2002 Spring Meeting Sessions

Designators for sessions belong to the lead section or committee abbreviation (i.e., A01 denotes Atmospheric Sciences, P01 denotes Planetary Sciences, etc.).  Additionally, sessions are listed under all sections or committees who have agreed to sponsor particular sessions.  These sessions are listed after the committee and section primary listing but with the lead section designation.  Some technical committees have elected to only cosponsor sessions.
 
Union(U) SPA: Magnetospheric Physics(SM)
Atmospheric Sciences(A) Tectonophysics(T)
Biogeosciences(B) Volcanology, Geochemistry, and Petrology(V)
Geodesy(G) Education and Human Resources(ED)
Geomagnetism and Paleomagnetism(GP) Global Climate Change(GC)
Geochemical Society(GS) Public Affairs(PA)
Hydrology(H) Nonlinear Geophysics(NG)
Mineralogical Society of America(M) Study of the Earth's Deep Interior(DI)
Ocean Sciences(OS) Mineral and Rock Physics Committee(MR)
Planetary Sciences(P) European Union of Geosciences(EG)
Seismology(S)
SPA: Aeronomy(SA)
SPA: Solar and Heliospheric Physics(SH)

Union

U01 Earth's Core: New Insights and Challenges
Recent observational and theoretical studies reveal major insights into the structure of the Earth's core and the dynamics at the center of the Earth but also pose new challenges. The progress was made at many fronts, including Geochemistry, Geodesy, Geomagnetism, Seismology, and Tectonophysics. This session will provide an interdisciplinary forum for presenting recent results and debates on the Earth's core. Topics include constraints on rotation of the inner core, fine structure of the inner core and influence of the mantle, theoretical and laboratory constraints on mineral properties at core conditions, geodynamo, core composition and formation, major and trace element partitioning during core crystallization, and interactions between the core and mantle.
Conveners: Xiaodong Song, Dept. of Geology, University of Illinois, , Urbana, IL 61801 USA, Tel: 217-333-1841, Fax: 217-244-4996, E-mail: xsong@uiuc.edu, and Lars Stixrude, Dept. of Geological Sciences, University of Michigan, 425 E. University Av., Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1063 USA, Tel: 734-647-9071, Fax: 734-763-4690, E-mail: stixrude@umich.edu, and Richard J. Walker, Dept. of Geology, University of Maryland, , College Park, MD 20742 USA, Tel: 301-405-4089, Fax: 301-314-9661, E-mail: rjwalker@geol.umd.edu, and William F. McDonough, Dept. of Geology, University of Maryland, , College Park, MD 20742 USA, Tel: 301-405-5561, Fax: 301-314-9661, E-mail: mcdonough@geol.umd.edu, and Daniel P. Lathrop, Dept. of Physics, University of Maryland, , College Park, MD 20742 USA, Tel: 301-405-1594, Fax: 301-301-1678, E-mail: dpl@complex.umd.edu

U02 Geophysics in the 20th Century: Contributions From Washington
In 1900, large-scale, systematic, and institutionalized research in Geophysics did not exist. By the end of the 20th century this had become the main model not only for geophysical research but also for essentially all of scientific research. This session - held on the occasion of the 100th anniversary of the founding of the Carnegie Institution of Washington (CIW) - will explore the historical legacies and interagency linkages which have contributed to the development of the geophysical sciences in the Washington, D. C. area over the last 100 years. The Nation's Capital plays a unique role as host to more organizations dedicated to some aspect of geophysical research (such as AAAS, American Geological Institute, AGU, CIW, Defense Mapping Agency, Geological Society of Washington, IRIS, JOI, Mineralogical Society of America, NASA, NIST, Naval Observatory, NOAA, Naval Research Lab, NSF, Smithsonian Institution, and USGS) than any other locale in the world. Contributions to this session are sought that will highlight the role of the Washington scientific community in the growth of Geophysics.
Conveners: Shaun J. Hardy, Carnegie Institution of Washington, 5241 Broad Branch Road, N.W., Washington, DC 20015 USA, Tel: 202-478-7960, Fax: 202-478-8821, E-mail: hardy@dtm.ciw.edu, and Steven B. Shirey, Department of Terrestrial Magnetism Carnegie Institution of Washington, 5241 Broad Branch Road, N.W., Washington, DC 20015 USA, Tel: 202-478-8473, Fax: 202-478-8821 , E-mail: shirey@dtm.ciw.edu, and C. Susan Weiler, Biology Department, Whitman College , , Walla Walla, WA 99362 USA, Tel: 509-527-5948, Fax: 509-527-5961, E-mail: weiler@whitman.edu, and William E Carter, University of Florida, Department of Civil Engineering, 345 Weil Hall, PO Box 116580, Gainsville, FL 32611 USA, Tel: 352-392-5003, E-mail: bcarter@ce.ufl.edu

U03 Sustainability of Fresh Water, Fossil Fuels, Minerals, and Other Earth Resources: How Much, How Deep, How Expensive, and How Certain?
Sustainable development with finite supplies of fresh water, fossil fuels, and many other resources poses huge challenges for Earth science. How much fresh water, petroleum, coal, copper, etc., exists, and where? What will it take to extract these resources, and at what environmental cost? What is the fate of the expended resources and their by-products? What materials will replace the exhausted ones, and what is their future? Will we have the metals and other resources to develop alternatives to fossil fuels when the time comes? What are the uncertainties in our projections of future supply and costs? What new technologies may answer these questions? What basic scientific problems must be solved to improve resource management on national and global scales? How can scientists, economists, and policy makers collaborate to preserve the life-support systems of planet Earth?
Conveners: David D. Jackson, Department of Earth and Space Sciences, UCLA, 595 Young Dr. East, Los Angles, CA 90095-1567 USA, Tel: 310-825-0421, Fax: 310-825-2779, E-mail: djackson@ucla.edu, and P. Patrick Leahy, U.S. Geological Survey, 2201 Sunrise Valley Drive National Center 911 , Reston, VA 20191 USA, Tel: (703) 648-660, E-mail: pleahy@usgs.gov, and Hugo Loaiciga, Department of Geography and Environmental Studies, University of California, Santa Barbara, , Santa Barbara, CA 93106-4060 USA, Tel: 805-893-8053, E-mail: hloaiciga@hotmail.com, and Laurie Brown, Department of Geosciences, Morrill Science Center University of Massachusetts , Amherst, MA 01003 UMI, Tel: 413-545-0245, E-mail: lbrown@geo.umass.edu

U04 Ice Sheets, Neotectonics, and Sea-Level Change
The Earth's response to past and present ice mass changes includes three-dimensional crustal motion and changes to sea level, the gravitational field, and mantle and lithospheric stress. In turn, ice sheet growth and stability is affected by the Earth's response because crustal subsidence affects the location of the grounding line and the height of the ice sheet. This session seeks contributions examining cryosphere-lithosphere interactions. Topics include, but are not limited to, discussions of new data or compilations related to present ice mass balance and past ice mass evolution; recent advances in glaciological modeling of ice sheet inception, growth, and decay, in particular the controls that isostasy may exert on the life cycle of an ice sheet; recent progress in glacio-isostatic modeling, including analysis of new data sets bearing on glacio-isostasy, new numerical and analytical techniques, and investigations of the effects of lateral crustal heterogeneity; and studies of interactions between ice sheet change, crustal stress, and seismicity. Contributions related to Antarctic neotectonics - its ice sheet history and present balance, the ensuing glacio-isostatic response, including crustal motion and sea level change, and patterns of seismicity and their relation to ice sheet balance - are especially welcomed.
Conveners: Thomas James, Geological Survey of Canada; Pacific Geoscience Centre, 9860 W. Saanich Road, Sidney, BC V8L 4B2 CAN, Tel: 250-363-6403, Fax: 250-363-6565, E-mail: james@pgc.nrcan.gc.ca, and Jo Jacka, Australian Antarctic Division, Channel Highway, Kingston, TAS 7050 AUS, Tel: +61 3 6232 3365, Fax: +61 3 6232 3215, E-mail: Jo.Jacka@aad.gov.au

U05 Integrating Climate Research, Applications, and Assessment
Climate research is advancing our understanding of not only mechanisms of climate change and variability, but also interactions among climatic, ecological, and social systems. Climate scientists are increasingly challenged to apply their knowledge to predictive analysis of policy response options. Assessments are being conducted to synthesize advances in climate research and applications and to evaluate the relevance of these advances to societal concerns. New forms of discourse are being explored among scientists, stakeholders, decision makers, and citizens concerned with problems such as prioritizing key regional issues, characterizing relevant uncertainties, and assessing potential responses. A principal challenge now is to develop these discussions into ongoing strategies for integration of assessment findings into research planning and applications development. Speakers in this session will focus on the following themes: climate inputs for impact assessments; response of ecological and social systems to climate; development of assessment methods; building regional and local capacity for understanding and response; integration in government-funded programs. Invited and submitted papers should address the challenges and implications of integration from both research and societal perspectives.
Conveners: Jack Fellows, UCAR, PO Box 3000, Boulder, CO 80307-3000 USA, Tel: 303-497-8638, Fax: 303-497-8638, E-mail: jfellows@ucar.edu, and Eric T. Sundquist, U.S. Geological Survey, 34 Woods Hole Road, Woods Hole, MA 02543 USA, Tel: 508-457-2397, Fax: 508-457-2310,, E-mail: esundqui@usgs.gov

U06 Geophysics and Terrorism
The new global priority to fight terrorism will involve, directly and indirectly, geophysicists and data and knowledge produced by the research community. In one sense, the geoscience community is strongly positioned to serve as the technological equivalent of a "global" neighborhood watch program through the wide variety of environmental sensors and networks that monitor the Earth, oceans, atmosphere, and space. This session will consist of invited and contributed talks that discuss how current Earth and space science research and environmental monitoring are applicable and important to the broader societal goal of combating global terrorism. Topics and themes will include, but are not limited to, seismology, watershed monitoring and water resource infrastructure, plume migration at all scales in the hydrosphere and atmosphere, weather forecasting for military and counterterrorism applications, space weather, and parameters relevant to understanding and protecting against bioterrorism.
Conveners: Greg van der Vink, IRIS Consortium, 1200 New York Avenue, NW, Suite 800 , Washington, DC 20005 USA, Tel: 202-682-2220, Fax: 202-682-2444, E-mail: gvdv@iris.edu

Atmospheric Sciences

A00 General Contributions
Contributions relevant in any area over the full spectrum of the Atmospheric Sciences may be submitted to this series of the sessions. Accepted contributions will be organized into appropriate topical sessions. More than half the papers contributed for AGU meetings will not find a home in the pre-approved sessions suggested by a variety of conveners. Papers submitted to these sessions give the program chairs an opportunity to fashion a backbone for the meeting and determine what the broad range of contributors feel is important in the section right now.
Convener: Linnea Avallone, University of Colorado, USA, E-mail: avallone@lasp.colorado.edu

A01 In Honor of Robert de Zafra's 70th Birthday
Bob de Zafra will be turning 70 years old this year. He has been a pioneer in ground-based microwave measurements of the stratosphere. His contributions go beyond just his own personal science. Many of the scientists doing experimental, analytical, and modeling studies of the stratosphere studied under Bob. We invite papers on how knowledge gained by ground-based remote sensing measurements of the middle atmosphere have helped advance our knowledge of stratospheric behavior. We also solicit contributions on contemporary investigations using ground-based remote sensing measurements to study the middle atmosphere.
Conveners: Marvin A Geller, SUNY Stony Brook, Marine Science Research Center 145 Endeavour Hall, Stony Brook, NY 11794-5000 USA, Tel: +1-631-632-8781, Fax: +1-631-632-8915, E-mail: mgeller@notes.cc.sunysb.edu, and Drew T Shindell, NASA GISS, 2880 Broadway, New York, NY 10025 USA, Tel: +1-212-678-5561, Fax: +1-212-678-5552, E-mail: dshindell@giss.nasa.gov

A02 Seventeen Years of SAGE II Data
On 5 October 2001, the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE II) passed the 17th anniversary of its launch aboard the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment. During this period, SAGE II data have significantly contributed to understanding trends and variability of ozone in the stratosphere and the long-term variability of aerosol including the 1991 eruption of Mount Pinatubo and the recent clean period. This session will focus on the recently released Version 6.1 including algorithms, validation, and comparisons with other platforms. In addition, applications of the new data set to understanding ozone and aerosol variability and other science applications will be addressed.
Conveners: Joseph M Zawodny, NASA Langley Research Center, Mail Stop 475, Hampton, VA 23693 USA, Tel: +1-757-864-2681, Fax: +1-757-864-2671, E-mail: j.m.zawodny@larc.nasa.gov, and Larry W Thomason, NASA Langley Research Center, Mail Stop 475, Hampton, VA 23693 USA, Tel: +1-757-864-6842, Fax: +1-757-864-2671, E-mail: l.w.thomason@larc.nasa.gov

A03 Atmospheric Impacts of Urban Air Pollution
Anthropogenic activities emit gaseous and particulate compounds into the atmosphere that significantly alter the air compositions on the urban scale. Recent studies have suggested that the changes in the atmospheric chemical compositions lead to changes in cloud microphysical and electrical properties. For instance, elevated aerosol concentrations may suppress the warm-rain process and enhance lightning. This session is intended to provide a forum for discussions of the potential impacts of human activities on the urban atmosphere. Papers are invited to assess the physical and chemical impacts of urban air pollution, on the basis of field, modeling, or laboratory studies.
Conveners: Richard E Orville, Texas A&M University, Department of Atmospheric Sciences 1204 Eller O&M Building 3150 TAMU, College Station, TX 77843-3150 USA, Tel: +1-979-845-9244, Fax: +1-979-862-4466, E-mail: orville@ariel.met.tamu.edu, and Renyi Zhang, Texas A&M University, Department of Atmospheric Sciences 1204 Eller O&M Building 3150 TAMU, College Station, TX 77843-3150 USA, Tel: +1-979-845-7656, Fax: +1-979-862-4466, E-mail: zhang@ariel.met.tamu.edu

A04 Upper Air Temperature Data Products for Climate Studies: Methods, Products, and Challenges
Changes in the atmospheric temperature profile are thought to be an important indication of climate change, and their vertical structure provides clues regarding the attribution of the changes to natural or forced variability. Detecting such changes requires high-quality, continuous data records that are relatively free of artificial signals, such as those associated with instrument drift or changes in observing systems. Recent controversy regarding differences in temperature trends from different data sets has motivated research efforts to create improved multidecadal data sets. Creation of homogeneous, global upper air temperature data records from satellites and radiosondes is challenging due to lack of reference temperature time series and a wide assortment of data sampling and quality issues. Papers dealing with the following topics are encouraged: methods used to quality control data, combine data from different observing systems, and remove artificial discontinuities; new climate data records for upper air temperature; comparisons among different data products; associated uncertainties in upper air temperature trends; challenges of creating historical data products from archived data; and improvements in future observing systems to facilitate more reliable trend analysis.
Conveners: Dian Seidel, NOAA Air Resources Laboratory, R/ARL 1315 East West Highway, Silver Spring, MD 20910 USA, Tel: +1-301-713-0295 x126, Fax: +1-301-713-0119, E-mail: dian.seidel@noaa.gov, and Frank Wentz, Remote Sensing Systems, 438 First Street, Suite 200, Santa Rosa, CA 95401 USA, Tel: +1-707-545-2904 x16, Fax: +1-707-545-2906, E-mail: wentz@remss.com

A05 Organic Aerosols in Past and Present Atmospheres
Organic aerosols are a very active area of research, with many laboratory and field measurements being performed, some with new techniques such as laser mass spectrometry and time of flight-secondary ion mass spectrometry, which are revolutionizing our understanding. We seek papers in these areas of laboratory and field measurement of organic aerosols and also contributions from those interested in the role of organic aerosols in the origin of life and in the laboratory synthesis of life.
Conveners: Adrian F Tuck, NOAA Aeronomy Laboratory, R/AL 325 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80305-3328 USA, Tel: +1-303-497-5485, Fax: +1-303-496-5373, E-mail: Adrian.F.Tuck@noaa.gov, and Jamie Donaldson, University of Toronto, Department of Chemistry, , CAN, E-mail: jdonalds@chem.utoronto.ca, and Heikki Tervahattu, University of Helsinki, , , FIN, E-mail: heikki.tervahattu@helsinki.fi, and Veronica Vaida, University of Colorado, , , USA, E-mail: vaida@spot.colorado.edu

A06 The Exchange of Chemically Reactive Trace Constituents Between Biosphere and Atmosphere
In this session the exchange of highly reactive trace species like ozone, nitric oxide, nitrogen dioxide, some volatile organic compounds (VOC), etc., between tall vegetation canopies and the atmosphere is to be considered. Furthermore, segregation effects owing to turbulence should also be elucidated.
Conveners: Gerhard Kramm, University of Alaska Fairbanks, Geophysical Institute 903 Koyukuk Drive P.O. Box 757320 , Fairbanks, AK 99775-7320 USA, Tel: +1-907-474-5992, Fax: +1-907-474-7290, E-mail: kramm@gi.alaska.edu, and Ralph Dlugi, AGAP, Gernotstrasse 11, Munich, D-80804 DEU, Tel: +49-89-3000-4258, Fax: +49-89-3000-4249, E-mail: rdlugi@gmx.de, and Peter Werle, Institute of Atmospheric Environmental Research, Kreuzeckbahnstrasse 19, Garmisch-Partenkirch, D-82467 DEU, Tel: +49 8821 183 170, E-mail: werle@ifu.fhg.de

A07 From Rain Gage to RANET to Radio: How Information Technology Is Transforming Forecast Communication
Just as supercomputing and network capacity have revolutionized the production of climate and weather information, technology is transforming the way this information is communicated and used. Innovative networks of old and new technology from satellite to Internet to radio are delivering climate and weather information to high-tech farms in the U.S. and nomadic herders in Africa. Papers are sought that describe how climate information networks are designed to meet the needs of a wide range of users and how new options for forecast delivery and use are, in turn, influencing the production of climate information itself.
Conveners: Macol Stewart, US Agency for International Development, RRB, Room 3.8-0 11300 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20523 USA, Tel: +1-202-712-1724, E-mail: MaStewart@usaid.gov, and Christopher Miller, NOAA Office of Global Programs, 1100 Wayne Avenue, Suite 1225, Silver Spring, MD 20910 USA, Tel: +1-301-427-2089, E-mail: miller@ogp.noaa.gov, and Kelly Sponberg, NOAA Office of Global Programs, 1100 Wayne Avenue, Suite 1225, Silver Spring, MD 20910 USA, Tel: +1-301-427-2089 x194, E-mail: sponberg@ogp.noaa.gov

A08 AERONET: Aerosol Observations, Related Investigations, and Synergism
AERONET is an established internationally collaborative program of over 120 globally distributed ground-based sites measuring spectral direct solar irradiance and directional sky radiance. Owing to significant advances in inversion retrieval algorithms, data availability, and measurement accuracy, a broad scientific community has investigated aerosol optical properties, validated satellite aerosol retrievals, and participated in numerous multisensor field campaigns. We solicit papers addressing all aspects of AERONET-associated research including observed aerosol optical properties, radiative forcing, synergism with satellite observations, aerosol climatology, aerosol models, validation, aerosol polarization effects, aerosol effects on public health, and other associated research. We also welcome non-AERONET contributions from other studies of the optical properties of aerosols from airborne or ground-based instruments.
Conveners: Brent Holben, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 923, Greenbelt, MD 20771 USA, Tel: +1-301-614-6658, E-mail: brent@aeronet.gsfc.nasa.gov, and Alexander Smirnov, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 923, Greenbelt, MD 20771 USA, Tel: +1-301-614-6626, E-mail: asmirnov@aeronet.gsfc.nasa.gov, and Tom Eck, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 923, Greenbelt, MD 20771 USA, Tel: +1-301-614-6625, E-mail: tom@aeronet.gsfc.nasa.gov, and Oleg Dubovik, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 923, Greenbelt, MD 20771 USA, Tel: +1-301-614-6624, E-mail: dubovik@aeronet.gsfc.nasa.gov

A09 Balance in Atmosphere-Ocean Dynamics (BALANCE 2002)
This session is organized around the central theme of geophysical fluid dynamics, "balance." It is aimed at fundamental problems in geophysical fluid dynamics with applications in the fields of atmospheric science, oceanography, and the planetary sciences. For further details, see a longer session description given at www.fluid.tue.nl/users/neven. We encourage experimentalists, numericists, and theoreticians to discuss balance and related concepts and their use in understanding vortex-wave interactions in a wide variety of geophysical phenomena.
Conveners: John A Knox, University of Georgia, Driftmier Engineering Center, Athens, GA 30602 USA, Tel: +1-706-542-6067, Fax: +1-706-542-8806, E-mail: John.Knox@sigmaxi.org, and Eduard C Neven, Eindhoven University of Technology, Vortex Dynamics Group Fluid Dynamics Laboratory P.O. Box 513, Eindhoven, 5600 Mb NLD, Tel: +31-40-247-3110, Fax: +31-40-246-4151, E-mail: e.c.neven@tue.nl, and Steven N Shore, Indiana University South Bend, Department of Physics and Astronomy 1700 Mishawaka Ave, South Bend, IN 46634-7111 USA, Tel: +1-219-237-4401, Fax: +1-219-237-6589, E-mail: sshore@paladin.iusb.edu

A10 Fires, Scars, and Smoke: Observations, Impact, and Policies
Given increasing fire activity/intensity around the world and rich information generated by numerous observational programs, this session will be devoted to a wide range of fire-related studies including remote and in situ osbervation of all fire attributes (hot spots, burned scars, and smoke particulate and gas emissions) and applications of the observations in understanding fire impact on, and interaction with, weather, climate, environment and ecosystem; modeling fire spread and smoke transportation; as well as policy issues related to wildfire management.
Conveners: Zhanqing Li, University of Maryland, Department of Meteorology and ESSIC 2335 CSS Building, College Park, MD 20742-2465 USA, Tel: +1-301-405-6699, Fax: +1-301-405-8468, E-mail: zli@atmos.umd.edu, and Yoram J Kaufman, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 913, Greenbelt, MD 20771 USA, Tel: +1-301-614-6189, Fax: +1-301-614-6307, E-mail: kaufman@climate.gsfc.nasa.gov

A11 Calibration of Meteorological Satellite Sensors and Validation of Derived Products (POSTER ONLY)
Prelaunch and postlaunch calibration and characterization of meteorological satellite sensors are crucial to ensure the accuracy, continuity, and viability of satellite-derived geophysical products. Independent validation of the geophysical products thus derived will in turn establish their usability in Earth system studies. Papers are solicited in the broad areas of (1) prelaunch and postlaunch calibration of meteorological satellite sensors; (2) intercalibration of sensors in the generation of merged geophysical records; (3) onboard calibration; (4) propagation of calibration uncertainties in product generation; (5) rehabilitation of long-term satellite-derived geophysical records; (6) procedures for product validation; (7) product validation campaigns; and (8) international collaborative and cooperative efforts.
Conveners: Shoba Kondragunta, NOAA/NESDIS, Office of Research and Applications E/RA1, World Weather Building, Room 810 5200 Auth Road, Camp Springs, MD 20746 USA, Tel: +1-301-763-8136 x151, Fax: +1-301-763-8034, E-mail: Shoba.Kondragunta@noaa.gov, and Changyong Cao, NOAA/NESDIS, Office of Research and Applications E/RA1, World Weather Building, Room 810 5200 Auth Road, Camp Springs, MD 20746 USA, Tel: +1-301-763-8136, Fax: +!-301-763-8034, E-mail: Changyong.Cao@noaa.gov, and Matt DeLand, Science System and Applications Incorporated, 10210 Greenbelt Road Suite 400, Lanham, MD 20706 USA, Tel: +1-301-867-2164, Fax: +1-301-867-2151, E-mail: matt_deland@sesda.com

