2001 Fall Meeting Town Meetings

NASA Town Meeting

        

Earth Science Enterprise Research Strategy for 2000-2010 and Global Water and Energy Cycle

Monday, 10 December
1830h to 2030h
Moscone, Room 131
How is the Earth changing and what are the consequences for life on Earth? NASA proposes to discuss progress in meeting the goals of its "Earth Science Enterprise (ESE) Research Strategy for 2000-2010" with the scientific community. We will use this opportunity to outline broad opportunities for involvement by the scientific community in all aspects of NASA supported Earth science research. The mission of NASA's Earth Science Enterprise (ESE) is to develop a scientific understanding of the Earth system and its response to natural or human-induced changes, and improve prediction capabilities for climate, weather, global air quality and natural hazards. The NASA Earth Science program is driven by the recognition of the societal importance of the variability of the planetary environment and the realization that humans are no longer passive participants in the evolution of the Earth system. The central paradigm of the program is based on the recognition that: (1) the Earth can be understood only as an interactive system embracing the atmosphere, oceans and sea-ice, glaciers and ice-sheets, marine and terrestrial ecosystems, the land surface, and the Earth's interior; (2) new environmental problems are likely to arise, the solutions of which must draw on years of accumulated knowledge; and (3) science is a partner in national and international decision-making aiming to develop the potential to benefit society and to enhance economic security. ESE aims to obtain a scientific understanding of the entire Earth system on a global scale by describing how its component parts and their interactions have evolved, how they function, and how they may be expected to continue to evolve on all time scales. The challenge is to develop the capability to predict those changes that will occur in the next decade to century, both naturally and in response to human activity.

In addition, the chair of the NASA Earth System Science (ESE) and Application Advisory Committee will discuss current plans and perspectives for the NASA Global Water and Energy Cycle Research (GWEC) initiative. (GWEC is an element of the ESE Science Program). Acting upon the long-term research strategy adopted by the U.S. Global Change Research Program, NASA has undertaken a multidisciplinary study of changes in the global water cycle induced by global climate variations, and consequences of those changes for the continental water balance and resources. This science theme aims to progress beyond the simplifications of planetary energy balance and feedbacks, and quasi-linear climate responses (global warming) to various radiative forcing factors. The theme will focus on changes in the rate of water and energy exchanges or transformation in the climate system, and consequences for weather and hydrologic processes.

 

Central America SEIZE and SUBFAC: MARGINS Workshop Results and New Initiatives

         Monday, 10 December
1830h to 2030h
Moscone, Room 133
Two of the primary initiatives of the MARGINS program are the Seismogenic Zone and the Subduction Factory. A workshop was held July 9-13, 2001, at the Hotel La Condesa in Heredia, Costa Rica to discuss what had been accomplished thus far and to make recommendations for further work. The workshop focused on the following topics: Role of incoming plate structure and plate kinematics on earthquake behavior and tsunami generation; Role of fluid, mass, heat, and volatile fluxes on seismogenic behavior; Effect of incoming plate structure on arc geochemistry and volcano behavior; Crust and mantle fluxes and evolution; and Effects on local populations. The purpose of this town meeting, following a synopsis of the workshop, is to develop a strategy for mounting several major interdisciplinary programs to address many of these broad themes. Examples might include passive and active seismic experiments designed at understanding the deep structure of the arc system; a program to expand our knowledge of the Nicaragua system sufficiently to allow meaningful comparisons with Costa Rica; acquisition of aeromagnetic and aerogravity data of the Costa Rica-Nicaragua system; and IODP drilling.

 

Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Town Meeting

         Tuesday, 11 December
1730h to 1930h
Moscone, Room 132
Come hear the latest news about ODP and its successor, the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP), which is slated to begin on October 1, 2003. In conjunction with the December AGU Meeting in San Francisco, JOI/USSSP is sponsoring a Scientific Ocean Drilling Town Meeting. Scientific community leaders will provide brief updates on ODP and IODP. This is an opportunity to ask questions and voice your opinions. All are welcome.

Refreshments will be served.

 

International Association of Hydrological Sciences (IAHS) Prediction of Ungaged Basins (PUBS)

         Thursday, 13 December
1530h to 1900h
Moscone, Room 130
In order to focus the scientific activities of the International Association of Hydrological Sciences(IAHS) and to make the scientific potentials practical, IAHS initiated a unique science discussion over the Internet. Many exchanges occurred, and numerous areas of research were proposed. One proposal that received enthusiastic support from the various IAHS scientific

commissions and individuals was on the subject of research on ungaged basins. In The Netherlands in July 2001 at the 6th Scientific Assembly of IAHS, it was recommended that a Working Group(WG) on Prediction of Ungaged Basins(PUBS) be established, and that this PUBS WG hold a series of open discussion meetings and workshops to define the appropriate research approaches to follow in addressing the ungaged basins problem. This meeting at AGU will be the first meeting in the series.

 

NSF Town Meeting

        

The Hydrologic Cycle and Its Role in Arctic and Global Environmental Change

Thursday, 13 December
1830h to 2030h
Moscone, Room 131
In September 2000, thirty-three scientists representing the physical, chemical, and biological disciplines met in a workshop in Santa Barbara CA to identify the critical research gaps and formulate a strategy to address the research needs related to arctic hydrology. Key challenges were associated with (a) a sparse and declining observational network, (b) lack of understanding of the basic hydrological processes operating across the pan-Arctic, and (c) absences of cross-disciplinary synthesis. These gaps demonstrate an urgent need to reformulate the manner in which arctic hydrological research is funded and executed. Implementation of the recommended actions will require a dedicated research program to support arctic hydrological synthesis studies. Such a program does not now exist, yet has been called for as a component of the U.S. Global Change Research Program=s initiative on the water cycle. To support this new science, members of the scientific community have recommended that NSF invest in the development of a pan-Arctic Community-wide Hydrological Analysis and Monitoring Program (Arctic-CHAMP) to provide a framework for integration studies of the pan-Arctic water cycle and to articulate the role of freshwater in terrestrial ecosystem, biogeochemical, biogeophysical, ocean, climate, and human dynamics. The primary aim of Arctic-CHAMP is to catalyze and coordinate interdisciplinary research with the goal of constructing a holistic understanding of arctic hydrology through integration of routine observations, process-based field studies, and integrative modeling. The contributions of an Arctic-CHAMP toward articulating the diverse physical, biological, and human vulnerabilities to a changing climate provide an important impetus for international cooperation in wisely managing this critical part of the earth system. The goal of this meeting is to inform the research community of this recommended program and to solicit input on the scope and execution of the effort.

 

Nankai Seismogenic Zone Experiment Town Meeting

         Thursday, 13 December
1830h to 2030h
Moscone, Room 133
The purpose of the town meeting will be to give a progress report on a preliminary proposal for IODP Seismogenic Zone Drilling in the Nankai Trough, and to discuss appropriate strategies for an integrated Nankai IODP drilling program plan in preparation for submission of the full IODP proposal.

 

2001 Fall Meeting
AGU top page