1996 Western Pacific Geophysics Meeting

SEDI Fifth International Symposium
SG2 Symposium: Structure and Dynamics of the Australian Lithosphere


July 23-27, 1996 (Tuesday-Saturday), Brisbane, Australia

ABSTRACT DEADLINE: March 15, 1996

Program and Sponsor
Brisbane - The Venue

Instructions for Submitting an Abstract
Electronic Abstract Submission
General Guidelines and Procedures
Preparation Information
Submission Instructions
Submission Fees
Mailing Instructions
Instructions for Preparation of Typewritten Abstract Copy
Important Dates
Policies Regarding Abstracts
Program Committee
General and Special Sessions


Program and Sponsor

This meeting will serve the needs of geophysicists interested in studies in the western Pacific region. Individuals are encouraged to submit papers on any geophysical related topic. The meeting will be organized similar in format to an AGU Annual Meeting held in the United States. Geophysical scientists worldwide, regardless of society membership or nationality, will be in attendance.

You can contribute to the success of this meeting by submitting an abstract and attending. Don't miss this unique opportunity to gather with your international colleagues to review the latest developments in your field. This will be the fourth meeting of this type. The previous meetings have been held in Hong Kong and Japan. The 1998 meeting will be held in Taiwan.

American Geophysical Union (AGU) is a society of 31,000 members with purposes of advancing progress in the Earth, atmospheric, oceanic, hydrologic, and space and planetary sciences. AGU is dedicated to fostering high-quality scientific research, disseminating the results of that research, enhancing educational opportunities in science, and encouraging international cooperation in geophysics.

Cosponsors


Brisbane - The Venue

Brisbane is on the subtropical eastern coast of Australia at latitude 27.5 degrees South. July is usually a dry month with bright and sunny days. Evenings are cool. Average daily high and low temperatures are 21C (70F) and 11C (52F).

The meeting venue is the new Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre. This is part of a cultural complex on the south bank of the Brisbane River, incorporating the Queensland Art Gallery, Museum, State Library, Concert Hall, and Theatres. The Cultural Complex is adjacent to the South Banks Parklands, a 40 acre recreational area with a beach and swimming facilities, public entertainment, and more than 20 restaurants and snack bars, providing for relaxed conference lunch breaks. Most of the hotels are in the city area, a 20-25 minute walk across the river or a short trip via public transportation, from the Convention Centre.

Pre-and Post Excursions


Instructions for Submitting an Abstract

All accepted abstracts will be published in a supplement to Eos. Those submitted electronically will also be made available through AGU's World Wide Web Services.

Electronic Abstract Submission

Electronic submissions are highly recommended:

All abstracts received electronically will be published on the World Wide Web. You will be able to view these abstracts weeks before the abstract volume is published. Electronic abstract submission instructions are available on the AGU Web site, by e-mail, and via FTP:

Instructions for Electronic Abstract Submission

E-mail
Send e-mail to: wpgm-request@agu.org You will receive 4 messages back that comprise the author packet.


General Guidelines and Procedures

  1. Anyone can submit an abstract and attend this meeting regardless of society membership or nationality.
  2. Sessions will focus on all AGU related disciplines: Atmospheric Sciences, Geodesy, Geomagnetism and Paleomagnetism, Hydrology, Ocean Sciences, Planetology, Seismology, Space Physics and Aeronomy, Tectonophysics, and Volcanology, Geochemistry and Petrology.
  3. Abstracts can't be considered if not received by March 15, 1996, at AGU headquarters.
  4. Abstracts must be submitted in English.
  5. Abstracts will be returned without consideration if they:
  6. New Procedure: Abstracts submitted electronically will receive a confirmation by e-mail. If this confirmation is not received within 24 hours you must contact AGU by March 20. Others may verify receipt of abstracts through AGU's World Wide Web Site under the Meeting section. Lists will be updated weekly. Those without access to electronic networks can phone or fax AGU for confirmation.
  7. Acceptance letters will be mailed to corresponding authors in mid May 1996.
  8. All accepted abstracts will be published in a supplement to Eos. Submission of an abstract for the meeting carries with it permission for AGU to reproduce the abstract in Eos, meeting programs, and reports related to the meeting. It is also presumed to permit the free copying of the abstract. Although Eos is a copyrighted publication, authors are not required to transfer copyright for abstracts submitted to meetings. Copyright, where it exists, will be reserved by the authors.
  9. Important: The abstract submittal fee is not refundable (including duplicate submissions).
  10. Authors are obligated to present papers in the mode of presentation and on the day and time assigned by the Program Committee.
  11. Please do not send cover letters or clip two or more abstracts together.
  12. To avoid duplicate charges, submit your abstract only once to AGU. If you must send in a revised abstract, type the word REVISED in very large letters in the top right hand corner of the abstract page.

