. Papers from theoretical and observational seismology, earthquake geology, and earthquake engineering are all welcome.

Conveners: Kuo-Fong Ma, Institute of Geophysics, National Central University, Chung-Li, 320-54, Taiwan, ROC, Tel: +886-3-4262421, Fax: +886-3-4222044, E-mail: fong@sal.gep.ncu.edu.tw Yuehua Zeng, Seismological Laboratory, University of Nevada, Reno, NV 89557 USA, Tel: +1-775-784-4231, Fax: +1-775-784-1833, E-mail: zeng@seismo.unr.edu

S04 Recent Results on the Seismicity and Mechanics of the San Andreas Fault System (Joint With G, P, T, MRP)

The session will provide a forum for diverse studies that bear on the seismological and mechanical workings of the San Andreas fault and other strands of the plate-bounding strike-slip system. Key issues include the spatial and temporal distribution of seismicity, the orientation and magnitude of the stress field around the faults, and the mechanical strength of the faults and interactions with the surrounding crust. Thus, we welcome papers based on seismicity relocations, stress orientations, borehole meaurements, and relevant geological or geomorphological constraints.

Conveners: Heidi Houston, Department of Earth and Spaces Sciences, University of California, 595 Young Dr. E, Los Angeles, CA 90095 USA, Tel: +1-310-206-3896, Fax: +1-310-825-2779, E-mail: heidi@moho.ess.ucla.edu Debi Kilb, Department of Geosciences, Princeton University, Guyot Hall, Princeton, NJ 08544, Tel: +1-609-258-2598, Fax: +1-609-258-1274, E-mail: dkilb@princeton.edu

S05 Subduction Zone Structure and Megathrust Earthquakes (Joint With G, T, MRP)

Many studies have suggested that the size and rupture characteristics of great subduction zone earthquakes are controlled by material properties and structural irregularities near the subduction zone plate boundary. This session is intended to bring together researchers studying such structure and those who study the earthquakes themselves. We encourage contributions ranging from geophysical surveys of subduction zone structure to studies of earthquake rupture in subduction zone environments.

Conveners: Phil Cummins, Frontier Research for Subduction Dynamics, Japan Marine Science and Technology Center, 2-15 Natsushima-cho, Yokosuka 237-0061, Japan, Tel: +81-468-67-3393, Fax: +81-468-67-3409, E-mail: cummins@jamstec.go.jp Shuichi Kodaira, Frontier Research for Subduction Dynamics, Japan Marine Science and Technology Center, 2-15 Natsushima-cho, Yokosuka 237-0061, Japan, Tel: +81-468-67-3407, Fax: +81-468-67-3409, E-mail: kodaira@jamstec.go.jp

S07 Melts and Volatiles in the Deep Mantle (Joint With T, V, MRP, SEDI)

Once believed to be confined to the low-velocity zone and at shallow depths in tectonically active regions, recent seismological results indicate a much greater distribution of partial melts in the mantle with evidence of melts ranging from transition zone depths through the lower mantle to the core-mantle boundary. Concomitant with this is a deepening understanding of the abundance and cycling of volatile components in the Earth's mantle. This session will focus on seismological, laboratory, and theoretical characterization and quantification of partial melts and volatiles in the mantle, their role in mantle dynamics, and their temporal evolution in abundance and mode. We encourage submissions from seismology, mineral physics, geodynamics, geochemistry, and volcanology.

Conveners: Justin Revenaugh, Earth Sciences, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95060 USA Tel: +1-831-459-3055, Fax: +1-831-459-3074, E-mail: jsr@monk.ucsc.edu Lars P. Stixrude, Department of Geology, University of Michigan, 2534 C. C. Little Bldg., 425 E. University Ave., Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1063 USA, Tel: +1-313-647-9071, Fax: +1-313-763-4690, E-mail: stixrude@umich.edu

S08 Thermal and Chemical Structures in the Core-Mantle Boundary Region: Implications for the Evolution of the Deep Interior (Joint With G, GP, T, MRP, SEDI)

Thermal and chemical structures in the core-mantle boundary (CMB) region are shaped by dynamics in the Earth's interior and provide clues to the long-term evolution of the planet. A wide range of processes from large-scale convection to small-scale melting and chemical reactions, are likely to contribute to the complexity of the boundary region. We welcome reports dealing with theoretical, observational, and experimental studies of the boundary region. Topics include, but are not restricted to, the structure and evolution of the thermal boundary layer, chemical stratification at the base of the mantle or top of the core, melting relations and physical properties of mantle minerals, evidence and implications of small-scale structure, effect of boundary layer structure on CMB topography, and observational techniques for discriminating between chemical and thermal boundary layers.

Conveners: Bruce Buffett, Department of Earth and Ocean Sciences, University of British Columbia 2219 Main Mall, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z4 Canada, Tel: +1-604-822-3466, Fax: +1-604-822-6088 E-mail: buffett@geop.ubc.ca Anne M. Hofmeister, Department of Earth and Planetary Science Washington University, Campus Box 1169, 1 Brookings Dr., St. Louis, MO 63130 USA, Tel: +1-314-935-7440, Fax: +1-314-935-7361, E-mail: Hofmeist@levee.wustl.edu Michael Wysession, Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Washington University, Campus Box 1169, 1 Brookings Dr., St. Louis, MO 63130 USA, Tel: +1-314-935-5625, Fax: +1-314-935-7361, E-mail: michael@wucore.wustl.edu

V01The Properties of Fe and Fe-Bearing Phases at High Pressures (Joint With GP, S, T, MRP, SEDI)

Iron is the fourth most abundant element in the Earth and, therefore, it plays an important role in most geochemical and petrological processes within the Earth. The fact that Fe can exist in a variety of valence states means that the geochemical character of Fe can vary depending on the reigning oxygen fugacity (fO2). The purpose of this special session is to bring together researchers who are interested in the properties of Fe° and Fe2+- and Fe3+-bearing phases at high pressures and the influence these properties may have on mantle processes and core formation. In addition to experimentally based studies, theoretical aspects and pertinent observations from natural samples are welcome.

Conveners: Alan Woodland, Institute of Mineralogy, University of Heidelberg, Germany E-mail: alan@classic.min.uni-heidelberg.de Dan Frost, Bayerisches Geoinstitut, University of Bayreuth, 95440 Bayreuth, Germany, E-mail: dan.frost@uni-bayreuth.de

V02 Physics of Axial Magma Chambers (Joint With GP, S, T, MRP)

In recent years, the geophysical community has made considerable progress understanding the structure, physical properties, and evolution of axial magma chambers (AMC) at oceanic spreading centers. This special session will involve volcanologists, tectonophysicists, and seismologists and will cover recent progress and upcoming challenges in multidisciplinary approaches to better understanding AMC structure and processes. Topics include (1) seismic, electromagnetic, and gravimetric observations; (2) structural and petrological features; and (3) geodynamic modeling; (4) laboratory characterization of rock properties from AMC regions.

Conveners: Nikolai Bagdassarov, Institut für Meteorologie und Geophysik, J. W. Goethe Universität Frankfurt, Feldbergstraße 47, D-60323 Frankfurt am Main, Germany, Tel: +49-69-798-23376, Fax: +49-69-798-23280, E-mail: nickbagd@geophysik.uni-frankfurt.de Benoît Ildefonse, Laboratoire de Tectonophysique, Institut de Sciences de la Terre, de l’Eau et de l’Espa?e de Montpellier, Université Montpellier II, 34095 Montpellier, cedex 05, France, Tel: +33-4-67-14 38-18/33, Fax: +33-4-67-14-36-03, E-mail: benoit@dstu.univ-montp2.fr William S. D. Wilcock, School of Oceanography, University of Washington, Box 357940, Seattle, WA 98195-7940 USA, Tel: +1-206-543-6043, Fax: +1-206-543-6073, E-mail: wilcock@ocean.washington.edu

V03 Aleutian Arc Volcanic and Related Processes (Joint With T)

This session will bring together scientists engaged in study of volcanic and volcano-tectonic processes, monitoring, and hazards associated with eruptions in the great volcanic arcs of the northwest Pacific region. The goal is to expand awareness about recent progress in understanding eruptive processes and the significance of these processes in terms of forecasting and monitoring eruptive activity and potential hazards. Eruptions from volcanoes in the Aleutian and Kamchatka-Kurile arcs pose major hazards to aviation and population centers, because large-magnitude eruptions are relatively frequent and the region includes major transcontinental flight paths used by hundreds of large aircraft per day. Because of the remote nature of the many eruptive centers in this region, techniques for study and monitoring are novel but not widely known by the greater volcanological community. Our hope is that the session will be a catalyst for discussion of common interests, research results, and important unresolved questions about magmatic systems, processes, and hazards in north Pacific arcs, one of the least known and poorly understood geological provinces on Earth.

Conveners: Christopher F. Waythomas, U.S. Geological Survey, Alaska Volcano Observatory, 4230 University Dr., Suite 201, Anchorage, AK 99508 USA, Tel: +1-907-786-7122, Fax: +1-907-786-7150, E-mail: chris@usgs.gov John C. Eichelberger, Geophysical Institute and Department of Geology and Geophysics, University of Alaska, 903 Koyukuk Dr., PO Box 757320, Fairbanks, AK 99775-7320 USA, E-mail: eich@dino.gi.alaska.edu

V06 New Developments in Volcanic Systems of Southern Italy (Joint With G, S, T)

Studies of volcanic areas in southern Italy have been conducted for both academic and societal reasons. Most of these volcanos are sited in areas of moderate to high population density, so research can yield vital, predicative scenarios that could be very beneficial to the affected populations. About 20 years ago, there was a resurgence of research related to southern Italian volcanic areas. This research was conducted by universities especially in southern Italy, but also involved research institutions in the rest of the world. Recently, the research has become more detailed and sophisticated, and especially has involved the use of various isotopic systems. We propose this special session for the AGU Fall Meeting in San Francisco. The purpose of this session is to bring together for a wider audience the recent and very exciting developments related to the volcanic systems of southern Italy. Although southern Italy is a long way from San Francisco, the synergy that can be developed with such a meeting can be very worthwhile. Our tentative structure would consist of a morning session of oral talks, both invited and volunteered, followed by an afternoon poster session. We have been in contact with various researchers involved with southern Italian volcanos and have agreement and support for such a session. The following institutions are represented: Università di Napoli, Italy, Osservatorio Vesuviano, Italy, University of Lancaster, UK; Technische Universität Muenchen, Germany; and in the USA, the University of Maryland, Eastern Washington University, American Museum of Natural History, and U.S. Geological Survey.

Conveners: Harvey E. Belkin, U.S. Geological Survey, 956 National Center, Reston, VA 20192 USA, Tel: +1-703-648-6162, Fax: +1-703-648-6419, E-mail: hbelkin@usgs.gov or hbelkin@mindspring.com Renato Somma, Università degli Studi di Napoli “Federico II,” Napoli, Italy

V07 Earth's First Billion Years: New Discoveries in Old Rocks (Joint With P, T)

Recent progress in understanding the first billion years of Earth history has been driven by investigations of the geological record preserved from the earliest times. These records suggest that during the time of life's emergence, early Earth was dominated by very different hydrospheric and atmospheric conditions. There was higher heat flow through the crust than at present, but there is debate whether that is reflected in differing tectonic styles. New methods developed to investigate the first billion years of Earth history as well as new discoveries from the oldest rocks will be highlighted.

Conveners: Stephen J. Mojzsis, Department of Earth and Space Sciences, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1567 USA, E-mail: sjm@argon.ess.ucla.edu James L. Crowley, Department of Earth Sciences, Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John's, NF A1B 3X5 Canada, E-mail: jcrowley@sparky2.esd.mun.ca Peter W. U. Appel, Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland, Thoravej 8, DK 2400, NV Copenhagen K, Denmark; E-mail: pa@geus.dk

V08 Slab Melting 2000: Archean to Modern Comparisons, Significance for Arc Magmatism and Continental Growth (Joint With T, MRP)

Kepezhinskas/Defant - Since the concept of slab melting was formulated by Bob Kay in his 1978 paper on high-Mg andesites from adak, this process was unraveled as an important factor in subduction zone magma genesis and continental growth. Slab melts were termed adakites by Defant and Drummond (1990) to commemorate the adak island discovery. Multiple studies also revealed the importance of slab-derived tonalites-trondhjemites-dacites in Archean crustal growth. Slab melt research fluorished over last decades and significantly advanced our understanding of tectonic and petrologic conditions of slab melting in Precambrian and Phanerozoic and of a general significance of this process for arc magmatism. Major advancements of the last decade of adakite research can be summarized as follows. This range of slab melt-related topics will bring together a multidisciplinary crowd interested in all espects of slab-mantle interactions and their significance for subduction zone petrogenesis. We expect a great attendance based on our preliminary discussions with colleagues in US, Canada, France and Australia. France which has a very strong slab melt, reserach groups will alone contribute over 15 papers to this kind of session. In fact, this will be the first session dedicated to slab melting and arc genesis since the Penrose meeting on low-K arc rocks in 1990. We had a great decade researching slab melts and associated phenomena and it is time to bring everybody together to discuss exciting results.

Conveners: Pavel Kepezhinskas, Department of Geology, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL 33620 USA, Tel: +1-813-974-8754, Fax: +1-813-974-2654, E-mail: kepezhin@chuma.cas.usf.edu Marc J. Defant, Department of Geology, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL 33620 USA, Tel: +1-813-974-1593, Fax: +1-813-974-2654, E-mail: defant@chuma1.cas.usf.edu

V09 Subduction Zone Devolatilization (Joint With S, T)

Subduction zone devolatilization is vital to deep earthquakes, magma genesis, and volatile recycling. This special session will focus on the release of fluids from subducted lithologies and the effect of slab devolatilization on the mantle wedge. Major volatile components (H2O and CO2), minor and trace element geochemistry, and isotopes are an integral part of this theme session. The convener encourages contributions from a variety of disciplines (geochemistry, petrology, tectonics, and seismicity).

Convener: Derrill M. Kerrick, Pennsylvania State University, 243 Deike Bldg., University Park, PA 16802 USA, Tel: +1-814-865-7574, Fax: +1-814-865-3191, Web site: http://www.geosc.psu.edu/~kerrick/

V11 Long Valley Caldera: A Natural Laboratory to Study Long-Term Unrest in Complex Volcanic Systems (Joint With G, S, T)

For the past twenty years Long Valley caldera has been the site of persistent unrest and a broad spectrum of studies devoted to understanding the processes driving the unrest in this and other large, Quaternary silicic calderas. The aim of this session is to provide a forum for presenting and discussing both recent results and new perspectives on the earlier unrest. We also encourage contributions focused generally on problems of the geophysical and geochemical processes behind caldera unrest.

Conveners: Maurizio Battaglia, Dept of Geophysics, Stanford University, Stanford CA 94305-2215, Tel: +1- (650) 723-5485, Fax (650) 725-7344, E-mail: battag@pangea.stanford.edu. David P. Hill, U. S. Geological Survey, 345 Middlefield Rd, MS 910 Menlo Park, CA 94025, E-mail: hill@usgs.gov

V12 Dynamics of Lower Crustal Processes (Joint With S, T, MRP)

This special session is designed to attract different disciplines together to discuss recent research on a variety of lower crustal processes. These include basaltic underplating, partial melting of the lower crust, MASH (mixing, assimilation, storage, and homogenization) processes, delamination of eclogitic lower crust, etc. Questions to address include Is the lower crust fundamentally more mafic than the upper crust? Is this true at continental arcs? Where is this not the case? What processes control or strongly influence the creation of continental crust at subduction zones? How important are magmatic processes that occur in the lower versus upper crust? We hope to address these issues by attracting papers on lower crustal xenoliths, the seismic structure of continental crust, as well as isotopic, geochemical, and petrologic studies of arc volcanoes and batholiths.

Conveners: John Chesley, E-mail: jchesley@geo.arizona.edu Rebecca Lange, E-mail: becky@umich.edu

V13 Volcanism in French Polynesia and Lithospheric Control of Intraplate Volcanism (Joint With T)

A number of recent research programs and multidisciplinary cruises have been conducted in French Polynesia. This region, which corresponds roughly to the South Pacific Superswell, is of particular interest because of the extraordinary abundance and diversity of short-lived hot spot tracks. In many, if not all, of the volcanic chains of French Polynesia, the lithosphere seems to play a significant role in determining the location, magnitude, and chemistry of volcanism, from the scale of island chains down to the scale of individual seamounts. Preexisting tectonic weaknesses, fracture in response to local and regional tectonic stresses, and thermomechanical anomalies have been invoked by various researchers to explain aspects of French Polynesian volcanism. This session will present recent geophysical and geochemical results from the islands and seamounts in and near French Polynesia, with a special focus on the role of the lithosphere on the distribution, and composition of magmas and morphology of volcanic features. We invite contributions on all aspects of volcanism in French Polynesia, as well as results from other geographic regions relevant to this theme.

Conveners: Alain Bonneville, Université de la Polynésie Française, BP 6570, Faaa Aéroport, Tahiti, French Polynesia, Tel: +689-80-38-05 (GMT-10), Fax: +689-80-38-42, 98702, Web site: http://www.ipgp.jussieu.fr/UFP Kelsey Jordahl, Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute, 7700 Sandholdt Rd., Moss Landing, CA 95039 USA, Tel: +1-831-775-1842, Fax: +1-831-775-1620 E-mail: kels@mbari.org

NG01 Nonlinear Space-Time Patterns (Joint With A, B, G, OS, T)

Nonlinear space-time patterns occur in a variety of complex systems. These space-time patterns represent the independent spatial modes of the system in terms of their associated temporal signal, and can provide significant scientific insight into both their sources and relative effects. Examples of systems that exhibit space-time patterns include fault networks, mantle convection, the ocean-atmosphere interface, the human body, and solar activity. Analysis of these patterns reveals information about the characteristics of the system in question. Recent developments resulting in the relative inexpensive accessibility to computational power have greatly improved the ability to analyze these space-time patterns and have yielded a number of important scientific insights. Applications include such widely varying fields as biometrics, seismic tomography, surface deformation, tidal signals, blood flow, and the El Nino-Southern Oscillation. Abstracts that emphasize scientific results based on the analysis of space-time patterns are encouraged. We plan to invite people and solicit contributions across a broad spectrum of sections at AGU.

Conveners: Kristy Tiampo, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences, University of Colorado, Room 318, Boulder, CO 80309-0216 USA, Tel: +1-303-492-4779, Fax: +1-303-492-5070, E-mail: kristy@caldera.colorado.edu Andrea Donnellan, Mail Stop 126-347, Jet Propulsion Laboratory and University of Southern California, 4800 Oak Grove Dr., Pasadena, CA 91109 USA, Tel: +1-818-354-4737, Fax: +1-818-393-4965, E-mail: andrea.donnellan@jpl.nasa.gov

NG02 Geocomplexity: Self-Organizing Systems (Joint With A, GP, OS, S, T)

Self-organizing complex systems are found in many branches of geophysics. The broadest-based example is fluid turbulence. Specific examples include the stochastic variability of climate and the variability of Earth’s magnetic field. Other examples are landforms and seismicity. These systems are generally chaotic, exhibit fractal (power-law) behavior, and may be examples of self-organized criticality. The proposed session will include broad overviews of the current understanding of complex systems as well as more specific recent developments. This session is intended as an overview of the current status of geocomplexity and will include several key invited speakers. Although this is not planned as a Union session, we strongly encourage contributions across a broad spectrum of AGU sections. Contributions that are applicable in more than one area are particularly welcome.