A12 Physics and Chemistry Near the Tropical Tropopause
The transition from troposphere to stratosphere in the tropics has come to be understood as a gradual one, rather than a sudden change at a sharp material boundary. This applies to thermodynamic, chemical, dynamical, and radiative properties. Mechanisms that are important in either the troposphere or stratosphere may interact in novel ways in this poorly observed and understood region, spanning at least from 14 to 19 km. Most stratospheric air is believed to be processed through this region. This frontier region may also be significant as a proving ground for theories or models of processes that have so far been validated only in the main troposphere or stratosphere where the processes are most obvious. We solicit papers that explore the properties and physical and chemical processes near the tropical tropopause. This includes studies of dynamical mixing, gravity and Kelvin waves, convection, thin cirrus clouds, dehydration and chemistry, and/or radiative transfer near the tropopause, or mechanisms that connect the tropical upper troposphere and lower stratosphere.
Conveners: Andrew Dessler, University of Maryland, Earth System Science Interdisciplinary Center 2207 Computer and Space Science Building, College Park, MD 20742-2465 USA, Tel: +1-301-405-5337, Fax: +1-301-405-8468, E-mail: dessler@metosrv2.umd.edu, and Steven Sherwood, Yale University, P.O. Box 208109, New Haven, CT 06520-8109 USA, Tel: +1-203-432-3167, Fax: +1-203-432-3134, E-mail: Steven.Sherwood@yale.edu

A13 Nonequilibrium Phenomena in Open Geophysical Systems
This session will focus on recent research on nonequilibrium processes and dissipative phenomena in open geophysical systems. Dissipative structures and related fractal scaling, which often appear in nonequilibrium systems, are recognized features of a number of geophysical systems and have applications in weather forecasting, climate characterization and prediction, anthroprogenetic changes in the atmosphere, and many more. We will address these issues by attracting papers on the global and local structures of geophysical fluids, the evolution of open systems, transport properties and scaling of turbulence, and energetics of the nonequilibrium systems. These include dissipative and evolutionary properties of the atmosphere and ocean, as well as mantle convection, long-range structures and correlations in earthquake fault systems, and extreme properties in the complex geophysical and extraplanetary geophysical fields.
Conveners: Vyacheslav M Somsikov, Institute of Ionosphere, , , 480020 KAZ, Tel: +8-3272-697971, Fax: +8-3272-65-0993, E-mail: nes@kaznet.kz

A14 Variability of Storm Tracks
Recent analyses of storm track variability by several groups have suggested that the Northern Hemisphere storm tracks have undergone significant interdecadal variability during the past few decades, and the storm track intensity may have been on an upward trend since the 1960s. The strengths of storm tracks have clear implications on local climate over the midlatitudes, as well as hemispheric impact on the energy and hydrological cycle. Better diagnoses and understanding of this phenomenon would have significant implications on our understanding of climate variability and change.
Conveners: Edmund Chang, State University of New York, ITPA/MSRC, Stony Brook, NY 11794-5000 USA, E-mail: chang@atmsci.msrc.sunysb.edu

A15 Midlatitude Stratospheric Ozone Loss: Understanding the Effects of Chemistry and Dynamics
Some researchers consider chemical reactions arising from anthropogenic compounds as a viable mechanism to explain observed midlatitude stratospheric ozone loss. Others find evidence for a strong dynamical component, arising in part from climate change issues. This session seeks papers discussing attempts to quantify the chemical and dynamical contributions to midlatitude ozone loss.
Conveners: Stephen J Reid, NOAA Aeronomy Laboratory, R/AL6 David Skaggs Research Center 325 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80303-3328 USA, Tel: +1-303-497-7942, Fax: +1-303-497-5373, E-mail: sreid@al.noaa.gov, and Jennifer A Logan, Harvard University, 108 Pierce Hall, Cambridge, MA 02138-3800 USA, Tel: +1-617-495-4582, Fax: +1-617-495-9837, E-mail: jal@io.harvard.edu

A16 Wet and Dry Atmospheric Deposition: Scientific Advances and Policy Developments
The understanding of the chemistry, physics, and biosphere-atmosphere interactions of atmospheric deposition, both wet and dry, is improving through modeling studies and observational programs. Nationwide wet and dry deposition monitoring networks have been in operation long enough to have developed an understanding of deposition, along with an understanding of its variation in time and space. These advances, and the push by Congress and the Administration for more cost-effective means of pollution control, are driving policy changes that could have major implications for the industrial community and the environment. This session will explore both scientific advances and policy developments in the field of atmospheric deposition.
Conveners: Peter Finkelstein, EPA, Atmospheric Modeling Division MD-80, Research Triangle Pk, NC 27711 USA, Tel: +1-919-541-4553, E-mail: Finkelstein.Peter@epamail.epa.gov, and Gary Lear, EPA, Clean Air Markets Division, , USA, E-mail: Lear.Gary@epamail.epa.gov

A17 Ice Cores: Glaciology and Environmental Change
Variations in the physical, biological, and chemical or isotopic content through layered snow and ice can provide substantial insight into past environmental conditions and climate variability. Extension of these site-specific records via satellite- or ground-based studies establishes their broader significance. Retrieval and analysis of these signals has led to significant advances in understanding the role of the cryosphere in global climate. In this session, we encourage submission of studies that pursue understanding of dynamic glaciologic problems as well as detectable natural and anthropogenic changes in climate conditions. We encourage submissions that link these studies to glaciologic modeling, remote sensing, oceanography, hydrology, and atmospheric science, as this will facilitate the development of a broad Earth system context. Both oral and poster presentations are welcome.
Conveners: Christopher A Shuman, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Oceans and Ice Branch Laboratory for Hydrospheric Processes, Greenbelt, MD 20771-0001 USA, Tel: +1-301-614-5706, Fax: +1-301-614-5644, E-mail: christopher.shuman@gsfc.nasa.gov, and Eric J Steig, University of Washington, Quaternary Research Center Department of Earth and Space Sciences 19 Johnson Hall, Seattle, WA 98195-1360 USA, Tel: +1-206-685-3715, Fax: +1-206-543-3836, E-mail: steig@u.washington.edu, and James W. C. White, University of Colorado, INSTAAR 450 UCB, Boulder, CO 80309-0450 USA, Tel: +1-303-492-5494, E-mail: james.white@colorado.edu

A18 Observations and Retrievals of the Ocean Surface Radiation Field and Aerosols Using Field Campaign Data Including the Chesapeake Lighthouse and Aircraft Measurements for Satellites (CLAMS) Experiment
The Chesapeake Lighthouse and Aircraft Measurements for Satellites (CLAMS) field experiment (10 July to 2 August, 2001) targeted atmospheric aerosols and the radiation field at the sea surface under cloud-free conditions. The emphasis was on the validation and improvement of satellite retrievals of aerosols, aerosol radiative forcing to climate, and ocean optics boundary conditions. Data were collected at the Chesapeake Lighthouse ("COVE") sea platform 15 miles off the coast of Virginia Beach, from coastal stations, and from a variety of aircraft and satellite sensors. NOAA buoys farther out at sea provided additional information on sea conditions. CLAMS participants included members of NASA's EOS CERES, MISR and MODIS science teams and the Global Aerosol Climatology Project (GACP), as well as six universities. The intent of this session is to report CLAMS and related science results and to introduce the CLAMS database to a wider community of atmospheric, ocean, and remote sensing scientists.
Conveners: Thomas P Charlock, NASA Langley Research Center, MS 420, Hampton, VA 23681-0001 USA, Tel: +1-757-864-5687, Fax: +1-757-864-7996, E-mail: t.p.charlock@larc.nasa.gov, and William L Smith, NASA Langley Research Center, , Hampton, VA 23681-0001 USA, E-mail: w.l.smith@larc.nasa.gov

A19 Policy-Relevant Versus Policy-Driven Atmospheric Chemistry Research: What Role Do Policy Applications Play in Determining Questions, Methods, and Funding?
We invite members of atmospheric chemistry and policy communities to discuss how policy applications affect scientific research on air quality. Session participants are encouraged to address questions such as the following: (1) When do funding priorities shape the science, and when do the scientific questions shape funding priorities? (2) How do agencies who need scientific information use policy-driven studies versus external research with varying degrees of policy relevance? (3) How have scientists adapted their research goals or program structures to meet the needs of the policy community?
Conveners: Tracey Holloway, Columbia Earth Institute, 405 Low Library, 535 West 116th Street, New York, NY 10027 USA, Tel: +1-212-854-9934, Fax: +1-212-854-6309, E-mail: th2024@columbia.edu, and Arlene Fiore, Harvard University, 29 Oxford Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 USA, Tel: +1-617-495-4577, Fax: +1-617-495-4551, E-mail: afiore@fas.harvard.edu, and Meredith (Galanter) Hastings, Princeton University, Department of Geosciences, Guyot Hall, Princeton, NJ 08544 USA, Tel: +1-609-258-4124, Fax: +1-609-258-0796, E-mail: galanter@princeton.edu

Atmospheric Sciences also presents jointly with the following sessions:
B01 Effects of Land Use on Net Primary Production of Terrestrial Ecosystems
B02 Biogeochemistry and Conservation Biology
H21 Global Precipitation Mission for Hydrology and Hydrometeorology
B03 Closing the N2O Budget Through Isotopic Discrimination
B08 Ecohydrology of Arid and Semiarid Ecosystems
B09 Intercomparison of Primary Production Models and Field Observations
B10 Bridging the Gap Between Ecosystem and Atmospheric Studies of Ecosystem-Atmosphere CO2 Fluxes
G01 Integrating Space Geodetic Techniques and Results for Global Earth Observing
G02 GPS Navigation as a Tool for Earth Science
H15 Predictability in Hydrometeorology
H20 Remote Sensing of Precipitation (Poster Only)
H22 Advances in Understanding the Global Water Cycle
H23 Remote Sensing, Hydrology, and Field Experiments
H25 Operational Monitoring of the Arctic Hydrological System
SA03 The Mesosphere/Lower Thermosphere Region: Structure, Dynamics, Composition, and Emission
GC02 Atlantic Decadal Variability
GC03 Pacific Decadal Variability
SA01 New Results and Approaches to Observations of the Atmospheric Limb
GC04 Carbon Management Technologies: Feasibility, Impacts, Risks, and Economics
GC05 Comparing Arctic Models
GC06 Reconstruction and Understanding the Late Maunder Minimum Climate Anomaly
B07 Land-Atmosphere Interactions
H24 Land-Atmosphere Interaction and the Atmospheric Boundary Layer

Biogeosciences

B00 General Contributions
Contributions relevant in any area over the full spectrum of the Biogeosciences may be submitted to this series of the sessions. Accepted contributions will be organized into appropriate topical sessions. More than half the papers contributed for AGU meetings will not find a home in the pre-approved sessions suggested by a variety of conveners. Papers submitted to these sessions give the program chairs an opportunity to fashion a backbone for the meeting and determine what the broad range of contributors feel is important in the section right now. Biogeosciences emphasizes linkages between biological sciences and geophysical sciences fundamental to study of the Earth and other planets. Research areas within the section include biogeochemistry, biogeophysics, astrobiology, and planetary ecosystem science. Those interested in advancing the understanding of coupled biological and geophysical processes and phenomena in emerging research areas in biology, ecology and earth and planetary science should submit general contributions. Some examples of such processes include, but are not limited to: biosphere-atmosphere-climate interactions, nutrient cycles and their interactions and feedbacks to abiotic processes, effects of stream flow patterns on aquatic biodiversity, extinction events in Earth history and existence of life under extreme conditions on Earth or other planets.
Convener: Ruth Defries, University of Maryland, USA, E-mail: rd63@umail.umd.edu

B01 Effects of Land Use on Net Primary Production of Terrestrial Ecosystems
The productivity of terrestrial ecosystems is a key determinant of the net exchange of carbon dioxide (CO2) between terrestrial ecosystems and the atmosphere, and hence atmospheric CO2 concentration. It is also the primary source of food and other resources for humans and other species. Humans have altered the productivity of terrestrial ecosystems by changing the climate, atmospheric chemistry, land use, and age structure of forests. The objective of the session will be to use empirical field studies, data synthesis activities, and process models to examine the effects of the various land use changes on net primary production of terrestrial ecosystems. Spatial scales can range from case studies to global synthesis, with an attempt to obtain a balanced coverage of all the major terrestrial ecosystems. Participants are strongly encouraged to place their results into a larger context, such as expressing their results relative to effects of elevated CO2 on NPP.
Conveners: Stith T. Gower, University of Wisconsin, Department of Forest Ecology and Management, University of Wisconsin,, Madison, WI 53706 USA, Tel: (608) 262-0532, Fax: (608) 262-9922, E-mail: stgower@facstaff.wisc.edu, and Navin Ramankutty, University of Wisconsin, Center for Sustainability and the Global Environment, Institute for Environmental Studies,, Madison, WI 53706 USA, Tel: (608) 265-0604, Fax: (608) 265-4113, E-mail: nramanku@facstaff.wisc.edu

B02 Biogeochemistry and Conservation Biology
This session focuses on the connections between Biogeochemistry and Conservation Biology and the relationships of these connections to environmental policy. Biogeochemistry and Conservation Biology are currently the locus of much research involving land use and climate change impacts. However, to a large extent they have remained conceptually and practically separate. Speakers will address the links among some of the classical issues in these fields and the opportunities for each discipline to inform the other. In particular, there will be an emphasis on the links between biological diversity and biogeochemical processes. Recent advances in the direct and remote assessment of diversity and in the measurement of biogeochemical processes will be discussed. The session will also address the status of biogeochemistry and conservation biology within the framework of current environmental policy and law.
Conveners: Manuel Lerdau, State University of New York, Associate Professor Ecology and Evolution Department and Institute for Terrestrial and Planetary Atmospheres, Stony Brook, NY 11794-5245 USA, Tel: (631) 632-6633, Fax: (631) 632-7626, E-mail: manuel.lerdau@sunysb.edu, and Marcy Litvak, University of Texas, Professor Biology Department, Austin, TX USA, E-mail: mlitvak@mail.utexas.edu, and Ken Griffin, Columbia University, Professor LDEO, New York, NY USA, E-mail: griff@ldeo.columbia.edu

B03 Closing the N2O Budget Through Isotopic Discrimination
Nitrous oxide (N2O) is a potent greenhouse gas and catalytic destroyer of stratospheric ozone with an atmospheric residence time of about 150 years. The concentration of N2O has been steadily increasing in the atmosphere over the past several years, but the budget is still incomplete. Unarguably, the primary source of N2O to the atmosphere is from biological activity in oceans and soils. Increased fertilizer usage has especially stimulated the rates of microbial nitrification and denitrification, the main activities which lead to N2O production. Over the past 10 years, a powerful approach has been employed to constrain the possible biological sources of N2O from various environments by examining the distribution of N and O isotopes within emitted N2O molecules. Combined with the preferential destruction of specific N2O isotopomers in the stratosphere, we are now closer than ever to closing the N2O budget in both its sources and sinks. This session will highlight recent advances in quantifying the sources and sinks of N2O using isotopic discrimination techniques by providing biochemical hypotheses for how N2O isotopic discrimination occurs, describing spectroscopic techniques for measuring N2O isotopomers, and presenting data that further quantify the N2O budget in natural systems.
Conveners: Lisa Y. Stein, University of California, Department of Environmental Science Geology 2217, Riverside, CA 92521 USA, Tel: (909) 787-2704, E-mail: Lisa.Stein@ucr.edu, and Yuk L. Yung, California Institute of Technology, Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences M/C 170-25, Pasadena, CA 91125 USA, Tel: (626) 395-6940, E-mail: yly@mercu1.gps.caltach.edu

B04 Species Populations and Relationships to Climate and Water Quality
Biological indicators increasingly are being used to evaluate human impacts on the environment. Declines in populations of many species have prompted efforts to assess species abundance and to consider causes of declines. For example, a worldwide decline in amphibian populations was initially recognized in the late 1980s and has since been confirmed by the scientific community. Many of the potential stresses to biota are related to climate and water quality. This session seeks papers that link population dynamics of biota to climate and the water quality of their environments. Papers that address interdisciplinary studies in the following areas are especially welcomed: long-term studies of population dynamics, malformations, habitat loss or fragmentation, pathogens, introduced species, contaminants, episodic events.
Conveners: Karen C. Rice, U.S. Geological Survey, P.O. Box B, Charlottesville, VA 22903 USA, E-mail: kcrice@usgs.gov, and William A. Battaglin, U.S. Geological Survey, Box 25046 Denver Federal Center, Denver, CO 80225 USA, E-mail: wbattagl@usgs.gov

B05 Use of Remote Sensing as Policy-Relevant Information
As public awareness grows that weather phenomena, climate change, water resources, and land use are inescapeably linked to human activities, health, and prosperity through various degrees of cause and effect, policy makers are forced to make decisions that often lack historical precedent. At the same time, advances in remote sensing and the products derived from satellite observations, including data assimilating model results, are revolutionizing our understanding of the Earth system and increasing its predictability. Therefore it is imperative that the gap be bridged between lawmakers and scientists so that policy reflects the most current state of knowledge and embraces developing information systems. This session will encompass remote sensing based research and applications that have influenced, do influence, or should influence policy decisions, address the scientific needs of policy makers, and describe both successes and deficiencies in the link between Earth science and policy.
Conveners: Robert J. Plante, Raytheon Corporation, , , USA, Tel: (301) 925-0898, E-mail: rplante@eos.east.hitc.com, and Peter Gilruth, Raytheon, Corporation, , , USA, Tel: (301) 925-0480, E-mail: pgilruth@eos.east.hitc.com, and Matt Rodell, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Hydrological Sciences Branch, Code 974, Greenbelt, MD 20771 USA, Tel: +1-301-614-5811, Fax: +1-301-614-5808, E-mail: mattro@dao.gsfc.nasa.gov

B06 Contributions of Biogeosciences to the Millennium Ecosystem Assessment
The Millennium Ecosystem Assessment is an international effort to assess the state of the world's ecosystems and their abilities to provide goods and services important for human development. The assessment will involve the contributions of hundreds of scientists over the next several years and will provide information to policy makers on the current and future condition of ecosystems (see http://www.ma-secretariat.org/). This session will explore the contributions from the biogeosciences that make such an assessment possible, including observation and modeling studies on a range of ecosystems at regional and global scales.
Conveners: Anthony Janetos, World Resources Institute, 10 G St., NE, Washington, DC 20002 USA, Tel: (202) 729-7600, Fax: (202) 729-7610, E-mail: ajanetos@wri.org

B07 Land-Atmosphere Interactions
This session provides a forum for reporting on recent studies of land-atmosphere interaction at various spatial and temporal scales. Field experiments, remote sensing analyses, and modeling studies are all welcome. Energy and water exchanges between the land and atmosphere will be considered, as will studies of vegetation impacts and the impacts of land-atmosphere exchange on climate.
Conveners: Randal Koster, Goddard Space Flight Center, , Greenbelt, MD 20771 USA, E-mail: randal.koster@gsfc.nasa.gov, and Paul Dirmeyer, Center for Ocean-Land-Atmosphere Studies, 4041 Powder Mill Rd. Suite 302, Calverton, MD 20705-3106 USA, Tel: (301) 595-7000, Fax: (301) 595-9793, E-mail: dirmeyer@cola.iges.org

B08 Ecohydrology of Arid and Semiarid Ecosystems
In water-limited ecosystems, hydrologic processes have a most significant impact on plant physiology, nutrient cycles, fluxes of CO2 and water vapor, biomass production, plant growth and (plant) population dynamics. This session solicits papers on the analysis of terrestrial ecosystems in water-limited environments at different spatial and temporal scales. Both hydrological and ecological studies on the role of the water cycle in soil-vegetation systems will be important contributions to the discussion. The aim of this session is to enhance, through the results of field studies and modeling efforts, the understanding of the hydrologic and ecologic mechanisms controlling ecosystems dynamics in arid and semiarid climates.
Conveners: Paolo D'Odorico, University of Virginia, Department of Environmental Sciences 291 MCormick Rd. Box 400123, Charlottesville, VA 22904-4123 USA, Tel: (434) 924-3964, Fax: (434)982-2137, E-mail: paolo@virginia.edu, and Amilcare Porporato, Polytechnic of Turin, Department of Hydraulics, Transportations, and Civil Infrastructures, Torino, 10129 ITA, Tel: (39) 011 564 5617, Fax: (39) 011 564 5698, E-mail: porporato@polito.it

B09 Intercomparison of Primary Production Models and Field Observations
The continuing challenge of understanding the carbon cycle has led to a new era in which extensive field measurements of primary production and related components of the carbon cycle are becoming available. Most models that are capable of global application are limited in spatial resolution by the availability of forcing data. This session will solicit presentations on new data compilations, including recent syntheses from the literature as well as new field observations. Presentations on the issues involved in comparing model results that are at a coarser spatial resolution than the field data will be encouraged. The main emphasis will be on comparisons of these new data with the results of current models. The session as a whole is designed to review progress and identify new opportunities for modeling of primary production and its contribution to the need for monitoring the global carbon cycle.
Conveners: Stephen D. Prince, University of Maryland, Department of Geography 2181 LeFrak Hall, College Park, MD 20742 USA, Tel: (301) 405-4062, Fax: (301) 314-9299, E-mail: sp43@umail.umd.edu, and Kathy A. Hibbard, University of New Hampshire, IGBP/IHDP/WCRP International Carbon Cycle Joint Project Morse Hall, Durham, NH 03824 USA, Tel: (603) 862-4255, Fax: (603) 862-2124, E-mail: kathyh@eos.sr.unh.edu

B10 Bridging the Gap Between Ecosystem and Atmospheric Studies of Ecosystem-Atmosphere CO2 Fluxes
Process-level studies, including eddy-covariance flux towers, yield a mechanistic understanding of the dynamics of ecosystem-atmosphere CO2 exchange, though on a small scale relative to biomes, continents, or the globe. The atmosphere integrates ecosystem-atmosphere CO2 exchange over very large scales. Thus the rate of change and spatial distribution of atmospheric CO2 mixing ratios provide the ability to infer ecosystem-atmosphere exchange of CO2 at global and zonal scales. The gap in spatial scales between these approaches is very large. This gap limits our ability to connect the process-level understanding derived from direct flux observations to the observed global atmospheric CO2 budget. We invite presentations of studies that attempt to bridge this gap in spatial scales. Possible topics include upscaling tower fluxes using ecosystem models and remote sensing, regional experiments using boundary layer budgets or airborne eddy-covariance measurements, or syntheses of multiple flux towers across regional to global scales.
Conveners: Kenneth Davis, The Pennsylvania State University, Department of Meteorology 512 Walker Bldg., University Park, PA 16802 USA, Tel: (814) 863-8601, Fax: (814) 865-3663, E-mail: davis@essc.psu.edu, and Scott Dennining, Colorado State University, , , USA, E-mail: denning@atmos.colostate.edu, and David Hollinger, USDA Forest Service, , , USA, E-mail: davidh@hypatia.unh.edu

B11 The Effects of Urban/Suburban Development on Nutrient Cycling Processes and Water Quality
Human development in urban and suburban settings affects nutrient cycling and water quality through additions of septic waste, treated sewage, pesticides, and fertilizer to the landscape. Alteration of preexisting runoff patterns by paved and other impermeable surfaces results in rapid delivery of these pollutants to waterways accompanied by enhanced sediment loads, resulting in impacts on the biological community. Additionally, soil and groundwater environments are altered by the movement of these same pollutants through the subsurface. Because some of these pollutants are also nutrients, changes in the types and rates of biotic and abiotic nutrient cycling processes such as mineralization, adsorption/desorption, and reduction may also result. Management of storm water runoff through creation of detention basins and wetlands may partially mitigate these adverse impacts. Contributions for this session are sought from investigators who have studied the effects of urban and suburban development on water quality and the resulting impacts on nutrient cycling processes in aquatic and terrestrial biological communities. Presentations focusing on the effects of mitigation strategies are also welcomed.
Conveners: Doug Burns, U.S. Geological Survey, Watersheds Research Section 425 Jordan Rd., Troy, NY 12180-8349 USA, Tel: +1-518-285-5662, Fax: +1-518-285-5601, E-mail: daburns@usgs.gov