Preparation Information

Submission Instructions

Numbered sections below refer to the items in the submittal information area on the sample abstract.

1. Title of meeting.

2. Society that you are a member of. AGU members should give an AGU membership number (see mailing label on Eos or an AGU journal).

3a. Corresponding address: Give name and mailing address of the author to whom all correspondence should be sent.

3b. Corresponding author's telephone number.

3c. Corresponding author's fax number.

3d. Corresponding author's e-mail address.

4. Section to which abstract is submitted. Use the following letter abbreviations: A (Atmospheric Sciences); G (Geodesy); GP (Geomagnetism and Paleomagnetism); H (Hydrology); O (Ocean Sciences); P (Planetology); S (Seismology); T (Tectonophysics); V (Volcanology, Geochemistry and Petrology); SG2 (SG2 Symposium); and SD (SEDI Symposium).

5a. Type special session code and title to which submittal is made, if any. 5b. Type the number and description of two AGU index terms that best fit the topic of your paper. Index terms are published in AGU Handbook, in the April 11, 1995 issue of Eos, and here on AGU's web page.

6. Indicate Poster Video (PV) or Poster Computer (PC), if you prefer to give your presentation as one of these options. AGU will charge for all equipment: US$ 60/AUS$ 80 approximately for PV and PC. Call AGU for prices of more sophisticated equipment.

Indicate Title Only (TO) if you wish to have your abstract published (if accepted) but will not be at the meeting to present the paper.

The final decision on which presentation method is used will be made by the Program Committee.

7. Percent of material previously presented or published, and where.

8. Amount and type of payment enclosed. Payment must accompany the abstract and may be made in U.S. or Australian dollars. Make checks payable to AGU. Please note: If paying by credit card, your abstract submittal fee will be processed in U.S. dollars only. If payment is with a purchase order, a copy of the PO must accompany each individual abstract. Abstracts without the necessary paper work will be rejected. See section on Submission Fees for payment information..

9. Indicate whether the paper is contributed (C) or invited (I). If invited, the name of the Program Committee Member who invited the paper must be provided; if no name is provided, the paper will be treated as contributed.

10. Special request. If you have a special request, such as "schedule paper before or after another," indicate here. Do not send cover letters. Requests for papers following each other and having the same presenter generally will not be honored.

If you would be willing to chair a session in your field, please indicate in number 10. If selected, you will be notified before the meeting.

11. Student paper. If student author is presenting his/her own paper, indicate YES.


Submission Fees

The fee must accompany the abstract. This fee is not refundable. These fees are set in U.S. and Australian dollars.

Abstract size: 11.8 cm x 18 cm (or less)

Abstract size: 11.8 cm x 28 cm

* The student rate is applicable only when the first author is a student presenting a paper.

**Discounts: If payment is made by a check, credit card, or a bank draft, the regular member fee is reduced by US$10/AUS$13. (This reduction does not apply to students or if submitting an extended abstract.)

AGU accepts payment by credit card (American Express, MasterCard, or Visa), checks, money orders, and bank drafts. Make checks, bank drafts, and money orders payable to AGU. Credit card payments will be processed in U.S. dollars only.

If payment is made in the form of a purchase order, an actual copy of the purchase order must accompany EACH abstract.


Mailing Instructions

The abstract deadline is March 15, 1996. Abstracts must be received in the AGU office on or before this date in the correct format with the correct submittal information and fee. Electronic abstract submissions received before 11:59 P.M. (EST) on March 15, 1996 will be processed as on-time abstracts..

Mail original and two copies with payment to:

1996 Western Pacific Geophysics Meeting
American Geophysical Union
2000 Florida Avenue, N.W.
Washington, DC 20009, USA

Instructions for Preparation of Typewritten Abstract Copy

----------------------------------------------8½"x11"page------------------------------------------

							   Submittal Information
							   must be typed to the
							   right of 11.8 cm area.
(allow 4 cm above abstract)
							  1. 1996 Western Pacific Geophysics Meeting 
(allow ½: cm left margin)					  2. 00234348 (AGU number)
							
