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Meeting Calendar
 20 Feb  2006 Ocean Sciences Meeting

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Named Lectures
Activities & Events
Town Hall Meetings

  Special Activities & Events

Scientific Sessions

Plenary Sessions

Tuesday, 21 February

OS21A Plenary I
HCC, Level 4, Ballroom
0800h: Reading the Ocean by the Light of its Inhabitants presented by E Widder, Ocean Research and Conservation Association
0845h: Ocean Scientists - What can we do to Enhance Ocean Literacy? presented by A Paytan, Stanford University


Wednesday, 22 February

OS31A Plenary II
HCC, Level 4, Ballroom
0800h: Biodiversity and Biocomplexity: A Coral Reef Example presented by N Knowlton, University of California, San Diego
0845h: Dynamics of Coastal Biogeochemical Processes: Marching to a Different Drummer presented by R A Jahnke, Skidaway Institute of Oceanography


Thursday, 23 February

OS41A Plenary III
HCC, Level 4, Ballroom
0800h: Ocean Observing Systems and the Interaction of Technology, Information and Understanding presented by J J Cullen, Dalhousie University
0845h: State of Fear the Day After Tomorrow? A Geological Perspective on Global Climate Change presented by G Philander, Princeton University


Friday, 24 February

OS51A Plenary IV
HCC, Level 4, Ballroom
0800h: Bio-optics: Relevance for Biological-Physical Interactions presented by S Sathyendranth, Bedford Institute of Oceanography
0845h: From Ocean Acoustics to Acoustic Oceanography presented by W Munk, Scripps Institution of Oceanography



Agency Lecture

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Tuesday, 21 February

NOAA Agency Lecture: Earth Observations: What does it take to Predict and Protect? (more)
Presented by VADM Lautenbacher
HCC, Level 4, Ballroom
1830h



Named Lectures

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Wednesday, 22 February

Sverdrup Lecture: Freshwater Influences on Coastal Productivity and Harmful Algal Blooms
Presented by B Hickey, University of Washington
HCC, Level 4, Ballroom
1145h
(Please bring your lunch.)


Friday, 24 February

Munk Lecture: A Greenland Sea Diary - and Other Stories
Presented by P Worcester, Scripps Institution of Oceanography
HCC, Level 4, Ballroom
1000h


Activities and Events

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Sunday, 19 February

Ice Breaker
HCC, Level 3
1700h-1900h

Wednesday, 22 February

Ocean Sciences Award Presentation
HCC, Level 4, Ballroom
1145h

Thursday, 23 February

TOS Fellows Presentation
HCC, Level 1, Exhibit Hall, TOS Booth
1700h

Aloha Reception
HCC, Level 4, Rooftop Garden
1830h-2100h

Friday, 24 February

Munk Award Presentation
HCC, Level 4, Ballroom
920h

TOS Business Meeting
HCC, Level 3, Room 327
1200h
(Open to all TOS Members.)


Town Halls

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Agency Lecture

Tuesday, 21 February

Earth Observations: What does it take to Predict and Protect?

HCC, Level 4, Ballroom
1830h
Presented by VADM Lautenbacher

Observations for the sake of observations are of immense importance to the scientific community. To society at large, however; observations alone are often meaningless without the actions and tools that provide economic and societal benefit. Reducing loss of life and property from disasters and monitoring our ocean resources are two of the nine societal benefits in both the U.S. and international plans for the Global Earth Observing System of Systems.

A comprehensive global Earth observation system could lead to dramatic improvements in NOAA's ability to predict and protect. Improved data collection and management is a high priority requiring an integrated approach, such as that outlined in the U.S. Ocean Action Plan. Strengthened international cooperation in the collection of high-quality observations will provide the basis for sound decision-making.

Linking the various observational systems for the benefit of society is a significant challenge; nevertheless, NOAA and our partners here at home and around the world are committed to leading this effort.



Monday, 20 February

MPOWIR: Mentoring Physical Oceanography Women to Increase Retention

HCC, Level 3, Room 316C
1830h
Hosted by Scripps Institution of Oceanography

Although the number of women receiving their Ph.D. in physical oceanography has approached 40%, the number of women occupying tenure-track positions and/or attaining principal investigator (PI) status remains fairly low. As recently reported in the Chronicle of Higher Education, the disparity between the number of women trained in a scientific field and the number subsequently occupying positions in that field is attributed by some to subtle biases that keep women out of research or academic positions. Others argue that women are simply staying away of their own accord. MPOWIR (Mentoring Physical Oceanography Women to Increase Retention), funded by ONR and NSF, is a community effort to design a mentoring program for junior women in the field of physical oceanography to help remove barriers, real or perceived, in their career development. An overview of MPOWIR will be presented along with a panel discussion of early career challenges, followed by informal exchanges over refreshments.