B12 Lake Vostok: An Ancient System?
The goal of this proposed biogeoscience session is to bring together the community of scientists interested in the biota of deep subglacial lakes and the physical scientists interested in the glacial and tectonic boundary conditions. Lake Vostok is a deep subglacial lake capped by 4 km of ice resting in the center of East Antarctica. Recent identification of viable microbes in frozen samples of the lake water raises the possibility of a viable ecosystem within the lake, isolated from direct exchange with the atmosphere for millions of years. The overlying ice sheet delivers a flux of particles and microbes into the lake. The location of the lake along a major geologic boundary indicates the subglacial geology controls the location and form of the lake. This unique and ancient system represents an unusual convergence of glaciologic, biologic, and tectonic processes.
Conveners: Robin E. Bell, Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia, , Palisades, NY 10964-8000 USA, Tel: +1-845-365-8827, Fax: +1-845-365-8179, E-mail: robinb@ldeo.columbia.edu, and John C. Priscu, Montana State Univ, Land Resources and Environmental Sciences, 334 Leon Johnson Hall, Bozeman, MT 59717 USA, Tel: +1-406-994-3250, Fax: +1-406-994-5863, E-mail: jpriscu@montana.edu, and Michael Studinger, Columbia University, Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, Palisades, NY 10964-8000 USA, Tel: +1-845-365-8598, Fax: +1-845-365-8179, E-mail: mstuding@ldeo.columbia.edu

B13 The Stimulation of Plant Production by Rising Atmospheric CO2: Did it Trigger Settled Life and Food Production at the End of the Last Glacial?
This session will explore the roles of the climate change and the rapid increase in atmospheric CO2 concentration from about 190 ppm during the Last Glacial Maximum to about 250 ppm at the appearance of settled life and food production. What was the climate during and following the LGM at the loci of the origins of food production? Did low production of food plants require nomadic life, and if so, was it increased production of the early domesticates that led to a shift to settled life? What were the relative roles of climate and CO2 in the stimulation of plant production? What factors would have favored plant survival at low CO2 and the climate of the LGM, and were plants different at that time than modern representatives of the founder species? These questions will be addressed by anthropologists, plant physiologists, ecologists, and climatologists.
Conveners: Bert G. Drake, Smithsonian Environmental Research Center, PO Box 28, Edgewater, MD 21037 USA, Tel: +1-443-482-2294, E-mail: BM_1_ drake@serc.si.edu, and Rowan Sage, University of Toronto, Department of Botany, Toronto, ONT M5S 3B2 CAN, Tel: +1-416-978-7660, E-mail: rsage@botany.utoronto.ca

Biogeosciences also presents jointly with the following sessions:
H11 Water Quality of Natural Systems (Poster Only)
A05 Organic Aerosols in Past and Present Atmospheres
A06 The Exchange of Chemically Reactive Trace Constituents Between Biosphere and Atmosphere
A10 Fires, Scars, and Smoke: Observations, Impact, and Policies
A16 Wet and Dry Atmospheric Deposition: Scientific Advances and Policy Developments
A17 Ice Cores: Glaciology and Environmental Change
H03 Characterization and Monitoring of Groundwater Geochemistry and Bioavailability: Impact of Recent Advances in Analytical Chemistry
H08 Hydrology and Transport of Contaminants in Riparian Zones
H09 Bioclogging of Natural Porous Media
H10 Links Between Hydrology and Water Quality in the Florida Everglades
H18 Coupled Watershed and Ecosystem Processes: Methodologies, Models, Measurements and Management
H19 Impacts of Urban Land Use Change: Hydrologic, Biogeochemical, and Policy Issues
H25 Operational Monitoring of the Arctic Hydrological System
OS01 Physical Processes in Salt Marshes and Barrier Islands
P06 Mars Sample Return: Science, Implementation, Issues, and Plans
V03 Minerals, Solutions, and Microbial Life
GC01 Climate and Development from Seasons to Centuries: How Our Understanding of and Responses to Seasonal Climate Variability Can Build Insight Into Human Adaptation to Long-Term Climate Change
GC02 Atlantic Decadal Variability
GC03 Pacific Decadal Variability
GC04 Carbon Management Technologies: Feasibility, Impacts, Risks, and Economics
GC06 Reconstruction and Understanding the Late Maunder Minimum Climate Anomaly
H24 Land-Atmosphere Interaction and the Atmospheric Boundary Layer

Geodesy

G00 General Contributions
Contributions relevant in any area over the full spectrum of Geodesy may be submitted to this series of the sessions. Accepted contributions will be organized into appropriate topical sessions. More than half the papers contributed for AGU meetings will not find a home in the pre-approved sessions suggested by a variety of conveners. Papers submitted to these sessions give the program chairs an opportunity to fashion a backbone for the meeting and determine what the broad range of contributors feel is important in the section right now. Geodesy is concerned with the study and measurement of the external shape of the Earth and its gravity field, including its temporal variations; crustal motion, loading and deformation; Earth rotation; the tidal and rotational motion and deformation of the Earth; the establishment and maintenance of a stable terrestrial reference frame; the dynamics of the Earth including its core and mantle; the construction of and internal dynamics of the Earth; and the flux and exchange of mass and momentum between and within the solid Earth, the hydrosphere, the cryosphere, and the atmosphere. Geodetic measurements are crucial to the study of climate change, including the advance and retreat of ice sheets and glaciers, sea level rise, and charting the motion of the Earth's crust through time. Papers in these disciplines that do not necessarily fit into the sessions are welcome.
Convener: Jeanne Sauber, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, USA, E-mail: jeanne@steller.gsfc.nasa.gov

G01 Integrating Space Geodetic Techniques and Results for Global Earth Observing
The Global Space Geodetic Networks and the terrestrial reference frame have become the fundamental resource in the measurement of sea level, polar mass balance, land surface change, atmospheric dynamics, navigation, time transfer, and national cadastral networks. To advance geodesy's contributions to the Earth sciences, the International Association of Geodesy (IAG) plans to implement an "Integrated Global Geodetic Observing System" in 2003. This session seeks to explore the optimum integration of mature (i.e. SLR, VLBI, GPS, and DORIS) and developing and supporting (e.g., GLONASS, GALILEO, altimetry, InSAR, gravimetry, etc.) techniques in anticipation of the IAG initiative. Topics of interest include scientific objectives and requirements; techniques for the efficient and accurate measurement of critical parameters and the efficient synthesis of observations; coordination of observing programs; local and global ties of the observing networks to improve accuracy; limits to accuracy; the definition, dissemination, and utilization of products; etc.
Conveners: Gerhard Beutler, Astronomical Institute, University of Berne, Sidlerstrasse 5 , Bern, CH-3012 CHE, Tel: 41-31-631-8596, Fax: 41-31-631-3869, E-mail: gerhard.beutler@aiub.unibe.ch, and John L. LaBrecque, Office of Earth Science, NASA/HQ, Code YS/YO NASA Headquarters, Washington, DC 20546-001 USA, Tel: 202-358-1373, Fax: 202-358-2770, E-mail: jlabrecq@hq.nasa.gov, and Jim Ray, U.S. Naval Observatory, EO Department 3450 Massachusetts Ave, NW , Washington, DC 20392-5420 USA, Tel: 202-762-1444, Fax: 202-762-1563, E-mail: jimr@maia.usno.navy.mil, and Tom Yunck, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, M/S 238-540 4800 Oak Grove Drive , Pasadena, CA 91109 USA, Tel: 818-354-3369, Fax: 818-393-6686, E-mail: tom.yunck@jpl.nasa.gov

G02 GPS Navigation as a Tool for Earth Science
Precise positioning of moving GPS receivers is an enabling technology for studing the Earth by remote sensing. It is a practical and affordable way to get precise geographic registration for many kinds of data, and speed and acceleration corrections, for example, for air and sea gravimetry. It is used in mapping topography, bathymetry, sea surface, and ice thickness, from ships, airplanes, and satellites, with various kinds of sonar, radar, and lidar. New developments include the combination of GPS and acoustic underwater positioning to monitor sea-floor tectonics, the observing in real time of earthquake ground motion and volcano inflation, and the use of buoys at sea to make tidal measurements, calibrate satellite altimeters, or detect tsunamis; all this happens at a time when the increasing use of robotic vehicles is opening the way to cheaper and faster surveys of larger areas. Authors are encouraged to send abstracts on any of these or similar topics; presentations are sought on both actual applications and on the relevant GPS techniques.
Conveners: Oscar L. Colombo, GEST/NASA GSFC, Code 926, Greenbelt, MD 20771 USA, Tel: 301-614-6093, Fax: 301-614-6099, E-mail: ocolombo@geodesy2.gsfc.nasa.gov, and Dorota Grejner-Brzezinska, Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Geodetic Science, The Ohio State Universi, 2070 Neil Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210-1275 USA, Tel: 614-292-8787, Fax: 614-292-2957, E-mail: dorota@cfm.ohio-state.edu

G03 Airborne and Spaceborne Laser Altimetry Observations: Scientific Applications, Processing Techniques, and Synergy With Other Remote Sensing Observations
Laser altimetry from airborne and spaceborne platforms is rapidly stablishing itself as an invaluable technique for many purposes, including mapping, surface characterization, and 3D deconstruction. Products include detailed topography and land cover data sets, which address fundamental issues ranging from subcanopy hydrography, to biomass estimates, to urban planning. Successful spaceborne applications to date include the Shuttle Laser Altimeter (SLA), the NEAR Laser Rangefinder (NLR), and the Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA). Planned launches include multiyear missions such as the Vegetation Canopy Lidar (VCL) and Ice, Cloud and Land Elevation Satellite (ICESat), which will yield global data sets on planetary topography, ice sheet mass balance, ocean topography, and landcover (vegetation). This session aims to bring together an interdisciplinary group of scientists, engineers, and end users working in the field of laser remote sensing. Topics of interest include geolocation processing, system calibration and performance assessments, data management and visualization, topography mapping, both planetary and terrestrial, on global, local, and regional scales. We solicit papers on all applications of laser altimetry, including the determination of bare Earth topography (in vegetated or built areas), geomorphology and hazards assessment, land use and urban planning, recovery of biophysical properties such as canopy height and biomass, surface change studies, applications to the study of glaciers and ice sheets, planetary mapping, and fusion of laser altimetry data with data from other sensors.
Conveners: Claudia Cristina Carabajal, NVI, Inc. @ NASA/GSFC, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center Space Geodesy Branch Code 926, Greenbelt, MD 20771 USA, Tel: 301-614-6111, Fax: 301-614-6099, E-mail: claudia@stokes.gsfc.nasa.gov, and Jean-Bernard Minster, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, IGPP (0225), La Jolla, CA 92093 USA, Tel: 858-534-5650, Fax: 858-534-2902, E-mail: jbminster@ucsd.edu

Geodesy also presents jointly with the following sessions:
T02 Global Earthquake System Science (Monitoring Earthquakes from Space)
T05 Active Deformation and Natural Hazards in the Caribbean Region
T01 Monitoring Deformation in Mountain Belts

Geomagnetism and Paleomagnetism

GP00 General Contributions
Contributions relevant in any area over the full spectrum of Geomagnetism and Paleomagnetism may be submitted to this series of the sessions. Accepted contributions will be organized into appropriate topical sessions. More than half the papers contributed for AGU meetings will not find a home in the pre-approved sessions suggested by a variety of conveners. Papers submitted to these sessions give the program chairs an opportunity to fashion a backbone for the meeting and determine what the broad range of contributors feel is important in the section right now. The Geomagnetism and Paleomagnetism section represents a variety of scientific fields, including applied mathematics, physics, and geology, linked by a common interest in the Earth's magnetic field and how its characteristics can be used to understand Earth's structure, dynamics, and history. The GP section welcomes papers focussed on properties of the present geomagnetic field and its behavior in the historical and geological past, studies of magnetic anomalies to understand the structure of the oceanic and continental crust, the study of the physics and chemistry of magnetic minerals, with particular emphasis on how they are formed and become magnetized, and electromagnetic methods used to study variations in composition, temperature, and other properties of Earth's crust and mantle.
Convener: Michael Purucker, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, USA, E-mail: purucker@geomag.gsfc.nasa.gov

GP01 Analysis of the Øersted, CHAMP, and SAC-C Magnetic Field Constellation
Previous missions to map the Earth's magnetic field from space have been isolated missions which had difficulty distinguishing between temporal and spatial variability of the field. With the launch of Ørsted (1999), CHAMP and Ørsted-2/SAC-C (2000), we now have three satellites in near-Earth orbit measuring the scalar and vector magnetic fields at the nanotesla accuracy level. In order to improve the utilization of these unique data sets, representatives of these projects have agreed to release to the community a sample of data from all three satellites spanning a variety of viewing geometries, local times, and magnetic disturbance levels. Associated with this data sample will be descriptive models and indices. We solicit presentations which describe the utility, analysis, and interpretation of this coordinated data set, and other data sets. We welcome presentations on external current systems, induction and crustal fields, and the main field. We hope to have this data sample available prior to 1 January 2002, so that everyone who wishes to participate in this session will have adequate time to analyze these data, and other data sets. The session will be largely on-line, with a single oral talk at AGU devoted to describing some of the exciting results. We expect that the conveners will organize several question and answer sessions on-line, pose questions for the participants, and summarize the results. The focus will be on facilitating interactions between the large but widely spread community (more than 50 international groups) which is actively working on these data sets. An article advertising this session will appear in an upcoming Eos, and a summary article will appear, also in Eos, describing the results of this interactive session. While the projects and the conveners will select some of the data samples, we would like your input now as to the data samples you would like to see from the projects. Please e-mail your requests to any of the conveners as soon as possible, but no later than 1 January 2002. We look forward to hearing from you and to a successful interactive session.
Conveners: Heather McCreadie, GeoForschungsZentrum/Potsdam, , Potsdam, D-14473 DEU, E-mail: bilby@gfz-potsdam.de, and Michael Purucker, Raytheon ITSS at Geodynamics Branch, , Greenbelt, MD 20771 USA, E-mail: purucker@geomag.gsfc.nasa.gov, and Susanne Vennerstrom, Danish Space Research Institute, , Copenhagen, DNK, E-mail: sv@dsri.dk, and Gauthier Hulot, IPGP, , Paris, FRA, E-mail: gh@ipgp.jussieu.fr

GP02 Improving the Reliability of Paleointensity Determinations: Microwaves and Other Techniques
A session and workshop
Convener: Derek Walton, McMaster University, CAN,

GP03 New Developments in Magnetic Instrumentation, Data Acquistion, and Processing
A session devoted to new advances in the measurement of magnetic fields. Papers are solicited on the following topics: magnetic microscopy, miniature space magnetometers and star cameras, absolute instruments, fluxgate magnetometers, the development of magnetometers to make measurements at the surface of Mars, and new tools in rock magnetism such as microwaves.
Conveners: Benjamin Weiss, California Institute of Technology, 170-25 1200 E. California Bl , Pasadena, CA 91125 USA, Tel: 626-395-6187, Fax: 626-568-0935, E-mail: bweiss@gps.caltech.edu, and Steve Constable, Scripps, , , USA, E-mail: sconstable@ucsd.edu

GP04 Planetary Magnetic Fields
We solicit contributions on magnetic fields of the planets and their moons, with an emphasis on internal field, internal-external field interactions, or purely external fields.
Convener: Jafar Arkani-Hamed, McGill University, CAN,

GP05 New Rock Magnetic Approaches and Their Geological Applications
This session will focus on results of recent rock magnetic analyses involving novel approaches to geomagnetic, tectonic, and paleoclimate studies. Contributions aimed at understanding the potential of nonconventional magnetic recorders (such as basaltic glass and individual rock-forming minerals) and/or new rock magnetic techniques are welcomed. Among potential issues to be discussed are effects of magnetic anisotropy and cooling rate on paleointensity estimates. Theoretical and experimental contributions considering formation and mineralogy of magnetic carriers in rocks and minerals as well as the nature of their primary magnetization are welcomed. Problems of stability of paleointensity and paleomagnetic signatures in geologic time and during Thellier-Thellier experiments are also encouraged.
Conveners: Alexei Smirnov, University of Rochester, , , USA, Tel: +1-716-275-8810, E-mail: alexei@siena.earth.rochester.edu, and Peter Riisager, Univ of California-Santa Cruz, , Santa Cruz, CA USA,

Geomagnetism and Paleomagnetism also presents jointly with the following sessions:
G01 Integrating Space Geodetic Techniques and Results for Global Earth Observing
T02 Global Earthquake System Science (Monitoring Earthquakes from Space)
T04 The Chesapeake Bay Impact Structure: Results From New Core Holes and Geophysical Surveys
T05 Active Deformation and Natural Hazards in the Caribbean Region
T03 A Memorial Session for Ronald W. Girdler: Rifts, Ridges, Reversals, and Regional Studies

Geochemical Society

GS00 General Contributions
Contributions relevant in any area over the full spectrum of the geochemical sciences may be submitted to this series of the sessions. Accepted contributions will be organized into appropriate topical sessions. More than half the papers contributed for AGU meetings will not find a home in the pre-approved sessions suggested by a variety of conveners. Papers submitted to these sessions give the program chairs an opportunity to fashion a backbone for the meeting and determine what the broad range of contributors feel is important in the section right now.
Convener: Adina Paytan, Stanford University, USA, E-mail: apaytan@pangea.stanford.edu

GS01 Application of Trace Metals to Paleoenvironmental Change: Limitations and Challenges
Trace metal ratios (e.g., Sr, Mg, Cd, Zn) in biogenic calcite are important tracers for paleoenvironmental change. For example, foraminiferal Mg/Ca ratios have become a popular proxy for oceanic paleotemperatures, but each tracer has its own limitations. A firm grasp of the challenges involved in the application of trace metal ratios is critical for meaningful environmental reconstructions. We welcome presentations that will address issues such as, but not limited to, calibration of data sets to modern oceanic environments, seawater geochemistry, biochemistry of trace metal uptake, or postdepositional alteration.
Convener: Katharina Billups, University of Delaware, College of Marine Studies 700 Pilottown Road, Lewes, DE USA, Tel: +1-302-645-4249, Fax: +1-302-645-4007, E-mail: kbillups@udel.edu

Geochemical Society also presents jointly with the following sessions:
V05 Determining Diamond Provenance
V01 Element Partitioning and Diffusion in the Earth's Interior
V03 Minerals, Solutions, and Microbial Life
V04 Hydrothermal Environments: Coupling Experimental, Field, and Analytical Techniques
V06 Volatiles and Light Elements in Magmatic Systems
V07 Multidisciplinary Constraints on Volcanic Volatile Budgets
S03 Hotspots: Observations and Theoretical Models

Hydrology

H00 General Contributions
Contributions relevant to the full spectrum of the hydrological sciences may be submitted to this series of sessions which follows. Accepted contributions will be organized into appropriate topical sessions. Papers not specifically directed toward a particular session will be assigned to a session that is most appropriate, including the creation of general sessions not listed as one of the sessions. Hydrologists study the occurrence, distribution, movement, and properties of water as a solid, liquid, and vapor, as it cycles through surface waters, the atmosphere, and the surface layers of the Earth. Hydrological inquiry involves almost all of the physical sciences, including physics, chemistry, geology, soil sciences, and meteorology, as well as engineering, the social sciences, and life sciences. This section is interested in contributions on a variety of terrestrial-based, water-related issues and concerns such as the relationship of land-based surface water processes to weather and climate, including floods, droughts, and erosion; groundwater flow and the remediation of contaminated groundwater; and the characteristics and causes of water quality conditions.
Convener: Allen Bradley, University of Iowa, USA, E-mail: allen-bradley@uiowa.edu

H01 Designing and Optimizing Long-Term Groundwater Monitoring Programs
Long-term monitoring (LTM) is a key component of environmental management, including monitoring natural attenuation and other remedial activities and verifying the long-term integrity of remediated sites and containment systems. Current practice often involves inadequate and/or redundant monitoring, excessive sampling, and expensive analysis. This session promotes efficient monitoring program design, consistent with satisfying appropriate site-specific objectives. Topics include LTM sampling/measurement methods, selecting monitoring alternatives, and LTM program optimization. Insights based on research at natural attenuation field sites are welcome, as are perspectives on future changes anticipated in monitoring paradigms and on issues involved at CERCLA, RCRA, and federal sites.
Conveners: Charles Davis, Member, ASCE EWRI Task Committee on Long-Term Monitoring Design, PAI Corporation, PO Box 98518, Las Vegas, NV 89193 USA, Tel: +1-702-295-0541, Fax: +1-702-295-1810, E-mail: davisc@nv.doe.gov, and Donna Rizzo, Vice-Chair, ASCE EWRI Task Committee on Long-Term Monitoring Design, Subterranean Research Inc., PO Box 1121, Burlington, VT 05402 USA, Tel: +1-802-658-8878, Fax: +1-802-658-8878, E-mail: drizzo@subterra.com, and Barbara Minsker, Chair, ASCE EWRI Task Committee on Long-Term Monitoring Design, University of Illinois, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, 3230D NCEL, MC-250, 205 North Mathews Avenue, Urbana, IL 61801 USA, Tel: +1-217-333-9017, Fax: +1-217-333-6968, E-mail: minsker@uiuc.edu

H02 Modeling Groundwater Flow and Transport Using the Analytical Element Method and Other Analytical Techniques
Analytic methods, in particular the analytical element method (AEM), have matured into powerful techniques for simulating groundwater flow in heterogeneous aquifers. Application of these methods includes (1) the NAGROM-Dutch National Groundwater Model, and (2) stochastic dispersion modeling. This session focuses on recent advances involving analytical modeling of groundwater flow and transport, with emphasis on the AEM. Topics include, but are not limited to (1) development of analytical solutions, such as for modeling multilayer and three-dimensional groundwater flow, (2) hybrid modeling using both the AEM and the finite difference method, (3) computational aspects of AEM modeling, and (4) challenging applications.
Conveners: Igor Jankovic, University at Buffalo, Department of Civil, Structural and Environmental Engineering, 231 Jarvis Hall, Buffalo, NY 14260-4400 USA, Tel: +1-716-645-2114 ext 2328, Fax: +1-716-645-3667, E-mail: ijankovi@eng.buffalo.edu, and Henk Haitjema, Indiana University at Bloomington, School for Public and Environmental Affairs, 1315 East Tenth Street, Bloomington, IN 47405 USA, Tel: +1-812-855-0563, E-mail: haitjema@indiana.edu

H03 Characterization and Monitoring of Groundwater Geochemistry and Bioavailability: Impact of Recent Advances in Analytical Chemistry
Characterizing and monitoring groundwater geochemistry remains an important challenge, creating a need for new tools in groundwater geochemistry. Recent advances in analytical chemistry, such as provided by MC-ICP-MS, GC-C-IRMS, and ICP-OES, provide new opportunities to understand groundwater processes. Examples include identification of recharge waters using element analysis; determining the fate of platinum-group elements; and "fingerprinting" organic pollutants. This session focuses on application of new analytical techniques with emphasis on the potential to gain new insights into the characterization of groundwater systems. Emphasis is placed on applications, statistical methods for handling large data sets, and the interplay of new analytical capabilities with established methods for groundwater characterization.
Conveners: Stephen E. Silliman, University of Notre Dame, Department of Civil Engineering and Geological Sciences, Notre Dame, IN 46556 USA, Tel: +1-219-631-5380, Fax: +1-219-631-9236, E-mail: silliman.1@nd.edu, and Richelle Allen-King, Washington State University, Department of Geology, Pullman, WA 99164-2812 USA, Tel: +1-509-335-1180, Fax: +1-509-335-7816, E-mail: allenkng@wsu.edu

H04 Recent Advances in Groundwater Hydrology (Poster Only)
This session will highlight recent advances in the field of groundwater hydrology. Poster presentations are encouraged on any aspect of groundwater hydrology. Possible topics include advances in field measurement and site characterization, new strategies for modeling flow or transport in porous and fractured media, interpretation of micro- and macro-scale laboratory experiments, and field case studies highlighting advances in theory or practice.
Conveners: Claire Welty, Drexel University, School of Environmental Science, Engineering, and Policy, Philadelphia, PA 19104 USA, Tel: +1-215-895-2281, Fax: +1-215-895-2267, E-mail: weltyc@drexel.edu, and Stephen E. Silliman, University of Notre Dame, Department of Civil Engineering and Geological Sciences, Notre Dame, IN 46556 USA, Tel: +1-219-631-5380, Fax: +1-219-631-9236, E-mail: silliman.1@nd.edu