							  3. (a) H S Second
<-------------------------11.8 cm----------------------->
							|    MS 123
The Title of the Abstract Should be in 			|    WHOI
Upper and   Lower Case Bold Type:    			|    Woods Hole, MA 02543
Capitalizing All Words of Four or More Letters		|    (b) Tel: 617-999-1111
							|    (c) fax: 617-999-4545
I M First Jr (Ocean Sciences Department, March Univer-	|
  sity, Watertown, MA  02172; 413-789-1234; 		| 4. OT
  e-mail: ifirst@march.osd.edu)				|
H S Second and N Y Third (Both at:  WHOI, Woods Hole,	| 5. (a) 10 Ocean Optics
  MA  02543; 617-999-1111; (e-mail: hsecond@whoi.inst	|    (b) 4564 Tsunamis
  (Sponsor: AGU Member Name)				| 
							|
Use minimum of 12-pitch type or 11-point font size.	| 6. PC or PV (Computer
							|  or VCR?,
Indent second line of title 2 spaces if it runs over.	|  preferred type)
							| 
Leave one line blank after title.			|
							| 7. 25% at 1995 Spring Meeting
Type names of authors (no punctuation) and address in 	|   
upper and lower case letters. Do not leave blank line 	|  
between authors. Indent second line 2 spaces		| 8. $50 check enclosed
if it runs over.					|            - or - 
Underline the name of the author who will present the 	|  charge $50 to T Third
paper							|  Visa 4343 040 523 558
Type sponsor's name if no author is an AGU member.	|  Expires 3/96
							|             - or -
Leave one blank line after author block.		|  Invoice $60 to
							|  Attached PO # L33435
Leave a blank line between paragraphs.			|  at WHOI/Accounts
							|  Payable, Woods Hole,
Neatly drawn symbols, Greek letters or other camera 	|  MA 02543 (Copy of PO
reproducible copy are acceptable, but avoid using in	|  must be attached)
the title if at all possible.				|
							| 
							| 9. I (by Session Chair,
Mount figures with clear glue or rubber cement not	|  John Whitely)
adhesive tape.						| 
							| 10. Schedule after Nelson
							|  paper on same topic.
							|
							| 
--------------------------------------------------------| 
							| 11. No
Extended abstract up to 28 cm long available 		| 
at a cost of US$70/AUS$93 (use 14" page)		|    
							|
<-------------------------11.8 cm----------------------->


Important Dates


Policies Regarding Abstracts

1. Submission of an abstract carries with it the obligation to present the paper in the session or in the mode of presentation (oral or poster) as assigned by the Program Committee. Once scheduled, presentations may NOT be moved.

2. Proofread your abstract prior to submission. AGU staff cannot make any changes or corrections to abstracts.

3. The abstract deadline is March 15, 1996. Abstract submissions (original and 2 copies) must be received by AGU on or before this date. Electronic abstracts (e-mail and WWW) abstracts must be received by 11:59 P.M. (EST), March 15, 1996. Correct submittal iformation and fee MUST be enclosed for either method.

4. Papers will be scheduled Tuesday through Saturday. Your paper could be scheduled on any day of the week including Saturday. Please make your airline and hotel reservations accordingly.

Program Committee

Australian-New Zealand Members

Co-Chairman: Brian Fraser, tel: 61-49-215445, fax: 61-49-216907, e-mail: phbjf@cc.newcastle.edu.au; Atmospheric Sciences: David C. Lowe, tel: 64-4-5704008, fax: 64-4-5666166, e-mail: lowe@grace.niwa.cri.nz; Geodesy: Arthur Stolz, tel: 61-2-3854196, fax: 61-2-3137493, e-mail: a.stolz@unsw.edu.au; Geomagnetism and Paleomagnetism: Phil McFadden, tel: 61-6-249-9612, fax: 61-6-249-9986, e-mail: pmcfadde@agso.gov.au; Hydrology: Warren J. Bond, tel: 61-6-246-5948, fax: 61-6-246 5965, e-mail: w.bond@cbr.soils.csiro.au; Ocean Sciences: Angus D. McEwan, tel: 61-02-325212, fax: 61-02-325125, e-mail: angus.mcewan@ml.csiro.au Planetology: Stuart R. Taylor, tel: 61-6-2492089, fax: 61-6-2490748; Seismology: Euan G.C. Smith, tel: 61-4-4955186, e-mail: euan.smith@vuw.ac.nz; Solar Physics and Planetary: Richard L Dowden, tel: 64-3-4797552, fax: 64-3-4790964, e-mail: dowden@otago.ac.nz; Solid Earth: Charles E. Barton, tel: 61-6-2499611, fax: 61-6-2499986, e-mail: cbarton@agso.gov.au; and Solid Earth (SG2): Robert Van der Hilst, tel: 61-6-2490339, fax: 61-6-2490339 and 61-6-2572737, e-mail: rob@bullen.anu.edu.au; Tectonophysics: Geoff Davies, tel: 61-6-2494517, fax: 61-6-2490738, e-mail: geoff@rses.anu.edu.au; Volcanology: Bruce Houghton, tel: 64-7-3748211, fax: 64-7-3748199, e-mail: b.houghton@gns.cri.nz;