Conveners: Donald L. Turcotte, Department of Geological Sciences, Cornell University, Snee Hall, Ithaca, NY 14853 USA, Tel: +1-607-255-7282, Fax: +1-607-254-4780, E-mail: turcotte@geology.cornell.edu John B. Rundle, Colorado Center for Chaos and Complexity and Cooperative Institute Research in Environmental Sciences, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309 USA, Tel: +1-303-492-5642, E-mail: rundle@terra.colorado.edu William Klein, Physics Department and Center for Computational Science, Boston University, 590 Commonwealth Ave., Boston, MA 02215 USA, Tel: +1-617-353-2188, E-mail: klein@buphyc.bu.edu

NG03 Scaling and the Extremes of Geophysical Fields (Joint With A, H, OS, S, T)

From earthquakes to floods, volcanic eruptions to magnetic storms and hurricanes, the extremes of geophysical fields are of prime importance. However, they are still poorly understood, and time series are often too short to yield the clear-cut empirical evidence necessary to distinguish between different theoretical behaviors. Of particular significance is the distinction between standard extreme value distributions and the nonclassical heavy tailed (algebraic) distributions generally associated with space-time scaling processes. This session will be devoted to the most recent theoretical and empirical developments of scaling approaches to understand and to characterize the interrelation between strong nonlinearities over wide ranges of temporal and spatial scales and their consequences for the extremes. Session topics will include recent empirical investigations; techniques to test for the algebraic fall-offs in probability distributions; statistical estimators and data requirements; comparisons of mean and extreme instabilities/events; the statistics and dynamics of the extremes; the relevance of the paradigm of self-organized criticality; cascades, multifractals, and heavy tails; and nonclassical return period statistics and their implications.

Conveners: Daniel Schertzer, Laboratoire de Modelisation en Mecanique, Centre National de la Reserche Scientifique UMR 7607, Case 162, Université P. et M. Curie, 4 Place Jussieu, F-75252 Paris Cedex 05, France, Tel: +33-1-44-27-4963, Fax: +33-1-44-27-5259, E-mail: schertze@ccr.jussieu.fr Shaun M. Lovejoy, Physics Department, McGill University, 3600 University Str., Montreal, QC H3A 2T8, Canada, Tel: +1-514-398-6537, Fax: +1-514-398-8434, E-mail: lovejoy@physics.mcgill.ca Per Bak, Niels Bohr Institute, Blegdamsvej 17, DK-2100 Copenhagen Ø, Denmark, Tel: +45-353-25393, Fax: +45-353-25016, E-mail: bak@nbi.dk Didier Sornette, Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics and Department of Earth and Space Science, University of California, 3845 Slichter Hall, Box 951567, 595 E. Circle Dr., University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 USA, Tel: +1-310-825-2863, Fax: +1-310-206-3051, E-mail: sornette@moho.ess.ucla.edu

NG04 Nonlinearity and Earthquakes (Joint With S, T, MRP)

This session solicits theoretical, experimental, and descriptive papers on nonlinear processes in earthquake science. Topics include comprehensive earthquake modeling; nonlinear deformation phenomena such as creep, afterslip, and fluid flow and diagenesis; the seismic cycle; foreshocks and aftershocks; nonlinear earthquake precursory and triggering mechanisms; nonlinear response to stress perturbations; self-organized intrafault structure; heterogeneities in distribution of physical properties and stresses along faults; and scaling of fracture and friction laboratory measurements to field scales. We anticipate that this session will attract some exciting papers by investigators pursuing research on nonlinear earthquake models and on other nonlinear earthquake-related topics.

Conveners: Chuck Bufe, U.S. Geological Survey, Denver Federal Center, Box 25046, Mail Stop 966, Denver, CO 80225 USA, Tel: +1-303-273-8413, Fax: +1-303-273-8450, E-mail: cbufe@usgs.gov Peter Ortoleva, Department of Geological Sciences, Indiana University, 1001 E. 10th St., Bloomington, IN 47405 USA, Tel: +1-812-855-5582, Fax: +1-812-855-2717, E-mail: ortoleva@indiana.edu Jean Schmittbuhl, Laboratoire de Geologie, Ecole Normale Superieure, 24 rue Lhomond, 75231 Paris Cedex 05, France, Tel: +33-1-44-32-22-18, Fax: +33-1-44-32-22-00, E-mail: Jean.Schmittbuhl@ens.fr

NG05 Fractals, Chaos, and Self-Organized Criticality in Natural and Human-Induced Hazards (Joint With A, H, OS, S, T, V)

Natural and human-induced hazards cover a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. They include a large variety and number of interacting components that combine to produce nonlinear power-law behaviors that are often associated with the basic concepts of complexity. Examples of these hazards include floods, landslides, volcanic eruptions, earthquakes, forest fires, cyclonic storms, droughts, global warming, and hazardous waste contamination. Papers that apply the concepts of fractals, chaos, or self-organized criticality to characterize, model, and assess the risk of natural and man-made hazards are solicited. Posters are also very much encouraged.

Conveners: Bruce D. Malamud, Department of Geography, Kings College London, Strand, London WC2R 2LS, UK, E-mail: bruce@malamud.com Didier Sornette, Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics and Department of Earth and Space Science, University of California, 3845 Slichter Hall, Box 951567, 595 E. Circle Dr., Los Angeles, CA 90095 USA, Tel: +1-310-825-2863, Fax: +1-310-206-3051, E-mail: sornette@moho.ess.ucla.edu Christopher Barton, U. S. Geological Survey, 600 4th St. South, St. Petersburg, FL 33701 USA, Tel: +1-727-803-8747 ext. 3014, Fax: +1-727-803-2030, E-mail: barton@usgs.gov

NG06 Quantifying Predictability in Geophysical Systems II (Joint With A, G, H, OS, SH, T, V)

Our ability to quantify the predictability of nonlinear geophysical systems provides a fundamental bridge between models of geophysical systems and the systems themselves. Uncertainty in the initial condition and errors in model formulation have led to probability forecasts (ensembles) even in deterministic systems. This session will focus on atmospheric and ocean dynamics over hours to centuries (e.g., adaptive observation strategies, Lagrangian and Eulerian approaches, intense short-duration events); theoretical aspects of the dynamics of nonlinear systems relevant to predictability and verification (including multiple models, contrasting modeling strategies, data assimilation); and practical issues in the interpretation and likely economic impact of probabilistic forecasts on a timescale minutes to hours (e.g., precipitation/wind), days to months (e.g., hurricanes), and years to millennia (e.g., earthquakes). A mix of oral and poster presentations of both pure and extremely applied contributions are welcome, and may focus on the predictability of geophysical systems other than those noted explicitly above.

Conveners: Leonard Smith, Oxford University, 24-29 St Giles', Oxford, OX1 3LB, UK, Tel: +44-1865-270-517, Fax: +44-1865-270-515, E-mail: lenny@maths.ox.ac.uk James Hansen, Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Ave., Room 54-1721, Cambridge, MA 02139 USA, Tel: +1-617-253-5935, E-mail: jhansen@mit.edu

NG08 Scaling Laws and Nonlinear Dynamics in Drainage Basins, Vegetation Patterns, and Geomorphic Processes (Joint With B, H, T)

Drainage basins, stream morphology, the distribution of vegetative communities, and many other landscape features exhibit power functions or other scaling behavior. These scaling laws have long been used in describing drainage basin and stream organization. The availability of digital elevation models of topography and remotely sensed data to obtain topography, vegetation, sedimentation patterns, etc. has expanded our ability to quantify geomorphic and biogeographic patterns and processes. These data can be used to compare the geomorphic and biological organization of landscapes. In addition, some research groups have been measuring sediment transport and other processes so that time series techniques can be used to characterize system behavior. The purpose of this session is to encourage papers that describe and explain scaling characteristics in drainage basins and vegetation patterns. We are also interested in papers that examine nonlinear behavior in geomorphic processes.

Conveners: Karen Prestegaard, Department of Geology, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 USA, Tel: +1-301-405-6982, Fax: +1-301-314-9661, E-mail: kpresto@geol.umd.edu Ralph Dubayah, Deparment of Geography, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 USA, Tel: +1-301-405-4069, Fax: +1-301-314-9299, E-mail: rdubayah@glue.umd.edu Jon Pelletier, Department of Geosciences, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona 85721 USA, Tel: +1-520-626-2126, E-mail: jon@geo.arizona.edu

NG10 Visual Computing in Nonlinear Geophysical Phenomena (Joint With A, G, GP, H, OS, T)

Researchers in geophysics are being overwhelmed by the huge amount of data generated by natural nonlinear phenomena and high-resolution numerical solutions. In this session we will bring together many of the different practioners using modern analytical and visualization tools (e.g., wavelets, eigenvectors, and EOFs) for treating and analyzing large data sets. We are soliciting examples from all areas in geophysics and at all scales, ranging from the molecular level, such as bacteria growth, to core dynamics. Also of great interest are examples from large data sets, such as SAR, ocean currents, and numerical simulations involving the bridging of scales in nonlinear processes. We foresee interest for this session from both numerical modelers and observation-oriented scientists.

Conveners: Dave Yuen, Minnesota Supercomputer Institute, 1200 Washington Ave., S., Minneapolis, MN 55415 USA, Tel: +1-612-624-1868, E-mail: davey@krissy.msi.umn.edu Bryan J. Travis, Los Alamos National Laboratory, ESS 5, MS F665, Los Alamos, NM 55455 USA, Tel: +1-505-667-1254, E-mail: bjt@vega.lanl.gov

NG11 Anomalous Transport in Inhomogeneous and (Multi-)Fractal Geophysical Media (Joint With A, H, OS, T)

Anomalous transport is ubiquitous in geophysics: mantle convection, subsurface hydrology, atmospheric and oceanographic diffusion, geophysical turbulence, solar wind, etc. It is associated with nonstandard scaling (e.g., non-Fickian diffusion), and has been attracting a renewed interest owing to its importance for environmental applications, a larger availability of data, and several recently proposed theoretical approaches: fractal modeling, continuous time random walks, chaotic advection, fractional transport equations, multifractal dispersion coefficients, and multifractal advection equations. This session will focus on the confrontation between the new available data and the new theoretical developments on anomalous transport in scaling and inhomogeneous geophysical media.

Conveners: Ioulia Tchiguirinskaia, Environmental Engineering and Science Department, Clemson University, 342 Computer Ct., Anderson, SC 29625 USA, Tel: +1-864-656-1462, Fax: +1-864-656-0672, E-mail: iouliat@clemson.edu Brian Berkowitz, Deparment of Environmental Sciences and Energy Research, Weizmann Institute of Science, PO Box 26, Rehovot, 76100, Israel, Tel: +972-8-934-2098, Fax: +972-8-934-4124,E-mail: brian.berkowitz@weizmann.ac.il Jeffrey Duan, Deparment of Applied Mathematics, Illinois Institute of Technology, 10 W. 32nd St., Chicago, IL 60616 USA, Tel: +1-312-655-3282, Fax: +1-312-567-3135, E-mail: duan@iit.edu

Volcanology, Geochemistry and Petrology (V)

V01The Properties of Fe and Fe-Bearing Phases at High Pressures (Joint With GP, S, T, MRP, SEDI)

Iron is the fourth most abundant element in the Earth and, therefore, it plays an important role in most geochemical and petrological processes within the Earth. The fact that Fe can exist in a variety of valence states means that the geochemical character of Fe can vary depending on the reigning oxygen fugacity (fO2). The purpose of this special session is to bring together researchers who are interested in the properties of Fe° and Fe2+- and Fe3+-bearing phases at high pressures and the influence these properties may have on mantle processes and core formation. In addition to experimentally based studies, theoretical aspects and pertinent observations from natural samples are welcome.

Conveners: Alan Woodland, Institute of Mineralogy, University of Heidelberg, Germany E-mail: alan@classic.min.uni-heidelberg.de Dan Frost, Bayerisches Geoinstitut, University of Bayreuth, 95440 Bayreuth, Germany, E-mail: dan.frost@uni-bayreuth.de

V02 Physics of Axial Magma Chambers (Joint With GP, S, T, MRP)

In recent years, the geophysical community has made considerable progress understanding the structure, physical properties, and evolution of axial magma chambers (AMC) at oceanic spreading centers. This special session will involve volcanologists, tectonophysicists, and seismologists and will cover recent progress and upcoming challenges in multidisciplinary approaches to better understanding AMC structure and processes. Topics include (1) seismic, electromagnetic, and gravimetric observations; (2) structural and petrological features; and (3) geodynamic modeling; (4) laboratory characterization of rock properties from AMC regions.

Conveners: Nikolai Bagdassarov, Institut für Meteorologie und Geophysik, J. W. Goethe Universität Frankfurt, Feldbergstraße 47, D-60323 Frankfurt am Main, Germany, Tel: +49-69-798-23376, Fax: +49-69-798-23280, E-mail: nickbagd@geophysik.uni-frankfurt.de Benoît Ildefonse, Laboratoire de Tectonophysique, Institut de Sciences de la Terre, de l’Eau et de l’Espa?e de Montpellier, Université Montpellier II, 34095 Montpellier, cedex 05, France, Tel: +33-4-67-14 38-18/33, Fax: +33-4-67-14-36-03, E-mail: benoit@dstu.univ-montp2.fr William S. D. Wilcock, School of Oceanography, University of Washington, Box 357940, Seattle, WA 98195-7940 USA, Tel: +1-206-543-6043, Fax: +1-206-543-6073, E-mail: wilcock@ocean.washington.edu

V03 Aleutian Arc Volcanic and Related Processes (Joint With T)

This session will bring together scientists engaged in study of volcanic and volcano-tectonic processes, monitoring, and hazards associated with eruptions in the great volcanic arcs of the northwest Pacific region. The goal is to expand awareness about recent progress in understanding eruptive processes and the significance of these processes in terms of forecasting and monitoring eruptive activity and potential hazards. Eruptions from volcanoes in the Aleutian and Kamchatka-Kurile arcs pose major hazards to aviation and population centers, because large-magnitude eruptions are relatively frequent and the region includes major transcontinental flight paths used by hundreds of large aircraft per day. Because of the remote nature of the many eruptive centers in this region, techniques for study and monitoring are novel but not widely known by the greater volcanological community. Our hope is that the session will be a catalyst for discussion of common interests, research results, and important unresolved questions about magmatic systems, processes, and hazards in north Pacific arcs, one of the least known and poorly understood geological provinces on Earth.

Conveners: Christopher F. Waythomas, U.S. Geological Survey, Alaska Volcano Observatory, 4230 University Dr., Suite 201, Anchorage, AK 99508 USA, Tel: +1-907-786-7122, Fax: +1-907-786-7150, E-mail: chris@usgs.gov John C. Eichelberger, Geophysical Institute and Department of Geology and Geophysics, University of Alaska, 903 Koyukuk Dr., PO Box 757320, Fairbanks, AK 99775-7320 USA, E-mail: eich@dino.gi.alaska.edu

V04 The Timescales and Rates of Geological Processes (Joint With GP)

A symposium to honor Ian McDougall's outstanding scientific contributions on the occasion of his 65th birthday and retirement from the Australian National University. Among many other achievements, McDougall led one of the two groups that calibrated the magnetic polarity timescale, a pivotal contribution in the development of the plate tectonic paradigm. This involved both refinements to the K-Ar dating method, then in its infancy, and collateral measurement of rock magnetism on specimens from thoughtfully selected natural laboratories. The bay area has been an important intersection throughout McDougall's career, and the AGU Fall Meeting is the venue for many of the spectacular discoveries of magnetic polarity reversals.

Conveners: Mark Harrison, Department of Earth and Space Sciences and Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Sciences, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1567 USA, Tel: +1-310-825-7970, Fax: +1-310-825-4396; Peter Zeitler, Lehigh University, Bethlehem, PA 18015 USA, E-mail: peter.zeitler@lehigh.edu

V05 Observation and Modeling of Volcanic Eruptions and Their Atmospheric Effects(Joint With A)

This session aims to bring together noted volcanologists and atmospheric scientists. The topics will span plume behavior with focus on ash deposition, trace gas transport (which may be important, for example, for the tropospheric and stratospheric sulphur budget), interaction of different phases of water with ash and gas, impact of environmental conditions on the plume behavior, and stratospheric injection of trace gases (SO2, H2S, Cl, Br, H2O). Further, we should include the modeling of the fate of these trace gases in the stratosphere (and the troposphere) all the way to chemical (ozone), radiative, and climate effects. Contributions should cover these topics both from the point of observations and modeling, from eruption to atmospheric effects. This opportunity should be used to make clear the big omissions in our understanding of these processes and help overcome the one-sided use of volcanological and atmospheric findings.

Conveners: Hans-F. Graf, Max Planck Institute for Meteorology, Bundesstr. 55, D-20146 Hamburg Germany, Tel: +49-40-41173247, Fax: +49-40-441787, E-mail: graf@dkrz.de Bill Rose, Geological Engineering and Sciences, Michigan Technological University, 1400 Townsend Dr., Houghton, MI 49931 USA, E-mail: raman@mtu.edu Giovanni Macedonio, Osservatorio Vesuviano, Via Diocleziano, 328 Napoli, Italy I-80125, Tel: +39-081-6108-335, Fax: +39-081-6108-351, E-mail: macedon@osve.unina.it

V06 New Developments in Volcanic Systems of Southern Italy (Joint With G, S, T)

Studies of volcanic areas in southern Italy have been conducted for both academic and societal reasons. Most of these volcanos are sited in areas of moderate to high population density, so research can yield vital, predicative scenarios that could be very beneficial to the affected populations. About 20 years ago, there was a resurgence of research related to southern Italian volcanic areas. This research was conducted by universities especially in southern Italy, but also involved research institutions in the rest of the world. Recently, the research has become more detailed and sophisticated, and especially has involved the use of various isotopic systems. We propose this special session for the AGU Fall Meeting in San Francisco. The purpose of this session is to bring together for a wider audience the recent and very exciting developments related to the volcanic systems of southern Italy. Although southern Italy is a long way from San Francisco, the synergy that can be developed with such a meeting can be very worthwhile. Our tentative structure would consist of a morning session of oral talks, both invited and volunteered, followed by an afternoon poster session. We have been in contact with various researchers involved with southern Italian volcanos and have agreement and support for such a session. The following institutions are represented: Università di Napoli, Italy, Osservatorio Vesuviano, Italy, University of Lancaster, UK; Technische Universität Muenchen, Germany; and in the USA, the University of Maryland, Eastern Washington University, American Museum of Natural History, and U.S. Geological Survey.

Conveners: Harvey E. Belkin, U.S. Geological Survey, 956 National Center, Reston, VA 20192 USA, Tel: +1-703-648-6162, Fax: +1-703-648-6419, E-mail: hbelkin@usgs.gov or hbelkin@mindspring.com Renato Somma, Università degli Studi di Napoli “Federico II,” Napoli, Italy

V07 Earth's First Billion Years: New Discoveries in Old Rocks (Joint With P, T)

Recent progress in understanding the first billion years of Earth history has been driven by investigations of the geological record preserved from the earliest times. These records suggest that during the time of life's emergence, early Earth was dominated by very different hydrospheric and atmospheric conditions. There was higher heat flow through the crust than at present, but there is debate whether that is reflected in differing tectonic styles. New methods developed to investigate the first billion years of Earth history as well as new discoveries from the oldest rocks will be highlighted.