H05 Quantifying Groundwater Contributions to TMDLs (Poster Only)
This session highlights recent research studies that quantify groundwater contributions, and the impact of the buffering/remediating capacity of groundwater, on nutrients, pesticides, pharmaceuticals, or other contaminants of interest to total maximum daily loads (TMDLs) for surface water bodies. Of particular interest is work that quantifies fluxes of contaminants across hydrologic interfaces, i.e., vadose zone to groundwater and groundwater to surface water. Submissions from both field and modeling studies are encouraged.
Conveners: Wendy Graham, University of Florida, Department of Agricultural and Biological Engineering, POB 110570, Gainesville, FL 32611-0570 USA, Tel: +1-352-392-1864, Fax: +1-352-392-4092, E-mail: WDGraham@mail.ifas.ufl.edu, and Jim Jawitz, University of Florida, Department of Soil and Water Science, 2169 McCarty Hall, POB 110290, Gainesville, FL 32611-0290 USA, Tel: +1-352-392-1951, E-mail: jawitz@ufl.edu

H06 Environmental Vadose Zone Hydrology (Poster Only)
The vadose zone serves many important environmental roles and is an important link as well as a buffer between the land surface-atmosphere and groundwater. Poster presentations are invited on a broad range of topics in environmental vadose zone hydrology including field investigations, laboratory studies, and modeling analyses. Topics may include unsaturated and multiphase flow and transport processes, plant-soil interaction, evaluation and modeling of heterogeneous systems, assessment of prediction uncertainty, biogeochemical and colloidal matter processes, measurement techniques, and monitoring of vadose zone systems.
Conveners: Thomas Harter, University of California, Davis, Department of Land, Air, and Water Resources; 125 Veihmeyer Hall, Davis, CA 95616-8628 USA, Tel: +1-530-752-2709, Fax: +1-530-752-5262, E-mail: thharter@ucdavis.edu, and Michael Young, Desert Research Institute, Division of Hydrologic Sciences, 755 E. Flamingo Road, Las Vegas, NV 89119 USA, Tel: +1-702-895-0489, Fax: +1-702-895-0427, E-mail: michael@dri.edu

H07 Uncertainty Assessments for Environmental Modeling in the Unsaturated Zone
Multipathway models which simulate contaminant transport through the environment to assess health effects (sometimes referred to as multimedia environmental models) incorporate simple to complex conceptual models of flow and transport through the unsaturated zone to the water table; hydrologic and transport parameter distributions; and human exposure scenario assumptions and parameters. In order to build confidence in the calculations from these models, uncertainty assessments and parameter sensitivity analyses of the conceptual models, their input parameter distributions, outcomes, and scenarios need to be performed. This session will focus on the progress being made in performing sensitivity and uncertainty analyses of risk-significant unsaturated zone processes, parameter distributions, and scenarios incorporated in the multimedia environmental models, and the cumulative uncertainty in the estimation of performance measures. The session presentations will discuss the use of these multimedia environmental models to evaluate potential human health exposures using real site data and realistic assumptions. Applications of multimedia models in codes such as 3MRA, RESRAD, DandD, MEPAS, FRAMES, and GoldSim to assess contaminant transport through the unsaturated zone to the water table will be sought. The session will also include other multipathway environmental model applications if contributed. The session will help communicate recent developments and lessons learned from testing uncertainty methods and parameter estimation techniques.
Conveners: Thomas J. Nicholson, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, 11545 Rockville Pike, MS T-9F31, Rockville, MD 20852-2738 USA, Tel: 301-415-6268, Fax: 301-415-5389, E-mail: tjn@nrc.gov, and Beth Moore, U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Basic and Applied Research, Washington, DC 20585 USA, Tel: +1-202-586-6334, Fax: +1-202-586-1492, E-mail: beth.moore@em.doe.gov, and Justin Babendreier, USEPA National Exposure Research Laboratory/ORD, Ecosystems Research Division, 960 College Station Road, Athens, GA 30605-2720 USA, Tel: +1-706-355-8344, E-mail: Babendreier.Justin@epa.gov

H08 Hydrology and Transport of Contaminants in Riparian Zones
Riparian zones are lands adjacent to water bodies like lakes, reservoirs, rivers, streams, and wetlands. The functions of riparian zones are related to their soil, vegetation, and hydrologic characteristics and geomorphology. Riparian zones usually are divided into three conceptual zones: zone 1 is adjacent to water bodies; Zone 2 is an intermediate zone upslope from Zone 1; and, Zone 3 is the vegetated areas upslope from Zone 2. Understanding the hydrologic characteristics of these riparian zones is essential to assessing their pollutant removal functions. This session presents research on the hydrologic pathways and the transport and fate of contaminants through riparian zones, especially occurring in the vadose zone and the hyporheic zone. The vadose is subjected to unsaturated flow, while the hyporheic zone is a saturated zone below streams and banks where water exchanges occur between the surface and subsurface. Several areas of research are of interest for this session, including theoretical, numerical, and laboratory/field experiments investigating the transport and fate of contaminants (e.g., phosphorus, microbial pathogens, sediments, pesticides, hazardous-waste landfills leachate) from the pore to regional scale, especially the Chesapeake Bay and the New York City watershed.
Conveners: Christophe Darnault, Malcolm Pirnie Inc., Envrionmental Restoration Group/Water Resources, 11832 Rock Landing Drive, Suite 400, Newport News, VA 23606 USA, Tel: +1-757-873-4480, Fax: +1-757-873-8723, E-mail: cdarnault@pirnie.com, and Philippe Baveye, Cornell University, Laboratory of Environmental Geophysics, Bradfield Hall, Ithaca, NY 14853 USA, Tel: +1-607-539-6456, Fax: +1-607-255-8615, E-mail: pcb2@cornell.edu

H09 Bioclogging of Natural Porous Media
In a wide range of contexts, microorganisms have been shown to be particularly effective at clogging natural porous media, i.e., obstructing their pore space and reducing their permeability, sometimes by several orders of magnitude. Bioclogging may be detrimental in some cases (e.g., in water wells or slow sand filters) but beneficial and put to profitable use in other cases (e.g., in subsurface biobarriers). In either context, a detailed understanding of the mechanisms and environmental controls of bioclogging is desirable. This session will review the state of the art in this emerging field. Topics may include (1) laboratory experiments and microscopic techniques to understand the process of bioclogging at the pore scale, (2) intermediate-scale experiments, (3) mathematical modeling of bioclogging at column and field scales, (4) methods to obtain evidence of bioclogging in field situations, and (5) discussions about criteria to assess the effectiveness of in situ biocontainment or biobarrier technologies.
Conveners: Christophe Darnault, Malcolm Pirnie, Inc., Environmental and Water Resources Engineering, 11832 Rock Landing Drive, Suite 400, Newport News, VA 23606 USA, Tel: +1-757-873-4480, Fax: +1-757-873-8723, E-mail: cdarnault@pirnie.com, and Philippe Baveye, Cornell University, Laboratory of Environmental Geophysics, Bradfield Hall, Ithaca, NY 14853 USA, Tel: +1-607-539-6456, Fax: +1-607-255-8615, E-mail: pcb2@cornell.edu

H10 Links Between Hydrology and Water Quality in the Florida Everglades
Over the last 100+ years, the aerial extent of the Everglades has been cut in half, the hydrologic flow has been altered by roads, levees, and canals, and the water quality has been degraded by agricultural runoff and other anthropogenic activities. Water quality, hydrology, and biogeochemistry are intimately linked in this unique ecosystem. For example, surface water flow is an important mechanism for phosphate transport; sulfate and oxygen concentrations play key roles in mercury methylation; high water levels and phosphate concentrations encourage cattail invasion, which in turn affect water quality and hydrologic flow. We must have a good understanding of these links if science-based restoration efforts are going to succeed. Papers are encouraged on any aspect of the hydrology, water quality, and biogeochemistry of the Everglades, including field, laboratory, and modeling studies.
Conveners: James M. Krest, U.S. Geological Survey, 430 National Center, Reston, VA 20192 USA, Tel: +1-703-648-5472, Fax: +1-703-648-5472, E-mail: jmkrest@usgs.gov, and Dan Childers, Florida International University, Department of Biological Sciences and Southeast Environmental Research Center, Miami, FL 33199 USA, Tel: +1-305-348-3101, Fax: +1-305-348-4096, E-mail: childers@fiu.edu

H11 Water Quality of Natural Systems (Poster Only)
The quality of natural waters is determined by complex interactions of hydrological, chemical, and biological processes. Poster presentations are invited on all aspects of water quality, ranging from field and laboratory studies to modeling approaches and theoretical work. Possible topics include behavior of solutes or contaminants, interaction of hydrology and water quality, geochemical reactions and processes, and novel techniques of analysis or investigation. Presentations may focus on surface water or groundwater systems at any spatial or temporal scale.
Conveners: Elizabeth W. Boyer, State University of New York, College of Environmental Science and Forestry,, 1 Forestry Drive, Syracuse, NY 13210 USA, Tel: +1-315-470-4818, E-mail: ewboyer@syr.edu, and Mary A. Voytek, U.S. Geological Survey, 430 National Center, 12201 Sunrise Valley Drive, Reston, VA 20192 USA, Tel: +1-703-648-6894, E-mail: mavoytek@usgs.gov

H12 Science, Politics, and Watershed Management
The expansion of watershed management plans has involved many scientists in the development of environmental policy and planning processes. The watershed planning process involves the integration of scientific knowledge with many different political actors and viewpoints. Effective watershed management requires that this process be understood and implemented in a manner that realizes both scientific competence and democratic procedures. This session will examine both our current understanding of watershed processes and the utilization of this knowledge in watershed management and environmental policy development. In order to encourage discourse between natural scientists, social scientists, and policy makers, this session seeks a broad array of presentations related to watershed hydrology, ecology, management, and policy. Examples of appropriate presentations include discussion of methods that yield better understanding of watershed processes (and thereby contribute to better decisions), discussion of regulation and/or management of development in urbanizing watersheds, and analysis of the underlying societal trends that drive both development and environmental regulations.
Conveners: Robert J. Brulle, Drexel University, School of Environmental Science, Engineering, and Policy, 3141 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 USA, Tel: +1-215-895-2294, Fax: +1-215-895-2267, E-mail: brullerj@mail.drexel.edu, and Aaron I. Packman, Northwestern University, Department of Civil Engineering, 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, IL 60208-3109 USA, Tel: +1-847-491-9902, Fax: +1-847-491-4011, E-mail: a-packman@northwestern.edu, and Michel C. Boufadel, Temple University, Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering, 1947 North 12th Street, Philadelphia, PA 19122 USA, Tel: +1-215-204-7871, Fax: +1-215-204-6936, E-mail: boufadel@astro.temple.edu

H13 Hydrologic and Water Quality Connections Between Mountains and Adjacent Lowlands
Virtually all of the world’s great river basins have important source areas in mountains (e.g., the Andean source of the Amazon, Rocky Mountain source of the Missouri, Alpine source of the Danube, and Himalayan source of the Yangtze). The contribution of water, sediments, and dissolved solutes from mountain sources far exceeds the proportional extent of mountain areas in many of these basins. In addition to direct contributions from mountains and their role in basin-wide mass balances, mountain-derived water and materials may also have multiple indirect impacts on lowland systems. This session invites contributions that explore the connections among meteorological, weathering, and runoff phenomenon in mountain source areas and the resulting hydrology and water quality of adjacent lowlands. It also encourages contributions that consider the impact of changing land use and climate on mountain-lowland linkages.
Conveners: Michael McClain, Florida International University, Department of Environmental Studies, 11200 SW 8th Street, Miami, FL 33199 USA, Tel: +1-305-348-6826, Fax: +1-305-348-6137, E-mail: mcclainm@fiu.edu, and Robert Stallard, U.S. Geological Survey, 3215 Marine Street, Boulder, CO 80303-1066 USA, Tel: +1-303-541-3022, Fax: +1-303-447-2505, E-mail: stallard@usgs.gov

H14 The Role of Models and Data in the TMDL Process
A recently completed National Research Council study of the Clean Water Act's Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) program assessed several issues related to the scientific basis of the TMDL program, including the development and use of information to identify sources of pollutant loadings and their respective contributions to water quality impairment. The study recognizes the importance of models in the development of TMDLs and emphasizes the importance of accounting for uncertainty and of using adaptive modeling approaches. We invite papers that address several model-related questions and recommendations made by the NRC Committee, including the following: (1) How can uncertainty and error be explicitly considered in the estimation and application of models used in the TMDL process? (2) What are the advantages and disadvantages of relatively complex, mechanistic models versus conceptually simpler empirical models for use in setting TMDLs? (3) How can models be used to estimate impairment probability distribution for all water bodies in a state? (4) How can monitoring data be utilized to revise and improve TMDL models? Papers that consider the coupling of different types of models at different scales are also encouraged. We encourage presenters to emphasize both the strengths and weaknesses of the modeling approach they use and to discuss the needs for further model development in light of the NRC recommendations.
Conveners: Gerard McMahon, U.S. Geological Survey, 3916 Sunset Ridge Road, Raleigh, NC 27607 USA, Tel: +1-919-571-4068, Fax: +1-919-571-4041, E-mail: gmcmahon@usgs.gov, and Richard B. Alexander, U.S. Geological Survey, 413 National Center, 12201 Sunrise Valley Road, Reston, VA 20192 USA, Tel: +1-703-648-6869, E-mail: ralex@usgs.gov

H15 Predictability in Hydrometeorology
The global water cycle is maintained by diverse physical processes in various geospheres. Models of different types and complexity can be used to predict various aspects of the water cycle. Many of the natural processes involved exhibit chaotic behavior. Small changes in the state of a system, due to either observational or model related uncertainties, lead to drastically different solutions after a finite time period, resulting first in a partial, and eventually in a complete loss of predictability. To be of use, forecasts in this environment need to be expressed probabilistically, instead of in the form of a single value. In this session, studies related to the predictability of hydrometeorological processes are solicited. This includes theoretical studies aimed at assessing the predictability properties of different subcomponents of the water cycle, as well as hydrometeorological applications aimed at quantifying forecast uncertainty on various spatial and temporal scales. In particular we invite contributions on different methodologies developed for capturing case-dependent forecast uncertainty related to the use of imperfect models and limited observations. Papers on the use of ensemble and related approaches in various hydrometeorological forecast applications are especially welcome.
Conveners: Zoltan Toth, SAIC-NCEP/EMC, 5200 Auth Road, Room 207, Camp Springs, MD 20746 USA, Tel: +1-301-763-8000 x7268, Fax: +1-301-763-8545, E-mail: Zoltan.Toth@noaa.gov, and John Schaake, NOAA/NWS, 1325 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD 20910 USA, Tel: +1-301-713-1660, Fax: +1-301-713-0963, E-mail: john.schaake@noaa.gov, and Qingyun Duan, NOAA/NWS, Hydrology Lab, 1325 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD 20910 USA, Tel: +1-301-713-1018, Fax: +1-301-713-0963, E-mail: qingyun.duan@noaa.gov

H16 Hypothesis, Theories, and Applications of Distributed Modeling and the Initial Results of the Distributed Model Intercomparison Project (DMIP)
The National Weather Service Hydrology Laboratory (NWS/HL) is hosting the distributed Model Intercomparison Project (DMIP) (http://hsp.nws.noaa.gov/oh/hrl/dmip/index.html) to identify, understand, and share science issues in distributed hydrologic modeling through intercomparison of distributed models (among themselves and with lumped models). Of particular interest to the host are those that are particularly important at the space-time scales where operational hydrologic models operate for purposes of flash flood, river flood, and water resources forecasting. The purpose of this session is (1) to provide a progress report, particularly in the area of data preparedness and availability, and initial results from limited model intercomparisons, and (2) to seek general contributions from the community on all aspects of such a study, including data analysis (including data quality), distributed and lumped modeling of soil moisture accounting and routing, comparison of results between distributed and lumped modeling, computational issues, objective assessment of model results, assessment of marginal benefit of additional/finer-resolution data sources and physical processes modeled, parameter estimation, data assimilation, and development of forecast products from distributed model output. Contributions from both participants and nonparticipants of DMIP are equally welcome.
Conveners: Michael Smith, National Weather Service, Hydrologic Science and Modeling Branch, Hydrology Laboratory, 1325 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD 20910 USA, Tel: +1-301-713-0640 ext 128, Fax: +1-301-713-0963, E-mail: michael.smith@noaa.gov, and Xu Liang, University of California, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, 631 Davis Hall #1710, Berkeley, CA 94720-1710 USA, Tel: +1-510-642-2648, Fax: +1-510-642-7483, E-mail: liang@ce.berkeley.edu

H17 Surface Water Hydrology and Water Resources (Poster Only)
This session will highlight recent advances in the field of surface water hydrology and water resources. Poster presentations are encouraged on a wide range of topics, including operational streamflow forecasting, riparian zone hydrology, water resources management, climate change, land surface modeling and processes, calibration issues in modeling, and statistical hydrology, among others. Topics may also include spatial and temporal scaling issues in surface hydrology.
Conveners: Terri S. Hogue, University of Arizona, Department of Hydrology and Water Resources, College of Engineering and Mines, Bldg. 11, PO Box 210011, Tucson, AZ 210011 USA, Tel: +1-520-626-1093, E-mail: hoguets@hwr.arizona.edu, and Christopher A. Williams, University of Virginia, Department of Environmental Sciences, 291 McCormick Road, Clark Hall,, Charlottesville, VA 22904-4123 USA, Tel: +1-804-924-0555, E-mail: caw4r@virginia.edu

H18 Coupled Watershed and Ecosystem Processes: Methodologies, Models, Measurements and Management
The limited knowledge of (1) the coupling of hydrological mechanisms to ecosystem structure and function and the effects of alteration activities, and (2) sound methods to monitor important ecosystem characteristics and the temporal and spatial changes resulting from system perturbations limit the ability to manage land and water resources using an ecosystem-driven approach. This session focuses on multidisciplinary research that monitors and models ecosystem processes at multiple spatial and temporal scales within a watershed framework. This section seeks papers from field and modeling-based research that examine the impact and interactions of soil, vegetation, and hydrological factors, from the hillslope to the landscape scale, and their response to changing systems. Topics that include the role of streamflow characteristics, soil water dynamics or flow paths on watershed riparian processes, nutrient cycling, carbon uptake, and habitat modification are encouraged. Research that addresses the transition from science to land and water resource management is also welcome.
Conveners: Jennifer Jacobs, University of Florida, Department of Civil and Coastal Engineering, Gainesville, FL 32611-6580 USA, Tel: +1-352-392-9537, Fax: +1-352-392-3394, E-mail: jjaco@ce.ufl.edu, and D. Scott Mackay, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Department of Forest Ecology and Management, 1630 Linden Drive, Madison, WI 53706 USA, Tel: +1-608-262-1669, E-mail: dsmackay@facstaff.wisc.edu

H19 Impacts of Urban Land Use Change: Hydrologic, Biogeochemical, and Policy Issues
As population in the U.S. and worldwide grows, pressures to urbanize the landscape continue to mount. The east and west coasts of the U.S. are highly urbanized with sprawl-type growth becoming a widely recognized phenomenon associated with many urban centers. Development of the landscape leads to a spectrum of negative hydrologic and biogeochemical consequences including heightened flood flows, reduced baseflows, channel incision and erosion, impaired groundwater recharge, changes in redox conditions, alteration of aquatic and terrestrial biological communities, and increased nutrient and pollutant loadings and concentrations. Scientists and policy makers are both focusing greater attention on these linked problems. Scientific pursuits in this area range from tracking and quantification of urban growth, to the creation of best management practices (BMPs) designed to mitigate the impacts of urbanization, to the development of high-resolution, physically based numerical models to estimate and predict nutrient concentrations in streams. Policy-oriented efforts include the establishment of measures to curb urban sprawl such as “smart growth” programs and regulations to monitor and limit nutrients and pollutants in streams. This session will attract a blend of both science and policy perspectives to the problems associated with urbanization. We invite papers that span scientific exploration of urbanization impacts and the policy realm of controlled or directed development. Appropriate scientific presentations would include the effects of urbanization on runoff, recharge, erosion, nutrient cycling processes, water quality, and species diversity in biological communities. Appropriate policy presentations might discuss the effectiveness of low-impact development and government or community efforts to create effective land development control programs. Presentations that integrate science and policy such as the impact of land use programs on runoff processes and water quality are particularly welcomed.
Conveners: Glenn Moglen, University of Maryland, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, College Park, MD 20742 USA, Tel: +1-301-405-1964, Fax: +1-301-405-2585, E-mail: moglen@eng.umd.edu, and Scott Goetz, University of Maryland, Department of Geography, 1153 Lefrak Hall, College Park, MD 20742-8225 USA, Tel: +1-301-405-1297, Fax: +1-301-314-9299, E-mail: sgoetz@geog.umd.edu, and Doug Burns, U.S. Geological Survey, Watersheds Research Section, 425 Jordan Road, Troy, NY 12180-8349 USA, Tel: +1-518-285-5662, Fax: +1-518-285-5601, E-mail: daburns@usgs.gov

H20 Remote Sensing of Precipitation (Poster Only)
This session will cover a broad range of topics related to all aspects of remote sensing of precipitation. Contributions are equally sought from both the research and operational communities to facilitate discussion and exchange of experience. The session will consist entirely of poster presentations. Papers are solicited on the estimation, validation, and error/uncertainty assessment of precipitation measured by ground-based, underwater, shipborne, airborne, or spaceborne remote sensors, such as active (radar) and passive (SSM/I, TMI) microwave, visible (VIS), infrared (IR), or sound-based (hydrophone) sensors. Papers focused on the assimilation of remotely sensed precipitation into atmospheric and/or hydrologic models, and new technologies for remote sensing of precipitation, are encouraged as well.
Conveners: Matthias Steiner, Princeton University, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Princeton, NJ 08544 USA, Tel: +1-609-258-4614, E-mail: msteiner@princeton.edu, and Eyal Amitai, UMBC JCET, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, , Greenbelt, MD 20771 USA, Tel: +1-301-286-9224, E-mail: eyal@radar.gsfc.nasa.gov

H21 Global Precipitation Mission for Hydrology and Hydrometeorology
This session will explore the potential benefits and needs of the Global Precipitation Mission (GPM) for hydrology and hydrometeorology. Contributions are solicited that cover a broad range of topics related to GPM, with particular emphasis on GPM's role for hydrology and hydrometeorology. This may include issues of monitoring key components of the hydrologic cycle at the appropriate scales in space and time, requirements for satellite sensor packages and sampling, data fusion for multiple spaceborne sensors, assimilation of GPM data into atmospheric and hydrologic models, and evaluation of the satellite measurements from ground observations. This session is envisioned as a platform to discuss the potential benefits for hydrology and hydrometeorology resulting from GPM and the requirements and needs to accomplish them.
Conveners: Matthias Steiner, Princeton University, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Princeton, NJ 08544 USA, Tel: +1-609-258-4614, E-mail: msteiner@princeton.edu, and Eric F. Wood, Princeton University, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Princeton, NJ 08544 USA, Tel: +1-609-258-4675, E-mail: efwood@princeton.edu