North American Members

Co-Chairman: Thomas Herring, tel: 617-253-5941, fax: 617-253-1699, e-mail: tah@mtglas.mit.edu; Hydrology: James A. Davis, tel: 415-329-4484, fax: 415-329-4453, e-mail: jadavis@rcamnl.wr.usgs.gov; Geomagnetism and Paleomagnetism: David J. Dunlop, tel: 416-828-3968, fax: 416-828-3717, e-mail: dunlop@ helios. physics. utoronto.ca; Ocean Sciences: Eric Lindstrom, tel: 202-429-2039, fax: 202-857-5219, e-mail: woce@access1.digex.net; Solar Physics and Planetary: Christopher T. Russell, tel: 310-825-3188, fax: 310-206-3051, email: ctrussell@igpp.ucla.edu; and Andrew F. Nagy, tel: 313-764-6592, fax: 313-747-3083, e-mail: andrew_nagy@um.cc.umich.edu; Tectonophysics: Jeffrey K. Weissel, tel: 914-359-2900 ext. 533, fax: 914-356-0718, e-mail: jeffw@lamont.ldgo.columbia.edu; Volcanology: Katherine V. Cashman, tel: 503-346-4573, fax: 503-346-4692, e-mail: cashman@oregon.uoregon.edu.

SEDI

Chairman: Kurt Lambeck, fax: 61-6-2495443, e-mail: chair.SEDI@anu.edu.au

General and Special Sessions

Deadline for abstract submissions to AGU headquarters is March 15, 1996
If submitting an abstract to a special session, in addition to sending one original and two copies of your abstract with payment, to AGU on or by March 15, 1996, you must send a copy of your abstract by e-mail, FAX or airmail to the first named convener by March 15, 1996. But remember, sending a copy of your abstract solely to a convener does not constitute sending it to AGU.

ALL abstracts must include payment information. If you wish to submit a paper to a special session, give the code and title of the session in the abstract submittal information. Contributed papers on any topic in geophysical sciences are solicited and encouraged. Descriptions of all special sessions are listed below.

The 1996 Western Pacific Geophysics Meeting Program Committee has developed numerous lectures and scientific sessions intended to serve the needs of geophysicists interested in studies in the western Pacific region. In addition to abstracts submitted to general sessions and to the large variety of special sessions, the committee has planned the following special lectures:

Public Lecture

Ozone in the South Pacific and Antarctic Regions
F. Sherwood Rowland, University of California at Irvine and co-recipient of the 1995 Nobel Prize in Chemistry, will present a lecture on stratospheric ozone depletion.

Union Lectures

U01 Looking From the Outside in: Observing the Earth's Interior From Space
Developments in space technology over the past few decades have provided entirely new insights into the Earth's interior, from just below the surface down to the core. Past progress and recent developments will be reviewed. These include the planet's gravity and magnetic fields, the mantle rheology, and the driving forces of plate tectonics.

This lecture will be presented by Kurt Lambeck, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200, Australia.

U02 The Galileo Mission
The Galileo mission to Jupiter is the first to probe directly the atmosphere of one of the gas giant planets. In this talk for a general audience, the probe and orbiter missions will be reviewed and the highlights of their initial scientific return presented. A live video linkup with NASA Ames Research Center is planned.

Atmospheric Sciences

A01 Paleoceanography and Paleoclimatology: Observation and Modeling
This session will include a broad range of topics describing observational and modeling work on any aspect of oceanographic and climatic conditions of the past. Presentations covering any timescale from decadal and century, through orbital to tectonic, are welcome. Presentations may be of results from climate models as well as those obtained from marine, terrestrial, and ice-core records. Papers with a Pacific-region emphasis are especially encouraged.
Conveners: J. Syktus, Division of Atmospheric Research, CSIRO, Private Bag No 1, Mordialloc, VIC 3195, Australia, tel: 61-3-9586 7548, fax: 61-3-95867600, e-mail: jis@dar.csiro.au; and R. Oglesby, Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, Purdue University, 1497 Civil Engineering Bldg., West Lafayette, IN 47907, tel: 317-494-9531, fax: 317-492-1210, e-mail: oglesby@spring.atms.purdue.edu

A02 Stratospheric Change
Public attention has been focused on the increasing size of the Antarctic ozone hole each spring. This session will include a broad range of topics covering the international cooperative research aimed at understanding the processes involved in stratospheric ozone depletion and related phenomena. Presentations covering any aspect of this work are welcome including the role of heterogeneous chemistry, ozone and related trace gas trends, and changes over polar regions as well as at other latitudes and new work on changes in ultraviolet radiation and radiative transfer.
Conveners: D. Hofmann, NOAA, CMDL, 325 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80303-3328, tel: 303-497-6663, fax: 303-497-6975, e-mail: dhofmann@adm1.cmdl.noaa.gov; and A. Matthews, NIWA Lauder, Central Otago, New Zealand, tel: 64-3-4473-411, fax: 64-3-4473348, e-mail: Matthews@lauder.niwa.cri.nz

A03 Climate and Global Change
Presentations on any aspect of global and climate change and related meteorology are solicited, with a special emphasis on how these research areas may be related to the carbon cycle. Observational and modeling studies of both natural and anthropogenic processes are welcome.
Conveners: D. Erickson, National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO, tel: 303-497-1424, fax: 303-497-1477, e-mail: erickson@ucar.edu; and J. Taylor, Centre for Resource and Environmental Studies, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200, Australia, tel: 61-6-2492635, fax: 61-6-2490757, e-mail: taylorj@cres.anu.edu.au