Needs and Requirements for the Generation of Ocean Color Climate Data Records in the NPOESS Era

HCC, Level 3, Room 314
1830h
Hosted by College of Oceanic & Atmospheric Sciences, Oregon State University

With the advent of the National Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite System (NPOESS), NOAA will play a larger role in the design and implementation of ocean color sensors. The NPOESS Preparatory Project (NPP), which is scheduled for launch later this decade, is joint NASA/NOAA mission that will carry a Visible Infrared Imager Suite (VIIRS). This sensor will help bridge between NASA's research ocean color missions and NPOESS. The meeting seeks: 1) to involve the oceans community regarding the requirements for the definition and the generation of Ocean Color Climate Data Records (CDRs) needed to ensure that the quality of the ocean color data produced over the next two decades can be used to study interannual and long-term variability in the marine environment and, 2) to inform the community about the present status and challenges regarding Ocean Color CDRs using the next generation of US ocean color satellite sensors.

Ocean Research, Education and Facilities: Status and Outlook from the National Science Foundation, the Joint Oceanographic Institutions and the Consortium for Oceanographic Research and Education

HCC, Level 3, Room 315
1830h
Hosted by Joint Oceanographic Institutions

This Town Hall provides an update on current status and outlook for National Science Foundation (NSF) Division of Ocean Sciences (OCE) activities. Discussion topics will include an overview of the diversity of OCE programs and special initiatives, as well as the NSF budget and implications for grant awards, infrastructure investment, and balancing facilities operations and research support. This is an opportunity for members of the ocean sciences community to communicate with OCE leadership on the challenges of research funding and addressing the dynamics of facility operations and new construction.

In addition to this overview, updates will be given on developments in ocean observing from the Executive Steering Committee of the Ocean Research Interactive Observatory Networks (ORION) Project Office; on scientific ocean drilling from the U.S. Advisory Committee for Ocean Drilling and on future directions in ocean research and education.

Refreshments will be provided.


Tuesday, 21 February

Development of a Federal 10-Year Ocean Research Priorities Plan and Implementation Strategy

HCC, Level 3, Room 316C
1930h
Hosted by Joint Subcommittee on Ocean Science and Technology

In 2005 the National Science and Technology Council established the Joint Subcommittee on Ocean Science and Technology (JSOST) to provide advice and assistance on national ocean science and technology issues. In response to the U.S. Commission on Ocean Policy's Report, the Bush Administration issued the "U.S. Ocean Action Plan" (OAP) outlining the fundamental components that provide the foundation to advance the next generation of ocean, coastal, and Great Lakes policy. As part of the OAP, the JSOST was tasked with developing a Ten-Year Ocean Research Priorities Plan and Implementation Strategy by December 31, 2006. The plan will describe a vision for U.S. ocean science and technology, describe the challenges to be addressed, identify key themes, specify goals for each theme and a time frame for their achievement, and address implications for the use or prioritization of resources. The Town Hall provides an opportunity for the ocean research community to exchange ideas with the JSOST.

Earth Science and Applications for Space: A Decadal Study by the National Academies

HCC, Level 3, Room 316A
1930h
Hosted by National Academy of Sciences

The National Academies Space Studies Board, in consultation with other units of the NRC, will lead a study to generate consensus recommendations from the Earth and environmental science and applications community regarding a systems approach to space-based and ancillary observations that encompasses the research programs of NASA and the related operational programs of NOAA and the USGS. The study will be conducted in a manner similar to previous NRC "decadal" studies.

The National Oceanographic Partnership Program and the Ocean Action Plan

HCC, Level 3, Room 315
1930h
Hosted by National Oceanographic Partnership Program

The National Oceanographic Partnership Program (NOPP) is a collaboration of fifteen federal agencies to provide leadership and coordination of national oceanographic research and education initiatives. The U.S. Congress established NOPP to promote the national goals of assuring national security, advancing economic development, protecting quality of life, and strengthening science education and communication through improved knowledge of the ocean. NOPP was designed to coordinate and strengthen oceanographic efforts in support of these goals through partnerships among federal agencies, academia, industry, and other members of the ocean sciences community.

This Town Hall provides the ocean sciences community an opportunity to learn about NOPP activities, including ocean observations, education, infrastructure, and partnership efforts. Discussion topics will also include the Ocean Action Plan, the Administration's response to the final report of the U.S. Commission on Ocean Policy, and how NOPP efforts fit into this Plan.

Refreshments will be provided.