Conveners: Stephen J. Mojzsis, Department of Earth and Space Sciences, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1567 USA, E-mail: sjm@argon.ess.ucla.edu James L. Crowley, Department of Earth Sciences, Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John's, NF A1B 3X5 Canada, E-mail: jcrowley@sparky2.esd.mun.ca Peter W. U. Appel, Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland, Thoravej 8, DK 2400, NV Copenhagen K, Denmark; E-mail: pa@geus.dk

V08 Slab Melting 2000: Archean to Modern Comparisons, Significance for Arc Magmatism and Continental Growth (Joint With T, MRP)

Kepezhinskas/Defant - Since the concept of slab melting was formulated by Bob Kay in his 1978 paper on high-Mg andesites from adak, this process was unraveled as an important factor in subduction zone magma genesis and continental growth. Slab melts were termed adakites by Defant and Drummond (1990) to commemorate the adak island discovery. Multiple studies also revealed the importance of slab-derived tonalites-trondhjemites-dacites in Archean crustal growth. Slab melt research fluorished over last decades and significantly advanced our understanding of tectonic and petrologic conditions of slab melting in Precambrian and Phanerozoic and of a general significance of this process for arc magmatism. Major advancements of the last decade of adakite research can be summarized as follows. This range of slab melt-related topics will bring together a multidisciplinary crowd interested in all espects of slab-mantle interactions and their significance for subduction zone petrogenesis. We expect a great attendance based on our preliminary discussions with colleagues in US, Canada, France and Australia. France which has a very strong slab melt, reserach groups will alone contribute over 15 papers to this kind of session. In fact, this will be the first session dedicated to slab melting and arc genesis since the Penrose meeting on low-K arc rocks in 1990. We had a great decade researching slab melts and associated phenomena and it is time to bring everybody together to discuss exciting results.

Conveners: Pavel Kepezhinskas, Department of Geology, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL 33620 USA, Tel: +1-813-974-8754, Fax: +1-813-974-2654, E-mail: kepezhin@chuma.cas.usf.edu Marc J. Defant, Department of Geology, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL 33620 USA, Tel: +1-813-974-1593, Fax: +1-813-974-2654, E-mail: defant@chuma1.cas.usf.edu

V09 Subduction Zone Devolatilization (Joint With S, T)

Subduction zone devolatilization is vital to deep earthquakes, magma genesis, and volatile recycling. This special session will focus on the release of fluids from subducted lithologies and the effect of slab devolatilization on the mantle wedge. Major volatile components (H2O and CO2), minor and trace element geochemistry, and isotopes are an integral part of this theme session. The convener encourages contributions from a variety of disciplines (geochemistry, petrology, tectonics, and seismicity).

Convener: Derrill M. Kerrick, Pennsylvania State University, 243 Deike Bldg., University Park, PA 16802 USA, Tel: +1-814-865-7574, Fax: +1-814-865-3191, Web site: http://www.geosc.psu.edu/~kerrick/

V10 Rhenium and Osmium Isotope and Elemental Constraints on Mantle and Magmatic Processes (Joint With G, S, P, MRP)

The chalcophile and siderophile elements rhenium and osmium (Re-Os) potentially provide key information on the differentiation of the terrestrial planets, both on the conditions under which core formation took place in the early solar system and on mantle melting and magmatic differentiation in the early Earth and to the present day. This session will focus on applications of the Re-Os system to recent results in these fields, such as, studies of meteorites and other planetary material; records of the early Earth recorded in ancient continental rocks; constraints on the sources of oceanic basalts; experimental constraints on Re and Os partitioning in mantle and magmatic systems; and studies of the distribution and behavior of these elements between natural minerals (silicates, sulphides, and melts). The essential aim is a multidisciplinary discussion that brings together experimental, geochemical, and petrological aspects of the above or related topics.

Conveners: Kevin W. Burton, Department of Earth Sciences, The Open University, Walton Hall, Milton Keynes, MK7 6AA, UK, Tel: +44-1908-652889, Fax: +44-1908-655151, E-mail: k.w.burton@open.ac.uk Pierre Schiano, Laboratoire Magmas et Volcans, Observatoire de Physique du Globe de Clermont-Ferrand-Centre National de la Reserche Scientifique, UMR 6524, Université Blaise-Pascal, 5 Rue Kessler, 63038 Clermont-Ferrand, France, Tel: +33-4-73-34-67-57, Fax: +33-4 73-34 67-44, E-mail: schiano@opgc.univ-bpclermont.fr

V11 Long Valley Caldera: A Natural Laboratory to Study Long-Term Unrest in Complex Volcanic Systems (Joint With G, S, T)

For the past 20 years Long Valley caldera has been the site of persistent unrest and a broad spectrum of studies devoted to understanding the processes driving the unrest in this and other large, Quaternary silicic calderas. The aim of this session is to provide a forum for presenting and discussing both recent results and new perspectives on the earlier unrest. We also encourage contributions focused generally on problems of the geophysical and geochemical processes behind caldera unrest.

Conveners: Maurizio Battaglia, Department of Geophysics, Stanford University, Stanford CA 94305-2215 USA, Tel: +1-650-723-5485, Fax: +1-650-725-7344; E-mail: battag@pangea.stanford.edu.David P. Hill, U. S. Geological Survey, 345 Middlefield Rd., MS 910, Menlo Park, CA 94025 USA, E-mail: hill@usgs.gov

V12 Dynamics of Lower Crustal Processes (Joint With S, T, MRP)

This special session is designed to attract different disciplines together to discuss recent research on a variety of lower crustal processes. These include basaltic underplating, partial melting of the lower crust, MASH (mixing, assimilation, storage, and homogenization) processes, delamination of eclogitic lower crust, etc. Questions to address include Is the lower crust fundamentally more mafic than the upper crust? Is this true at continental arcs? Where is this not the case? What processes control or strongly influence the creation of continental crust at subduction zones? How important are magmatic processes that occur in the lower versus upper crust? We hope to address these issues by attracting papers on lower crustal xenoliths, the seismic structure of continental crust, as well as isotopic, geochemical, and petrologic studies of arc volcanoes and batholiths.

Conveners: John Chesley, E-mail: jchesley@geo.arizona.edu Rebecca Lange, E-mail: becky@umich.edu

V13 Volcanism in French Polynesia and Lithospheric Control of Intraplate Volcanism Joint With T)

A number of recent research programs and multidisciplinary cruises have been conducted in French Polynesia. This region, which corresponds roughly to the South Pacific Superswell, is of particular interest because of the extraordinary abundance and diversity of short-lived hot spot tracks. In many, if not all, of the volcanic chains of French Polynesia, the lithosphere seems to play a significant role in determining the location, magnitude, and chemistry of volcanism, from the scale of island chains down to the scale of individual seamounts. Preexisting tectonic weaknesses, fracture in response to local and regional tectonic stresses, and thermomechanical anomalies have been invoked by various researchers to explain aspects of French Polynesian volcanism. This session will present recent geophysical and geochemical results from the islands and seamounts in and near French Polynesia, with a special focus on the role of the lithosphere on the distribution, and composition of magmas and morphology of volcanic features. We invite contributions on all aspects of volcanism in French Polynesia, as well as results from other geographic regions relevant to this theme.

Conveners: Alain Bonneville, Université de la Polynésie Française, BP 6570, Faaa Aéroport, Tahiti, French Polynesia, Tel: +689-80-38-05 (GMT-10), Fax: +689-80-38-42, 98702, Web site: http://www.ipgp.jussieu.fr/UFP Kelsey Jordahl, Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute, 7700 Sandholdt Rd., Moss Landing, CA 95039 USA, Tel: +1-831-775-1842, Fax: +1-831-775-1620 E-mail: kels@mbari.org

V14 Preliminary Results of the Hawaii Scientific Drilling Project (HSDP) 3 km Corehole at Hilo

The HSDP is a multi-investigator international project sponsored by the National Science Foundation and the International Continental Drilling Program. The project involves drilling and coring a 4.5-km-deep hole through the flank of the Mauna Kea volcano to obtain a stratigraphically ordered sequence of lavas that represents the volcano output as it drifts over the Hawaiian mantle plume. Coring to a depth of 3 km was completed in 1999. Papers in this session will report preliminary results of the volcanological, petrological, mineralogical, geochemical, and paleomagnetic studies of the core samples, and describe drilling conditions, downhole measurements, and aspects of the hydrology of the drill site. The results are directed at testing and refining models for the structure and dynamics of mantle plumes, and the evolution of large oceanic volcanoes.

Conveners: Donald J. DePaolo, Department of Earth and Planetary Science, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 USA, Tel: +1-510-643-5064, Fax: +1-510-642-9520, E-mail: depaolo@socrates.berkeley.edu Edward M. Stolper, Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences, Caltech, 170-25, Pasadena, CA 91125 USA, Tel: +1-626-395-6504, Fax: +1-818-568-0935, E-mail: ems@expet.gps.caltech.edu Donald M. Thomas, School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI 96822 USA, Tel: +1-808-956-6482, Fax: +1-808-956-2538, E-mail: dthomas@soest.hawaii.edu

V15 Volcanology 2010: How Will the Science and Practice of Volcanology Change in the Coming Decade?

In the two decades since Mount St. Helens exploded, volcanology has had spectacular successes, as at Mount Pinatubo, and tragic failures, as at Nevado del Ruiz. The goal of this session is to provide educated forecasts about how the theory and practice of volcanology will change in the coming decade through the use of new technology, improved theoretical models, and greater multinational and interdisciplinary collaborations. Speakers from federal agencies, universities, and industry will imaginatively extrapolate from emerging trends in instrumentation, information sciences, and telecommunications to describe how the more highly wired society of 2010 will better respond to volcanic dangers.

Conveners: Jonathan Fink, Office of the Vice Provost for Research, Arizona State University, Box 872703, Tempe, AZ 85287-2703 USA, Tel: +1-480-965-3195, Fax: +1-480-965-8293, E-mail: jon.fink@asu.edu Paul Segall, Department of Geophysics, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305-2215 USA, Tel: +1-650-725-7241, Fax: +1-650-725-7344, E-mail: segall@pangea.stanford.edu

B17 The Science of Carbon Sequestration (Joint With OS, V)

Several complementary strategies have been proposed to limit the accumulation of anthropogenic carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. It has been proposed that carbon dioxide generated during fossil fuel burning (or as a result of land use changes) could be stored in the terrestrial biosphere, the oceans, or deep geologic reservoirs, effectively sequestering this carbon dioxide away from the atmosphere. The U. S. Department of Energy has set up centers to study these issues in collaboration with the broader community; CSITE for studying terrestrial biosphere options; DOCS for studying ocean sequestration options; and GEO-SEQ for studying geologic sequestration options. Presentations are requested focusing on scientific results that are critical to understanding, evaluating, and addressing issues relevant to proposed carbon sequestration strategies, including research gaps, effectiveness, unintended impacts, and feasibility and cost.

Conveners: Jeff Amthor, CSITE, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, MS 6422, PO Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6422 USA, Tel: +1-865-576-2779, Fax: +1-865-576-9939, E-mail: amthorjs@ornl.gov Sallie Benson, GEO-SEQ, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, MS 90-1116, Berkeley, CA 94720 USA, E-mail: smbenson@lbl.gov Jim Bishop, DOCS, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, MS 90-1116, Berkeley, CA 94720 USA, Tel: +1-510-495-2457, Fax: +1-510-486-5686, E-mail: jkbishop@lbl.gov Ken Caldeira, DOCS, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 7000 East Ave., L-103, Livermore, CA 94550 USA, Tel: +1-925-423-4191, Fax: +1-925-422-6388, E-mail: kenc@llnl.gov

G04 Advances in Modeling Volcanic Deformation (Joint With S, T, V)

Over the last decade the proliferation of continuous GPS receivers and the widespread use of INSAR have led to an abundance of very high quality deformation data sets from volcanoes around the world. Rich both spatially and temporally, these data sets provide an excellent opportunity to understand the dynamics of volcanic deformation while simultaneously improving our ability to forecast and address volcanic hazards. The quality and extent of the data now available demand complex models that until recently would have been unjustified because of weak data strength. The aim of this session is to apply volcanic modeling techniques that incorporate more realistic earth and source models and to use those techniques to make detailed inferences about the structure and behavior of volcanic deformation sources. Examples of possible topics include (1) the effect of topography and elastic heterogeneity, (2) deformation sources that go beyond the Mogi or uniform dislocation, (3) efficient inversion methods that can manage the computational burden of complex source and earth models, and (4) the incorporation of other data types such as seismograms and gravity measurements into the modeling process.

Conveners: Paul M. Davis, Department of Earth and Space Sciences, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1567 USA, Tel: +1-310-825-1343, Fax: +1-310-825-2779, E-mail: pdavis@dino.ess.ucla.edu Peter Cervelli, Department of Geophysics, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305-2215 USA, Tel: +1-650-725-5472, Fax: +1-650-725-7344, E-mail: cervelli@pangea.stanford.edu

G06 Real-Time GPS (Joint With S, T, V)

This session will explore real-time and near-real-time GPS methods, applications, interpretation, and theoretical considerations. Questions of interest include what kinds of GPS hardware and software are currently available for these kinds of applications? How accurate are estimates of deformation? What kind of triggering algorithms are being used to infer "real" signals? Applications spanning the real-time to near real-time spectrum from navigation, structure monitoring, landslide mitigation, volcano monitoring, and tectonic deformation are appropriate. We also seek presentations concerning societal needs and how real-time GPS techniques can meet those needs.

Conveners: Ken Hurst, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, 4800 Oak Grove Dr., Mail Stop 238-600, Pasadena, CA 91109-8099 USA, Tel: +1-818-354-6637, Fax: +1-818-393-4965, E-mail: hurst@cobra.jpl.nasa.gov Elliot Endo, U.S. Geological Survey, 5400 MacArthur Blvd., Vancouver, WA 98661 USA, Tel: +1-360- 993-8911, Fax: +1-360-993-8980, E-mail: etendo@usgs.gov

GP05 Magnetic Anisotropy: New Developments and Applications (Joint With T, V)

Anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) increasingly provides valuable insight into rock fabric with wide applications in igneous petrology (both volcanic and intrusive), sedimentology, tectonics, and other fields. Anisotropy of magnetic remanence (AMR), with its potentially broader applications beyond the reach of AMS is attracting ever greater interest. This session focuses on all aspects of magnetic anisotropy, with emphasis on new techniques and applications.

Conveners: William D. MacDonald, State University of New York at Binghamton, Binghamton, NY 13902 USA, Tel: +1-607-777-2863, E-mail: wdmacdon@binghamton.edu Bernard Housen, Department of Geology, Western Washington University, Bellingham, WA 98225 USA, Tel: +1-360-650-6573 E-mail: bernieh@cc.wwu.edu

H06 Noble Gases in Groundwater and Associated Fluids: Origin and Transport Processes Joint With V)

Noble gases in groundwater provide quantitative information about basin-scale hydrogeologic systems, a paleoclimate resource, and are transferred into nonaqueous phases to preserve a record of multiphase fluid interaction. Inconsistencies exist in our interpretation of these closely related noble gas records. For example, estimates of groundwater residence times estimated using the noble gases are often higher than other tracer systems, whereas fractionation processes affecting noble gases are not fully understood. We encourage papers that address noble gas source and transport, mathematical (analytical and numerical) modeling advances, and the integration of noble gas information with other crustal fluid tracer systems.

Conveners: Maria Clara Castro, Department of Geological Sciences, University of Michigan, 2534 C. C. Little Bldg., 425 E. University Ave., Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1063 USA, Tel: +1-734-615-3812, Fax: +1- 734-763-4690, E-mail: mccastro@umich.edu Christopher Ballentine, ETH, Zurich, Switzerland

OS23 The Development and Future of Nanoscale Geoscience (Joint With B, V)

Research to be funded by the Geosciences Directorate as part of the NSE program will be interdisciplinary and will focus on probing nanostructures and processes of relevance in the environment, including such issues as understanding the distribution, composition, origin, and behavior of nanoscale structures under a wide variety of naturally occurring physical, chemical and biological conditions; developing new field and laboratory instrumentation for characterizing the chemical composition and physical/chemical properties of molecular clusters, surface and interface nanostructures, and ultrafine and fine aerosol particles; investigating biogeochemical and physicochemical processes at marine interfaces; understanding the distribution and behavior of nanoscale biogeochemical structures throughout the oceans; and the development and application of earth systems nanosensor technology.

Conveners: David D. Lambert, Division of Earth Sciences, National Science Foundation, Arlington, VA 22230 USA, Tel: +1- 703-306-1554, Fax: +1-703-306-0382, Peter McMurry, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Univeristy of Minnesota, 111 Church Street, SE, Tel: +1-612-624-2817, Fax: +1-612-626-1854, E-mail: mcmurry@me.umn.edu

P04 Impact Craters From Geophysical Exploration to Deep Drilling (Joint With T, V, MRP)

This session brings together the whole range of disciplines focusing on understanding the formation of large craters on Earth, such as detection/study of impact structures using geophysical methods, the petrology/geochemistry of impactites, the production and distribution of ejecta material, shock metamorphism, and computer modeling of impact cratering events. Contributions from researchers interested in drilling crater-fill sediments as indicators of climate changes are also welcome. This session is well timed, as the International Continental Scientific Drilling Program’s deep drilling of the Chicxulub crater is planned for the end of 2000 and subsequent offshore drilling is being considered by Ocean Drilling Program.

Conveners: Philippe Claeys, Institute of Mineralogy, Museum of Natural History, D-10099, Berlin, Germany, Tel: +49-30-2093-8857, Fax: +49-30-2093-5865, E-mail: philippe.claeys@rz.hu-berlin.de Joanna Morgan, T. H. Huxley School, Imperial College, Prince Consort Rd., London, SW7 2BP, United Kingdom, Tel: +44-171-594-64-23, Fax: +44-171-594-65-29, E-mail: j.v.morgan@ic.ac.uk

S07 Melts and Volatiles in the Deep Mantle (Joint With T, V, MRP, SEDI)

Once believed to be confined to the low-velocity zone and at shallow depths in tectonically active regions, recent seismological results indicate a much greater distribution of partial melts in the mantle with evidence of melts ranging from transition zone depths through the lower mantle to the core-mantle boundary. Concomitant with this is a deepening understanding of the abundance and cycling of volatile components in the Earth's mantle. This session will focus on seismological, laboratory, and theoretical characterization and quantification of partial melts and volatiles in the mantle, their role in mantle dynamics, and their temporal evolution in abundance and mode. We encourage submissions from seismology, mineral physics, geodynamics, geochemistry, and volcanology.

Conveners: Justin Revenaugh, Earth Sciences, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95060 USA Tel: +1-831-459-3055, Fax: +1-831-459-3074, E-mail: jsr@monk.ucsc.edu Lars P. Stixrude, Department of Geology, University of Michigan, 2534 C. C. Little Bldg., 425 E. University Ave., Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1063 USA, Tel: +1-313-647-9071, Fax: +1-313-763-4690, E-mail: stixrude@umich.edu

T01 Plate Boundary Deformation: From Kinematics to Dynamics (Joint With G, S, V)

Diffusive deformation in the Himalayan-Tibetan plateau, western North America, the Andes, and other continental plate boundaries deviate significantly from predictions of classical plate tectonics theory and are often associated with strong earthquakes and volcanic eruptions. In addition to seismological and geological observations, recent developments in space geodetic measurements, including the Global Positioning System and satellite Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar, have provided rich kinematic information about plate boundary deformation. Much better constraints on the kinematics can be expected from the proposed Plate Boundary Observatory. The fast accumulating kinematic observations provide unprecedented opportunities for understanding the dynamics of plate boundary deformation. This session aims to facilitate interactions between workers focused on measuring crustal deformation at plate boundaries and modelers focused on investigating the dynamics. Papers using all kinds of kinematic data to illustrate the dynamics of plate boundary deformation are welcome, and studies that integrate geodetic, seismological, and geological data to investigate the large-scale dynamic systems of continental plate boundaries are particularly encouraged.