A06 Fractals and Nonlinearities in Earth-Ocean-Atmosphere Systems
The mathematical concepts of fractals and nonlinearities in geophysics underpins many of the notions of scale, and statistical variability describing the inter-relations between the atmosphere, the Earth, and the ocean, primarily through the hydrological cycle. Furthermore, the small-scale processes of turbulence and mixing, as well as the large-scale processes of circulation, are driven by forces that are deterministically described by nonlinear equations and statistically described by power law spectra which are indicative of fractal properties. Papers on any aspect of fractals and nonlinearities related to these areas are invited.
Conveners: M. Borgas, CSIRO Division of Atmospheric Research, Private Bag 1, Aspendale, VIC 3195, Australia, tel: 61-3-92394543, fax: 61-3-92394444, e-mail: msb@dar.csiro.au; T. Beer, CSIRO Division of Atmospheric Research, Private Bag 1, Aspendale, VIC 3195, Australia, tel: 61-3-92394546, fax: 61-3-92394444, e-mail: Tom.Beer@dar.csiro.au; and R. Cahalan, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center-913, Greenbelt, MD 20771, tel: 301-286-4276, fax: 301-286-1627, e-mail: cahalan@clouds.gsfc.nasa.gov

Atmospheric Sciences General Sessions:

A04 Sources, Sinks, and Trends of Tropospheric Trace Gases
Significant changes in the atmospheric burden and distribution of tropospheric trace gases have been observed. Presentations on any aspect of this field are encouraged including measurement techniques, trends and changes in the distribution of important species and model predictions of changes in the sources and sinks of the gases.
Conveners: D. Lowe, NIWA, P.O. Box 31-311, Lower Hutt, New Zealand, tel: 64-4-5704008, fax: 64-4-5666166, e-mail: lowe@grace.niwa.cri.nz; and S. Tyler, Earth System Science, University of California, Irvine, CA 92717-3100, tel: 714-824-2685, fax: 714-824-3256, e-mail: styler@uci.edu

A05 Aerosols, Radiation, and Climate
Observational, theoretical, and modeling contributions related to the fluxes and the compositional and climatic impact of atmospheric aerosals are solicited. Natural and anthropogenic processes influence the overall atmospheric burden of particulate matter, and research results related to both of these aerosol production pathways are welcome.
Conveners: D. Erickson, National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO, tel: 303-497-1424, fax: 303-497-1477, e-mail: erickson@ucar.edu; and J. Taylor, Centre for Resource and Environmental Studies, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200, Australia, tel: 61-6-2492635, fax: 61-6-2490757, e-mail: taylorj@cres.anu.edu.au

Geodesy

G01 GPS Crustal Motion Studies in the Australasian Region
This session will concentrate on GPS surveys and networks that span two or more plate boundaries from south of New Zealand up through the complex zones surrounding the New Hebrides, Papua New Guinea, and Indonesia to the equally complex zones around the Philippine plate. It is hoped that discussions will link current GPS values with other regional information from geological, geophysical, or oceanographic sources so that a more complete picture of the region can be established, thereby leading to a better understanding of the processes associated with the collision of large plates. Profiles and campaigns that extend from the interior of a major plate across the boundary to a second stable interior are especially welcome.
Convener: P. Morgan, Information Sciences, University of Canberra, P.O. Box 1, Belconnen, ACT 2616, Australia, fax: 61-6-2015030, e-mail: peterm@ise.canberra.edu.au

G02 High-Precision GPS and the Earth Sciences
This session will cover GPS geodesy and regional networks (densification, upgrading, new datums); GPS and atmospheric studies (ionosphere and troposphere); GPS and deformation monitoring (engineering, earthquake zones, volcanoes); high-precision kinematic GPS instrumentation (manufacturer presentations, Leica 399, TurboRogue, etc.); improvements in GPS observation modeling (ambiguity resolution techniques, multipath, atmosphere, cycle slip detection/repair, etc.).
Convener: C. Rizos, School of Geomatic Engineering, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052, Australia, tel: 61-2-3854205; fax: 61-2-3137493, e-mail: C.Rizos@unsw.edu.au

G03 National and Regional Geoids
This session will concentrate on problems relevant to, but not necessarily exclusive to, countries in the western Pacific region. Special problems in the region that deserve attention include: (1) extension and measurement of the gravity field into areas of difficult terrain, including airborne techniques, (2) the modeling of the gravity anomaly field for interpolation and analysis, (3) the incorporation of DEMs into the prediction of the free air anomaly field, (4) computations of the terrain corrections and associated problems, (5) the optimum geopotential models for the region, and (6) the merging of terrestrial and altimetrically-derived gravity data.
Convener: B. Kearsley, School of Geomatic Engineering, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052, Australia, tel: 61-2-3854188, fax: 61-2-3137493, e-mail: W.Kearsley@unsw.edu.au