Wednesday, 22 February

Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation Town Hall

HCC, Level 3, Room 318
1830h
Hosted by Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation

The Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation (GBMF, www.moore.org) is one of the top ten nonprofit foundations in the US with a special interest in science and environment issues. One specific area of interest is marine microbiology, in which we have a 10 year, $145M initiative (http://www.moore.org/marinemicro), which was launched in 2004. Though GBMF does not accept unsolicited proposals, we look for community input on our research support activities. Please join us for an open forum discussion on pressing research needs in marine microbiology. Contact Lita Proctor at lita.proctor@moore.org for more information.

NASA Town Hall

HCC, Level 3, Room 316B
1830h
Hosted by NASA

NASA Oceanography is involved in advanced planning on many levels ranging from the programmatic to agency-wide. As ocean research from space moves forward with new measurements such as ocean salinity, we continue to plan for exciting new measurements and research opportunities in Earth System Science. This town hall will provide the opportunity to discuss key issues at NASA, ranging from infrastructure to research and budget. NASA Headquarters staff members will be present to discuss various research plans within the programs and agency, as well as to answer questions. This town hall is open to all.

Research in NOAA:Understanding Global Ecosystems to Support Informed Decision-Making

HCC, Level 3, Room 315
1830h
Hosted by National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration

NOAA completed its first corporate 20-year Research Vision and 5-Year Research Plan in January 2005. In the coming year, NOAA will be revising the 5-Year Research Plan to reflect comments received from the extramural research community and reflect the priorities of the Ocean Research Priorities Plan under development by the Joint Subcommittee on Ocean Science and Technology (JSOST) of the U.S. Committee on Ocean Policy.

We welcome colleagues from the ocean research community to attend this town hall to discuss the future direction of NOAA's research activities as captured in the 5-year Research Plan and 20-year Research Vision and provide input for the revision of the 5-Year Research Plan. An overview of the Vision and Plan will be presented, followed by questions and discussion.

You are encouraged to review the 20-Year Research Vision and 5-Year Research Plan prior to the town hall. The Vision and Plan may be accessed at http://www.nrc.noaa.gov/Reports.htm. If you need additional information, please contact Dr. Terry Schaefer at (301) 713-2465 ext.184 or terry.schaefer@noaa.gov.

The GLOBEC-CLIOTOP Project

HCC, Level 3, Room 314
1830h
Hosted by IRD

CLIOTOP (Climate Impacts on Oceanic TOp Predators http://www.pml.ac.uk/globec/structure/regional/cliotop/cliotop.htm) is a recently implemented international project of the GLOBEC program. The general objective of CLIOTOP is to organize a large-scale worldwide comparative effort aimed at identifying the impact of both climate variability (at various scales) and fishing on the structure and function of open ocean pelagic ecosystems and their top predator species by elucidating the key processes involved in open ocean ecosystem functioning. The ultimate objective is the development of a reliable predictive capability for the dynamics of top predator populations and oceanic ecosystems that combines both fishing and climate (i.e. environmental) effects.

This Town Hall session will provide an overview of the GLOBEC-CLIOTOP program to the community and will present the protocols for projects affiliation. It concerns all the scientists interested in oceanic top predators ecology, ecosystem dynamics and climate-biology coupling as well as project managers and funding agencies.

Western Arctic Shelf-Basin Interactions (SBI): Implementation Planning for Phase III Synthesis and Modeling

HCC, Level 3, Room 316A
1830h
Hosted by Western Arctic Shelf-Basin Interactions (SBI) Project Office, funded by the US National Science Foundation

The goal of the ongoing Western Arctic Shelf-Basin Interactions (SBI) project is to improve our understanding of the impacts of global change on the physical and biogeochemical connections among the continental shelves, slopes, and deep basins of the western Arctic. SBI was developed to include three phases: Phase I (1999-2001) included retrospective synthesis, opportunistic sampling and modeling, Phase II (2002-2006) is the on-going multi-year field program and modeling effort in the Amerasian Arctic, and the planned Phase III will be the pan-Arctic synthesis and modeling component. The purpose of this evening Town Hall session is to have an open-forum to discuss implementation objectives and planning for SBI Phase III and to solicit community input for a systems approach to understanding Arctic shelf-basin dynamics.

Workshop on LADCP Processing and Development Issues

HCC, Level 3, Room 316C
1830h
Hosted by Rosenthiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science, University of Miami

A small, but international group of scientists, engineers, and technicians are involved in developing, collecting, and analysing Lowered Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (LADCP) measurements. Arguably the most expert members of this group are Eric Firing of UH, Martin Visbeck of IfMGEOMAR, and Egil Rasmussen of RDInstruments. In recent years the LADCP technique has fallen into somewhat disarray, owing to a fundamental change in processing protocols, and more importantly, to a lack of viable instrument development. A meeting of the LADCP community is long overdue to consider and discuss these serious issues and reach a unified resolution on the future development of the technique.