Conveners: Mian Liu, Department of Geological Science, University of Missouri, 101Geology Bldg., Columbia, MO 65211 USA, Tel: +1-573-882-3784, Fax: +1-573-882-5458, E-mail: lium@missouru.edu William E. Holt, Department of Geosciences, State University of New York, Stony Brook, NY 11794-2100 USA, Tel: +1-631-632-8215, Fax: +1-631-632-8240; E-mail: wholt@horizon.ess.sunysb.edu

T02 Observational Constraints on the Dynamics of Subducting Slabs (Joint With G, S, V, SEDI)

The detailed dynamic evolution of subducting slabs is poorly understood. From a physical point of view, we know that the slab is one component of a complex interacting system of mantle convection and the lithospheric plates. The nature of the coupling between plates and mantle is still strongly debated. It is probable, however, that small scale plate boundary processes play a controlling role in the behavior of the large-scale system, and will certainly need to be included in large-scale models in parameterized form. For this reason, modeling cannot proceed from a purely theoretical viewpoint. Strong observational constraints are required to train the parameterized models. In this session we wish to consider the broadest range of observations that will bear upon the understanding of subducting lithosphere, including those from plate kinematics, seismic tomography, earthquake mechanisms, the subsidence record from oceanic and continental basins, geochemistry, the geological record in island arcs, and active continental margins. We would like to build up a slab taxonomy by considering how subduction zones behave in the wild. Do slabs really look like the pictures we see in textbooks? How often do slabs roll back? What makes slabs tear or break, and how do they behave when this happens? How do slabs evolve in the presence/absence of a nearby continental margin? How can slabs change polarity, and how frequently do they do so? When do slabs flatten under continents, and why? We are particularly keen to foster the involvement of scientists having detailed knowledge of observational constraints with more theoretical modelers. What is the state of the art in modeling of convergent plate boundaries? In what ways are these models still limited? What time-dependent behaviors of subducted slabs are by models, and can observations be used to verify the solutions? What do the models tell us about plate driving forces?

Conveners: L. Moresi, CSIRO Exploration and Mining, PO Box 437, Nedlands, WA 6009, Australia, Tel: +61-8-9389-8421, Fax: +61-8-9389-1906, E-mail: l.moresi@ned.dem.csiro.au R. Dietmar Müller, School of Geosciences, Division of Geology and Geophysics, Bldg. F05, University of Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia, Tel: +61-2-9351-2003, Fax: +61-2-9351-0184, E-mail: dietmar@es.usyd.edu.au

T03 Raising Plateaus (Joint With G, GP, S, V)

Two of the world's highest plateaus, Tibet and the Altiplano, have formed in markedly distinct tectonic settings. Does this require different mechanisms to form them? Models (analytical, numerical, physical) of Tibet and the Altiplano, as well as the wider region surrounding them, remain highly variable because of meager databases. We are interested in geological, geophysical, and geochemical results from current research on all levels (small to large, single to multidiscipline) concerning continent-continent and ocean-continent interactions that could help to improve this position. Earth scientists working in both orogens are few, yet new data are emerging, and therefore the time seems ripe to exchange experience and ideas that are related to uplift, and sustaining uplift, of large expanses of continental crust. How well are models being tested/eliminated? Are there new or revised models arising thereupon? By bringing together a number of disciplines, we look forward to real learning and cross-fertilization leading to wider ideas.

Conveners: Mike Edwards, Asian Tectonics Research Unit, Institut für Geologie, Technische Universitäet Bergakadamie Freiberg, Berhard-von-Cotta Str. 2, D-09596 Freiberg, Germany, Tel: +49- 3731-39-4598 or +49-177-783-2827, Fax: +49-3731-39-3597, E-mail: edwards@geologie.uni-wuerzburg.de S. Gilder, Laboratoire de Paleomagnetisme, Institut de Physique du Globe de Paris, 4 place Jussieu, 75252 Paris Cedex 05, France, Tel: +33-1-44-27-24-32 or +33-1-44-27-24-31, Fax: +33-1-44-27-74-63; Bryan L. Isacks, Department of Geological Sciences, Cornell University, Snee Hall, Ithaca, NY 14853 USA, Tel: +1-607-255-2307, Fax: +1-607-254-4780, E-mail: bli1@cornell.edu Paul Tapponnier, Laboratoire de Tectonophysique, Institut de Physique du Globe de Paris, 4 place Jussieu, 75252 Paris Cedex 05, France, Tel: +33-1-44-27-49-24, Fax: +33-1-44-27-24-40, E-mail: tappon@ipgp.jussieu.fr

T04 Quantifying Orogenic Exhumation (Joint With V)

Orogenic development is fundamentally driven by the exhumation of rock. This session focuses on assessing rates and processes of orogenic exhumation. We welcome papers that address methods of assessing long- and short-term rates of exhumation in either the rocks in the orogenic system itself or by evaluating the sedimentary record of orogenisis. Of interest are studies that integrate different methodologies so that rates can be evaluated at different time-scales. Papers in this session will also address mechanisms of exhumation, including normal faulting, erosion, and ductile thinning, and how these processes may affect rates. Therefore, this session will have two components: one that addresses rates of exhumation and methods that quantify these rates; the other that addresses mechanisms, processes, and controls on exhuming rocks in orogenic belts. We hope that this interdisciplinary session brings together a number of approaches that give us a better understanding orogenic development.

Conveners: John I. Garver, Department of Geology, Union College, Schenectady, NY 12308-2311 USA, Tel: +1-518-388-6517 or 388-6770, Fax: +1-518-388-6417, E-mail: garverj@union.edu Mark T. Brandon, Department of Geology and Geophysics, Yale University, PO Box 208109, 210 Whitney Ave., New Haven, CT 06520-8109 USA, Tel: +1-203-432-3135, Fax: +1-203-432-3134, E-mail: mark.brandon@yale.edu

T05 Cenozoic Tectonics and Magmatism of the Southeastern Eurasian Margin (Joint With G, S, V)

Southeastern Eurasia (defined here as India, Tibet, China blocks, Indochina and Greater Sundaland, Indonesia, and the Philippines) has been the site of Mesozoic-Cenozoic continent and terrane accretion, suturing, and (potentially) extrusion and disaggregation of continental assemblages. The remnants of these terranes are in the final act of Tethyan closure currently, and the mechanisms by which accretion and extrusion are accomplished are controversial. Complex and often cryptic tectonic boundaries hamper clear understanding of even current tectonics, to say nothing of earlier stages of southeast Eurasia development. Anomalous volcanism throughout the Cenozoic in this region is difficult to place in a well-understood tectonic framework here. We solicit presentations detailing relevant studies of the tectonics and magmatism of southeastern Eurasia, including structural geology, seismology, tectonophysics, paleomagnetism, petrology, and geochemistry.

Conveners: Martin F. J. Flower, Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Illinois at Chicago, 845 W. Taylor St., MC 186, Chicago, Illinois 60607-7059 USA, Tel: +1-312 996-9662, Fax: +1-312 413-2279, E-mail: flower@uic.edu Victor Mocanu, Faculty of Geology and Geophysics, University of Bucharest, 6 Traian Vuia st., Sect. 1, 70139 Bucharest, Romania, Tel: +40-1-2117390, Fax: +40-1-2113120, E-mail: mocanu@gg.unibuc.ro

T08 The Structure and Evolution of the Lithosphere in the Rocky Mountain Region Joint With G, GP, S, V)

The Rocky Mountain region is part of a broad orogenic plateau that extends along the western margin of the North American plate. This region has experienced a complex tectonic evolution from its formation during the Proterozoic to the present, and understanding this evolution is a key issue in continental tectonics. This evolution began with the formation of a 1500-km-wide Proterozoic orogenic belt that records an episode of rapid accretion of continental materials from mantle sources and their assembly to form southern Laurentia between 1.8 and 1.6 Ga. The Ancestral Rocky Mountains and Laramide orogenies greatly altered the lithosphere of this region. Today the high elevations of the southern Rocky Mountain Rio Grande rift region in particular are the manifestation of Phanerozoic and still ongoing modification and disassembly of Proterozoic lithosphere. A better understanding of this region will require integration of a variety geophysical and geological measurements, and diverse contributions to this session are sought.

Conveners: G. Randy Keller, Department of Geological Sciences, University of Texas, El Paso, TX 79968-0555 USA, Tel: +1-915-747-5850, Fax: +1-915-747-5073, E-mail: keller@geo.utep.edu Karl E. Karlstrom, Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131 USA, Tel: +1-505-277-4346, Fax: +1-505-277-8843, E-mail: kek1@unm.edu

T11 Integrative Approaches to Caribbean Neotectonics and Seismic Hazard (Joint With G, S, V)

The tectonic complexity, small land areas, political subdivisions, and dense populations of the strike-slip and subduction margins of the Caribbean plate pose special challenges to the earth science community in understanding the neotectonic setting and evaluating seismic hazards in this region. The purpose of this session is to bring together an international group of researchers who are currently integrating a wide variety of methods to better understand the neotectonics and seismic hazards of this region. These methods include paleoseismology of onshore faults, GPS-based geodesy and modeling of geodetic results, paleoseismic studies of liquefaction features, geophysical surveys of offshore faults, earthquake seismology and historical research, strong ground motion studies, geologic and geomorphic studies of major faults, studies of tsunami deposits, and tsunami modeling. The session welcomes original contributions to Caribbean neotectonics using these and other methods.

Conveners: Carol Prentice, U.S. Geological Survey, 345 Middlefield Rd., MS 977, Menlo Park, CA 94025 USA, Tel: +1-650-329-5690, Fax: +1-650-329-5163, E-mail: cprentice@usgs.gov Paul Mann, Institute for Geophysics, University of Texas at Austin, 4412 Spicewood Springs Rd., Bldg. 600, Austin, TX 78759-8500 USA, Tel: +1-512-471-0452, Fax: +1-512-471-8844, E-mail: paulm@utig.ig.utexas.edu

T12 Pacific and Indian Ocean Trenches and Indian Ocean Ridges: A Session Honoring Robert L. Fisher (Joint With OS, V)

This is a session devoted to honoring Bob Fisher in his 75th year. Fisher has contributed over the past 50 years (1) to determining the depth and structure of the Pacific and Indian Ocean trenches, (2) to a better understanding of the petrologic structure of Indian Ocean Ridge system, and (3) to providing the bathymetric framework for the plate tectonic interpretation of the Indian Ocean. He is still active scientifically, and his publications span six decades.

Conveners: John G. Sclater, Geosciences Research Division, Scripps Insititution of Oceanography, University of California, San Diego, MC 0215, La Jolla, CA 92093-0215 USA, Tel: +1-858-534-3051, Fax: +1-858-534-0784, E-mail: jsclater@ucsd.edu Roland Schlich, Ecole et Observatoire des Sciences de la Terre, Université de Strasbourg 1, 5 rue Rene Descartes, 67084 Strasbourg Cedex, France, Tel: +33-3-88-416393, Fax: +33-3-88-603887, E-mail: Roland.Schlich@eost.u-strasbg.fr Sherman H. Bloomer, College of Science, Oregon State University, 128 Kidder Hall, Corvallis, OR 97331 USA, Tel: +1-541-737-3877, Fax: +1-541-737-1007, E-mail: sherman.bloomer@orst.edu

T18 Dynamic Rupture of Rocks and Other Brittle Materials (Joint With S, V, MRP)

Rock failure in the crust is frequently unstable, producing earthquakes, tremors, and rockbursts. Unstable rupture is also generated by impacts and other rapid loadings. This session focuses on descriptions and analyses of nucleation, propagation, and arrest of dynamic rupture in rocks and other brittle materials under tensile and shear conditions. Advances in these subjects could provide tools for deducing growth velocity and other properties of dynamic failure from observed in situ features of faults, dikes, and joints. Presentations of field, experimental, and modeling results are welcomed.

Conveners: Yehuda Ben-Zion, Department of Earth Sciences, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90089-0740 USA, Tel: +1-213-740-6734, Fax: +1-213-740-8801, E-mail: benzion@terra.usc.edu Ze'ev Reches, Institute of Earth Sciences, Hebrew University, Jerusalem 91904, Israel, Tel: +972-2-658-4669, Fax: +972-2-566-2581, E-mail: reches@earth.es.huji.ac.il

T19 Honoring the Geothermal Work of John H. Sass: From Drilling, Logging, and Laboratory Measurement to Heat Flow and Geodynamics (Joint With H, V, MRP)

John Sass has determined terrestrial heat flow extensively in the conterminous western United States, in Alaska, Canada, Central America, Australia, Liberia, Jordan, Germany, Greenland, and Wales. His interpretations address geodynamic aspects such as stress (e.g., in the San Andreas Fault), extension (e.g., in the Basin and Range province), volcanism (e.g., in Long Valley Caldera), sedimentation (e.g., in the Salton Trough), and metamorphism (e.g., in the Basin and Range province). He is involved in the application of geothermal studies in geothermal energy systems (e.g., in the Geysers), and using temperature as a tracer for fluid flow in waste management applications (e.g., in Yucca Mountain). Sass is an expert in drilling and temperature logging techniques, and has had a major impact on improving laboratory measurements of thermophysical rock properties. We invite contributions that are related to these topics underlining the dualism of making geothermal field measurements and interpreting the results at local, regional and global scales.

Conveners: Daniel Pribnow, Institute for Joint Geoscientific Research, Stilleweg 2, 30655 Hannover, Germany, Tel: +49-511-643-3513, Fax: +49-511-643-3665, E-mail: dan.pribnow@gga-hannover.de David S. Chapman, Department of Geology and Geophysics, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112-9016 USA, Tel: +1-801-581-7642, Fax: +1-801-585-6749, E-mail: dchapman@mines.utah.edu

NG05 Fractals, Chaos, and Self-Organized Criticality in Natural and Human-Induced Hazards (Joint With A, H, OS, S, T, V)

Natural and human-induced hazards cover a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. They include a large variety and number of interacting components that combine to produce nonlinear power-law behaviors that are often associated with the basic concepts of complexity. Examples of these hazards include floods, landslides, volcanic eruptions, earthquakes, forest fires, cyclonic storms, droughts, global warming, and hazardous waste contamination. Papers that apply the concepts of fractals, chaos, or self-organized criticality to characterize, model, and assess the risk of natural and man-made hazards are solicited. Posters are also very much encouraged.

Conveners: Bruce D. Malamud, Department of Geography, Kings College London, Strand, London WC2R 2LS, UK, E-mail: bruce@malamud.com Didier Sornette, Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics and Department of Earth and Space Science, University of California, 3845 Slichter Hall, Box 951567, 595 E. Circle Dr., Los Angeles, CA 90095 USA, Tel: +1-310-825-2863, Fax: +1-310-206-3051, E-mail: sornette@moho.ess.ucla.edu Christopher Barton, U. S. Geological Survey, 600 4th St. South, St. Petersburg, FL 33701 USA, Tel: +1-727-803-8747 ext. 3014, Fax: +1-727-803-2030, E-mail: barton@usgs.gov

NG06 Quantifying Predictability in Geophysical Systems II (Joint With A, G, H, OS, SH, T, V)

Our ability to quantify the predictability of nonlinear geophysical systems provides a fundamental bridge between models of geophysical systems and the systems themselves. Uncertainty in the initial condition and errors in model formulation have led to probability forecasts (ensembles) even in deterministic systems. This session will focus on atmospheric and ocean dynamics over hours to centuries (e.g., adaptive observation strategies, Lagrangian and Eulerian approaches, intense short-duration events); theoretical aspects of the dynamics of nonlinear systems relevant to predictability and verification (including multiple models, contrasting modeling strategies, data assimilation); and practical issues in the interpretation and likely economic impact of probabilistic forecasts on a timescale minutes to hours (e.g., precipitation/wind), days to months (e.g., hurricanes), and years to millennia (e.g., earthquakes). A mix of oral and poster presentations of both pure and extremely applied contributions are welcome, and may focus on the predictability of geophysical systems other than those noted explicitly above.

Conveners: Leonard Smith, Oxford University, 24-29 St Giles', Oxford, OX1 3LB, UK, Tel: +44-1865-270-517, Fax: +44-1865-270-515, E-mail: lenny@maths.ox.ac.uk James Hansen, Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Ave., Room 54-1721, Cambridge, MA 02139 USA, Tel: +1-617-253-5935, E-mail: jhansen@mit.edu

Committee on Education and Human Resources (CEHR)

ED01 New Careers for Geoscientists

For more than a century geoscience careers have existed in nonacademic environments such as geological engineering, extractive industries, and the geological surveys. A new generation of geoscientists are now actively pursuing these and other careers that go beyond the traditional academic faculty positions. These scientists use scientific information in concert with engineering, economic, political, and social considerations for careers ranging from finance, media, and high technology to diplomacy, international development, national security, and education. In an increasingly technological world, a background in geoscience with broad interests and skills is a highly marketable combination for a wide range of exciting and lucrative career options. This session will showcase geoscientists who have successfully leveraged their science background to pursue such new career directions in a series of invited and contributed papers. A reception following the session will allow for informal discussions with speakers.

Conveners: Jennifer Giesler, American Geophysical Union, 2000 Florida Ave. NW, Washington, DC 20009 USA, Tel: +1-202-777-7512, Fax: +1-202-328-0566, E-mail: jgiesler@agu.org Catherine Johnson, Incorporated Research Institutions for Seismology, Tel: +1-202-682-2220, Fax: +1-202-682-2444 E-mail: catherine@iris.edu Peter Folger, American Geophysical Union, 2000 Florida Ave. NW, Washington, DC 20009 USA, Tel: +1-202-777-7509, Fax: +1-202-328-0566, E-mail: pfolger@agu.org

ED02 Building Bridges Between Research and Education to Enhance Learning About the Earth

This theme session will cover numerous ways in which geosciences research results can enhance geoscience education. We invite presentations addressing (1) successful programs that allow students to engage discovery- and inquiry-based learning through true research or researchlike activities; (2) effective translation of new scientific discoveries into formal and informal educational settings; (3) research on education (what do we really know about the ways in which students learn about the Earth, and how does this impact both research and educational activities?); and (4) education and research (is current educational practice doing the job to prepare future researchers, as well as an informed citizenry that can understand and appreciate the scientific enterprise?). The role of the Digital Library for Earth System Education will be explored as a facilitator of, and contributor to, building bridges between the research and education communities. Anticipated invited speakers: Alan Gaines, NSF Digital Earth; David Simpson, Incorporated Research Institutions Seismology; David Fulker, Unidata; and Ralph Coppola, Project Globe.