G04 Collocation and Comparison of High Precision Geodetic Techniques
This symposium covers accurate determination and monitoring, particularly of the vertical component, in the Global Terrestrial Reference Frame for high precision applications, e.g., absolute sea level monitoring; complementing and/or supplementing one geodetic technique by collocating it with another; comparison of approaches, analysis methods and results from collocation experiments comprising VLBI, SLR, GPS, DORIS, PRARE and Absolute Gravity measurements are appropriate. Papers and poster presentations are invited from investigators who are working on collocating multiple techniques for high precision geodetic/geodynamic applications.
Convener: R. Govind, AUSLIG, Scrivener Building, Dunlop Court, Fern Hill Park, Bruce, ACT 2617, Australia, tel: 61-6-2014371, fax: 61-6-2014366, e-mail: RameshGovi@auslig.gov.au

G05 Ocean Dynamics Using Altimetry and Radar (Joint with Ocean Sciences O02)
This symposium will focus on results from the analysis of open ocean dynamics as determined from space borne active sensors, either as stand-alone analyses or in conjunction with other data sets, such as conventional in situ data or numerical models. Fields of interest from the symposium include wind-driven dynamics, mesoscale and large-scale circulation studies, open ocean tides, surface waves, and coastal circulation. Particular interest will be in studies using observations from recently launched satellites such as TOPEX/POSEIDON and ERS-1.
Conveners: R. Coleman, Department of Surveying and SIS, University of Tasmania, GPO Box 252C, Hobart, TAS 7001, Australia, fax: 61-02-240282, e-mail: Richard.Coleman@surv.utas.edu.au; and John Church, CSIRO Division of Oceanography, GPO Box 1538, Hobart, TAS 7001, Australia, fax: 61-002-32-5123, e-mail: church@ml.csiro.au

G06 Geodesy in Antarctica
This session covers the use of geodetic methods in Antarctica to determine the past, present and future mass balance and the climate implications of the Antarctic ice sheet. Papers dealing with GPS, altimetry, radar interferometry, and precision gravimetry are encouraged. Papers linking these observations to observations and results in geophysics, glaciology, oceanography, and meteorology in Antarctica are especially welcome. Typical topics are likely to include weight of the ice cap, mass and volume changes, the Antarctic plate and its unique constructive boundary, and the polar ionosphere as determined by GPS techniques. The session has been recognized by the SCAR Working Group on Geodesy.
Convener: P. Morgan, Information Sciences, University of Canberra, P.O. Box 1, Belconnen, ACT 2616, Australia, fax: 61-6-2015231, e-mail: peterm@ise.canberra.edu.au

Geomagnetism/Paleomagnetism

GP01 Gondwana Paleomagnetism
This symposium seeks to examine Gondwana paleomagnetism in a broad context. Contributions are solicited from paleomagnetic studies of the formation of Gondwana, including studies of hypothetical precursor reconstructions such as Rodinia and constituent Precambrian cratons, the relationship of Gondwana to other supercontinents, and the break-up and dispersal of Gondwana. Studies of long-standing problems such as the early-mid-Paleozoic pole path are particularly welcomed.
Convener: P. Schmidt, CSIRO Division of Exploration and Mining, P.O. Box 136, North Ryde, NSW 2113, Australia, tel: 61-2-8878873, fax: 61-2-8878874, e-mail: p.schmidt@dem.csiro.au

GP02 Asian and Pacific Rim Paleomagnetism
Peripheral parts of the Asian continent along the Pacific Ocean rim behave as a nonrigid assemblage. In mantle tomographic maps, the boundary between the Asian continent and the Pacific Ocean is clearly marked by slow seismic velocity anomalies at depths of 0 (200) km. Movement of island arcs and peripheral parts of the Asian continent in the boundary region appear to be influenced by flow of the upper mantle as well as by plate interaction. This symposium addresses the movement of blocks in the Asian and Pacific plate rim. We welcome paleomagnetic contributions that address this problem and enhance our understanding of the rigidity of the lithosphere and the behavior of the asthenosphere and upper mantle are welcomed.
Convener: Y. Otofuji, Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Kobe University, Kobe 657, Japan, tel: 81-78-8030564, fax: 81-78-8030490, e-mail: otofuji@icluna.kobeu.ac.jp

GP03 Rock Magnetism and Its Applications
Contributions are solicited in basic rock magnetism that will elucidate problems created by remagnetization and chemical remanence. Other topics include effects of grain size and chemical composition on rock magnetic parameters, and the applications of such data to magnetic anomalies, magnetism of sediments, and magnetic proxies of climate change.
Convener: S. Banerjee, Institute for Rock Magnetism, 251 Shepherd Laboratories, 100 Union Street SE, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455-0128, tel: 612-624-5722, fax: 612-624-6369, e-mail: chunt@maroon.tc.umn.edu