H22 Advances in Understanding the Global Water Cycle
Growing recognition of the importance of variations in the cycling of water through the Earth system has led to the development of a strengthened Water Cycle program under the auspices of the U.S. Global Change Research Program (USGCRP). Water has important ramifications for the Earth system in all its phases. As a gas it preferentially absorbs radiant energy emitted by the Earth's surface, thereby enhancing the greenhouse effect. As a solid its high albedo reflects incoming solar radiation to space, and its crystalline structure allows it to store water both above and below ground particularly during the winter months. Most critically, as a liquid it is an essential source of fluid and nutrients for humans and animals, it provides essential infrastructure support for society's economic activities, and it serves as a solvent and transport mechanism for many natural and man-made chemicals and pathogens with both positive and negative consequences. Prediction of the variability of the water cycle is a major issue because water excesses in the form of floods constitute a major life-threatening natural hazard while prolonged water deficits during droughts cause economic hardship and social disruption. This session will be a mix of invited and submitted papers dealing with the cycling of water through the Earth system with a focus on pathways, fluxes, and reservoirs. Papers are solicited that deal with observation, analysis, simulation, and prediction of the principal components of the water cycle system and of the system as a whole. Papers are also invited that address factors that introduce changes in the rate of the cycling of water such as land use modification, changing atmospheric composition, and changes to water management practices. In addition to scientific lectures, some USGCRP agency presentations will be included to provide a context and overview for these activities.
Conveners: Rick Lawford, NOAA Office of Global Programs, 1100 Wayne Avenue, Suite 1210, Silver Spring, MD 20910 USA, Tel: +1-301-427-2089 x146, Fax: +1-301-427-2222, E-mail: lawford@ogp.noaa.gov, and Rafael Bras, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Ralph M Parsons Lab, Room 1-290, Cambridge, MA 02139-4307 USA, Tel: +1-617-253-2117, Fax: +1-617-253-4546, E-mail: rlbras@mit.edu, and Roni Avissar, Duke University, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Durham, NC 27708-0287 USA, Tel: +1-919-660-5200, E-mail: avissar@duke.edu, and Paul Houser, NASA, Godard Space Flight Center, Code 974, Greenbelt, MD 20771 USA, Tel: +1-301-614-5772, E-mail: paul.houser@gsfc.nasa.gov

H23 Remote Sensing, Hydrology, and Field Experiments
This session hopes to bring together research in hydrological remote sensing with emphasis on field experiments. In the past, numerous field experiments have brought together data measured from different platforms, including tower-, aircraft-, and satellite-based measurements. These experiments include FIFE, HAPEX, MONSOON-90, Mac-Hydro, SGP-97, and SGP-99, to name a few. Contributions are encouraged that examine the results from these varied measurements in field experiments, the use of remote sensing in hydrology, and the integration of remotely sensed measurements with measurements at different scales.
Conveners: Venkat Lakshmi, University of South Carolina, Department of Geological Sciences, Columbia, SC 29208 USA, Tel: +1-803-777-3552, Fax: +1-803-777-6684, E-mail: vlakshmi@geol.sc.edu, and Anthony Cahill, Texas A&M University, Department of Civil Engineering, College Station, TX 77845 USA, Tel: +1-979-862-3858, Fax: +1-979-862-1542, E-mail: tcahill@civilmail.tamu.edu

H24 Land-Atmosphere Interaction and the Atmospheric Boundary Layer
The focus of this session is on advances in field experimentation, modeling, and simulation to improve our understanding of land-atmosphere interaction over natural terrain at local to regional scales (meters to kilometers). Presentations concerning observations in the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) and at the land surface of mass, heat, and momentum transfer in the soil-plant-atmosphere continuum and the development of models are welcomed. This includes discussion on the use of remote sensing tools (e.g., lidar and radar) as well as the design of new field experimental campaigns with fast response instrumentation, aircraft, and more conventional instruments to probe the ABL. In addition, talks on the application and development of turbulence models, large eddy simulation, field campaign initiatives, and issues on coupling land and atmosphere models including data assimilation are relevant in this session.
Conveners: Marc Parlange, Johns Hopkins University, Department of Geography & Environmental Engineering 313 Ames Hall, Baltimore, MD 21218-2686 USA, Tel: +1-410-516-6042, Fax: +1-410-516-8996, E-mail: mbparlange@jhu.edu, and John Albertson, Duke University, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Durham, NC 27708-0287 USA, Tel: +1- 919-660-5200, E-mail: john.albertson@duke.edu

H25 Operational Monitoring of the Arctic Hydrological System
The geography and dynamics of water across the Arctic region are important elements of the larger Earth system given growing evidence of the vulnerabililty of the Arctic climate and terrestrial biosphere to global change. The Arctic freshwater cycle figures prominently in any analysis of these dynamical systems, with important links among land, atmosphere, and ocean. Our capacity to monitor this important environment is paradoxically deteriorating rapidly relying on traditional sources of land-based data while at the same improving dramatically with the emergence of numerical weather prediction models, satellite-based remote sensing, spatial analysis, and simulation modeling. Several of these new tools have been used to provide a comprehensive picture of change to the entire Arctic. This session seeks to highlight some of these current capabilities and how these might be unified within a common framework. Of particular relevance is a newly proposed component of the NSF Arctic Systems Science Program devoted to Arctic water cycle synthesis studies, Arctic-CHAMP (Pan-Arctic Communitywide Hydrological Analysis and Monitoring Program).
Conveners: Mark Serreze, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences, University of Colorado at Boulder, 216 UCB, Boulder, CO 80309-0216 USA, Tel: +1-303-492-2963, E-mail: serreze@kryos.colorado.edu, and Charles Vorosmarty, University of New Hampshire, Complex Systems Research Center, Durham, NH 03824 USA, Tel: +1-603-862-1792, E-mail: charles.vorosmarty@unh.edu, and Larry Hinzman, University of Alaska Fairbanks, Water & Environmental Research Center, 525 Duckering Bldg, Fairbanks, AK 99775-1760 USA, Tel: +1-907-474-7331, E-mail: ffldh@uaf.edu, and Richard Lammers, University of New Hampshire, Complex Systems Research Center, Durham, NH 03824 USA, Tel: +1-603-862-4699, Fax: +1-603-862-0188, E-mail: Richard.Lammers@unh.edu

H26 A Strategy for the Advancement of Hydrologic Science
The Consortium of Universities for the Advancement of Hydrologic Sciences (CUAHSI) seeks to facilitate hydrologic sciences by (1) providing scientists access to data and information at wide ranges of spatial and temporal scales, as well as access to the most appropriate instruments and technologies for the creation of hydrologic understanding to address a list of pressing national and international problems; (2) nurturing general understanding of hydrologic sciences through programs of education and outreach; and (3) assuring applicability of the advances through a program of technology transfer. This session will include a moderated discussion, with invited speakers to present and stimulate discussion of proposed CUAHSI initiatives, and a poster session. Poster presentations are solicited on various facets of the infrastructure proposals. For additional information on CUAHSI, see www.cuahsi.org.
Conveners: John Wilson, New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology, Department of Earth & Environmental Science, Socorro, NM 87801 USA, Tel: +1-505-835-5308, Fax: +1-505-835-6436, E-mail: jwilson@nmt.edu, and Ken Potter, University of Wisconsin, Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering, 1261C Engineering Hall, 1415 Engineering Drive, Madison, WI 53706 USA, Tel: +1-608-262-0040, Fax: +1-608-262-5199, E-mail: kwpotter@facstaff.wisc.edu

H27 Long-Term Hydrologic and Water Quality Data: An Essential Resource for Science and Public Policy (Poster Only)
Long-term monitoring of hydrology and water quality is critical, both for progress in hydrologic sciences and for sound water resource policy-making. Datasets spanning many decades are essential for establishing reliable estimates of flood and drought risk, for separating human and natural impacts on water quality and streamflow, and for detecting environmental change. Long-term monitoring data often become more valuable over time (e.g., as rare extreme events -- and recovery from them -- become part of the record). They also often prove to be valuable for uses far beyond their original purpose. Yet researchers face persistent challenges in attempting to sustain observation programs over many decades. Unfortunately, no amount of money can buy "lost time" to make up for gaps in time series, or replace essential measurements that were not made. Posters are solicited that illustrate the importance of long-term observations in hydrology, for scientific advancement and as support for policy and resource management decisions. Practical examples and case studies are especially sought. Posters should be suitable for a broad audience, including educated non-scientists. The session will include guided "open house" tours for successive small groups of invited attendees, including key legislative and executive staff.
Conveners: Holly C. Hartmann, University of Arizona, Department of Hydrology and Water Resources, PO Box 210011, Tucson, AZ 85721 USA, Tel: +1-520-626-8523, Fax: +1-520-626-2488, E-mail: hollyh@hwr.arizona.edu, and James W. Kirchner, University of California, Department of Earth and Planetary Science, 479 McCone Hall, Berkeley, CA 94720-4767 USA, Tel: +1-510-643-8559, Fax: +1-510-643-9980, E-mail: kirchner@seismo.berkeley.edu, and Robin L. Hartmann, Natural Resources/Governmental Affairs Consultant, 835 SE McClelland Avenue, Roseburg, OR 97470 USA, Tel: 541-672-3694, Fax: 541-464-0052, E-mail: hartmann@teleport.com

H28 Geomorphology
Diverse approaches are required to understand the processes of erosion, transport, and deposition of sediment and solutes, and to predict their influence on short- and long-term landscape changes. In this session we solicit poster presentations on geomorphic processes, particularly the influence of wind, water, and ice on the land surface; the behavior of soil, rock, and ice under applied stresses; and the rates of landscape development and the ages of surfaces. We welcome contributions from field or lab experiments, modeling, field monitoring, application of cosmogenic radionuclides, and development of new techniques.
Conveners: Beverley C. Wemple, University of Vermont, Geography Department, Burlington, VT 05405 USA, Tel: +1-802-656-2074, Fax: +1-802-656-3042, E-mail: Beverley.Wemple@uvm.edu, and Greg Pasternack, University of California, 211 Veihmeyer Hall, LAWR One Shields Avenue, Davis, CA 95616-8628 USA, Tel: +1-530-754-9243, Fax: +1-530-752-5262, E-mail: gpast@ucdavis.edu

Hydrology also presents jointly with the following sessions:
B06 Contributions of Biogeosciences to the Millennium Ecosystem Assessment
B02 Biogeochemistry and Conservation Biology
A07 From Rain Gage to RANET to Radio: How Information Technology Is Transforming Forecast Communication
A10 Fires, Scars, and Smoke: Observations, Impact, and Policies
A17 Ice Cores: Glaciology and Environmental Change
B03 Closing the N2O Budget Through Isotopic Discrimination
B04 Species Populations and Relationships to Climate and Water Quality
B08 Ecohydrology of Arid and Semiarid Ecosystems
B11 The Effects of Urban/Suburban Development on Nutrient Cycling Processes and Water Quality
G01 Integrating Space Geodetic Techniques and Results for Global Earth Observing
G02 GPS Navigation as a Tool for Earth Science
G03 Airborne and Spaceborne Laser Altimetry Observations: Scientific Applications, Processing Techniques, and Synergy With Other Remote Sensing Observations
P01 Mars Polar and Paleopolar Deposits: Implications for Climate Change
T04 The Chesapeake Bay Impact Structure: Results From New Core Holes and Geophysical Surveys
GC01 Climate and Development from Seasons to Centuries: How Our Understanding of and Responses to Seasonal Climate Variability Can Build Insight Into Human Adaptation to Long-Term Climate Change
GC02 Atlantic Decadal Variability
GC03 Pacific Decadal Variability
B05 Use of Remote Sensing as Policy-Relevant Information
GC04 Carbon Management Technologies: Feasibility, Impacts, Risks, and Economics
GC05 Comparing Arctic Models
B07 Land-Atmosphere Interactions

Mineralogical Society of America

M00 General Contributions
Contributions relevant in any area over the full spectrum of the mineralogical sciences may be submitted to this series of the sessions. Accepted contributions will be organized into appropriate topical sessions. More than half the papers contributed for AGU meetings will not find a home in the pre-approved sessions suggested by a variety of conveners. Papers submitted to these sessions give the program chairs an opportunity to fashion a backbone for the meeting and determine what the broad range of contributors feel is important in the section right now.
Convener: Yingwei Fei, Geophysical Laboratory, USA, E-mail: fei@gl.ciw.edu

M01 Mineral Structures and Stabilities
This session will focus on all aspects of mineral crystal structures, as well as on the stability of minerals under varying geological conditions. Emphasis will be on experimental and theoretical studies of the connectivity and topology of mineral structures (and synthetic analogs), including how they respond to changing conditions of pressure and temperature.
Conveners: Peter C Burns, University of Notre Dame, Department of Civil Engineering and Geological Sciences 156 Fitzpatrick Hall, Notre Dame, IN 46556 USA, Tel: 219-631-7380, Fax: 219-631-9236, E-mail: pburns@nd.edu, and Jeffrey E. Post, Smithsonian Institution, Mineral Sciences NHB 119, Washington, DC 20560 USA, Tel: (202) 357-4009, Fax: (202) 357-2476, E-mail: post.jeffrey@nmnh.si.edu

M02 Transformations in Earth Materials: Electronic, Magnetic, and Structural Transitions
The study of the Earth as a whole cannot be considered complete without understanding and characterizing Earth materials at a fundamental level. With the advancement of the diamond anvil cell techniques the possibilities for the fundamental materials research are rapidly expanding. The aim of this session is to present the manifold of techniques and new results in studies of electronic, magnetic, and structural transformations in Earth materials. The emphasis will be on electronic and magnetic properties and their coupling to elastic, structural properties of materials. Results from other techniques are also welcome, including experimental and theoretical studies of electronic and magnetic properties at varying P, T conditions.
Conveners: Viktor Struzhkin, Geophysical Laboratory, 5251 Broad Branch Rd., NW, Washington, DC 20015 USA, Tel: 202-478-8952, Fax: 202-478-8901, E-mail: struzhkin@gl.ciw.edu, and Nancy L Ross, Virginia Tech, Dept. of Geological Sciences 4044 Derring Hall, Blacksburg, VA 24061 USA, Tel: (540) 231-6356, Fax: (540) 231-3386, E-mail: nross@vt.edu

M03 Advances in Mineral Physics Using Synchrotron Radiation
Synchrotron radiation sources provide extremely high brilliance and low-emittance X-ray beams. These sources, including the newly developed third-generation synchrotron facilities, have opened up many new frontiers in the study of fundamental physical and chemical properties of minerals and other materials. New capabilities have been pioneered in the study of crystalline and noncrystalline stuctures, elasticity, electronic and phonon density of states, and rheology at conditions extending from near the Earth's surface to those of the deep mantle and core. This session will provide an interdisciplinary forum for the presentation of frontier techniques and recent results from synchrotron-based studies of Earth materials with applications to the study of the large-scale structure of the Earth and planets. We also encourage contributions using theoretical and other experimental techniques that have relevance to the new synchrotron-based methods. 
Conveners: Guoyin Shen, University of Chicago, Consortium for Advanced Radiation Sources, 9700 S. Cass Avenue, Building 434A, APS, Chicago, IL 60637 USA, Tel: 630-252-0429, Fax: 630-252-0436, E-mail: shen@cars.uchicago.edu, and Thomas Duffy, Princeton University, Department of Geosciences, Princeton, NJ 08544 USA, Tel: (609) 258-6769, Fax: (609) 258-1274, E-mail: duffy@princeton.edu

M04 Viewing Seismic Observations Through the Lens of Mineral Physics
Observations of the seismic velocity of the Earth represents one of our most important constraints on the structure of the Earth's interior. The interpretation of seismic velocity in terms of more physically relevant properties, such as temperature, composition, mineralogy, and rheology, relies on laboratory experimental data at high pressure and temperature. Recent advances in seismology and mineral physics have produced large quantities of high-quality data that are in need of interpretation. This session encourages seismologists to present seismic observations that require mineral physics data for interpretation, and mineral physicists to present experimental data that can be used for interpreting seismic observations. Scientific topics that would greatly benefit from this interaction include (1) the temperature dependence of transition-zone thickness, (2) the thermochemical properties of ultra-low velocity zones at the CMB, (3) the composition, mineralogy, temperature, and rheology of the D" region, (4) the rheological basis for deep earthquakes, and (5) the cause and characteristics of seismic anisotropy. Seismological observations and mineral physics data relevant to these and other topics are strongly encouraged.
Conveners: Yingwei Fei, Geophysical Laboratory, 5251 Broad Branch Rd., NW, Washington, DC 20015 USA, Tel: 202-478-8936, Fax: 202-478-8901, E-mail: fei@gl.ciw.edu, and Paul Silver, Department of Terrestrial Magnetism, 5241 Broad Branch Road, N.W., Washington, DC 20015 USA, Tel: 202/478-8834, Fax: 202/478-8821, E-mail: silver@dtm.ciw.edu

Mineralogical Society of America also presents jointly with the following sessions:
V05 Determining Diamond Provenance
GP02 Improving the Reliability of Paleointensity Determinations: Microwaves and Other Techniques
V01 Element Partitioning and Diffusion in the Earth's Interior
V03 Minerals, Solutions, and Microbial Life
S03 Hotspots: Observations and Theoretical Models

Ocean Sciences

OS00 General Contributions
Contributions relevant in any area over the full spectrum of the ocean sciences may be submitted to this series of the sessions. Accepted contributions will be organized into appropriate topical sessions. More than half the papers contributed for AGU meetings will not find a home in the pre-approved sessions suggested by a variety of conveners. Papers submitted to these sessions give the program chairs an opportunity to fashion a backbone for the meeting and determine what the broad range of contributors feel is important in the section right now.
Convener: Alan Mix, Oregon State University, USA, E-mail: mix@oce.orst.edu

OS01 Physical Processes in Salt Marshes and Barrier Islands
Salt marshes and barrier islands are complex environments located at the border between sea and land. The understanding of the causes that lead to the formation and evolution of these environments is a key element for assessing the impact of human activities and climate change on coastlines. This session seeks to examine the physical processes acting in salt marshes and barrier islands. We welcome contributions that link field observations and experiments with modeling and theoretical studies. Papers that investigate the hydrodynamics, morphology, and sediment transport of coastal environments are of interest. Particularly encouraged are studies that address the strong link between morphology and vegetation. The goal of this session is to present a general picture of salt marshes and barrier islands, with particular emphasis on their morphological and ecological equilibrium.
Conveners: Sergio Fagherazzi, University of Virginia, Department of Environmental Sciences P.O. Box 400123 , Charlottesville, VA 22904-4123 USA, Tel: 434-243-8901, Fax: 434-982-2137, E-mail: sf9t@virginia.edu, and Tao Sun, Florida State University, Center for Earth Surface Processes Research and School of Computational Science & Information Technology Dirac Science Library, Tallahassee, FL 32306-4120 USA, Tel: 850-644-7057, E-mail: taosun@csit.fsu.edu

Ocean Sciences also presents jointly with the following sessions:

A18 Observations and Retrievals of the Ocean Surface Radiation Field and Aerosols Using Field Campaign Data Including the Chesapeake Lighthouse and Aircraft Measurements for Satellites (CLAMS) Experiment
B02 Biogeochemistry and Conservation Biology
A09 Balance in Atmosphere-Ocean Dynamics (BALANCE 2002)
A17 Ice Cores: Glaciology and Environmental Change
B03 Closing the N2O Budget Through Isotopic Discrimination
G01 Integrating Space Geodetic Techniques and Results for Global Earth Observing
G02 GPS Navigation as a Tool for Earth Science
H20 Remote Sensing of Precipitation (Poster Only)
H25 Operational Monitoring of the Arctic Hydrological System
T04 The Chesapeake Bay Impact Structure: Results From New Core Holes and Geophysical Surveys
V03 Minerals, Solutions, and Microbial Life
V04 Hydrothermal Environments: Coupling Experimental, Field, and Analytical Techniques
V06 Volatiles and Light Elements in Magmatic Systems
GC02 Atlantic Decadal Variability
GC03 Pacific Decadal Variability
S02 Dynamics of the Oceanic Mantle
GC04 Carbon Management Technologies: Feasibility, Impacts, Risks, and Economics
GC05 Comparing Arctic Models

Planetary Sciences

P00 General Contributions
Contributions relevant in any area over the full spectrum of the planetary sciences may be submitted to this series of the sessions. Accepted contributions will be organized into appropriate topical sessions. More than half the papers contributed for AGU meetings will not find a home in the pre-approved sessions suggested by a variety of conveners. Papers submitted to these sessions give the program chairs an opportunity to fashion a backbone for the meeting and determine what the broad range of contributors feel is important in the section right now. Planetary Sciences encompasses both basic research into how planets work as well as the planning and implementation of space missions for exploration and discovery. Those interested in characterizing the current properties of the known planets and developing an understanding of the formation and diverse evolution of planetary systems (core, mantle, crust, surface, hydrosphere, atmosphere, exosphere, rings, and satellites) should submit an abstract. The varied manifestation of planetary processes (volcanism, tectonics, impact cratering, geochemical evolution) continues to challenge our formulation of geophysical principles.
Convener: James Zimbleman, Smithsonian Institute, USA, E-mail: jrz@ceps.nasm.edu

P01 Mars Polar and Paleopolar Deposits: Implications for Climate Change
New data are available on the present polar deposits of Mars, and increasing evidence is being found for ancient polar and circumpolar deposits. In this session, contributions are solicited that address the nature of present and past polar deposits, their composition, physical properties, relative roles of water, carbon dioxide, and clathrates, evidence for evolution and related landforms, age, possible causes for changes with time, and relations to climate change.
Conveners: James W. Head, Brown University, Department of Geological Sciences Box 1846 , Providence, RI 02912 USA, Tel: 401-863-2526, Fax: 401-863-3978, E-mail: James_Head_III@Brown.edu, and David Fisher, Geological Survey of Canada, , Ottawa, CAN, E-mail: fisher@nm1.nrcan.nc.ca, and Jeffrey Kargel, U.S. Geological Survey, 2255 N. Gemini Drive, Flagstaff, AZ 86001 USA, Tel: 928-556-7034, Fax: 928-556-7014, E-mail: jkargel@usgs.gov

P02 New Views of Venus: Recent Results From Mapping and Data Analysis
Many new interpretations of the history of Venus have resulted from the highly successful Magellan mission in 1990-1994. The detailed nature of the Magellan synthetic aperature radar images of this complex planet are continuing to generate new hypotheses and interpretations as detailed mapping and data analysis progresses. This session will be a showcase for the latest results and new ideas for Earth's nearest planetary neighbor.
Conveners: James R. Zimbelman, Smithsonian Institution, CEPS/NASM MRC 315, Washington, DC 20560-0315 USA, Tel: 202-786-2981, Fax: 202-786-2566, E-mail: jrz@nasm.si.edu, and Timothy J. Parker, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, , Pasadena, CA USA, E-mail: timothy.j.parker@jpl.nasa.gov

P03 Landslides on Mars: Processes and Predictions
The past few years have produced umparalleled data for the analysis of Martian landforms. Large landslides are of particular interest since they often involve issues of tectonic triggering, water saturation, and volcanic activity. This session aims to focus on Martian landslides and their behavior, rheology, setting, and implications. An emphasis on quantitative estimates of flow behavior and comparison with terrestrial systems is encouraged.
Conveners: S. Julio Friedmann, University of Maryland, Department of Geology GEOL - 3106, College Park, MD 20742 USA, Tel: 301-405-4087, Fax: 301-314-9661, E-mail: juliof@geol.umd.edu, and Mark Bulmer, University of Maryland - Baltimore County, , Baltimore, MD USA,

P04 Emission and Reflectance Spectra of Martian Materials
Presentation of new results obtained for the Martian surface, including (but not restricted to) data from the thermal emission spectrometer on the Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft and the thermal emission and imaging spectrometer on the Mars Odyssey spacecraft.
Conveners: Phillip R. Christensen, Arizona State University, , Tempe, AZ USA, E-mail: phil.christensen@asu.edu, and Steven W. Ruff, Arizona State University, Department of Geology P.O. Box 871404, Tempe, AZ 85287-1404 USA, E-mail: ruff@tes.asu.edu

P05 Mars from Two Perspectives: Global Surveyor and Odyssey
For the first time since Viking in 1976, we have two spacecraft in orbit around Mars. However, this time we can conduct synergistic observations with the Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) on MGS and the Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) on Odyssey. With these instruments we will be able to combine the high spectral but low spatial resolution TES data with the high spatial but low spectral resolution THEMIS images. The session will include summary invited papers from MGS and Odyssey recent findings and contributed papers that report on other science results from these data sets.
Conveners: Stephen Saunders, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Mail Stop 180-701, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109 USA, Tel: 818-354-2867, Fax: 818-354-0712, E-mail: saunders@jpl.nasa.gov, and James W. Head, Brown University, Department of Geological Sciences Box 1846, Providence, RI 02912 USA, Tel: 401-863-2526, Fax: 401-863-3978, E-mail: James_Head_III@Brown.edu