Conveners: David Mogk, Department of Earth Sciences, Montana State University, Bozeman, MT 59717 USA, Tel: +1-406-994-6916, E-mail: mogk@montana.edu Cathy Manduca, Keck Geology Consortium, Carleton College, Northfield, MN 55057 USA, Tel: +1-507-646-4425, E-mail: cmanduca@carleton.edu Frank Ireton, American Geophysical Union, 2000 Florida Ave. NW, Washington, DC 20009 USA E-mail: fireton@agu.org Ed Geary, Center for Science, Mathematics, and Technology Education, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523-1802 USA

ED03 Preparing Graduate Students to Teach

We welcome contributions on any aspect of preparing graduate students as teaching assistants and/or future faculty and particularly encourage those that discuss the role of departments in this task. Possible topics: descriptions of what individual faculty do to prepare graduate students for teaching; description and assessment of department programs (e.g., orientations, workshops, courses); challenges inherent to departmental involvement; collaborations with university centers; examples of student leadership in departmental programs; and the use of teaching portfolios. It is important that graduate students be well prepared for their immediate teaching responsibilities as teaching assistants, as well as for their roles as future faculty members, particularly in light of calls for reform of undergraduate education. However, the preparation of geoscience graduate students for teaching has not been systematically addressed. We have offered two workshops (1999 GSA and AGU) on this topic that drew more than 60 participants from more than 20 universities. These workshops were well received, and participants left with a plan for creating/enhancing their departmental efforts. We anticipate that they, as well as others, would be interested in sharing their experiences, and that many faculty and graduate students would be interested in such a session. On personal correspondence, we know that geoscientists not at the workshop are also interested in this topic. Poster session.

Conveners: R. Heather Macdonald, Department of Geology, College of William and Mary, PO Box 8795, Williamsburg, VA 23187-8795 USA, Tel: +1-757-221-2443, Fax: +1-757-221-2093, E-mail: rhmacd@wm.edu John D. Milliman, School of Marine Science, Virginia Institute of Marine Science, College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA 23187-8795 USA, E-mail: milliman@vims.edu

ED04: Measuring Success: Evaluating Geoscience Education Programs

This session provides a forum for an expanded discussion of the methods and uses of program evaluation in geoscience education. As more and more scientists become involved in geoscience education at all levels, we can all learn from explicit examples of how program leaders set objectives, select methods of evaluation, and use evaluation results. How do we know we are meeting our program goals, and how can we most benefit from our evaluation efforts? Submissions are invited that address evaluation of specific programs for students, teachers, and the public. We are particularly interested in contributions from those who have evaluated changes in student learning as a result of these programs. We are also interested in creative solutions to time, personnel and money constraints. The session will include several invited talks and an interactive poster session.

Conveners: S.M. Buhr, CIRES, CB 216, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309 USA, Tel: +1-303-492-5657, FAX: +1-303-492-1149, E-mail: sbuhr@terra.colorado.edu and Alex Weaver, CIRES, Tel: +1-303-492-5431, FAX: +1-303-492-1149 E-mail: alex.weaver@colorado.edu.

ED05 Special Session on Graduate and Undergraduate Education in Ocean Sciences Joint With OS)

The continuing evolution of reforms and innovations in K-12 and undergraduate education in sciences, mathematics, and technology has been explored and discussed in special sessions at AGU. It is natural and important that AGU should expand this series of sessions to include graduate education. This session will focus on current graduate education in ocean sciences (physical, geological, chemical, biological, and interdisciplinary), innovations in progress, innovations needed, and connectivity of undergraduate education in earth sciences and ocean sciences and graduate education in ocean sciences. The early overview report from the biennial Ocean Science Educators Retreat of October 2000 (sponsored by the Consortium for Ocean Research and Education), including assessment of various application, enrollment, and graduation demographics for the 40 participating graduate education programs in ocean sciences in the United States and issues evolving from the retreat, will be one of the keynote presentations. The conveners will present a paper on the opportunities for innovation in connectivity between graduate education in ocean sciences and undergraduate education in earth sciences. Other invited presentations will be by Robert B. Gagosian, director, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (with several co-authors), on the connectivity between graduate education and future educators and spokespersons for ocean sciences; and Ken Melville, head of the graduate program at Scripps Institution of Oceanography, on future challenges in graduate education with the advent of the Global Ocean Observing System; among others.

Conveners: John W. Farrington, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Woods Hole, MA 02543 USA, Edward P. Laine, Environmental Studies Department, Bowdoin College, Brunswick, ME 04011 USA

ED06 Visualization in Undergraduate Education

This special session will investigate how visualization can support a variety of learning outcomes in undergraduate education. We will highlight the potential of visualizations as educational resources, and outline some of the technological and pedagogical challenges of using them in a "typical" undergraduate classroom. We will also explore cognitive research results that offer guidance for developing and using visualizations, and highlight recently implemented projects.

Conveners: Mary R. Marlino, DLESE Program Center, Program for the Advancement of Geoscience Education, University Corporation for Atmospheric Research, PO Box 3000, Boulder, CO 80307-3000 USA, Tel: +1-303-497-8350, E-mail: marlino@page.ucar.edu Rajul Pandya, West Chester University E-mail: rpandya@wcupa.edu

ED07 Teaching Where the People Are; Science and Informal Education

Education has been experienced in nontraditional settings for decades. Are you a part of it? Many scientists have successfully collaborated with museums, science centers, aquaria, zoos, national parks, malls, county fairs, scouting, elderhostels, and even Disneyland's Tomorrowland. You are the expert in your content, and they are experts in interpreting that content to the masses. Learn to build the collaborations that puts your expertise where the people are. Sure, you do great science, but does the general public know it and support it as much as it should? Are you putting your science where the people are?

Conveners: Tom Nolan, Earth Science Flight Projects NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Mail Stop 264-686 4800 Oak Grove Drive Pasadena, California 91109-8099, Tel: +1- (818) 393-1064, Fax: +1- (818) 354-0368; and David Heil, Heil & Associates

ED08 Teaching Biogeoscience and Earth System Science

A wide range of societal problems demand public understanding based on both earth science and biological expertise. To address this need, some educational institutions have successfully implemented interdisciplinary courses, curricula, and programs. These innovations require difficult balancing among the requirements of various disciplines and departments. This session will provide an opportunity to discuss the educational challenges posed by the emerging need for biogeoscience and earth system science studies. The session will seek to present a variety of perspectives, including experiences from small and large schools, undergraduate and graduate programs, potential employers, and recent students. Particular emphasis will be given to constructive advice for those who are considering or beginning curriculum changes to address needs for biogeoscience and earth system science education.

Conveners: William H. Schlesinger, Duke University, E-mail: schlesin@acpub.duke.edu Eric T. Sundquist, U.S. Geological Survey, E-mail: esundqui@usgs.gov

ED09 The Use of the Internet and Web-Based Technology for Space and Geoscience Education

The past decade has seen the explosive development of the Internet and the Web. These technologies promise tremendous opportunities for creating interactive learning environments, both formal and informal, especially in areas that are rich in data and Internet resources, such as space science and the geosciences. This session will explore how such resources are being used. Distance learning, webcasts, distributed collaboration, and virtual exhibits and experiments are all examples of emerging technologies to be showcased. Participants are also encouraged to describe areas of project design and evaluation in a manner that will benefit members of the audience who would like to use these technologies in their classrooms or outreach projects.

Conveners: Ramon E. Lopez, Department of Physics, University of Texas at El Paso, E-mail: relopez@utep.edu; C. Morrow, Space Science Institute, Boulder, CO, Tel: +1-303-492-7321, E-mail: camorrow@spot.colorado.edu

COPA02 The National Science Education Standards in the Earth and Space Sciences Joint With ED)

This session will address the formulation and impact of the educational standards for the Earth and Space Sciences, a key part of the National Science Education Standards (NSES). The rationale for national standards, their relationship to other similar statements such as the AAAS Benchmarks, the process leading to the formulation of the standards for the earth and space sciences, and the impact of these standards on national (geo-)science literacy will be covered in this session. Special emphasis will be given to the opportunity the earth and space science standards give to university programs in terms of programs for teacher preparation and evolution of entry-level introductory courses in the geosciences. This session will be a mixture of invited and contributed papers. Invited papers by individuals involved in the development of the NSES will set the tone for the session. To highlight the adaptability of the standards, there will be several invited speakers who are working in disciplines that do not have a strong voice in the NSES. Speakers will also explain why the implementation of these standards is important to geophysicists and why AGU members should be active supporters of these standards as citizens and members of their local school boards. Individuals in all geophysical disciplines are encouraged to submit papers on the application of the NSES to all phases of their course work.

Conveners: Marguerite Kingston, U.S. Geological Survey, Mail Stop 954, Reston, VA 20192 USA, Tel: +1-703-648-6369, Fax: +1-703-648-6252, E-mail: mkingston@usgs.gov John T. Snow, College of Geosciences, University of Oklahoma, 100 E. Boyd St., Suite 710, Norman, OK 73019 USA, Tel: +1- 405-325-3101, E-mail: jsnow@ou.edu M. Frank W. Ireton, American Geophysical Union, 2000 Florida Ave., NW, Washington, DC 20009 USA, Tel: +1-202-777-7508, Fax: +1-202 328-0566, E-mail: fireton@agu.org

Committee on Public Affairs (COPA)

COPA01 Agency Night

The Committee on Public Affairs proposes a two-speaker session to highlight the current status and future direction of geophysical research outside North America. COPA proposes that two speakers could address geophysical research in Asia and in Europe, and suggests inviting Enrique Banda of the European Science Foundation and Hiroti Ushita of Japan. COPA suggests following the format of the two previous Fall Meetings and holding the lectures on the first evening of the Fall Meeting, Friday, December 15, beginning at 5:15 and continuing for one hour. By Invitation Only

Convener: Peter Folger, American Geophysical Union, 2000 Florida Ave., NW, Washington, DC 20009 USA, Tel: +1-202-777-7509, Fax: +1-202-328-0566, E-mail: pfolger@agu.org

COPA02 The National Science Education Standards in the Earth and Space Sciences Joint With ED)

This session will address the formulation and impact of the educational standards for the Earth and Space Sciences, a key part of the National Science Education Standards (NSES). The rationale for national standards, their relationship to other similar statements such as the AAAS Benchmarks, the process leading to the formulation of the standards for the earth and space sciences, and the impact of these standards on national (geo-)science literacy will be covered in this session. Special emphasis will be given to the opportunity the earth and space science standards give to university programs in terms of programs for teacher preparation and evolution of entry-level introductory courses in the geosciences. This session will be a mixture of invited and contributed papers. Invited papers by individuals involved in the development of the NSES will set the tone for the session. To highlight the adaptability of the standards, there will be several invited speakers who are working in disciplines that do not have a strong voice in the NSES. Speakers will also explain why the implementation of these standards is important to geophysicists and why AGU members should be active supporters of these standards as citizens and members of their local school boards. Individuals in all geophysical disciplines are encouraged to submit papers on the application of the NSES to all phases of their course work.

Conveners: Marguerite Kingston, U.S. Geological Survey, Mail Stop 954, Reston, VA 20192 USA, Tel: +1-703-648-6369, Fax: +1-703-648-6252, E-mail: mkingston@usgs.gov John T. Snow, College of Geosciences, University of Oklahoma, 100 E. Boyd St., Suite 710, Norman, OK 73019 USA, Tel: +1- 405-325-3101, E-mail: jsnow@ou.edu M. Frank W. Ireton, American Geophysical Union, 2000 Florida Ave., NW, Washington, DC 20009 USA, Tel: +1-202-777-7508, Fax: +1-202 328-0566, E-mail: fireton@agu.org

Mineral and Rock Physics Committee (MRP)

GP06 Electromagnetic Investigation of the Earth (Joint With T, MRP, SEDI)

This session solicits contributions on the theory and practice of electromagnetic methods for the examination of structure and properties of Earth’s near-surface, crust, mantle, and core. Papers describing advances in instrumentation, algorithms, and laboratory measurements that improve our understanding of Earth’s internal constitution and the phenomena therein are encouraged.

Conveners: Chester Weiss, Geophysical Technology Division, Sandia National Laboratories, PO Box 5800, MS 0750, Albuquerque, NM 87185-0750 USA, Tel: +1-505-284-6347, Fax: +1-505-844-7354 E-mail: cjweiss@sandia.gov Lee Slater, Department of Geosciences, University of Missouri Kansas City, MO USA, Tel: +1-816-235-5535, Fax: +1-816-235-2978, E-mail: SlaterL@umkc.edu

P04 Impact Craters From Geophysical Exploration to Deep Drilling (Joint With T, V, MRP)

This session brings together the whole range of disciplines focusing on understanding the formation of large craters on Earth, such as detection/study of impact structures using geophysical methods, the petrology/geochemistry of impactites, the production and distribution of ejecta material, shock metamorphism, and computer modeling of impact cratering events. Contributions from researchers interested in drilling crater-fill sediments as indicators of climate changes are also welcome. This session is well timed, as the International Continental Scientific Drilling Program’s deep drilling of the Chicxulub crater is planned for the end of 2000 and subsequent offshore drilling is being considered by Ocean Drilling Program.

Conveners: Philippe Claeys, Institute of Mineralogy, Museum of Natural History, D-10099, Berlin, Germany, Tel: +49-30-2093-8857, Fax: +49-30-2093-5865, E-mail: philippe.claeys@rz.hu-berlin.de Joanna Morgan, T. H. Huxley School, Imperial College, Prince Consort Rd., London, SW7 2BP, United Kingdom, Tel: +44-171-594-64-23, Fax: +44-171-594-65-29, E-mail: j.v.morgan@ic.ac.uk

S04 Recent Results on the Seismicity and Mechanics of the San Andreas Fault System Joint With G, P, T, MRP)

The session will provide a forum for diverse studies that bear on the seismological and mechanical workings of the San Andreas fault and other strands of the plate-bounding strike-slip system. Key issues include the spatial and temporal distribution of seismicity, the orientation and magnitude of the stress field around the faults, and the mechanical strength of the faults and interactions with the surrounding crust. Thus, we welcome papers based on seismicity relocations, stress orientations, borehole meaurements, and relevant geological or geomorphological constraints.

Conveners: Heidi Houston, Department of Earth and Spaces Sciences, University of California, 595 Young Dr. E, Los Angeles, CA 90095 USA, Tel: +1-310-206-3896, Fax: +1-310-825-2779, E-mail: heidi@moho.ess.ucla.edu Debi Kilb, Department of Geosciences, Princeton University, Guyot Hall, Princeton, NJ 08544, Tel: +1-609-258-2598, Fax: +1-609-258-1274, E-mail: dkilb@princeton.edu

S05 Subduction Zone Structure and Megathrust Earthquakes (Joint With G, T, MRP)

Many studies have suggested that the size and rupture characteristics of great subduction zone earthquakes are controlled by material properties and structural irregularities near the subduction zone plate boundary. This session is intended to bring together researchers studying such structure and those who study the earthquakes themselves. We encourage contributions ranging from geophysical surveys of subduction zone structure to studies of earthquake rupture in subduction zone environments.

Conveners: Phil Cummins, Frontier Research for Subduction Dynamics, Japan Marine Science and Technology Center, 2-15 Natsushima-cho, Yokosuka 237-0061, Japan, Tel: +81-468-67-3393, Fax: +81-468-67-3409, E-mail: cummins@jamstec.go.jp Shuichi Kodaira, Frontier Research for Subduction Dynamics, Japan Marine Science and Technology Center, 2-15 Natsushima-cho, Yokosuka 237-0061, Japan, Tel: +81-468-67-3407, Fax: +81-468-67-3409, E-mail: kodaira@jamstec.go.jp

S07 Melts and Volatiles in the Deep Mantle (Joint With T, V, MRP, SEDI)

Once believed to be confined to the low-velocity zone and at shallow depths in tectonically active regions, recent seismological results indicate a much greater distribution of partial melts in the mantle with evidence of melts ranging from transition zone depths through the lower mantle to the core-mantle boundary. Concomitant with this is a deepening understanding of the abundance and cycling of volatile components in the Earth's mantle. This session will focus on seismological, laboratory, and theoretical characterization and quantification of partial melts and volatiles in the mantle, their role in mantle dynamics, and their temporal evolution in abundance and mode. We encourage submissions from seismology, mineral physics, geodynamics, geochemistry, and volcanology.

Conveners: Justin Revenaugh, Earth Sciences, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95060 USA Tel: +1-831-459-3055, Fax: +1-831-459-3074, E-mail: jsr@monk.ucsc.edu Lars P. Stixrude, Department of Geology, University of Michigan, 2534 C. C. Little Bldg., 425 E. University Ave., Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1063 USA, Tel: +1-313-647-9071, Fax: +1-313-763-4690, E-mail: stixrude@umich.edu

S08 Thermal and Chemical Structures in the Core-Mantle Boundary Region: Implications for the Evolution of the Deep Interior (Joint With G, GP, T, MRP, SEDI)

Thermal and chemical structures in the core-mantle boundary (CMB) region are shaped by dynamics in the Earth's interior and provide clues to the long-term evolution of the planet. A wide range of processes from large-scale convection to small-scale melting and chemical reactions, are likely to contribute to the complexity of the boundary region. We welcome reports dealing with theoretical, observational, and experimental studies of the boundary region. Topics include, but are not restricted to, the structure and evolution of the thermal boundary layer, chemical stratification at the base of the mantle or top of the core, melting relations and physical properties of mantle minerals, evidence and implications of small-scale structure, effect of boundary layer structure on CMB topography, and observational techniques for discriminating between chemical and thermal boundary layers.

Conveners: Bruce Buffett, Department of Earth and Ocean Sciences, University of British Columbia 2219 Main Mall, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z4 Canada, Tel: +1-604-822-3466, Fax: +1-604-822-6088 E-mail: buffett@geop.ubc.ca Anne M. Hofmeister, Department of Earth and Planetary Science Washington University, Campus Box 1169, 1 Brookings Dr., St. Louis, MO 63130 USA, Tel: +1-314-935-7440, Fax: +1-314-935-7361, E-mail: Hofmeist@levee.wustl.edu Michael Wysession, Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Washington University, Campus Box 1169, 1 Brookings Dr., St. Louis, MO 63130 USA, Tel: +1-314-935-5625, Fax: +1-314-935-7361, E-mail: michael@wucore.wustl.edu

T17 Physical Properties of Fault Zones: A Session in Honor of James D. Byerlee Joint With G, S, MRP)

James Byerlee has devoted his professional career to the understanding of the complex processes that control rock failure and the behavior of fault zone materials. This session, in keeping with Byerlee’s spirit of innovation and creativity, explores the current state of understanding of mechanical and hydrological properties of active fault systems. Contributions are invited in the areas of laboratory and field observations as well as theoretical developments relating to active faults, such as fault zone stability, fault strength and rheology, state of stress, fluid compartmentalization, and rupture nucleation models.

Conveners: David Lockner, U.S. Geological Survey, 345 Middlefield Rd., MS 977, Menlo Park, CA 94025 USA, Tel: +1-650 329-4826, Fax: +1-650 329-5163, E-mail: dlockner@usgs.gov Malcolm Johnston, U.S. Geological Survey, 345 Middlefield Road, MS 977, Menlo Park, CA 94025 USA, Tel: +1-650-329-4812, Fax: +1-650-329-5163, E-mail: mal@usgs.gov

T18 Dynamic Rupture of Rocks and Other Brittle Materials (Joint With S, V, MRP)

Rock failure in the crust is frequently unstable, producing earthquakes, tremors, and rockbursts. Unstable rupture is also generated by impacts and other rapid loadings. This session focuses on descriptions and analyses of nucleation, propagation, and arrest of dynamic rupture in rocks and other brittle materials under tensile and shear conditions. Advances in these subjects could provide tools for deducing growth velocity and other properties of dynamic failure from observed in situ features of faults, dikes, and joints. Presentations of field, experimental, and modeling results are welcomed.