GP04 Crustal Magnetic Signatures
Papers are invited that deal with presentation of magnetic anomaly data from the western Pacific region; new techniques in acquisition and processing of satellite, aeromagnetic, and ground magnetic data; advances in modeling and efficient interpretation of large magnetic data sets; and magnetic petrophysics and magnetic petrology.
Convener: D. Clark, CSIRO Division of Exploration and Mining, P.O. Box 136, North Ryde, NSW 2113, Australia, tel: 61-2-8878872, fax: 61-2-8878874, e-mail: d.clark@dem.csiro.au

GP05 Properties and Applications of the Geomagnetic Field
Papers are welcomed that relate broadly to any aspect of the Earth's magnetic field. Because of the focus of other GP sessions at the meeting and the parallel SEDI program, where core dynamo material will be discussed, it is expected that the session will concentrate on electromagnetic induction at the Earth's surface by the time-varying part of the geomagnetic field. The cause may be electromagnetic induction by source fields external to the Earth (natural or "artificial") or motional electromagnetic induction by ocean currents.
Convener: F.E.M. Lilley, Research School of Earth Sciences, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200, Australia, tel: 61-6-2493406, fax: 61-6-2490738, e-mail: ted.lilley@anu.edu.au

GP06 Pseudo-Single Domain Remanence, Then and Now
The idea that regions within multi domain grains can behave in a pseudo-single-domain manner originated in the late 1950s. It was originally proposed as an explanation for the high stability of thermoremanent magnetization of rocks, but many other aspects of rock magnetism, for example the grain-size dependence of hysteresis properties and the surprising stability of low-temperature memory, have since been described as pseudo-single-domain effects. This session will review the past, present, and future of the PSD question, covering both experimental evidence and theoretical modeling, including micro magnetic models. It is appropriate that this session should be held in Australia, since PSD remanence was first proposed by F.D. Stacey and the PSD threshold in thermoremanent magnetization was first observed by L.G. Parry.
Convener: D. Dunlop, Rock Magnetism Laboratory/Physics Department, University of Toronto, Erindale Campus, 3359 Mississauga Road North, Mississauga, ONT L5L1C6, Canada, tel: 905-828-3968, fax: 905-828-3717, e-mail: dunlop@physics.utoronto.ca

GP07 Polarity Superchrons: The Legacy of Kiama
Papers are solicited for a special session on the magneto stratigraphic, paleogeographic, and geochronologic setting of superchrons and their geophysical implications. Papers dealing with the chronology of the Kiaman and the magnetic stratigraphy before and after the superchron are very welcome. Papers dealing with polar wandering during and prior to the Kiaman, as well as the paleogeography and paleoclimatology of this interval, are also solicited.
Convener: N. Opdyke, Geology Department, 1112 Gen. Pur. Bldg. A, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611, tel: 904-392-2231, fax: 904-392-3584, e-mail: drno@nervm.nerdc.ufl.edu

GP08 Marine Magnetism: The Shape of Things to Come
Having provided one of the key observations for acceptance of plate tectonics, marine magnetic anomalies are now often viewed as an exhausted resource. New data sets and innovations in data analysis, however, continue to provide insights into the nature of the geomagnetic field, the processes responsible for accretion at sea floor spreading centers, and the positions and kinematics of lithospheric plates. This session welcomes studies that have either broadened or extended the use of marine magnetic data into new research areas and studies that present results from recently acquired marine magnetic data sets. One emphasis of the session will be on the analysis of shapes (skewness and anomalous skewness) and amplitudes of marine magnetic anomalies for use in paleomagnetic studies.
Convener: G. Acton, ODP/Texas A&M University, 1000 Discovery Drive, College Station, TX 77845-9547, tel: 409-845-2520, fax: 409-845-0876, e-mail: Gary_Acton@odp.tamu.edu

GP09 Glacial/Interglacial Records of the PEP Transects
The intent of this symposium is to bring together geophysicists and other earth scientists who share a common interest in the IGBP's core project "Past Global Changes" (PAGES) as it relates to the Pole-Equator-Pole (PEP) transects, particularly the one that runs through Australasia, eastern Asia, and adjacent oceanic areas (PEP II). The various methods employed to reconstruct paleoenvironmental records will be presented (e.g., sediment magnetism, geochemistry, palynology, stratigraphy, TL dating, pedology, etc.). The main goals are to establish mutual understanding, to encourage collaboration, and to develop new initiatives in order to provide further insights, both qualitative and quantitative, into Quaternary environmental change.
Conveners: M.E. Evans, Institute of Geophysics, Meteorology and Space Physics, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB T6G 2J1, Canada, fax: 403-492-4256, e-mail: evans@phys.ualberta.ca; F. Heller, Institut fur Geophysik, ETH Honggerberg, CH-8093 Zurich, Switzerland, fax: 41-1-6331065, e-mail: frieder@mag.geo.phys. ethz.ch; P. Kershaw, Department of Geography and Environmental Science, Monash University, Melbourne, VIC 3168, Australia, fax: 61-3-99052948, e-mail: Peter.Kershaw@arts.monash.edu.au; and N.W. Rutter, Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB T6G 2E1, Canada, fax: 403-492-2030, e-mail: nrutter@gpu3.srv.ualberta.ca