P06 Mars Sample Return: Science, Implementation, Issues, and Plans
This session is intended to provide a comprehensive look at Mars sample return missions that can be accomplished in the next two decades, along with the scientific technical issues involved. Papers are being solicited that will address issues such as scientific goals and objectives, Mars site and sample selection requirements, sample-science measurement requirements and the Earth instrumentation needed to accomplish them, mission architectures and design considerations, and planetary protection considerations involved with the potential for Mars to harbor indigenous life. The session will involve both selected invited presentations and contributed papers.
Conveners: James Garvin, NASA Headquarters, Code SE, Washington, DC 20546 USA, Tel: 202-358-0206, Fax: 202-358-3097, E-mail: jgarvin@hq.nasa.gov, and Michael A. Meyer, NASA Headquarters, Code SE, Washington, DC 20546 USA, Tel: 202-358-0307, Fax: 202-358-3097, E-mail: mmeyer@hq.nasa.gov, and John D. Rummel, NASA Headquarters, Code S, Washington, DC 20546 USA, Tel: 202-358-0702, Fax: 202-358-3987, E-mail: jrummel@hq.nasa.gov

P07 Farewell to Io: A Last Look by Galileo
January 15, 2002, marks the Galileo spacecraft's seventh and last close flyby of Io and the first that will view the Jupiter-facing hemisphere at high spatial resolution. This session will cover recent results about Io's interior, tectonics, volcanism, atmosphere, and magnetospheric interactions, and provide a summary of our new understanding of Io at the end of the Galileo era.
Conveners: Alfred S. McEwen, University of Arizona, Lunar and Planetary Lab P.O. Box 210092 1629 E. University Blvd, Tucson, AZ 85721-0092 USA, Tel: 520-621-4573, Fax: 520-621-9628, E-mail: mcewen@lpl.arizona.edu, and Rosaly Lopes, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, 4800 Oak Grove Drive MS 183-601, Pasadena, CA 91109 USA, Tel: 818-354-4321, E-mail: rlopes@lively.jpl.nasa.gov

P08 The Whipple Award lecture
The highlight of this session will be a lecture by this year's winner of the Fred Whipple Award by the Planetary Sciences section. Selected invited lectures will complement the topic of the award winner's lecture.
Convener: James W. Head, Brown University, Department of Geological Sciences Box 1846, Providence, RI 02912 USA, Tel: 401-863-2526, Fax: 401-863-3978, E-mail: James_Head_III@Brown.edu

Planetary Sciences also presents jointly with the following sessions:
GP04 Planetary Magnetic Fields
A09 Balance in Atmosphere-Ocean Dynamics (BALANCE 2002)
G03 Airborne and Spaceborne Laser Altimetry Observations: Scientific Applications, Processing Techniques, and Synergy With Other Remote Sensing Observations
GP03 New Developments in Magnetic Instrumentation, Data Acquistion, and Processing
T04 The Chesapeake Bay Impact Structure: Results From New Core Holes and Geophysical Surveys
V01 Element Partitioning and Diffusion in the Earth's Interior
V03 Minerals, Solutions, and Microbial Life
V04 Hydrothermal Environments: Coupling Experimental, Field, and Analytical Techniques

Seismology

S00 General Contributions
Contributions relevant in any area over the full spectrum of seismology may be submitted to this series of the sessions. Accepted contributions will be organized into appropriate topical sessions. More than half the papers contributed for AGU meetings will not find a home in the pre-approved sessions suggested by a variety of conveners. Papers submitted to these sessions give the program chairs an opportunity to fashion a backbone for the meeting and determine what the broad range of contributors feel is important in the section right now.
Convener: Edward Garnero, Arizona State Univerity, USA, E-mail: garnero@asu.edu

S01 Understanding the Heterogeneity of the Lower Mantle
Featuring extreme velocity decrements, decoupled P and S wave variability, strong anisotropy, and multiscale structure, seismic heterogeneity in the lower mantle is clearly not exclusively thermal in origin. Layering, mixing, melting, flow banding, and other effects are at work, but where, why, and with what effects? This session explores the evidence for these composition- and state-induced variations in lower mantle elasticity and viscosity, the mineral physics and geochemical interpretations of that evidence, and the dynamic implications for planetary chemical and thermal evolution.
Conveners: Justin S Revenaugh, Earth Sciences,, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 USA, Tel: 831-459-3164, E-mail: jsr@coltrane.u.sc.edu, and Sebastian Rost, Earth Sciences, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 USA, Tel: 831-459-3132, E-mail: srost@es.ucsc.edu, and Quentin Williams, Earth Sciences, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 USA, Tel: 831-459-3132, E-mail: quentw@emerald.ucsc.edu

S02 Dynamics of the Oceanic Mantle
Plate tectonics and associated deformation at Earth's surface are the manifestation of thermal convection in the mantle. The oceanic domain is a logical focus for studies of mantle dynamic processes because fundamental components of convection can have simple tectonic manifestations beneath the oceans, and the signatures of dynamic processes are far less likely to be overprinted here than in continental settings. In recent years, models have been developed to describe a number of important dynamic processes beneath the oceans, including focused upwelling and swell formation at hotspots, hotspot-ridge interaction, small-scale convection beneath the plates, mantle flow and melt migration beneath spreading centers and propagating rifts, and slab-induced flow in back-arc and fore-arc environments. A new generation of seismic instrumentation and imaging, geodynamic theory and modeling, and geochemical and petrological techniques are being used to constrain and evaluate these models. This session will provide an interdisciplinary forum for the presentation of recent results on all aspects of oceanic mantle dynamics.
Conveners: Jim Gaherty, School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332-0340 USA, Tel: (404)894-1992, Fax: (404)894-5638, E-mail: gaherty@eas.gatech.edu, and Dan Lizarralde, School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, Georgia Institute of Technology , Atlanta, GA 30332-0340 USA, Tel: (404)894-1992, Fax: (404)894-5638, , and Don Forsyth, Dept. of Geological Sciences, Brown University , Providence, RI 02912 USA, Tel: (401) 863-1699, Fax: (401) 863-2058, E-mail: Donald_Forsyth@brown.edu, and Bob Detrick, Dept. of Geology & Geophysics, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution 360 Woods Hole Road , Woods Hole, MA 02543-1542 USA, Tel: (508) 289-3335, Fax: (508) 457-2150, E-mail: rdetrick@whoi.edu

S03 Hotspots: Observations and Theoretical Models
The past few years have seen several new developments in studies of both continental and oceanic hotspots. Seismic tomographic models of unprecedented clarity have revealed the crustal and mantle structure beneath several hotspots. An increasing number of geochemical studies have suggested the presence of recycled slabs in the mantle beneath hotspots, but there are few constraints on the amount or age of various recycled components. Recent experimental studies on mantle rheology have led to dynamic models that reconcile geochemical and geophysical data. New paleomagnetic data, however, raise questions about the motion of hotspots and about the nature of associated mantle upwelling. The objective of this session is to bring together researchers working on different hotspot systems to promote discussion and comparison of observational constraints and theoretical models pertinent to the dynamics and structure of the crust and mantle beneath hotspots.
Conveners: Yang Shen, Graduate School of Oceanography, University of Rhode Island South Ferry Road , Narragansett, RI 02818 USA, Tel: 401-874-6848, Fax: 401-874-6818, E-mail: yshen@gso.uri.edu, and Erik Hauri, Carnegie Institution of Washington, Department of Terrestrial Magnetism, 5241 Broad Branch Road, NW, Washington, DC 20015 USA, Tel: 202-478-8471, E-mail: hauri@dtm.ciw.edu

Seismology also presents jointly with the following sessions:
G02 GPS Navigation as a Tool for Earth Science
M04 Viewing Seismic Observations Through the Lens of Mineral Physics
T02 Global Earthquake System Science (Monitoring Earthquakes from Space)
T04 The Chesapeake Bay Impact Structure: Results From New Core Holes and Geophysical Surveys
T05 Active Deformation and Natural Hazards in the Caribbean Region
T03 A Memorial Session for Ronald W. Girdler: Rifts, Ridges, Reversals, and Regional Studies

SPA: Aeronomy

SA00 General Contributions
Contributions relevant in any area over the full spectrum of space physics and aeronomy may be submitted to this series of the sessions. Accepted contributions will be organized into appropriate topical sessions. More than half the papers contributed for AGU meetings will not find a home in the pre-approved sessions suggested by a variety of conveners. Papers submitted to these sessions give the program chairs an opportunity to fashion a backbone for the meeting and determine what the broad range of contributors feel is important in the section right now.
Convener: Robert Meier, Naval Research Laboratory, USA, E-mail: meier@uap.nrl.navy.mil

SA01 New Results and Approaches to Observations of the Atmospheric Limb
The Odin satellite, a combined astronomy/aeronomy mission supported by Sweden, Canada, Finland, and France, was launched from Svobodny in Russia on 20 February 2001. The two instruments, a sub-mm/mm radiometer and a combined optical spectrograph infrared imaging system (OSIRIS), observe the terrestrial limb. The entire satellite is nodded in order to scan tangent line of sight and permit the retrieval of atmospheric height profiles. The early results from Odin have revealed the presence of atmospheric structures and temporal variations that have not been previously observed; at the same time, these new observations also show the potential for misinterpretation with traditional observing strategies. This session will bring together observers, theorists, and modelers to consolidate what has been learned so far and what needs to be done for a better understanding of the results provided by this new approach to atmospheric observation. Emphasis will be placed on the advantages afforded by combining the Odin approach with other traditional observing approaches and the potential for new missions. Contributed papers for oral talks and posters dealing with all aspects of limb remote sensing are welcome.
Conveners: E. J. (Ted) Llewellyn, University of Saskatchewan, , Saskatoon, SK S7N 5E2 CAN, Tel: +1-306-966-6441, Fax: +1-306-966-6400, E-mail: Edward.Llewellyn@usask.ca, and Donal Murtagh, Institution för Radio och Rymdvetenskap, Chalmers Tekniska Högskola, , GÖTEBORG, SE-412 96 SWE, Tel: +46-31-772-5651, Fax: +46-31-772-1884, E-mail: donal@rss.chalmers.se

SA02 Preliminary Results from the Thermosphere, Ionosphere, Mesosphere, Energetics, and Dynamics (TIMED) Mission
The Thermosphere-Ionosphere-Mesosphere Energetics and Dynamics (TIMED) satellite studies the temporal and spatial variations of the basic atmospheric structure and energy balance between 60 and 180 kilometers. It will provide at least 2 years of continuous, near-global observations of important geophysical parameters from a 625 km circular orbit with a 74.1 degree inclination using four remote sensing instruments. GUVI is a spatial scanning far ultraviolet spectrograph that measures composition and temperature in the lower thermosphere, as well as auroral energy inputs. SABER, an infrared radiometer, measures pressure, temperature, and infrared cooling rates in the stratosphere, mesosphere, and lower thermosphere. SEE, a spectrometer and a suite of photometers, measures incoming solar irradiance. TIDI, a Fabry-Perot interferometer, measures horizontal vector winds, temperature, and composition in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere. The TIMED mission also includes numerous ground-based collaborative observations. This session will be dedicated to preliminary scientific results and validation studies from both satellite and ground-based investigators. In addition to invited speakers, contributed papers in either oral talk or poster format are welcome.
Convener: Jeng-Hwa Yee, Johns Hopkins University, Applied Physics Laboratory, 11100 Johns Hopkins Road, Laurel, MD 20723 USA, Tel: +1-240-228-6206, Fax: +1-240-228-6670, E-mail: jeng-hwa_yee@jhuapl.edu

SA03 The Mesosphere/Lower Thermosphere Region: Structure, Dynamics, Composition, and Emission
The Mesosphere and Lower Thermosphere (MLT) between 50 and 150 km is a complex region where a variety of processes are important. Papers in this session explore this variety and highlight the interactions between radiative process, chemistry, wave dynamics, turbulence, electrodynamics, and nonlinear processes. Contributions related to MLT coupling from regions above and below are also encouraged.
Conveners: Christian Meyer, Colorado Research Associates, 3380 Mitchell Lane, Boulder, CO 80301 USA, Tel: +1-303-415-9701 ext. 228, Fax: +1-303-415-9702, E-mail: meyer@co-ra.com, and William Ward, University of New Brunswick, Department of Physics PO Box 4400, Fredericton, NB E3B 5A3 CAN, Tel: :+1-506-447-3257, Fax: +1-506-453-4581, E-mail: wward@unb.ca

SA04 Student Contributions to Aeronomy Research
This session is designed to provide a forum for students to present their ongoing research efforts in aeronomy. The session will allow for students, including theorists, modelers, and experimentalists, to discuss research in either oral or poster presentations. Emphasis will be placed on the multidisciplinary nature of the field with research from all of the subsections of aeronomy represented.
Conveners: Pamela Loughmiller, Cornell University, School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, 351 Rhodes Hall, Ithaca, NY 14853 USA, Tel: 607-255-8298, Fax: 607-255-6236, E-mail: demi@ece.cornell.edu, and April Hiscox, Optical Remote Sensing Lab., Pennsylvania State University, 213 EE East , University Park, PA 16802 USA, Tel: 814-863-1470, Fax: 814-863-8457, E-mail: alh270@psu.edu, and Jonathan Makela, Cornell University, School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, 351 Rhodes Hall, Ithaca, NY 14853 USA, Tel: 607-255-8298, Fax: 607-255-6236, E-mail: jjm20@cornell.edu

SPA: Aeronomy also presents jointly with the following sessions:
SM01 The Physics of the Plasmasphere and Its Coupling to the Ionosphere and Ring Current
SH02 Operational Space Weather Products and Models
SM04 Mysteries of Magnetotail Dynamics
SM05 Research progress and model validation through community access to state-of-the-art space science models

SPA: Solar and Heliospheric Physics

SH00 General Contributions
Contributions relevant in any area over the full spectrum of space physics, solar and heliospheric sciences may be submitted to this series of the sessions. Accepted contributions will be organized into appropriate topical sessions. More than half the papers contributed for AGU meetings will not find a home in the pre-approved sessions suggested by a variety of conveners. Papers submitted to these sessions give the program chairs an opportunity to fashion a backbone for the meeting and determine what the broad range of contributors feel is important in the section right now.
Convener: Nancy Crooker, Boston Univeristy, USA, E-mail: crooker@bu.edu

SH01 Comparative Studies of Solar Activity During the Rising and Declining Phases of Cycle 23
Advanced instrumentation has made possible a more detailed examination of solar activity in cycle 23 than ever before. Some aspects of these observations hint at qualitative differences in the nature of solar eruptive phenomena during the rising and declining phases of the cycle. For example, from November 1997 through 1998, there were numerous, moderate-sized solar energetic particle events, many of which showed unusually strong fractionation effects in elemental and isotopic composition. There was a relative dearth of significant SEP events in 1999 and the first half of 2000. However, since July 2000, SEP events have been both larger and more frequent, but with relatively little indication of the strong fractionation effects observed during the rising phase of solar activity in 1997-1998. We invite comparative studies of solar activity in the rising and declining phases of cycle 23, to determine whether or not these effects are real or perhaps merely a reflection of limited SEP-event statistics. In addition to SEP studies, we particularly solicit reports on solar wind, interplanetary conditions, CMEs, flares, and radio observations, which may serve to clarify the extent of these effects and their possible causes. We also welcome studies on similar behavior in previous solar cycles and the potential significance of these results for space weather predictions.
Conveners: Allan J Tylka, Naval Research Laboratory, Code 7652, Washington, DC 20375 USA, Tel: 202-767-2200, Fax: 202-767-6473, E-mail: tylka@gamma.nrl.navy.mil, and Christina M.S. Cohen, California Institute of Technology, MC 220-47, Pasadena, CA 91125 USA, Tel: 626-395-6614, Fax: 626-449-8676, E-mail: cohen@srl.caltech.edu, and Mark Popecki, University of New Hampshire, Morse Hall, 39 College Road , Durham, NH 03824 USA, Tel: (603)862-2957, Fax: (603)862-0311, E-mail: popecki@atlas.sr.unh.edu

SH02 Operational Space Weather Products and Models
A variety of space weather data and models are used as tools or direct drivers for operational products that, in their totality, encompass all venues (solar, interplanetary, magnetosphere, ionosphere, and neutral atmosphere) of the space environment. These "operationally utilized" data, models, and products often represent the "bottom line" of what many researchers, analysts, and engineers have accomplished. It is important to understand the difference between the tools and the true end-user (customer) products and to know which are truly operational. This session seeks to promote such distinction, along with information on current operational product use, development, and validation efforts, ultimately pointing out which space environmental variables should be scrutinized for potential quantitative, qualitative, or timeliness improvement. Papers are invited on current or imminent operational space weather products or tools, their direct use, indications of their accuracy (validation), and ideas on how to make them better.
Conveners: Stephen Quigley, Air Force Research Laboratory, AFRL/VSBX, c/o SMC Det 11/CIT, 1050 E. Stewart Ave, Peterson AFB, CO 80914-2902 USA, Tel: 719-556-2889, Fax: 719-556-8861, E-mail: Stephen.Quigley@cisf.af.mil, and Christopher Balch, NOAA Space Environment Center, 325 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80303-3328 USA, Tel: 303-497-5693, Fax: 303-497-7392, E-mail: Christopher.Balch@noaa.gov

SH03 Magnetic Topology and Complexity of CMEs
During enhanced levels of solar activity, CMEs and their interplanetary counterparts make an important contribution to the transport of mass and magnetic flux away from the Sun. Models have been used successfully to understand a special and conceptually simple class of CMEs: magnetic clouds (flux ropes). However, the majority of CMEs observed in the heliosphere are significantly more complex, showing a high degree of dynamic variability and complex internal magnetic and plasma structure. The physical reasons for this complexity are not well understood but may be related to (1) the initial structure of the source; (2) interactions of two or more ejecta in the corona and/or heliosphere; (3) instabilities within the ejecta; or (4) observational selection effects related to the spacecraft’s trajectory through the event. This session will focus on both the experimental and theoretical evidence for the causes of complexity of CMEs in both the corona and solar wind. We particularly encourage contributions that discuss topological aspects of CME-associated magnetic fields and their contribution to the large-scale magnetic field in the corona and the heliosphere.
Conveners: Pete Riley, SAIC, 10260 Campus Point Dr., San Diego, CA 92121 USA, Tel: +1-858-826-9550, Fax: +1-858-826-6261, E-mail: pete.riley@saic.com, and Thomas Zurbuchen, University of Michigan, 2417B Space Research Building, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 USA, Tel: +1-734-647-6835, Fax: +1-734-763-7130, E-mail: thomasz@umich.edu

SH04 Energetic Electrons (70 eV to 1 MeV) and Related Electromagnetic Emissions: Probing the Solar Corona and the Heliosphere
Fluxes and distributions of suprathermal and more energetic electrons in the energy range from ~70 eV to ~1 MeV are highly variable in the solar wind and are excellent tracers of magnetic field line topology and physical processes occurring at distant sites. These electrons can be sampled directly in situ and often can be detected remotely by the electromagnetic emissions they generate. Sensitive new in situ and remote sensing measurements are providing new information on the generation of these electrons at the Sun and in the heliosphere, as well as on the magnetic topologies of the heliospheric current sheet, CMEs, CME-driven and corotating shocks, and other heliospheric structures. This session will bring together theorists and experimentalists to highlight and discuss recent developments in this expanding field of research.
Conveners: Dennis K Haggerty, The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, 11100 Johns Hopkins Road, Laurel, MD 20723 USA, Tel: (240) 228-7886, Fax: (240) 228-6670, E-mail: dennis.haggerty@jhuapl.edu, and Jack Gosling, Los Alamos National Laboratory, PO Box 1663, MS D466, Los Alamos, NM 87545 USA, Tel: (505) 667-5389, Fax: (505) 665-7395, E-mail: jgosling@lanl.gov, and Jack D Scudder, The University of Iowa, 506 Van Allen Hall, Iowa City, IA 52242-1479 USA, Tel: (319) 335-0804, E-mail: Jack-scudder@uiowa.edu, and Michael L Kaiser, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 695, Greenbelt, MD 20771 USA, Tel: (301) 286-5461, Fax: (301) 286-1683, E-mail: mkaiser@lepmlk.gsfc.nasa.gov

SH05 The Heliosphere at Solar Maximum
The period of solar maximum is of special interest because it includes the time when the Sun's magnetic field changes polarity. This session will focus on the accompanying structural and dynamic changes in the heliosphere during the recent maximum. Presentations will include observations from spacecraft and ground-based instrumentation as well as results from models intended to explain the effects of the changing sun and the interaction of the solar wind and the interstellar medium. Spacecraft observations during this period include those from IMP 8, Wind, and ACE; the Voyagers in the distant heliosphere; Ulysses as it makes its fast latitude scan; and solar observations from SOHO and Yohkoh.
Conveners: Alan Lazarus, MIT Center for Space Research, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139 USA, Tel: 617-253-4284, Fax: +1-617-253-0861, E-mail: ajl@space.mit.edu, and Richard Marsden, European Space Agency, , , NLD, Tel: 31-71-565-3583, Fax: 31-71-565-4697, E-mail: richard.marsden@esa.int, and R. Bruce McKibben, University of Chicago, , , USA, Tel: 773-702-7851, Fax: 773-702-6645, E-mail: mckibben@odysseus.uchicago.edu, and Edward J. Smith, JPL, , , USA, Tel: 818-354-2248, Fax: 818-354-8895, E-mail: edward.j.smith@jpl.nasa.gov

SH06 The Heliosphere and Its Surrounding Interstellar Medium: Current State of Knowledge and Future Direction
The local interstellar medium (LISM) provides an accessible sample of present-day galactic matter and determines the boundary of our heliosphere. The flow of neutral interstellar gas through the heliosphere and the interaction with the surrounding medium at the boundaries provide ample opportunity for not only in situ observations of particles and fields but also remote sensing observations using photons and energetic neutral atoms. The simultaneous availability of a variety of heliospheric data from spacecraft such as ACE, EUVE, IMAGE, SOHO, Ulysses, Voyager, and Wind over the past five to ten years has contributed to a rapidly growing understanding of the LISM and its influence on the heliosphere. At the same time, vastly improved heliospheric modeling provides a framework into which the observational pieces fit, and exciting new mission and instrument concepts promise to answer some questions but raise even more. The time has come to synthesize results from myriad efforts designed to determine the physical parameters and the material composition of the LISM, its interaction with the Sun and solar wind through the formation of pickup ions and neutral solar wind, and the size, shape, and character of the heliosphere and its boundary regions. We are inviting contributions on in situ and remote sensing observations of interstellar neutral atoms, interstellar pickup ion populations, their energetic products, neutral solar wind and other signs of LISM-heliosphere interaction, as well as related modeling and new measurement techniques and missions.
Conveners: Michael R Collier, NASA / Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 692, Greenbelt, MD 20771 USA, Tel: 301-286-5256, Fax: 301-286-1648, E-mail: mcollier@pop600.gsfc.nasa.gov, and Peter Wurz, University of Bern, Physics Institute, Bern, CH-3012 CHE, Tel: +41 31 631 44 26, Fax: +41 31 631 44 05, E-mail: peter.wurz@soho.unibe.ch, and Eberhard Moebius, University of New Hampshire, Space Science Center and Department of Physics, Morse Hall, 39 College Road, Durham, NH 03824 USA, Tel: 603-862-3097, Fax: 603-862-0311, E-mail: eberhard.moebius@unh.edu, and John Raymond, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Solar and Stellar Physics Division 60 Garden St. MS-15, Cambridge, MA 02138 USA, Tel: 617-495-7416, Fax: 617-495-7049, E-mail: jraymond@cfa.harvard.edu

SPA: Solar and Heliospheric also presents jointly with the following sessions:
SM05 Research progress and model validation through community access to state-of-the-art space science models

SPA: Magnetospheric Physics

SM00 General Contributions
Contributions relevant in any area over the full spectrum of space physics and magnetospheric physics may be submitted to this series of the sessions. Accepted contributions will be organized into appropriate topical sessions. More than half the papers contributed for AGU meetings will not find a home in the pre-approved sessions suggested by a variety of conveners. Papers submitted to these sessions give the program chairs an opportunity to fashion a backbone for the meeting and determine what the broad range of contributors feel is important in the section right now.
Convener: Terry Onsager, NOAA Space Environment Center, USA, E-mail: tonsager@sec.noaa.gov