Conveners: Yehuda Ben-Zion, Department of Earth Sciences, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90089-0740 USA, Tel: +1-213-740-6734, Fax: +1-213-740-8801, E-mail: benzion@terra.usc.edu Ze'ev Reches, Institute of Earth Sciences, Hebrew University, Jerusalem 91904, Israel, Tel: +972-2-658-4669, Fax: +972-2-566-2581, E-mail: reches@earth.es.huji.ac.il

T19 Honoring the Geothermal Work of John H. Sass: From Drilling, Logging, and Laboratory Measurement to Heat Flow and Geodynamics (Joint With H, V, MRP)

John Sass has determined terrestrial heat flow extensively in the conterminous western United States, in Alaska, Canada, Central America, Australia, Liberia, Jordan, Germany, Greenland, and Wales. His interpretations address geodynamic aspects such as stress (e.g., in the San Andreas Fault), extension (e.g., in the Basin and Range province), volcanism (e.g., in Long Valley Caldera), sedimentation (e.g., in the Salton Trough), and metamorphism (e.g., in the Basin and Range province). He is involved in the application of geothermal studies in geothermal energy systems (e.g., in the Geysers), and using temperature as a tracer for fluid flow in waste management applications (e.g., in Yucca Mountain). Sass is an expert in drilling and temperature logging techniques, and has had a major impact on improving laboratory measurements of thermophysical rock properties. We invite contributions that are related to these topics underlining the dualism of making geothermal field measurements and interpreting the results at local, regional and global scales.

Conveners: Daniel Pribnow, Institute for Joint Geoscientific Research, Stilleweg 2, 30655 Hannover, Germany, Tel: +49-511-643-3513, Fax: +49-511-643-3665, E-mail: dan.pribnow@gga-hannover.de David S. Chapman, Department of Geology and Geophysics, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112-9016 USA, Tel: +1-801-581-7642, Fax: +1-801-585-6749, E-mail: dchapman@mines.utah.edu

T21 Measurements and Modeling of Marine Sediments (Joint With OS, S, MRP)

The special session targets experimental (laboratory and in situ) measurements as well as modeling results of marine sediments. We would like to see papers covering both modeling and measurements of compaction, porosity decrease, diagenesis, and physical properties of marine sediments. Of great interest is the link between physical properties and indirect field (e.g., seismic) measurements as well as relationships between static and dynamic moduli.

Conveners: Manika Prasad, Geophysics Department, Stanford University, 397 Panama Mall, Code 322GG, Stanford, CA 94305-2215 USA, Tel: +1-650-723-8547, Fax: +1-650-723-1188, E-mail: manika.prasad@stanford.edu Roy H. Wilkens, Office of Naval Research, 800 N. Quincy Street, Code 322GG, Arlington, VA 22217-5660 USA, Tel: +1-703-696-7237, Fax: +1-703-696-2710, E-mail: roy_wilkens@onr.navy.mil

T22 Planetary-Interior Research: A New Frontier in Geophysics (Joint With MRP)

The evolution of Earth and other planets is a process of vast proportions, involving huge amounts of matter (crystalline and molten silicates, metals, and volatile constituents), temperatures from near-absolute zero to several thousand degrees, and pressures from a fraction to millions of atmospheres. Despite this complexity, the present state of these bodies, as well as their evolution through time, is governed by the properties of the constituent materials and their chemical interactions. The past 10 years have seen a revolution in Earth- and planetary-materials science and the simulation of planetary processes, ignited by technical developments that allowed higher pressures and temperatures to be attained for sustained periods, larger sample volumes in experiments, new in situ and microanalytical tools, and access to national synchrotron facilities for critical experiments. This session will focus on the recent and near-future advances in material studies and the impact of these studies on our understanding of planetary interiors. This session also aims to bring together laboratory experimentalists with researchers who model planetary interiors, such as seismologists, dynamicists, and geochemists.

Conveners: Donald J. Weidner, Department of Geosciences, State University of New York, Stony Brook, NY 11794 USA, E-mail: dweidner@sunysb.edu Jay D. Bass, Department of Geology, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, 235 Natural History Bldg., MC 102, 1301 W. Green, Urbana, IL 61801 USA, E-mail: Bass@hercules.geology.uiuc.edu

V01The Properties of Fe and Fe-Bearing Phases at High Pressures Joint With GP, S, T, MRP, SEDI)

Iron is the fourth most abundant element in the Earth and, therefore, it plays an important role in most geochemical and petrological processes within the Earth. The fact that Fe can exist in a variety of valence states means that the geochemical character of Fe can vary depending on the reigning oxygen fugacity (fO2). The purpose of this special session is to bring together researchers who are interested in the properties of Fe° and Fe2+- and Fe3+-bearing phases at high pressures and the influence these properties may have on mantle processes and core formation. In addition to experimentally based studies, theoretical aspects and pertinent observations from natural samples are welcome.

Conveners: Alan Woodland, Institute of Mineralogy, University of Heidelberg, Germany E-mail: alan@classic.min.uni-heidelberg.de Dan Frost, Bayerisches Geoinstitut, University of Bayreuth, 95440 Bayreuth, Germany, E-mail: dan.frost@uni-bayreuth.de

V02 Physics of Axial Magma Chambers (Joint With GP, S, T, MRP)

In recent years, the geophysical community has made considerable progress understanding the structure, physical properties, and evolution of axial magma chambers (AMC) at oceanic spreading centers. This special session will involve volcanologists, tectonophysicists, and seismologists and will cover recent progress and upcoming challenges in multidisciplinary approaches to better understanding AMC structure and processes. Topics include (1) seismic, electromagnetic, and gravimetric observations; (2) structural and petrological features; and (3) geodynamic modeling; (4) laboratory characterization of rock properties from AMC regions.

Conveners: Nikolai Bagdassarov, Institut für Meteorologie und Geophysik, J. W. Goethe Universität Frankfurt, Feldbergstraße 47, D-60323 Frankfurt am Main, Germany, Tel: +49-69-798-23376, Fax: +49-69-798-23280, E-mail: nickbagd@geophysik.uni-frankfurt.de Benoît Ildefonse, Laboratoire de Tectonophysique, Institut de Sciences de la Terre, de l’Eau et de l’Espa?e de Montpellier, Université Montpellier II, 34095 Montpellier, cedex 05, France, Tel: +33-4-67-14 38-18/33, Fax: +33-4-67-14-36-03, E-mail: benoit@dstu.univ-montp2.fr William S. D. Wilcock, School of Oceanography, University of Washington, Box 357940, Seattle, WA 98195-7940 USA, Tel: +1-206-543-6043, Fax: +1-206-543-6073, E-mail: wilcock@ocean.washington.edu

V08 Slab Melting 2000: Archean to Modern Comparisons, Significance for Arc Magmatism and Continental Growth (Joint With T, MRP)

Kepezhinskas/Defant - Since the concept of slab melting was formulated by Bob Kay in his 1978 paper on high-Mg andesites from adak, this process was unraveled as an important factor in subduction zone magma genesis and continental growth. Slab melts were termed adakites by Defant and Drummond (1990) to commemorate the adak island discovery. Multiple studies also revealed the importance of slab-derived tonalites-trondhjemites-dacites in Archean crustal growth. Slab melt research fluorished over last decades and significantly advanced our understanding of tectonic and petrologic conditions of slab melting in Precambrian and Phanerozoic and of a general significance of this process for arc magmatism. Major advancements of the last decade of adakite research can be summarized as follows. This range of slab melt-related topics will bring together a multidisciplinary crowd interested in all espects of slab-mantle interactions and their significance for subduction zone petrogenesis. We expect a great attendance based on our preliminary discussions with colleagues in US, Canada, France and Australia. France which has a very strong slab melt, reserach groups will alone contribute over 15 papers to this kind of session. In fact, this will be the first session dedicated to slab melting and arc genesis since the Penrose meeting on low-K arc rocks in 1990. We had a great decade researching slab melts and associated phenomena and it is time to bring everybody together to discuss exciting results.

Conveners: Pavel Kepezhinskas, Department of Geology, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL 33620 USA, Tel: +1-813-974-8754, Fax: +1-813-974-2654, E-mail: kepezhin@chuma.cas.usf.edu Marc J. Defant, Department of Geology, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL 33620 USA, Tel: +1-813-974-1593, Fax: +1-813-974-2654, E-mail: defant@chuma1.cas.usf.edu

V10 Rhenium and Osmium Isotope and Elemental Constraints on Mantle and Magmatic Processes (Joint With G, S, P, MRP)

The chalcophile and siderophile elements rhenium and osmium (Re-Os) potentially provide key information on the differentiation of the terrestrial planets, both on the conditions under which core formation took place in the early solar system and on mantle melting and magmatic differentiation in the early Earth and to the present day. This session will focus on applications of the Re-Os system to recent results in these fields, such as, studies of meteorites and other planetary material; records of the early Earth recorded in ancient continental rocks; constraints on the sources of oceanic basalts; experimental constraints on Re and Os partitioning in mantle and magmatic systems; and studies of the distribution and behavior of these elements between natural minerals (silicates, sulphides, and melts). The essential aim is a multidisciplinary discussion that brings together experimental, geochemical, and petrological aspects of the above or related topics.

Conveners: Kevin W. Burton, Department of Earth Sciences, The Open University, Walton Hall, Milton Keynes, MK7 6AA, UK, Tel: +44-1908-652889, Fax: +44-1908-655151, E-mail: k.w.burton@open.ac.uk Pierre Schiano, Laboratoire Magmas et Volcans, Observatoire de Physique du Globe de Clermont-Ferrand-Centre National de la Reserche Scientifique, UMR 6524, Université Blaise-Pascal, 5 Rue Kessler, 63038 Clermont-Ferrand, France, Tel: +33-4-73-34-67-57, Fax: +33-4 73-34 67-44, E-mail: schiano@opgc.univ-bpclermont.fr

V12 Dynamics of Lower Crustal Processes (Joint With S, T, MRP)

This special session is designed to attract different disciplines together to discuss recent research on a variety of lower crustal processes. These include basaltic underplating, partial melting of the lower crust, MASH (mixing, assimilation, storage, and homogenization) processes, delamination of eclogitic lower crust, etc. Questions to address include Is the lower crust fundamentally more mafic than the upper crust? Is this true at continental arcs? Where is this not the case? What processes control or strongly influence the creation of continental crust at subduction zones? How important are magmatic processes that occur in the lower versus upper crust? We hope to address these issues by attracting papers on lower crustal xenoliths, the seismic structure of continental crust, as well as isotopic, geochemical, and petrologic studies of arc volcanoes and batholiths.

Conveners: John Chesley, E-mail: jchesley@geo.arizona.edu Rebecca Lange, E-mail: becky@umich.edu

NG04 Nonlinearity and Earthquakes (Joint With S, T, MRP)

This session solicits theoretical, experimental, and descriptive papers on nonlinear processes in earthquake science. Topics include comprehensive earthquake modeling; nonlinear deformation phenomena such as creep, afterslip, and fluid flow and diagenesis; the seismic cycle; foreshocks and aftershocks; nonlinear earthquake precursory and triggering mechanisms; nonlinear response to stress perturbations; self-organized intrafault structure; heterogeneities in distribution of physical properties and stresses along faults; and scaling of fracture and friction laboratory measurements to field scales. We anticipate that this session will attract some exciting papers by investigators pursuing research on nonlinear earthquake models and on other nonlinear earthquake-related topics.

Conveners: Chuck Bufe, U.S. Geological Survey, Denver Federal Center, Box 25046, Mail Stop 966, Denver, CO 80225 USA, Tel: +1-303-273-8413, Fax: +1-303-273-8450, E-mail: cbufe@usgs.gov Peter Ortoleva, Department of Geological Sciences, Indiana University, 1001 E. 10th St., Bloomington, IN 47405 USA, Tel: +1-812-855-5582, Fax: +1-812-855-2717, E-mail: ortoleva@indiana.edu Jean Schmittbuhl, Laboratoire de Geologie, Ecole Normale Superieure, 24 rue Lhomond, 75231 Paris Cedex 05, France, Tel: +33-1-44-32-22-18, Fax: +33-1-44-32-22-00, E-mail: Jean.Schmittbuhl@ens.fr

Nonlinear Geophysics (NG)

NG01 Nonlinear Space-Time Patterns (Joint With A, B, G, OS, T)

Nonlinear space-time patterns occur in a variety of complex systems. These space-time patterns represent the independent spatial modes of the system in terms of their associated temporal signal, and can provide significant scientific insight into both their sources and relative effects. Examples of systems that exhibit space-time patterns include fault networks, mantle convection, the ocean-atmosphere interface, the human body, and solar activity. Analysis of these patterns reveals information about the characteristics of the system in question. Recent developments resulting in the relative inexpensive accessibility to computational power have greatly improved the ability to analyze these space-time patterns and have yielded a number of important scientific insights. Applications include such widely varying fields as biometrics, seismic tomography, surface deformation, tidal signals, blood flow, and the El Nino-Southern Oscillation. Abstracts that emphasize scientific results based on the analysis of space-time patterns are encouraged. We plan to invite people and solicit contributions across a broad spectrum of sections at AGU.

Conveners: Kristy Tiampo, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences, University of Colorado, Room 318, Boulder, CO 80309-0216 USA, Tel: +1-303-492-4779, Fax: +1-303-492-5070, E-mail: kristy@caldera.colorado.edu Andrea Donnellan, Mail Stop 126-347, Jet Propulsion Laboratory and University of Southern California, 4800 Oak Grove Dr., Pasadena, CA 91109 USA, Tel: +1-818-354-4737, Fax: +1-818-393-4965, E-mail: andrea.donnellan@jpl.nasa.gov

NG02 Geocomplexity: Self-Organizing Systems (Joint With A, GP, OS, S, T)

Self-organizing complex systems are found in many branches of geophysics. The broadest-based example is fluid turbulence. Specific examples include the stochastic variability of climate and the variability of Earth’s magnetic field. Other examples are landforms and seismicity. These systems are generally chaotic, exhibit fractal (power-law) behavior, and may be examples of self-organized criticality. The proposed session will include broad overviews of the current understanding of complex systems as well as more specific recent developments. This session is intended as an overview of the current status of geocomplexity and will include several key invited speakers. Although this is not planned as a Union session, we strongly encourage contributions across a broad spectrum of AGU sections. Contributions that are applicable in more than one area are particularly welcome.

Conveners: Donald L. Turcotte, Department of Geological Sciences, Cornell University, Snee Hall, Ithaca, NY 14853 USA, Tel: +1-607-255-7282, Fax: +1-607-254-4780, E-mail: turcotte@geology.cornell.edu John B. Rundle, Colorado Center for Chaos and Complexity and Cooperative Institute Research in Environmental Sciences, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309 USA, Tel: +1-303-492-5642, E-mail: rundle@terra.colorado.edu William Klein, Physics Department and Center for Computational Science, Boston University, 590 Commonwealth Ave., Boston, MA 02215 USA, Tel: +1-617-353-2188, E-mail: klein@buphyc.bu.edu

NG03 Scaling and the Extremes of Geophysical Fields (Joint With A, H, OS, S, T)

From earthquakes to floods, volcanic eruptions to magnetic storms and hurricanes, the extremes of geophysical fields are of prime importance. However, they are still poorly understood, and time series are often too short to yield the clear-cut empirical evidence necessary to distinguish between different theoretical behaviors. Of particular significance is the distinction between standard extreme value distributions and the nonclassical heavy tailed (algebraic) distributions generally associated with space-time scaling processes. This session will be devoted to the most recent theoretical and empirical developments of scaling approaches to understand and to characterize the interrelation between strong nonlinearities over wide ranges of temporal and spatial scales and their consequences for the extremes. Session topics will include recent empirical investigations; techniques to test for the algebraic fall-offs in probability distributions; statistical estimators and data requirements; comparisons of mean and extreme instabilities/events; the statistics and dynamics of the extremes; the relevance of the paradigm of self-organized criticality; cascades, multifractals, and heavy tails; and nonclassical return period statistics and their implications.

Conveners: Daniel Schertzer, Laboratoire de Modelisation en Mecanique, Centre National de la Reserche Scientifique UMR 7607, Case 162, Université P. et M. Curie, 4 Place Jussieu, F-75252 Paris Cedex 05, France, Tel: +33-1-44-27-4963, Fax: +33-1-44-27-5259, E-mail: schertze@ccr.jussieu.fr Shaun M. Lovejoy, Physics Department, McGill University, 3600 University Str., Montreal, QC H3A 2T8, Canada, Tel: +1-514-398-6537, Fax: +1-514-398-8434, E-mail: lovejoy@physics.mcgill.ca Per Bak, Niels Bohr Institute, Blegdamsvej 17, DK-2100 Copenhagen Ø, Denmark, Tel: +45-353-25393, Fax: +45-353-25016, E-mail: bak@nbi.dk Didier Sornette, Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics and Department of Earth and Space Science, University of California, 3845 Slichter Hall, Box 951567, 595 E. Circle Dr., University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 USA, Tel: +1-310-825-2863, Fax: +1-310-206-3051, E-mail: sornette@moho.ess.ucla.edu

NG04 Nonlinearity and Earthquakes (Joint With S, T, MRP)

This session solicits theoretical, experimental, and descriptive papers on nonlinear processes in earthquake science. Topics include comprehensive earthquake modeling; nonlinear deformation phenomena such as creep, afterslip, and fluid flow and diagenesis; the seismic cycle; foreshocks and aftershocks; nonlinear earthquake precursory and triggering mechanisms; nonlinear response to stress perturbations; self-organized intrafault structure; heterogeneities in distribution of physical properties and stresses along faults; and scaling of fracture and friction laboratory measurements to field scales. We anticipate that this session will attract some exciting papers by investigators pursuing research on nonlinear earthquake models and on other nonlinear earthquake-related topics.

Conveners: Chuck Bufe, U.S. Geological Survey, Denver Federal Center, Box 25046, Mail Stop 966, Denver, CO 80225 USA, Tel: +1-303-273-8413, Fax: +1-303-273-8450, E-mail: cbufe@usgs.gov Peter Ortoleva, Department of Geological Sciences, Indiana University, 1001 E. 10th St., Bloomington, IN 47405 USA, Tel: +1-812-855-5582, Fax: +1-812-855-2717, E-mail: ortoleva@indiana.edu Jean Schmittbuhl, Laboratoire de Geologie, Ecole Normale Superieure, 24 rue Lhomond, 75231 Paris Cedex 05, France, Tel: +33-1-44-32-22-18, Fax: +33-1-44-32-22-00, E-mail: Jean.Schmittbuhl@ens.fr

NG05 Fractals, Chaos, and Self-Organized Criticality in Natural and Human-Induced Hazards (Joint With A, H, OS, S, T, V)

Natural and human-induced hazards cover a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. They include a large variety and number of interacting components that combine to produce nonlinear power-law behaviors that are often associated with the basic concepts of complexity. Examples of these hazards include floods, landslides, volcanic eruptions, earthquakes, forest fires, cyclonic storms, droughts, global warming, and hazardous waste contamination. Papers that apply the concepts of fractals, chaos, or self-organized criticality to characterize, model, and assess the risk of natural and man-made hazards are solicited. Posters are also very much encouraged.