SM01 The Physics of the Plasmasphere and Its Coupling to the Ionosphere and Ring Current
Spectacular new remote imaging of the inner magnetosphere regions and other recent observations as well as new simulations are leading to dramatic changes in our understanding of the physics of the plasmasphere and its coupling to its ionospheric source and the energetic ring current with which it overlaps. The purpose of this session is to provide a forum to present the latest theoretical, numerical, and observational results related to this region and discuss and debate the physical understanding from them. Subjects anticipated include exchange between ionosphere and plasmasphere, evolution, convection, and dynamics of the plasmasphere, temporal/spatial structures in the plasmasphere, wave activities, plasmapause phenomena, and hot-cold plasma interactions in the plasmasphere-ring current overlap region, as well as other areas of related interest.
Conveners: James Horwitz, University of Alabama in Huntsville, Department of Physics and Center for Space Plasma and Aeronomic Research, Huntsville, AL USA, Tel: 256-824-6662, Fax: 256-824-6575, E-mail: horwitzj@cspar.uah.edu, and Paul Song, University of Massachusetts, Lowell, Center for Atmospheric Research, Lowell, MA USA, Tel: 978-934-4905, Fax: 978-459-7915, E-mail: paul_song@uml.edu

SM02 Magnetic Field Aligned Electric Fields: Causes and Consequences
Electric fields directed along the background magnetic field play an important role in the acceleration of charged particles in space plasmas. The parallel electric fields which develop between the magnetosphere and the ionosphere produce the aurora. In reconnection regions, such electric fields produce plasma jets which pinpoint the diffusion region. Time-varying electric fields due to solitary structures and waves also play important roles in the physics of particle acceleration in these regions. Similar processes are believed to produce observable astrophysical phenomena. Understanding how these electric fields are created and the processes that result from their existence is therefore important for understanding the physics of the magnetosphere. Contributed papers dealing with theory and modeling; observations from FAST, Cluster, Geotail, Interball, and other spacecraft; and anticipated results from the upcoming Magnetospheric Multiscale mission of the causes and consequences of magnetic field aligned electric fields in space plasmas, whether quasi-static or time-varying, are welcome.
Conveners: Eric J. Lund, University of New Hampshire, Space Science Center, Durham, NH 03824 USA, Tel: 603-862-0758, Fax: 603-862-0311, E-mail: eric.lund@unh.edu, and Robert E. Ergun, Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics, University of Colorado, Boulder 1234 Innovation Drive, Boulder, CO 80303 USA, Tel: 303-492-1560, Fax: 303-492-6444, E-mail: ree@fast.colorado.edu

SM03 Turbulence and Dynamics at the High-Altitude Cusp and Dayside Magnetopause Boundary Layer
The high-altitude cusp and dayside magnetopause boundary layer are the major regions for transferring solar wind energy, mass, and momentum into the Earth's magnetosphere. Large turbulent electromagnetic fields and energetic charged particles with energies of 10-1000 keV are present in these regions. This session addresses the turbulence and dynamics at the high-altitude cusp and dayside magnetopause boundary layer. In situ observations from the CLUSTER II, IMAGE, INTERBALL, and ISTP missions and theoretical studies for understanding of the solar wind drivers, acceleration mechanisms, and plasma source and loss processes are most welcome for this session.
Conveners: Theodore A. Fritz, Boston University, Center for Space Physics 725 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston, MA 02215 USA, Tel: 617-353-7446, Fax: 617-353-6463, E-mail: fritz@bu.edu, and Jiasheng Chen, Boston University, Center for Space Physics 725 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston, MA 02215 USA, Tel: 617-353-1152, Fax: 617-353-6463, E-mail: jschen@bu.edu

SM04 Mysteries of Magnetotail Dynamics
An unique and scientifically powerful constellation of spacecraft for the study of magnetospheric dynamics assembled recently when the Polar, Cluster and Geotail orbits all penetrated into the region of the nightside equatorial magnetosphere. These spacecraft observe magnetospheric dynamics at the critical location where the dipolar magnetic field changes into an extended tail-like field. Together with the global views of the IMAGE spacecraft and in situ measurements at strategic positions throughout the magnetosphere with the FAST, SAMPEX, GOES and Los Alamos geosynchronous satellites, an unprecedented opportunity is offered to study the explosive disruption and subsequent evolution of the magnetotail during substorms and the unresolved reasons for the occurrence of the great magnetic storms. These measurements are "jewels" of SEC research and will allow substantial progress in resolving the mysteries of magnetotail dynamics. This session will bring together scientists from the above constellation of spacecraft with interests in advancing our knowledge of magnetotail dynamics. The participation of theorists and modelers in this session is equally important. Emphasis will be placed upon contributions which provide advances in a host of research areas such as plasma dynamics, connection to the ionosphere, mechanisms for the elusive onset instability, and the evolution of magnetotail phenomena during expansive and recovery phases of the substorms. Contributed papers for oral presentations and posters for all aspects of the nightside dynamical processes are welcome.
Conveners: Robert A. Hoffman, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 696, Greenbelt, MD 20771 USA, Tel: 301-286-7386, Fax: 301-286-1648, E-mail: robert.a.hoffman@gsfc.nasa.gov, and Tsugunobu Nagai, Tokyo Institute of Technology, , Tokyo, 152-8551 JPN, Tel: 81-3-5734-2621, Fax: 81-3-5734-3537, E-mail: nagai@geo.titech.ac.jp, and Christopher Owen, Mullard Space Science Laboratory, University College London Holmbury St. Mary, Dorking, Surrey, RH5 6NT GBR, Tel: 44-1483-204281, Fax: 44-1483-278312, E-mail: cjo@mssl.ucl.ac.uk, and Vassilis Angelopoulos, University of California Berkeley, , Berkeley, CA USA, Tel: +1-510-643-1841, E-mail: vassilis@ssl.berkeley.edu

SM05 Research progress and model validation through community access to state-of-the-art space science models
Traditionally, space research models have been primarily utilized by individuals or small groups, which originally developed the model. This led to a limitation of research benefits for the scientific community, particularly for those not involved in modeling themselves. The necessity to expand the usage of modern research models has been recognized in programs of several agencies, most notably in the Geospace Environment Modeling Program of the National Science Foundation. Another attempt to broaden model access to non-modelers was provided by NASA's International Solar Terrestrial Physics Program. The interagency National Space Weather Program aims to develop end-to-end models of the space environment from the Sun to the Earth for both research and operational applications. The growing importance of Space Weather research activities enhances the need to expand model use for the purpose of model validation through comparison with measurements. The Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC) is an activity, which strives to accommodate these needs. CCMC provides, to the research community, the benefit of usage of state-of-the-art space science models. Furthermore, CCMC performs and supports model validation and evaluation against measurements and metrics. This session will review scientific progress resulting from community use of publicly accessible space research models. It will also summarize advances in validation and metrics evaluations, and provide a forum to discuss new candidate metrics against which models can be evaluated.
Conveners: Michael Hesse, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 696, Greenbelt, MD 20771 USA, Tel: 301-286-8224, Fax: 301-286-1648, E-mail: michael.hesse@gsfc.nasa.gov, and Robert Robinson, National Science Foundation, 4201 Wilson Boulevard, Room 775, Arlington, VA 22230 USA, Tel: 703-306-1531, Fax: 703-306-0849, E-mail: rmrobins@nsf.gov, and Paul Bellaire, Air Force Office of Scientific Research, 801 North Randolph St Rm 732, Arlington, VA 22203-1977 USA, Tel: 703-696-8411, Fax: 703-696-8450, E-mail: paul.bellaire@afosr.af.mil

SPA: Magnetospheric Physics also presents jointly with the following sessions:
GP01 Analysis of the Oersted, CHAMP, and SAC-C Magnetic Field Constellation
GP03 New Developments in Magnetic Instrumentation, Data Acquistion, and Processing
SH02 Operational Space Weather Products and Models

Tectonophysics

T00 General Contributions
Contributions relevant in any area over the full spectrum of tectonophysics may be submitted to this series of the sessions. Accepted contributions will be organized into appropriate topical sessions. More than half the papers contributed for AGU meetings will not find a home in the pre-approved sessions suggested by a variety of conveners. Papers submitted to these sessions give the program chairs an opportunity to fashion a backbone for the meeting and determine what the broad range of contributors feel is important in the section right now.
Convener: Lars Stixrude, University of Michigan, USA, E-mail: stixrude@umich.edu

T01 Monitoring Deformation in Mountain Belts
The session will focus on geodetic, geomorphic, and geochemical techniques for measuring current rates of deformation in mountain belts. Emphasis will be placed on comparing these results with long-term rates based on classical methods and with the predictions of competing structural models. Contributions which deal with novel methods and with poorly documented regions are especially welcome.
Conveners: Claudio Vita-Finzi, Natural History Museum, Dept of Mineralogy, London, SW7 5BD GBR, E-mail: cvitafinzi@hotmail.com, and Lewis Owen, University of California at Riverside, Dept. of Earth Sciences, Riverside, CA 92521 USA, Tel: 909-656-7344, Fax: 909-656-7344, E-mail: lewis.owen@ucr.edu

T02 Global Earthquake System Science (Monitoring Earthquakes from Space)
This session will present science results from the recently completed NASA Global Earthquake System Science Program, investigating space-borne platforms from which to observe earthquakes and their precursors. Contributions are solicited on all potential space borne tools for observing earthquakes and their precursors, including such techniques as InSar.
Convener: Carol Raymond, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, , , USA, , and Ed Simon, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, , , USA,

T03 A Memorial Session for Ronald W. Girdler: Rifts, Ridges, Reversals, and Regional Studies
This session will be led by Tectonophysics, with GP and S coconvenors. Ron Girdler had an active and productive career. Together with his many students, he worked on several aspects of solid Earth geophysics. From his earlier work on rock magnetics and paleomagnetism through field work in East Africa and the Red Sea to his later interest in the geologic signature of impacts, his studies encompassed a number of AGU sections. Mirroring his career this session of invited and contributed papers tries to parallel Ron's broad interests with presentations which could broadly be described as Earth dynamics.
Conveners: Peter Styles, Keele University, GBR, Tel: +44-1782-584116, E-mail: p.styles@keele.ac.uk, and Patrick T Taylor, NASA, Code 921 NASA/GSFC, Greenbelt, MD 20771 USA, Tel: +1-301-614-6454, Fax: +1-301-614-6522, E-mail: ptaylor@ltpmail.gsfc.nasa.gov

T04 The Chesapeake Bay Impact Structure: Results From New Core Holes and Geophysical Surveys
The Chesapeake Bay impact structure is one of the Earth's largest and best preserved "wet-target" impact features. This 90-km-wide (or larger) complex crater lies buried within the Virginia Coastal Plain, United States, where it was created 35 million years ago by an impact on the late Eocene continental shelf. This structure has influenced the geologic evolution of the Chesapeake Bay area to the present day and has produced anomalous patterns of groundwater flow and saltwater distribution that place major limitations on the use of the region's groundwater resources. This session explores our rapidly increasing knowledge of the Chesapeake Bay impact structure through an examination of recent core hole and geophysical investigations conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey and affiliated agencies. These studies provide important petrologic, geochemical, structural, stratigraphic, and hydrologic data needed for inferring impact processes and for numerically modeling these processes and the regional groundwater flow system.
Conveners: David S. Powars, U.S. Geological Survey, MS 926A, Reston, VA 20192 USA, Tel: +1-703-648-4325, Fax: +1-703-648-6953, E-mail: dspowars@usgs.gov, and Greg Gohn, U.S. Geological Survey, MS 926A, Reston, VA 20192 USA, Tel: +1-703-648-4382, Fax: +1-703-648-6953, E-mail: ggohn@usgs.gov

T05 Active Deformation and Natural Hazards in the Caribbean Region
The Caribbean region offers excellent examples of active tectonic processes such as subduction, strike-slip faulting, and collision. As a consequence, it is also severely exposed to natural hazards such as earthquakes, volcanoes, or tsunamis. In the past few years, significant advances have been made in imaging and understanding the plate kinematic framework and active deformations along the boundaries of the Caribbean plate, thanks to a number of geophysical and geological studies. In parallel, local governments and agencies are becoming increasingly aware of the issue of natural risks in their countries. This sessions aims at bringing together presentations of the most recent results on active deformation processes in the Caribbean region, with a particular emphasis on merging observational results (GPS geodesy, seismology, paleoseismology, marine surveys, etc.) and models. Presentations discussing implications on natural hazards and risks are particularly welcome.
Conveners: Eric Calais, Purdue University, Dept. of Earth & Atmospheric Sciences 1397 Civil, West Lafayette, IN 47907-1397 USA, Tel: 765-496-2915, Fax: 765-496-1210, E-mail: ecalais@purdue.edu, and Glen Mattioli, Dept. of Geological Sciences, University of Arkansas 113 Ozark Hall, Fayetteville, AK 72701 USA, Tel: 501-575-4748, Fax: 501-444-7343, E-mail: mattioli@uark.edu

Tectonophysics also presents jointly with the following sessions:
G01 Integrating Space Geodetic Techniques and Results for Global Earth Observing
G02 GPS Navigation as a Tool for Earth Science
G03 Airborne and Spaceborne Laser Altimetry Observations: Scientific Applications, Processing Techniques, and Synergy With Other Remote Sensing Observations
GP01 Analysis of the Oersted, CHAMP, and SAC-C Magnetic Field Constellation
S01 Understanding the Heterogeneity of the Lower Mantle
V01 Element Partitioning and Diffusion in the Earth's Interior
S02 Dynamics of the Oceanic Mantle

Volcanology, Geochemistry, and Petrology

V00 General Contributions
Contributions relevant in any area over the full spectrum of volcanology, geochemistry, and petrology may be submitted to this series of the sessions. Accepted contributions will be organized into appropriate topical sessions. More than half the papers contributed for AGU meetings will not find a home in the pre-approved sessions suggested by a variety of conveners. Papers submitted to these sessions give the program chairs an opportunity to fashion a backbone for the meeting and determine what the broad range of contributors feel is important in the section right now.
Convener: Steven Shirey, Carnegie Institute of Washington, DC, USA, E-mail: shirey@dtm.ciw.edu

V01 Element Partitioning and Diffusion in the Earth's Interior
This session will discuss recent progress in the field of element partitioning and diffusion at high pressures and temperatures. Geochemical models of large-scale differentiation processes such as core formation, mineral fractionation in a deep magma ocean, and partial melting beneath hot spots, mid-ocean ridges, and subduction zones require accurate studies of major and trace element partitioning and diffusion at conditions relevant to the Earth's deep interior. A combination of novel experimental and analytical techniques has led to a large increase in the number and quality of these studies. New data on the systematics of mineral-melt trace element partitioning, metal-silicate melt partitioning, and major and trace element diffusion in both solid and liquid phases will provide quantitative tests of geochemical and geodynamical models for Earth differentiation.
Conveners: Wim van Westrenen, Geophysical Laboratory, Carnegie Institution of Washington 5251 Broad Branch Rd, NW, Washington, DC 20015 USA, Tel: +1-202-478-8926, Fax: +1-202-478-8901, E-mail: w.van_westrenen@gl.ciw.edu, and James A Van Orman, Geophysical Laboratory, Carnegie Institution of Washington 5251 Broad Branch Rd, NW, Washington, DC 20015 USA, Tel: +1-202-478-8929, Fax: +1-202-478-8901, E-mail: j.van_orman@gl.ciw.edu

V02 Education on Volcanology at the Graduate and Undergraduate Levels
Volcanology is an interdisciplinary science and is thus an excellent topic for education at several levels. Introductory courses may use examples from volcanology to illuminate basic concepts. Advanced undergradute classes offer a chance to integrate knowledge. Further, natural hazards are of broad interest to the environmental studies community, and at the undergraduate level, volcanology provides a good bridge to the environmental/social sciences community. Graduate courses may be quite specialized, and are used to prepare students for professional careers in research. In this session we intend to explore the range and depth of courses offered in volcanology at many universities, and to understand and improve the role volcanology plays in general science education.
Conveners: Stephen R McNutt, Alaska Volcano Observatory, UAFGI, P.O. Box 757320, Fairbanks, AK 99775-7320 USA, Tel: +1-907-474-7131, Fax: +1-907-474-5618, E-mail: steve@giseis.alaska.edu, and Katherine V Cashman, University of Oregon, Department of Geological Science, Eugene, OR 97403-4692 USA, Tel: +1-541-346-4573, Fax: +1-541-346-4692, E-mail: cashman@oregon.uoregon.edu, and William I Rose, Michigan Technological University, Dept of Geological & Engineering Sciences 1400 Townsend Dr, Houghton, MI 49931 USA, Tel: +1-906-487-2531, Fax: +1-906-487-3371, E-mail: raman@mtu.edu

V03 Minerals, Solutions, and Microbial Life
Microbes play an important role in the geochemistry of the planet. This session will bring together theoretical, experimental, and observational studies on a variety of biochemical and geochemical systems that cover low to extreme conditions of temperature, pressure, pH, salinity, dessication, and radiation. Papers addressing the interaction of biological systems with geological processes on Earth and outer planetary bodies are welcomed, as are papers on the origin/evolution of life and on the diversity/viability of life in various geochemical environments. The development and application of new experimental and analytical techniques added with natural observations has provided new insights into the interaction of microbes with minerals and aqueous solutions. Such biogeochemical studies have begun to provide valuable insight into various biochemical processes as well as understanding of the origins and limits of life. Experiments on hydrothermal biochemical systems have provided new information about the evolutionary formation of metastable and nonquenchable phases as well as kinetics and pathways information at extreme conditions.
Conveners: James H. Scott, Carnegie Institution of Washington, Geophysical Laboratory 5251 Broad Branch Rd, NW, Washington, DC 20015 USA, Tel: +1-202-478-8986, Fax: +1-202-478-8901, E-mail: j.scott@gl.ciw.edu, and Anurag Sharma, Carnegie Institution of Washington, Geophysical Laboratory 5251 Broad Branch Rd, NW, Washington, DC 20015 USA, Tel: +1-202-478-8957, Fax: +1-202-478-8901, E-mail: a.sharma@gl.ciw.edu, and George Cody, Carnegie Institution of Washington, Geophysical Laboratory 5251 Broad Branch Rd., NW, Washington, DC 20015 USA, Tel: +1-202-478-8980, Fax: +1-202-478-8901, E-mail: g.cody@gl.ciw.edu

V04 Hydrothermal Environments: Coupling Experimental, Field, and Analytical Techniques
Understanding the physico-chemical conditions of magmatic-hydrothermal ore-forming environments requires detailed knowledge of the melt-crystal-fluid equilibria that obtain in such systems. This knowledge comes from two areas of active geological research: (1) the analysis of melt and fluid inclusions in natural systems; and (2) controlled laboratory experiments in which the thermodynamics of ore-forming processes are determined. Techniques such as laser ablation inductively coupled mass spectrometry allow us to accurately determine the chemical composition of melt/fluid inclusions in fossilized hydrothermal systems. Classical hydrothermal experiments allow us to map out the physical chemistry of the evolving melt-crystal-fluid system at the conditions that would have existed during formation of the hydrothermal system. It is imperative that scientists from both camps come together to discuss their data and hypotheses for additional research. This session is designed to bring together both the analyst and the experimentalist to discuss our recent data and hypotheses for future research.
Conveners: Adam C. Simon, University of Maryland, Department of Geology, College Park, MD 20742 USA, Tel: +1-202-405-0235, Fax: +1-301-314-9661, E-mail: asimon@geol.umd.edu, and Philip A. Candela, University of Maryland, Department of Geology, College Park, MD 20742-4211 USA, Tel: +1-301-405-2783, Fax: +1-301-314-9661, E-mail: candela@geol.umd.edu, and Philip Piccoli, University of Maryland, Department of Geology, College Park, MD 20742-4211 USA, Tel: +1-301-405-6966, Fax: +1-301-314-9661, E-mail: piccoli@geol.umd.edu

V05 Determining Diamond Provenance
Diamonds continue to offer fundamental insights into Earth processes ranging from bolide impacts to mantle dynamics. The need to remove so-called "conflict diamonds" from the market has provided an added urgency to discover characteristic properties that reveal the history of diamond genesis and emplacement. This session will focus on the most recent advances in diamond analysis and characterization and their implications regarding diamond formation and provenancing.
Conveners: Peter J. Heaney, Pennsylvania State University, Department of Geosciences 309 Deike Building, University Park, PA 16802 USA, Tel: +1-814-865-6821, Fax: +1-814-861-8808, E-mail: heaney@geosc.psu.edu, and Edward P. Vicenzi, Smithsonian Institution, Department of Mineral Sciences 10th & Constitution Ave, NW, Washington, DC 20560-0119 USA, Tel: +1-202-357-2594, Fax: +1-202-357-2476, E-mail: vicenzi@volcano.si.edu

V06 Volatiles and Light Elements in Magmatic Systems
This session aims to bring together recent and ongoing studies which highlight the role of volatiles (e.g., CO2, H2O, SO2 Cl) and light elements (e.g. Li, Be, B, F) in various magmatic systems, i.e. MORB, OIB, subduction systems, etc. Especially important is the unique or clearer insight the study of these tracers brings to our understanding of specific aspects of magmatic systems. Contributions detailing a wide variety of studies are encouraged: for example, magmatic assimilation of various seawater-derived or influenced components, contrasting on- and off-axis ridge magmatic systems, compositions of phenocryst melt-inclusions, volatile fluxes in subduction systems, and geochemical and geophysical aspects of mantle regions. Also encouraged are contributions showcasing advances in relevant analytical techniques, theoretical approaches, or fundamental behavior of these geochemical tracers.
Conveners: Petrus J. le Roux, Carnegie Institution of Washington, Dept of Terrestrial Magnetism 5241 Broad Branch Rd., NW, Washington, DC 20015 USA, Tel: +1-202-478-8475, Fax: +1-202-478-8821, E-mail: leroux@dtm.ciw.edu, and Erik H. Hauri, Carnegie Institution of Washington, Department of Terrestrial Magnetism 5241 Broad Branch Road, NW, Washington, DC 20015 USA, Tel: +1-202-478-8471, Fax: +1-202-478-8821, E-mail: hauri@dtm.ciw.edu

V07 Multidisciplinary Constraints on Volcanic Volatile Budgets
Volcanoes can emit volatiles both passively and explosively, impacting the atmosphere, hydrosphere, and biosphere on scales from local to global. Volatiles are also released by magma bodies covertly, sequestered by hydrothermal systems which may slowly accumulate at depth while decomposing and weakening the core of the volcanic edifice. The action of different degassing regimes during intereruptive periods will control to some degree the size of the volatile reservoir that may be tapped during a major eruption, be it explosive or effusive. However, illuminating the degassing processes acting at individual volcanoes requires long-term campaigns. This session aims to bring together remote sensors, petrologists, volcanologists, geochemists, and hopefully geophysicists to discuss topical work on the supply, storage, and emission of volcanic gases. Remote sensing using established and recently launched instruments (TOMS, MODIS, ASTER) capable of quantifying SO2, sulfate aerosol, and ash in volcanic clouds has built a valuable database of observations covering the last 25 or so years. Petrological estimates of volatile emissions augment this database by extending it back prior to remote sensing and into prehistory. Volcano monitoring using COSPEC, FTIR, and other techniques characterizes the size, chemistry, and short-term variability of passive volcanic plumes. We solicit contributions on these topics but also on studies that illuminate processes potentially responsible for discrepancies between remotely sensed and petrological data (e.g., the excess sulfur problem). These could include magmatic gas scrubbing, sulfur speciation and thermodynamics, hydrothermal studies, and geophysical imaging of volcano interiors. Papers on new instruments or techniques for measuring volatile species emitted by volcanoes are also encouraged.
Conveners: Simon A. Carn, University of Maryland Baltimore County, Joint Center for Earth Systems Technology (NASA/UMBC) 1000 Hilltop Circle, Baltimore, MD 21250 USA, Tel: +1-410-455-1454, Fax: +1-410-455-1291, E-mail: scarn@umbc.edu, and Bill Rose, Michigan Technological University, Geological and Engineering Sciences 1400 Townsend Drive, Houghton, MI 49931 USA, Tel: +1-906-487-2367, Fax: +1-906-487-3371, E-mail: raman@mtu.edu, and Steve Schaefer, University of Maryland Baltimore County, Joint Center for Earth Systems Technology (NASA/UMBC) 1000 Hilltop Circle, Baltimore, MD 21250 USA, E-mail: schaefer@core2.gsfc.nasa.gov, and Paul Wallace, University of Oregon, Department of Geological Sciences, Eugene, OR 97403-1272 USA, Tel: +1-541-346-5985, Fax: +1-541-346-4692, E-mail: pwallace@darkwing.uoregon.edu