Conveners: Bruce D. Malamud, Department of Geography, Kings College London, Strand, London WC2R 2LS, UK, E-mail: bruce@malamud.com Didier Sornette, Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics and Department of Earth and Space Science, University of California, 3845 Slichter Hall, Box 951567, 595 E. Circle Dr., Los Angeles, CA 90095 USA, Tel: +1-310-825-2863, Fax: +1-310-206-3051, E-mail: sornette@moho.ess.ucla.edu Christopher Barton, U. S. Geological Survey, 600 4th St. South, St. Petersburg, FL 33701 USA, Tel: +1-727-803-8747 ext. 3014, Fax: +1-727-803-2030, E-mail: barton@usgs.gov

NG06 Quantifying Predictability in Geophysical Systems II (Joint With A, G, H, OS, SH, T, V)

Our ability to quantify the predictability of nonlinear geophysical systems provides a fundamental bridge between models of geophysical systems and the systems themselves. Uncertainty in the initial condition and errors in model formulation have led to probability forecasts (ensembles) even in deterministic systems. This session will focus on atmospheric and ocean dynamics over hours to centuries (e.g., adaptive observation strategies, Lagrangian and Eulerian approaches, intense short-duration events); theoretical aspects of the dynamics of nonlinear systems relevant to predictability and verification (including multiple models, contrasting modeling strategies, data assimilation); and practical issues in the interpretation and likely economic impact of probabilistic forecasts on a timescale minutes to hours (e.g., precipitation/wind), days to months (e.g., hurricanes), and years to millennia (e.g., earthquakes). A mix of oral and poster presentations of both pure and extremely applied contributions are welcome, and may focus on the predictability of geophysical systems other than those noted explicitly above.

Conveners: Leonard Smith, Oxford University, 24-29 St Giles', Oxford, OX1 3LB, UK, Tel: +44-1865-270-517, Fax: +44-1865-270-515, E-mail: lenny@maths.ox.ac.uk James Hansen, Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Ave., Room 54-1721, Cambridge, MA 02139 USA, Tel: +1-617-253-5935, E-mail: jhansen@mit.edu

NG07 Scaling, Multifractals, and Upscaling and Downscaling Techniques in Precipitation and Hydrology (Joint With A, H)

Hydrological processes are highly nonlinear over wide ranges of temporal and spatial scales. Fractal structures and multifractal statistics are ubiquitous. The corresponding scaling properties quantitatively relate statistics and structures at potentially widely different space-time scales and provide a systematic basis for aggregation (upscaling) and disaggregation (downscaling) techniques. In addition, wide-range scaling can be used for space-time hydrological and precipitation modeling, determining intensity-duration relations, and areal reduction factors. In the past several years, there have been many developments of specific techniques in order to handle these nonclassical scaling behaviors that are at best only poorly handled by conventional analysis and models. This session will be devoted to the most recent theoretical and operational developments and applications of scaling and other innovative approaches to characterizing and modeling of (1) precipitation, in situ (e.g., rain gage) and remotely sensed (e.g. radar) rainfall measurements, nowcasting and multifractal techniques, and extreme precipitation, including the relationship of precipitation with other intermittent atmospheric processes; (2) surface processes, including run-off, river flows, river networks. flooding and their relationship with scaling topography; and (3) groundwater and subsurface processes, in particular transport and dispersion in scaling and hierarchical porous media.

Conveners: Shaun M. Lovejoy, Physics Department, McGill University, 3600 University Str., Montreal, QC H3A 2T8, Canada, Tel.: +1-514-398-6537, Fax: +1-514-398-8434, E-mail: lovejoy@physics.mcgill.ca Daniel Schertzer, Laboratoire de Modelisation en Mecanique, Centre National de la Reserche Scientifique, UMR 7607, Case 162, Université P. et M. Curie, 4 Place Jussieu, F-75252 Paris Cedex 05, France, Tel: +33-1-44-27-4963, Fax: +33-1-44-27-5259, E-mail: schertze@ccr.jussieu.fr John Selker, Department of Bioresource Engineering, Gilmore Hall, Room 240, Corvallis, OR 97331-3906 USA, Tel: +1-541-737-6304, Fax: +1-541-737-2082, E-mail: selkerj@engr.orst.edu

NG08 Scaling Laws and Nonlinear Dynamics in Drainage Basins, Vegetation Patterns, and Geomorphic Processes (Joint With B, H, T)

Drainage basins, stream morphology, the distribution of vegetative communities, and many other landscape features exhibit power functions or other scaling behavior. These scaling laws have long been used in describing drainage basin and stream organization. The availability of digital elevation models of topography and remotely sensed data to obtain topography, vegetation, sedimentation patterns, etc. has expanded our ability to quantify geomorphic and biogeographic patterns and processes. These data can be used to compare the geomorphic and biological organization of landscapes. In addition, some research groups have been measuring sediment transport and other processes so that time series techniques can be used to characterize system behavior. The purpose of this session is to encourage papers that describe and explain scaling characteristics in drainage basins and vegetation patterns. We are also interested in papers that examine nonlinear behavior in geomorphic processes.

Conveners: Karen Prestegaard, Department of Geology, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 USA, Tel: +1-301-405-6982, Fax: +1-301-314-9661, E-mail: kpresto@geol.umd.edu Ralph Dubayah, Deparment of Geography, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 USA, Tel: +1-301-405-4069, Fax: +1-301-314-9299, E-mail: rdubayah@glue.umd.edu Jon Pelletier, Department of Geosciences, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona 85721 USA, Tel: +1-520-626-2126, E-mail: jon@geo.arizona.edu

NG09 Biocomplexity in the Environment (Joint With B, H, OS)

Biocomplexity arises owing to dynamic interactions that occur between biological systems, including humans, and the physical environment. In FY1999 and in FY2000, the National Science Foundation (NSF) held competitions in this area, seeking interdisciplinary projects aimed at understanding the complex behavior observed in such systems. The most recent competition emphasized research that would directly explore nonlinearities, emergent phenomena, or feedbacks within and between biological and environmental systems, or would integrate across multiple components or scales of time and space in order to better understand and predict dynamic behavior. This special session will include an overview of the scientific interests that emerged from the competition and a roundtable discussion, including time for questions from the floor, with some of the grantees about research issues arising in this new area. In addition to the planned overview and roundtable discussion, we actively seek both oral and poster contributions on research in biocomplexity; contributions are not restricted to NSF grantees in the biocomplexity program.

Conveners: Marge Cavanaugh, Office of the Director, National Science Foundation, 4201 Wilson Blvd., Suite 1205, Arlington, VA 22230 USA, Tel.: +1-703-306-1004, Fax: +1-703-306-0109, E-mail: mcavanau@nsf.gov Margaret Leinen, National Science Foundation, 4201 Wilson Blvd., Arlington, VA 22230 USA, Tel.: +1-703-306-1500, Fax: +1-703-306-0372, E-mail: mleinen@nsf.gov Patricia M. Glibert, Horn Point Laboratory, 2020 Horns Point Rd., PO Box 775, Cambridge, MD 21613 USA, Tel: +1-410-221-8422, Fax: +1-410-221-8490, E-mail: glibert@hpl.umces.edu

NG10 Visual Computing in Nonlinear Geophysical Phenomena (Joint With A, G, GP, H, OS, T)

Researchers in geophysics are being overwhelmed by the huge amount of data generated by natural nonlinear phenomena and high-resolution numerical solutions. In this session we will bring together many of the different practioners using modern analytical and visualization tools (e.g., wavelets, eigenvectors, and EOFs) for treating and analyzing large data sets. We are soliciting examples from all areas in geophysics and at all scales, ranging from the molecular level, such as bacteria growth, to core dynamics. Also of great interest are examples from large data sets, such as SAR, ocean currents, and numerical simulations involving the bridging of scales in nonlinear processes. We foresee interest for this session from both numerical modelers and observation-oriented scientists.

Conveners: Dave Yuen, Minnesota Supercomputer Institute, 1200 Washington Ave., S., Minneapolis, MN 55415 USA, Tel: +1-612-624-1868, E-mail: davey@krissy.msi.umn.edu Bryan J. Travis, Los Alamos National Laboratory, ESS 5, MS F665, Los Alamos, NM 55455 USA, Tel: +1-505-667-1254, E-mail: bjt@vega.lanl.gov

NG11 Anomalous Transport in Inhomogeneous and (Multi-)Fractal Geophysical Media (Joint With A, H, OS, T)

Anomalous transport is ubiquitous in geophysics: mantle convection, subsurface hydrology, atmospheric and oceanographic diffusion, geophysical turbulence, solar wind, etc. It is associated with nonstandard scaling (e.g., non-Fickian diffusion), and has been attracting a renewed interest owing to its importance for environmental applications, a larger availability of data, and several recently proposed theoretical approaches: fractal modeling, continuous time random walks, chaotic advection, fractional transport equations, multifractal dispersion coefficients, and multifractal advection equations. This session will focus on the confrontation between the new available data and the new theoretical developments on anomalous transport in scaling and inhomogeneous geophysical media.

Conveners: Ioulia Tchiguirinskaia, Environmental Engineering and Science Department, Clemson University, 342 Computer Ct., Anderson, SC 29625 USA, Tel: +1-864-656-1462, Fax: +1-864-656-0672, E-mail: iouliat@clemson.edu Brian Berkowitz, Deparment of Environmental Sciences and Energy Research, Weizmann Institute of Science, PO Box 26, Rehovot, 76100, Israel, Tel: +972-8-934-2098, Fax: +972-8-934-4124,E-mail: brian.berkowitz@weizmann.ac.il Jeffrey Duan, Deparment of Applied Mathematics, Illinois Institute of Technology, 10 W. 32nd St., Chicago, IL 60616 USA, Tel: +1-312-655-3282, Fax: +1-312-567-3135, E-mail: duan@iit.edu

NG12 Dynamical Structure and Persistence: Nonlinear Analysis of Superposed Natural Processes With Different Characteristic Times (Joint With H)

Nature has complex structure and dynamics, with many different temporal and spatial scales. Therefore, it is often difficult to find reliable descriptions for process dynamics in real systems, even when using modern nonlinear time series tools. If the system dynamics are more complex than periodic, quasi-periodic, or low-dimensional chaos, deterministic prediction of their behavior becomes impossible, even when using observed patterns. At the same time, processes are not always random and often have some nonlinear dynamical structure (high- or low-dimensional). A major challenge is the description and quantification of these process dynamics, examining overall randomness and deterministic chaos by modern methods through their decomposition into constituents, reliable filtration, and noise reduction without distortion of inherent dynamical structure, etc. For example, there is evidence that complex, highly nonlinear processes are characterized by linear long- or short-range correlations (persistence). Linear and nonlinear tools are needed to investigate real dynamics (for example, to accomplish evaluation of nonlinear structure and discriminating statistics, together with the study of the extent of persistence in time series). Recent applications include geophysics, hydrology, climatology, medicine, and economics. We solicit papers that apply decomposition concepts for studying the complex dynamics in atmospheric, geomagnetic, hydrologic, and seismic data and models. Concepts include the use of characteristic times, evaluation of nonlinear structure and/or the use of persistent characteristics for the differentiation of processes, modeling,and looking for new markers for forecasting natural disasters.

Conveners: Tamaz L. Chelidze; Teimuraz N. Matcharashvili, Institute of Geophysics, 1 Alexidze Str., Tbilisi 380093, Georgia, Tel: +995-32-94-35-91, Fax: +995-32-33-28-67, E-mail: tnmat@hotmail.com or root@)geophy.acnet.ge

B09 The Role of Fire in the Boreal Forest and Its Impacts on Climatic Processes (Joint With A, NG)

Boreal forests account for about a third of the carbon sequestered in terrestrial ecosystems, so changes in their functioning or distribution could create important feedbacks to the climate system. Changes in the extent of forest cover could alter regional energy budgets sufficiently to amplify or nullify the expected rapid climatic warming at high latitudes. Warming could cause boreal forests to change from being a component of the "missing sink" of carbon dioxide to being a net source if fire frequency or decomposition increases. The rate of change in boreal forests is governed by fire frequency and severity, with important effects on carbon and energy flows. In the boreal forests several feedback mechanisms must be quantified to fully understand the role of fire in influencing landscape response to a changing climate. Some topics that this session will address are (1) changes in carbon stocks caused by immediate off-site transfer during the fire and by changes in decomposition and production following fire; (2) changes in energy budgets caused by fire; and (3) changes in the structure of the ecosystem, with associated changes in carbon or energy budgets.

Conveners: Larry Hinzman, Water and Environmental Research Center, University of Alaska Fairbanks, Fairbanks, AK 99775-5860 USA, Tel: +1-907-474-7331, Fax: +1-907-474-7979, E-mail: ffldh@uaf.edu F. Stuart Chapin, Institute of Arctic Biology, University of Alaska, Fairbanks, AK 99775 USA, Tel: +1- 907-474-7922, Fax: +1-907-474-6716, E-mail: fschapin@bonanza.lter.uaf.edu

H01 Predictive Modeling of Geomorphic Processes (Joint With NG)

As geomorphology matures toward being a predictive science, important questions loom. What limits predictability of geomorphic processes? What constitutes adequate model testing? When can we claim that a predictive model is a success? What are the advantages of empirical/statistical models versus mechanistic models? What are the advantages of constructionist models based on rules versus reductionist models derived from physical laws? Contributions are solicited for a poster session that will be held in conjunction with a half-day forum with keynote talks and a 90-minute open discussion.

Conveners: Richard Iverson, U.S. Geological Survey, 5400 MacArthur Blvd., Vancouver, WA 98661 USA, Tel: +1- 360-993-8920, Fax: +1- 360-993-8980, E-mail: riverson@usgs.gov Peter Wilcock, Geography and Environmental Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218 USA, Tel: +1-410-516-5421, Fax: +1-410-516-8996, E-mail: wilcock@jhu.edu

H05 An Integrated View of Subsurface Heterogeneity: Measurements, Geology, Modeling, and Implications for Contaminant Transport (Joint With NG)

Geologists tend to think about aquifers in terms of geologic deposition and modification, while hydrologists tend to choose a more idealized mathematical approach. If and when the heterogeneity problem is solved, these two approaches may become one. This session attempts to provide an integrated view of the latest developments in the fields of geology and hydrology regarding heterogeneity in the subsurface. Talks are sought in four categories: measuring sediment properties in the lab or field; quantitative hydrofacies models; stochastic methods for representing subsurface heterogeneity, including fractals, multi-fractals, and multi-media concepts; and resulting methods for simulating solute transport in heterogeneous media.

Conveners: Michel C. Boufadel, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering Temple University 1947 N. 12th St., Philadelphia, PA 19122 USA, Tel: +1-215-204-7871, Fax: +1-215-204-4696; Fred J. Molz III, Department of Environmental Engineering and Science, Clemson University, Clemson, SC 29625 USA, Tel: +1-864-656-1003; Graham E. Fogg, Department of Land, Air and Water Resources, University of California, Davis, CA 95616-8628 USA, Tel: +1-530-752-6810; David A. Benson, Desert Research Institute, 2215 Raggio Pkwy., Reno, NV 89512 USA, Tel: +1-775-673-7496

H11 State-of-the-Science in Modeling and Interpreting Three-Dimensional Flow and Transport (Joint With NG)

This session will bring together hydrologists that develop and use three-dimensional models of flow and contaminant transport. Recent developments have produced more accurate and efficient models based on the finite element, finite difference, boundary element and analytic element methods, and dual domain, random walk, and method-of-characteristics techniques. Consequently, the model domain is increasing in size and complexity. Papers are solicited that discuss problems that can be addressed using current technology. Papers are especially encouraged that present new methods and their application; use model results to interpret field and laboratory data; and provide modeling results that delineate future challenges.

Conveners: David R. Steward, Department of Civil Engineering, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 66506-2905 USA, Tel: +1-785-532-1585, Fax: +1-785-532-7717, E-mail: steward@ksu.edu Eileen Poeter, International Ground-Water Modeling Center, Department of Geology and Geological Engineering, Colorado School of Mines, 1500 Illinois St., Golden, CO 80401 USA, Tel: +1-303-273-3829, Fax: +1-303-384-2037 or 303-273-3859, E-mail: epoeter@mines.edu

H18 Nonlinear Propagation of Multiple-Scale Dynamics Through Hydrologic Subsystems (Joint With NG)

Hydrology is the study of the interactions between the atmosphere and the land surface, occurring over the full range of time and space scales. How, for example, the space-time variability in the rainfall interacts with spatial variability of soils, topography, vegetation, network geomorphology, etc. to produce spatially and temporally variable fields of runoff, evapotranspiration, and soil moisture is a rich area of research, with applications to flood estimation, climate change studies, and water quality predictions. This session invites contributions that study the propagation of multiple scale effects/variability/errors, cascading through such hydrologic subsystems via nonlinear dynamical interactions. These may include, but are not limited to, rainfall fields, topography and network geomorphology, soils and vegetation, soil-moisture, and near-surface energy and momentum fluxes.

Conveners: Praveen Kumar, 205 N. Mathews Ave., Department of Civil Engineering, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801 USA, Tel: +1-217-333-4688, Fax: +1-217-333-06872, E-mail: kumar1@uiuc.edu Daniel Harris, St. Anthony Falls Laboratory, University of Minnesota, Mississippi River at 3rd Ave. SE, Minneapolis, MN 55414 USA, Tel: +1-612-627-4597, Fax: +1-612-627-4609, E-mail: dh@macedonia.safhl.umn.edu Seth Veitzer, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309 USA, Tel: +1-303-492-8124, Fax: +1-303-492-5070, E-mail: veitzer@colorado.edu

OS12 Air-Wave-Sea Interaction (Joint With A, NG)

Momentum and energy transfers across the air-sea interface under realistic ocean conditions are important not only in theoretical studies, but also in many applications, including marine and oceanic forecast and climate modeling on all scales. Most difficulties that arise in air-sea coupling studies are at the interface (the surface wave layer) of the two fluids. Surface waves are believed to be an important supplier of turbulent energy, besides shear production of the classical turbulence theory. Recent theoretical and experimental studies have contributed to a better understanding of the complex wind-wave-turbulence-current relationship. Therefore, surface wave parameterization and wave-dependent surface characteristics (roughness length, drag coefficient, turbulent dissipation), taking into account the wind-wave-turbulence-current relationship, have a very important role, not only in small-scale models, but also in larger scale forecast and climate models. Lately, air-wave-sea coupled systems have been developed by various national and international groups using a different coupling physics. This special section will be a forum to exchange ideas and results between marine and oceanic small scale and larger scale coupled modeling and experimental researchers.

Convener: Le Ly, Department of Oceanography, Naval Postgraduate School, Code Oc/Le, Monterey,CA 93943 USA, Tel: +1-831-656-3257, Fax: +1-831-656-2712, E-mail: lely@nps.navy.mil

OS19 Nontraditional Oceanographic Applications for Oceanographic Data (Joint With G, NG)

Today, oceanographers, geophysicists, geodesists, and climate researchers are using a large amount of oceanographic data (i.e., numerical models, satellite observations, and in-situ measurements) to conduct non-traditional oceanographic research. This session will provide a forum for expanding the dialogue between these communities by addressing the following two issues. The first issue the session will address is the advances in instrumentation and modeling, and future oceanographic related studies. The second issue this session will emphasize is the application of these datasets to non-traditional oceanographic research and how this non-traditional research can enhance our understanding of large-scale and mesoscale oceanic variability.