Volcanology, Geochemistry, and Petrology also presents jointly with the following sessions:
G01 Integrating Space Geodetic Techniques and Results for Global Earth Observing
G02 GPS Navigation as a Tool for Earth Science
P07 Farewell to Io: A Last Look by Galileo
T05 Active Deformation and Natural Hazards in the Caribbean Region
S02 Dynamics of the Oceanic Mantle
S03 Hotspots: Observations and Theoretical Models

Education and Human Resources

ED00 General Contributions
Contributions relevant in any area over the full spectrum of education and human resources may be submitted to this series of the sessions. Accepted contributions will be organized into appropriate topical sessions. More than half the papers contributed for AGU meetings will not find a home in the pre-approved sessions suggested by a variety of conveners. Papers submitted to these sessions give the program chairs an opportunity to fashion a backbone for the meeting and determine what the broad range of contributors feel is important in the section right now.
Convener: Stephanie Stockman, NASA/GSFC, USA, E-mail: stockman@core2.gsfc.nasa.gov

ED01 The Earth and Space Science Education Revolution: A Call to Action
Fueled by new technologies over the last 40 years, advances in Earth and space science are revolutionizing our understanding of Earth's systems and processes. This growing understanding is increasingly needed to inform political and economic decisions of local, national, and global impact. In summer of 2001, at a national conference in Snowmass, Colorado, a "call to action" was issued to scientists, educators, business leaders, and policy makers to the join in a parallel "revolution" to reform Earth and space science education in grades K-12. The purpose of this education revolution is to insure that all citizens have the opportunity to learn about Earth as a system and to investigate how Earth systems interactions affect our lives. The resulting conference report outlines a vision for Earth and space science education in the next decade and sets out specific goals and recommendations to achieve this vision. Among the key recommendations are (1) the formation of state-based alliances to promote Earth and space science education, (2) enhancement of efforts to increase diversity throughout the Earth and space sciences, (3) an annual national assessment on the status of Earth and space science education reform efforts, (4) the need to work collaboratively with other science and education organizations (and math and geography) to promote education reform across the board, and (5) the need for additional research on teaching and learning of Earth and space science concepts. As the "revolution" moves from the planning phase to implementation, we are seeking abstracts from scientists and educators working on projects which support Earth and space science education reform at local, state, and national levels.
Conveners: Edward Geary, Colorado State University, Center for Science, Mathematics and Technology Education,, Fort Collins, CO 80523 USA, E-mail: egeary@smate.colostate.edu, and Frank Hall, University of New Orleans, , New Orleans, LA 70148 USA, E-mail: frhall@uno.edu

ED02 Careers for Geoscience Degrees: Jobs That Fit Our Needs, and Those of Employers
A panel discussion will emphasize careers through the eyes of the employee and the employer. Geoscientists representing a wide variety of career choices will be available to answer questions about how geoscience skills fit into their jobs or businesses, the pathways they took to their current employment, job satisfaction, concerns about the job market, and any insights they may have on the job hunt. Midcareer changes will also be highlighted.
Conveners: Ines L. Cifuentes, Carnegie Institution of Washington, 1530 P St., NW, Washington, DC, 20005-1910 USA, Tel: 202-939-1103, Fax: 202-387-8092, E-mail: icifuentes@pst.ciw.edu, and Ellen S. Kappel, Geosciences Professional Services, Inc., 5610 Gloster Rd., Bethesda, MD 20816-2058 USA, Tel: 301-229-2709, Fax: 301-229-2709, E-mail: ekappel@geo-prose.com

ED03 Innovative Strategies for Enhancing Space Science and Geoscience Education at all Levels
This session will showcase innovative teaching and learning of space science and geoscience at all educational levels: Pre K-12, undergraduate, graduate, and continuing education. We are especially interested in contributions from programs that have made creative use of space & plasma physics and other space & earth system science disciplines as contexts for teaching the fundamental concepts articulated in the national science education standards. We are also very interested in programs that have used the inquiry-based principles of successful K-12 science teaching to enhance undergraduate and graduate teaching and curriculum development in these disciplines. Our invited speakers will represent these two strategies.
Conveners: Cherilynn Morrow, Space Science Institute, Education & Outreach, 3100 Marine Street, Room A353, Boulder, CO 80303-1058 USA, Tel: 303-492-7321, Fax: 303-492-3789, E-mail: camorrow@colorado.edu, and Timothy F. Slater, University of Arizona, Department of Astronomy, Tucson, AZ 85721 USA, Tel: 520-621-7096, Fax: 520-621-1532, E-mail: tslater@as.arizona.edu, and Jim Thieman, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 633 , Greenbelt, MD 20771 USA, Tel: 301-286-9790, Fax: 301-286-1771, E-mail: thieman@nssdc.gsfc.nasa.gov

ED04 Math and Science Partnerships: School-College Collaborations on a New Scale
The Elementary Secondary Education Act (ESEA) passed by both the House and Senate contains language to support math and science partnerships. Much of the legislative language was based on proposals from the Bush administration. This legislation would provide significant new opportunities for support to universities and colleges to engage in collaborative efforts to support high-quality K-12 education. These partnerships are envisioned as bringing math and science curricula based on current research to the classroom in forms that apply effective practice based on research on learning, assessment, and pedagogy. This session will offer some comments about the current status of the math and science partnerships programs as implemented in federal agencies, and it will explore existing partnerships that provide models for future work. Contributed papers demonstrating effective interactions among science departments, schools of education, universities, school districts, and state educational programs are encouraged.
Conveners: Cathy Manduca, Carleton College, , , USA, E-mail: cmanduca@carleton.edu, and Jack Hehn, American Institute of Physics, , , USA, E-mail: jhehn@aip.org

ED05 Looking to Tomorrow: Research Projects of High School-Aged Geoscientists
Several science programs in the Washington, D.C. and Richmond, VA region allow promising high school students to conduct research on topics related to the Earth and space sciences. This invitation-only session will highlight the recent research results of these student projects associated with the Richmond Area Higher Education Consortium (AHEC) and Carnegie Institution CASE programs.
Conveners: Jill Karsten, American Geophysical Union, 2000 Florida Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20009 USA, Tel: 202-777-7508, Fax: 202-328-0566, E-mail: jkarsten@agu.org, and Julia Beatrice Reed, Greater Richmond Area Higher Education Consortium, 4901 Fitzhugh Avenue Suite 301, Richmond, VA 23230 USA, Tel: 804-358-7280, Fax: 804-358-7210, E-mail: jbreed@grahec.org

ED06 Much Ado About Criterion Two: Does Anyone Care?
In the spring of 1997 the NSF announced changes in its review process that included two criteria to be addressed by reviewers. These criteria are: (1) What is the intellectual merit of the proposed activity? (2) What are the broader impacts of the proposed activity? The changes became effective in the fall of 1997. With four years of the new criteria in place, there is debate on how much impact the second criterion has had on both the writing of proposals and the review and funding decision processes. The National Science Foundation and the National Science Board recently indicated the need for enforcement of both criteria. Speakers for this session will include NSF leadership who can provide a history of the evolution of the review criteria, including the impetus for the 1997 changes, the intent of the changes, and the desired outcomes in science research and education resulting from the changes. Candidate invitees include Dr. Rita Colwell and Dr. Warren Washington, who chaired the subcommittee that made the recommendations for the change. Other speakers, such as Dr. Margaret Leinen, division directors, and program managers, will discuss the challenges of the implementation of the new criteria within the NSF Geosciences Directorate, and help to clarify the types of proposal elements that can satisfy criterion 2. Contributed papers are encouraged from the geosciences community that address how research and proposal writing as well as proposal reviewing have adapted to the new criteria.
Conveners: Susan K Avery, University of Colorado-Boulder, , , USA, E-mail: susan.avery@colorado.edu, and Cheri Morrow, Space Science Institute, , , USA, E-mail: camorrow@colorado.edu

Education and Human Resources also presents jointly with the following sessions:
V02 Education on Volcanology at the Graduate and Undergraduate Levels

Global Climate Change

GC00 General Contributions
Contributions relevant in any area over the full spectrum of global environmental change may be submitted to this series of the sessions. Accepted contributions will be organized into appropriate topical sessions. More than half the papers contributed for AGU meetings will not find a home in the pre-approved sessions suggested by a variety of conveners. Papers submitted to these sessions give the program chairs an opportunity to fashion a backbone for the meeting and determine what the broad range of contributors feel is important in this area right now. The scientific focus for sessions on global environmental change will include large-scale chemical, biological, geological, and physical perturbations of the Earth's atmosphere, ocean, land surface, and hydrological/biogeochemical cycles, with special attention to time scales of decades to centuries and to human-caused perturbations. These sessions will also include information about developing programs that enhance the understanding of global environmental change among policy makers, media, and the public.
Convener: Eric Sundquist, U.S. Geological Survey, USA, E-mail: esundqui@usgs.gov

GC01 Climate and Development from Seasons to Centuries: How Our Understanding of and Responses to Seasonal Climate Variability Can Build Insight Into Human Adaptation to Long-Term Climate Change
The need for considering the interdependencies between climate and development policy has gained prominent attention both in the United States and internationally. Research on understanding the relationships between climate variability and human systems, particularly in the agriculture and water sectors, clearly shows these links. The session will highlight studies that have focused on real-world experience using seasonal climate forecasts by individuals and institutions in developing countries and examine the implications for adaptive responses to long-term climate change.
Conveners: Macol Stewart, U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID), RRB, Room 3.8-0, 11300 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20523 USA, Tel: 202-712-1724, E-mail: MaStewart@usaid.gov, and Sally Kane, NOAA Office of Global Programs, 1100 Wayne Avenue, Suite 1225, Silver Spring, MD 20910 USA, Tel: 301-427-2089, E-mail: kane@ogp.noaa.gov, and Paul Kirshen, Tufts University, CEE Anderson Hall, Medford, MA 02155 USA, Tel: 617-627-5589, E-mail: paul.kirshen@tufts.edu

GC02 Atlantic Decadal Variability
This session will focus on the long-term (decadal and multidecadal) variability in the Atlantic Basin as seen in oceanic and atmospheric variables, in observations, paleoclimatic evidence, and models and its relation to global climate variability. It will consider recent findings on the characteristics of the variability, the mechanisms proposed to explain them, and their predictability. Abstracts addressing the effects of Atlantic decadal variability on the climate of the surrounding continents, changes in storm frequencies, and the effects on ecosystems and fisheries are also invited. The session will consist of representative talks (solicited and unsolicited) and posters.
Conveners: Yochanan Kushnir, Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, Columbia University, Palisades, NY 10964 USA, Tel: 845-365-8669, E-mail: kushnir@ldeo.columbia.edu, and Martin Visbeck, Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, Columbia University, Palisades, NY 10964 USA, Tel: 845-365-8531, E-mail: visbeck@ldeo.columbia.edu

GC03 Pacific Decadal Variability
This is a proposed session of invited talks and posters outlining the problems of identifying decadal variability in the Pacific from observations and from paleoclimatic evidence, relating it to atmospheric variability, considering the models that demonstrate decadal variability, and considering the mechanisms and predictability that have been suggested for the generation of such variability, including the relationship of ENSO decadal variability with Pacific decadal variability in general. The effects of Pacific variability on the climate of the United States, in particular on the hydrology of the west coast of America, and the effects of fisheries in the Pacific will be an important part of the session.
Conveners: Nathan Mantua, JISAO, Center for Science in the Earth System University of Washington Box 354235, Seattle, WA 98195-4235 USA, Tel: 206-616-5347, E-mail: mantua@atmos.washington.edu, and Edward Sarachik, JISAO, Center for Science in the Earth System University of Washington Box 354235, Seattle, WA 98195-4235 USA, Tel: 206-543-6720, E-mail: sarachik@atmos.washington.edu

GC04 Carbon Management Technologies: Feasibility, Impacts, Risks, and Economics
Strategies to capture and sequester carbon-dioxide (CO2) promise to sustain fossil energy use by avoiding climate change. Consequently, technologies such as CO2 injection into geologic formations or the deep ocean, stimulation of natural biological terrestrial and oceanic CO2 sinks, air extraction of CO2, mineral carbonation, and novel methods to generate fossil energy that facilitate CO2 recovery are being aggressively explored. They are at various stages of development ranging from being operational on a small scale, to field-experimentation, to laboratory prototypes, to conceptual designs. This session will examine these technologies by focusing on their feasibility, scalability, environmental impacts and risks, and implementation costs and time-constants. Our objective is to guide informed public policy to secure our energy future.
Conveners: Manvendra K. Dubey, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Earth and Environmental Sciences , Los Alamos, NM 87545 USA, Tel: (505) 665-3128, E-mail: dubey@lanl.gov, and David Keith, Carnegie Mellon University, Department of Engineering and Public Policy, 129 Baker Hall, Pittsburgh, PA 15213-3890 USA, Tel: 412-268-2678, E-mail: keith@cmu.edu, and Klaus S. Lackner, Columbia University, H. Krumb School of Mines, 924 Mudd, New York, NY 10027-4711 USA, Tel: 212-854-0304, E-mail: kl2010@columbia.edu, and Taro Takahashi, Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, P.O. Box 1000, Palisades, NY 10964 USA, Tel: +1-845-365-8537, E-mail: taka@ldeo.columbia.edu

GC05 Comparing Arctic Models
The Arctic is an important component of the global climate system. This fact is highlighted by global climate model simulations that consistently show the Arctic to be one of the most sensitive regions to climate change. Although essential to interpreting model simulation results and their implications for climate variability, an identification of the differences among models and model systematic errors in the Arctic has yet to be achieved. For this reason, a set of symbiotic model intercomparison projects are currently addressing different aspects of the Arctic climate system, for example, the Sea Ice Model Intercomparison Project (SIMIP), the Arctic Regional Climate Model Intercomparison Project (ARCMIP), the Arctic Ocean Model Intercomparison Project (AOMIP), etc. Collectively, all these intercomparison projects reflect a significant research effort toward improving the representation of the Arctic region in global climate models. The goal of this session is to bring together Arctic researchers involved inthe model intercomparisons and model validation studies in order to exchange ideas and methods of model improvement based on the intercomparion approach. It is our hope that this session will serve as a catalyst for researchers from different fields, fostering a synthesis of major aspects of Arctic climate system modeling.
Conveners: Judith Curry, University of Colorado, PAOS 311 UCB, Boulder, CO 80309-0311 USA, E-mail: curryja@cloud.colorado.edu, and Gregory Flato, University of Victoria, Canadian Centre for Climate Modelling and Analysis, Meteorological Service of Canada, P.O. Box 1700, , CAN, Tel: +1-250-363-8233, Fax: +1-250-363-8247, E-mail: greg.flato@ec.gc.ca, and William Hibler, International Arctic Research Center, University of Alaska Fairbanks 930 Koyukuk Drive P.O. Box 757340, Fairbanks, AK 99775-7340 USA, Tel: +1-907-474-7254, Fax: +1-907-474-5662, E-mail: billh@iarc.uaf.edu, and Andrey Proshutinsky, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, MS #29, 360 Woods Hole Road, Woods Hole, MA 02543 USA, Tel: +1-508-289-2796, Fax: +1-508-457-2181, E-mail: aproshutinsky@whoi.edu, and John Walsh, University of Alaska Fairbanks, International Arctic Research Center, 930 Koyukuk Drive, P.O. Box 757340, Fairbanks, AK 99775-7340 USA, Tel: +1-907-474-2773, Fax: +1-907-474-5662, E-mail: walsh@atmos.uiuc.edu

GC06 Reconstruction and Understanding the Late Maunder Minimum Climate Anomaly
The Late Maunder Minimum (LMM; 1675-1715) is an extraordinary interval in the historical climate record, with significant societal implications at least in Europe. It has been documented by historical sources as well as by various proxy data. Furthermore, modeling studies are making progress in reproducing this period, thus allowing for an analysis of the dynamical background, in particular with respect to solar output and volcanic aerosol loading. We solicit papers dealing with empirical and/or model-based analyses of the climate response during the Late Maunder Minimum period.
Conveners: Rudolf Brazdil, Masaryk University, Department of Geography Kotlarska 2, Brno, 611 37 CZE, E-mail: brazdil@porthos.geogr.muni.cz, and Michael Mann, University of Virginia, Department of Environmental Science Clark Hall, Charlottesville, VA 22903 USA, Tel: +1-804-924-7770, Fax: +1-804-982-2137, E-mail: mann@multiproxy.evsc.virginia.edu, and Hans von Storch, GKSS Research Center, Institute for Coastal Research Max Planck Strasse 1, Geesthacht, D-21 502 DEU, Tel: +49-415-287-1831, Fax: +49-415-287-2832, E-mail: storch@gkss.de

Global Climate Change also presents jointly with the following sessions:
B01 Effects of Land Use on Net Primary Production of Terrestrial Ecosystems
B06 Contributions of Biogeosciences to the Millennium Ecosystem Assessment
B02 Biogeochemistry and Conservation Biology
A15 Midlatitude Stratospheric Ozone Loss: Understanding the Effects of Chemistry and Dynamics
H21 Global Precipitation Mission for Hydrology and Hydrometeorology
A04 Upper Air Temperature Data Products for Climate Studies: Methods, Products, and Challenges
A05 Organic Aerosols in Past and Present Atmospheres
A07 From Rain Gage to RANET to Radio: How Information Technology Is Transforming Forecast Communication
A08 AERONET: Aerosol Observations, Related Investigations, and Synergism
A09 Balance in Atmosphere-Ocean Dynamics (BALANCE 2002)
A10 Fires, Scars, and Smoke: Observations, Impact, and Policies
A11 Calibration of Meteorological Satellite Sensors and Validation of Derived Products (POSTER ONLY)
A17 Ice Cores: Glaciology and Environmental Change
B03 Closing the N2O Budget Through Isotopic Discrimination
B04 Species Populations and Relationships to Climate and Water Quality
B08 Ecohydrology of Arid and Semiarid Ecosystems
B09 Intercomparison of Primary Production Models and Field Observations
G01 Integrating Space Geodetic Techniques and Results for Global Earth Observing
H20 Remote Sensing of Precipitation (Poster Only)
H22 Advances in Understanding the Global Water Cycle
H25 Operational Monitoring of the Arctic Hydrological System
SH03 Magnetic Topology and Complexity of CMEs
T04 The Chesapeake Bay Impact Structure: Results From New Core Holes and Geophysical Surveys
B07 Land-Atmosphere Interactions

Public Affairs

PA00 General Contributions
Contributions relevant in any area over the full spectrum of public affairs may be submitted to this series of the sessions. Accepted contributions will be organized into appropriate topical sessions. More than half the papers contributed for AGU meetings will not find a home in the pre-approved sessions suggested by a variety of conveners. Papers submitted to these sessions give the program chairs an opportunity to fashion a backbone for the meeting and determine what the broad range of contributors feel is important in the section right now.
Convener: Jack D. Fellows, Committee on Public Affairs, PO Box 3000, Boulder, CO 80307-3000 USA, Tel: +1-303- 497-8655, Fax: +1-303-497-8638, E-mail: jfellows@ucar.edu

PA01 Dam Removal in the United States: How Does Scientific Research Influence Decision-Making? Or, Is Dam Removal an Art, a Science, or Neither?
Decisions to remove existing dams from U.S. waterways should include careful consideration of impacts to river hydrology and ecosystems. What are the scientific questions that need to be asked before policy makers can act responsibly? Are researchers investigating aspects of hydrology and watershed ecology that produce knowledge useful and useable to decision makers? This session will illuminate (1) what scientific issues are integral to dam removal, (2) how the current state of knowledge bears on the U.S. policies regarding dam removal, and (3) what research is needed to enable the local, state, and federal interests to make better informed decisions. The session will be structured so that technical talks will address questions 1-3, and a panel discussion will elicit views from policy makers and representatives of the environmental community as to the relevance of current research and to what extent scientific research will bear upon their actions.
Conveners: Tim Cohn, U.S. Geological Survey, , Reston, VA USA, Tel: +1-703-648-5711, Fax: +1-703-648-5470, E-mail: tacohn@usgs.gov, and Kathy Cashman, University of Oregon, Dept. Geological Science, Eugene, OR 97403-1272 USA, Tel: +1-541-346-4573, Fax: +1-541-346-4692, E-mail: cashman@oregon.uoregon.edu

Public Affairs also presents jointly with the following sessions:
B06 Contributions of Biogeosciences to the Millennium Ecosystem Assessment
B02 Biogeochemistry and Conservation Biology
V05 Determining Diamond Provenance
H12 Science, Politics, and Watershed Management
A07 From Rain Gage to RANET to Radio: How Information Technology Is Transforming Forecast Communication
A10 Fires, Scars, and Smoke: Observations, Impact, and Policies
A16 Wet and Dry Atmospheric Deposition: Scientific Advances and Policy Developments
A19 Policy-Relevant Versus Policy-Driven Atmospheric Chemistry Research: What Role Do Policy Applications Play in Determining Questions, Methods, and Funding?
H19 Impacts of Urban Land Use Change: Hydrologic, Biogeochemical, and Policy Issues
ED04 Math and Science Partnerships: School-College Collaborations on a New Scale
GC01 Climate and Development from Seasons to Centuries: How Our Understanding of and Responses to Seasonal Climate Variability Can Build Insight Into Human Adaptation to Long-Term Climate Change
B05 Use of Remote Sensing as Policy-Relevant Information
GC04 Carbon Management Technologies: Feasibility, Impacts, Risks, and Economics

Nonlinear Geophysics

Nonlinear Geophysics also presents jointly with the following sessions:
A13 Nonequilibrium Phenomena in Open Geophysical Systems
H15 Predictability in Hydrometeorology
SA03 The Mesosphere/Lower Thermosphere Region: Structure, Dynamics, Composition, and Emission
V02 Education on Volcanology at the Graduate and Undergraduate Levels
V03 Minerals, Solutions, and Microbial Life

Study of the Earth's Deep Interior

Study of the Earth's Deep Interior also presents jointly with the following sessions:
V05 Determining Diamond Provenance
S01 Understanding the Heterogeneity of the Lower Mantle
V01 Element Partitioning and Diffusion in the Earth's Interior
S03 Hotspots: Observations and Theoretical Models

Mineral and Rock Physics Committee

Mineral and Rock Physics Committee also presents jointly with the following sessions:
GP02 Improving the Reliability of Paleointensity Determinations: Microwaves and Other Techniques
M01 Mineral Structures and Stabilities
M02 Transformations in Earth Materials: Electronic, Magnetic, and Structural Transitions
M03 Advances in Mineral Physics Using Synchrotron Radiation
S01 Understanding the Heterogeneity of the Lower Mantle
V01 Element Partitioning and Diffusion in the Earth's Interior
V03 Minerals, Solutions, and Microbial Life

European Union of Geosciences

European Union of Geosciences also presents jointly with the following sessions:
V05 Determining Diamond Provenance
T05 Active Deformation and Natural Hazards in the Caribbean Region
V01 Element Partitioning and Diffusion in the Earth's Interior
V02 Education on Volcanology at the Graduate and Undergraduate Levels
V03 Minerals, Solutions, and Microbial Life
V04 Hydrothermal Environments: Coupling Experimental, Field, and Analytical Techniques
V06 Volatiles and Light Elements in Magmatic Systems
V07 Multidisciplinary Constraints on Volcanic Volatile Budgets
S02 Dynamics of the Oceanic Mantle
S03 Hotspots: Observations and Theoretical Models
T01 Monitoring Deformation in Mountain Belts
T03 A Memorial Session for Ronald W. Girdler: Rifts, Ridges, Reversals, and Regional Studies