Conveners: Thomas Johnson, U.S. Naval Observatory, 3450 Massachusetts Ave. NW, Washington DC 20392-5420 USA, Tel: +1-202-762-1518, Fax: +1-202-762-1563, E-mail: tj@CasA.usno.navy.mil Richard Gross, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, M/S 238-332, Pasadena, CA 91109 USA, Tel: +1-818-354-4010, Fax: +1-818-393-6890, E-mail: rsg@logos.jpl.nasa.gov

SM02 Multi- and Cross-Scale Processes in Space Plasmas (Joint With SA, SH, and NG)

Research activity in space plasma physics is now arriving at an interesting juncture that becomes apparent when we look back at what has been accomplished in the past and look forward to what will be required in the future. In this regard, we note that considerable observational and theoretical attention has been devoted toward the understanding of local point observations from spacecraft and sounding rockets. On the other hand, new and future observations are becoming multispacecraft in scope, and theoretical models are likewise being forced to confront issues of nonlocality. For systems involving nonlocality, we encounter many situations in which multiscale processes such as coupled micro-macro effects, wave-particle interactions, forced and/or self-organized criticality interactions among coherent structures, and intermittent turbulence connected with large- and small-scale fluid motion and electric and magnetic fields are important. There is at present a significant base of useful observations that may be utilized to help resolve some of the basic issues of multi- and cross-scale coupling phenomena in space plasmas. This special session is convened to address these issues. Papers are invited on observational, theoretical, and modeling aspects in such multi- and cross-scale space plasma processes.

Conveners: Tom Chang, Center for Space Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Ave., Room 37-261, Cambridge, MA 02139 USA, Tel: +1-617-253-7523, Fax: +1-617-253-0861, E-mail: tsc@space.mit.edu Nicholas Watkins, Physical Sciences Division, British Antarctic Survey, High Cross, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0ET, UK, Tel: +44-1223-221545, Fax: +44-1223-221226, E-mail: nww@bas.ac.uk

T06 Interactions Between Tectonics and Surface Processes (Joint With H, S, NG)

Rapid new advances are now being made in our understanding of surface processes operating in active tectonic settings. Yet there remains a need for greater integration with the latest findings of how faults grow through time. Recently, structural geologists and geophysicists have made significant progress in mapping and modeling spatial and temporal rates of propagation and displacement along tectonic structures. This information is only just beginning to filter through to the geomorphology and sedimentology communities. The manner in which surface processes respond to a fluctuating tectonic signal will play a first-order role in determining the subsequent landscape evolution, as well as the size and location of sediment entry points into basins and the nature and distribution of syntectonic strata. This topic represents an outstanding problem in nonlinear dynamics and is of fundamental importance to our understanding of how coupled geologic processes work. Furthermore, the structural geology and paleoseismology communities can gain useful insights into interpreting the temporal record of active faulting by considering geomorphological and sedimentological evidence. This session is an attempt to fill these needs by bringing together structural geologists, paleoseismologists, geophysicists, geomorphologists, and sedimentologists to discuss the state of the art in understanding coupled structural-geomorphic-sedimentary systems. We welcome interdisciplinary contributions to this session that deal with field observations (structural, paleoseismological, and sedimentological/geomorphological), landscape evolution modeling, fault growth modeling, and theoretical work on the physics of erosion/transport/deposition at different scales in active tectonic settings.

Conveners: Patience Cowie, Department of Geology and Geophysics, Edinburgh University, Edinburgh EH9 3J, UK, Tel: +44-131-650-5886, Fax: +44-131-668-3184, E-mail: cowie@glg.ed.ac.uk Ruth Robinson, School of Geography and Geosciences, University of St Andrews, St Andrews, Fife KY16 9ST, UK, Tel: +01334-463996, E-mail: rajr@st-andrews.ac.uk Gregory E. Tucker, Deparment of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Institute of Technology, Room 48-429 Cambridge, MA 02139 USA, Tel: +1-617-253-7475, E-mail: greg.tucker@geography.oxford.ac.uk

Snow, Ice Permafrost (SIP)

OS05 IMAGES: Rapid Climatic Changes and Ice Sheets-Ocean-Climate Interactions (Joint With SIP)

IMAGES (International Marine Past Global Change) is an international program with the Institut de Physique du Globe de Paris’s PAGES (Past Global Change) initiative. A critical component of the IMAGES research is the employment of the French research vessel Marion Dufresne, "armed" with the Calypso giant piston coring system. This system has taken suites of piston cores in the range of 20–60 m from a variety of sites from continental margins to deep-sea basins, with the view of recovering sediments that will allow the reconstruction of ocean variability on decadal to millennial timescales. In 1999 an ambitious international cruise was developed as part of the IMAGES program (IMAGES V) with a general research theme of "North Atlantic high resolution study of the variability of surface and deep water hydrology in relation to local and global climate." The cruise consisted of five legs, with changes of researchers in the Caribbean (starting point), Quebec City, Reykjavik, Tromso, Reykjavik, Brest, and ending in Marseilles. Dr E. Jansen from the University of Bergen was the overall Chief Scientist. Canada, the United States, Norway, Germany, United Kingdom, and other countries contributed to ship costs, although the cruise was heavily subsidized by the French government. A major focus was on the retrieval of sediments from sites that would have very high rates of sediment accumulation. Examples of such sites were fjords and shelf-troughs and sediment drifts from sites on the east and northeast Canadian margin, southwest and north Iceland, Norway, Spitsbergen, and East Greenland. Initial AMS 14C dates from these sites indicate that sediment accumulation rates range from 1 to 4 m/ky! Other sites from this and earlier IMAGES cruises have slower rates, but are sufficient to capture ocean variability during MIS 3, 4, and 5 at the same scale as the Greenland Summit ice cores.

Conveners: John T. Andrews, Institute for Arctic and Alpine Research and Department of Geological Sciences, University of Colorado, Box 450, Boulder, CO 80309 USA, Tel: +1-303-492-5183, Fax: +1-303-492-6388, E-mail: andrewsj@spot.colorado.edu Eystein Jansen, Department of Geology, University of Bergen, Allégaten 4, N-5007 Bergen, Norway, Tel: +47-55-583491, Fax: +47-55-584330, E-mail: eystein.jansen@geol.uib.no Laurent Labeyrie, Department des Sciences de la Terre, l'Universite Paris-Sud Orsay, Bt 504, 91405 Orsay, et Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l'Environnement, Unité Mixte CEA-CNRS, Bat 12, Domaine du CNRS, Av. de la Terrasse, F-91198 Gif/Yvette Cedex, France, Tel: +33-1-69-82-35-36, Fax: +33-1-69-82-35-68 E-mail: labeyrie@mailhost.lsce.cnrs-gif.fr

OS08 Cenozoic Antarctic Glacial Evolution: The Marine Geologic Record (Joint With GP, T, SIP)

In recent years, the Ocean Drilling Program has conducted a series of cruises to the Antarctic continental margin as well as to the Southern Ocean (here broadly defined as the ocean between the southern continents and Antarctica). In addition, research vessels of various nations have conducted geologic investigations in the far reaches of the Southern Ocean and along the Antarctic margin. Studies on cores and geologic samples collected by these expeditions continue to yield exciting results on Cenozoic high-latitude paleoenvironments. The proposed session will bring together scientists involved in Antarctic and sub-Antarctic marine geological research that is focused on Cenozoic Antarctic glacial history and its record in the marine environment. Emphasis will be on geologic sampling of the current and former continental margins of Antarctica and links to deep ocean records of Cenozoic glaciations.

Conveners: Detlef "Dietz" Warnke, Department of Geological Sciences, California State University, Hayward, CA 94542 USA, Tel: +1-510-885-4716, Fax: +1-510-885-2526, E-mail: dwarnke@csuhayward.edu Alan K. Cooper, Department of Geological and Environmental Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 USA, Tel: +1-650-723-0817, Fax: +1-650-725-2199, E-mail: akcooper@pangea.stanford.edu

OS11 Sediment Rafting by Marine, Fluvial, and Lacustrine Ice (Joint With SIP)

Sediment that is entrained into seasonal ice can be widely dispersed if the ice is mobile. The ice buoyancy carries entrained sediment past normal (hydraulic) sediment transport barriers. This is a cause of concern in the Arctic Ocean, where potentially contaminated sediment may be dispersed throughout the basin by drifting ice. Sediment-laden seasonal ice has been documented in oceans, rivers, and lakes. For this session we solicit presentations of field observations, modeling efforts, and laboratory studies that elucidate ice rafting in diverse environments. Topics of particular interest include (1) observations or models of environmental conditions that lead to sediment entrainment into the ice cover, including interactions of frazil and anchor ice with sediment; (2) descriptions of sediment entrained into ice covers (mineralogy, grain size, grain surface characteristics, sorbed contaminants, etc.); (3) observations or models that identify sources and fates of ice-rafted material in different environments; and (4) studies that assess the relative importance of ice rafting to other sediment transport mechanisms. The goal of this session is to come to a better understanding sediment transport by ice in all aqueous environments.

Conveners: Ed Kempema, Geology and Geophysics, University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY 82072 USA, Tel: +1-307-766-2885, Fax: +1-307-766-6679, E-Mail: kempema@uwyo.edu Erk Reimnitz, Geomar Wischhofstrasse 1-3, Geb. 4, D-24148 Kiel, Germany, Tel: +1-650-329-5285, E-Mail: erk@octopus.wr.usgs.gov

Study of the Earth's Deep Interior (SEDI)

GP02 The Time-Averaged Geomagnetic Field and Paleosecular Variation (Joint With SEDI)

The availability of compilations of paleomagnetic data has stimulated renewed interest in global paleomagnetic average field and secular variation modeling. However, there remain substantial gaps in both temporal and spatial sampling of the paleomagnetic field. Consequently, there is little consensus on what features are required in the time-averaged field, or whether there exist significant geographic differences in paleosecular variation. Most recent global field modeling has concentrated on the 0-5 Ma time period due to the better spatial and temporal distribution of data; however, local data sets extending beyond 5 Ma can be used to elucidate field behavior over longer time periods. Many studies have focused on stable polarity intervals, but a complicating issue is determining what can be regarded as normal secular variation, and what should be considered excursional or transitional in the continuum of geomagnetic field behavior. In addition to new data sets and associated field models, progress in numerical simulations of the geodynamo has enabled, within the constraints of current modeling capabilities, the investigation of field behavior over paleomagnetic timescales. Suitable contributions for this session include new data sets for use in paleofield modeling, as well as modeling studies, results from geodynamo simulations, and more theoretical papers directed at elucidating the long-term behavior of the geomagnetic field.

Convener: Catherine Johnson, Incorporated Research Institutions for Seismology, 1200 New York Ave., Suite 800, Washington, DC 20005 USA, Tel: +1-202-682-2220, Fax: +1-202-682-2444, E-mail: catherine@iris.edu Neil Opdyke, Department of Geology, B 137 Turlington hall, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611-2036 USA, Tel: +1-904-392-6127, Fax: +1-904-392-9294, E-mail: drno@nersp.nerdc.ufl.edu

GP03 Paleointensity From Archean to the Present (Joint With SEDI)

New methods for estimating paleogeomagnetic field strength in both absolute and relative terms are being introduced at an impressive rate (e.g., using isotopes of various atmospheric components, microwave techniques, numerical simulations, and improved Thellier and pseudo-Thellier techniques). New data resulting from these efforts are challenging long-held beliefs about the long- and short-term behavior of the geomagnetic field. Are these new data converging on a new understanding of geomagnetic field behavior? Abstracts are solicited concerning new data, new techniques, or new interpretations of old data derived from simulated, absolute, or relative paleointensity methods.

Convener: Lisa Tauxe, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California at San Diego La Jolla, CA 92093-0220 USA, Tel: +1- 858-534-6084, Fax: +1-858-534-0784, E-mail: ltauxe@ucsd.edu

GP06 Electromagnetic Investigation of the Earth (Joint With T, MRP, SEDI)

This session solicits contributions on the theory and practice of electromagnetic methods for the examination of structure and properties of Earth’s near-surface, crust, mantle, and core. Papers describing advances in instrumentation, algorithms, and laboratory measurements that improve our understanding of Earth’s internal constitution and the phenomena therein are encouraged.

Conveners: Chester Weiss, Geophysical Technology Division, Sandia National Laboratories, PO Box 5800, MS 0750, Albuquerque, NM 87185-0750 USA, Tel: +1-505-284-6347, Fax: +1-505-844-7354 E-mail: cjweiss@sandia.gov Lee Slater, Department of Geosciences, University of Missouri Kansas City, MO USA, Tel: +1-816-235-5535, Fax: +1-816-235-2978, E-mail: SlaterL@umkc.edu

H32 Water Quality Impacts of Contaminated Sediments (Joint With SEDI)

Sediment contamination is prevalent in U.S. waterways, notably in lakes, rivers, and estuaries near major urban and industrial centers. Investigation of contaminated sediments requires an interdisciplinary approach, because physical processes control bulk sediment mobility, but often the contaminant of interest is a reactive constituent that has become associated with the sediments. This session seeks to explore the interdisciplinary nature of sediment-related environmental problems by examining the mechanisms by which sediments become contaminated, properties of contaminated sediments, and impacts of contaminated sediments on water quality and ecological systems. Appropriate papers could analyze topics such as contaminant interactions with fluvial, lacustrine, estuarine, and marine sediments; the properties, mobility, and transport of contaminated sediments; releases of contaminants from sediments to biota or overlying waters; and remediation strategies for sediment-related contamination.

Conveners: Aaron Packman, Department of Civil and Architectural Engineering, Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA 19104 USA, Tel: +1-215-895-2087, Fax: +1-215-895-1363, E-mail: apack@drexel.edu Karen Prestegaard, Dept. of Geology, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742-0001 USA, Tel: +1-301-405-6982, Fax: +1-301-314-9661, E-mail: kpresto@glue.umd.edu

S07 Melts and Volatiles in the Deep Mantle (Joint With T, V, MRP, SEDI)

Once believed to be confined to the low-velocity zone and at shallow depths in tectonically active regions, recent seismological results indicate a much greater distribution of partial melts in the mantle, with evidence of melts ranging from transition zone depths through the lower mantle to the core-mantle boundary. Concomitant with this is a deepening understanding of the abundance and cycling of volatile components in the Earth's mantle. This session will focus on seismological, laboratory, and theoretical characterization and quantification of partial melts and volatiles in the mantle, their role in mantle dynamics, and their temporal evolution in abundance and mode. We encourage submissions from seismology, mineral physics, geodynamics, geochemistry, and volcanology.

Conveners: Justin Revenaugh, Earth Sciences, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95060 USA, Tel: +1-831-459-3055, Fax: +1-831-459-3074, E-mail: jsr@monk.ucsc.edu Lars P. Stixrude, Department of Geology, University of Michigan, 2534 C. C. Little Bldg., 425 E. University Ave., Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1063 USA, Tel: +1-313-647-9071, Fax: +1-313-763-4690, E-mail: stixrude@umich.edu

S08 Thermal and Chemical Structures in the Core-Mantle Boundary Region: Implications for the Evolution of the Deep Interior (Joint With G, GP, T, MRP, SEDI)

Thermal and chemical structures in the core-mantle boundary (CMB) region are shaped by dynamics in the Earth's interior and provide clues to the long-term evolution of the planet. A wide range of processes, from large-scale convection to small-scale melting and chemical reactions, are likely to contribute to the complexity of the boundary region. We welcome reports dealing with theoretical, observational, and experimental studies of the boundary region. Topics include, but are not restricted to, the structure and evolution of the thermal boundary layer, chemical stratification at the base of the mantle or top of the core, melting relations and physical properties of mantle minerals, evidence and implications of small-scale structure, effect of boundary layer structure on CMB topography, and observational techniques for discriminating between chemical and thermal boundary layers.

Conveners: Bruce Buffett, Department of Earth and Ocean Sciences, University of British Columbia 2219 Main Mall, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z4 Canada, Tel: +1-604-822-3466, Fax: +1-604-822-6088, E-mail: buffett@geop.ubc.ca Anne M. Hofmeister, Department of Earth and Planetary Science Washington University, Campus Box 1169, 1 Brookings Dr., St. Louis, MO 63130 USA, Tel: +1-314-935-7440, Fax: +1-314-935-7361, E-mail: Hofmeist@levee.wustl.edu Michael Wysession, Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Washington University, Campus Box 1169, 1 Brookings Dr., St. Louis, MO 63130 USA, Tel: +1-314-935-5625, Fax: +1-314-935-7361, E-mail: michael@wucore.wustl.edu

T02 Observational Constraints on the Dynamics of Subducting Slabs (Joint With G, S, V, SEDI)

The detailed dynamic evolution of subducting slabs is poorly understood. From a physical point of view, we know that the slab is one component of a complex interacting system of mantle convection and the lithospheric plates. The nature of the coupling between plates and mantle is still strongly debated. It is probable, however, that small scale plate boundary processes play a controlling role in the behavior of the large-scale system, and will certainly need to be included in large-scale models in parameterized form. For this reason, modeling cannot proceed from a purely theoretical viewpoint. Strong observational constraints are required to train the parameterized models. In this session we wish to consider the broadest range of observations that will bear upon the understanding of subducting lithosphere, including those from plate kinematics, seismic tomography, earthquake mechanisms, the subsidence record from oceanic and continental basins, geochemistry, the geological record in island arcs, and active continental margins. We would like to build up a slab taxonomy by considering how subduction zones behave in the wild. Do slabs really look like the pictures we see in textbooks? How often do slabs roll back? What makes slabs tear or break, and how do they behave when this happens? How do slabs evolve in the presence/absence of a nearby continental margin? How can slabs change polarity, and how frequently do they do so? When do slabs flatten under continents, and why? We are particularly keen to foster the involvement of scientists having detailed knowledge of observational constraints with more theoretical modelers. What is the state of the art in modeling of convergent plate boundaries? In what ways are these models still limited? What time-dependent behaviors of subducted slabs are by models, and can observations be used to verify the solutions? What do the models tell us about plate driving forces?

Conveners: L. Moresi, CSIRO Exploration and Mining, PO Box 437, Nedlands, WA 6009, Australia, Tel: +61-8-9389-8421, Fax: +61-8-9389-1906, E-mail: l.moresi@ned.dem.csiro.au R. Dietmar Müller, School of Geosciences, Division of Geology and Geophysics, Bldg. F05, University of Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia, Tel: +61-2-9351-2003, Fax: +61-2-9351-0184, E-mail: dietmar@es.usyd.edu.au

V01The Properties of Fe and Fe-Bearing Phases at High Pressures (Joint With GP, S, T, MRP, SEDI)

Iron is the fourth most abundant element in the Earth and, therefore, it plays an important role in most geochemical and petrological processes within the Earth. The fact that Fe can exist in a variety of valence states means that the geochemical character of Fe can vary depending on the reigning oxygen fugacity (fO2). The purpose of this special session is to bring together researchers who are interested in the properties of Fe° and Fe2+- and Fe3+-bearing phases at high pressures and the influence these properties may have on mantle processes and core formation. In addition to experimentally based studies, theoretical aspects and pertinent observations from natural samples are welcome.

Conveners: Alan Woodland, Institute of Mineralogy, University of Heidelberg, Germany E-mail: alan@classic.min.uni-heidelberg.de Dan Frost, Bayerisches Geoinstitut, University of Bayreuth, 95440 Bayreuth, Germany, E-mail: dan.frost@uni-bayreuth.de


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