Hydrology

H01 Estuarine Wetland Hydrology
The ecological, environmental and commercial importance of estuarine wetlands is gradually being recognized, and there are increasing efforts to conserve and reestablish these important ecosystems in coastal regions throughout the world. Estuarine wetlands comprise interactions between saltwater tidal flows and freshwater movement from river water, infiltration, and regional groundwater flows, and this complex hydrology is poorly understood. Nutrient, chemical, and sediment fluxes are also a vital part of an accurate picture of these systems. Papers are sought on topics such as acid sulphate soils, surface water hydraulics, groundwater, soil water, sediment transport, or any related topic.
Conveners: P. Binning, Department of Civil Engineering and Surveying, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW 2308, Australia, tel: 61-49-21-5735, fax: 61-49-21-6991, e-mail: philip@firebird. newcastle.edu.au; and G. Willgoose, Department of Civil Engineering and Surveying, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW 2308, Australia, tel: 61-49-216039, fax: 61-49-216991, e-mail: cegrw@cc.newcastle.edu.au

H02 Hydrobiochemical Processes in Riparian Zones
Riparian forests and grass buffer strips have been shown to strip sediment and sorbed nutrients from overland flow, denitrify shallow groundwater flow, and slow gully and bank erosion processes. As the interactions between landscape attributes, hydrology, vegetation, and other biota are unraveled, our ability to manage the riparian zone for water quality, bank stability and ecological values improves. Papers are invited that pull together results of experimental and theoretical work in this area, particularly those that quantify cross-disciplinary links. The session will attempt to develop a framework for applying existing research to current management problems, and identify important remaining knowledge gaps.
Conveners: C. Wilson, CRC for Catchment Hydrology, GPO Box 1666, Canberra, ACT 2601, Australia, tel: 61-6-2465816, fax: 61-6-246-5845, e-mail: cathy@styx.cbr.dwr.csiro.au; and P. Hairsine, CSIRO Division of Soils, GPO Box 639, Canberra, ACT 2601, Australia, tel: 61-6-2465924, fax: 61-6-2465965, e-mail: peter.hairsine@cbr.soils.csiro.au

H03 Field Measurement of Soil Characteristics That Determine Chemical Transport
Compared with soil properties that determine water movement, little attention has been given to field methods for measuring properties that primarily affect chemical transport. These include mobile/immobile water fractions, adsorption/ exchange isotherms, anion exclusion, etc. This session will focus on field measurement techniques for such soil properties that have primary impact on chemical transport. Papers on new and improved techniques for measuring soil water properties required for chemical transport studies are also welcome.
Conveners: B. Clothier, Environment Group, HortResearch, Palmerston North, New Zealand, tel: 64-6-2358080, fax: 64-6-3546731, e-mail: bclothier@hort.cri.nz; A. Warrick, Department of Soil, Water, and Environmental Science, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721, tel: 520-621-1516, fax: 520-621-1647, e-mail: aww@ag.arizona.edu; and K. Smettem, Department of Soil Science and Plant Nutrition, University of Western Australia, Nedlands, WA 6009, Australia, tel: 61-9-3801506, fax: 61-9-3801050, e-mail: hydsol@uniwa.uwa.edu.au

H04 Soil Moisture: Measurement, Modeling, and Scaling
Soil moisture, through its spatial and temporal variability, plays a significant role in many processes at the land-atmosphere interface. Its dynamic relationship with rainfall, runoff, subsurface drainage, evaporation, soil and vegetation is only understood at the conceptual level. Papers are invited that explore these relationships, through either modeling or experiments, with particular emphasis on the understanding, modeling, measuring and analysis of soil moisture. Remote sensing papers are particularly welcome. This session aims to provide a forum for the exchange of ideas about the analysis and interpretation of experimental results and the role that numerical models can play in this process.
Conveners: G. Willgoose, Department of Civil Engineering and Surveying, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW 2308, Australia, tel: 61-49-216039, fax: 61-49-216991, e-mail: cegrw@cc.newcastle. edu.au; and A. Western, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC 3052, Australia, tel: 61-3-93447305, fax: 61-3-93446215, e-mail: western@civag.unimelb.edu.au

H05 Subsurface Hydrological Responses to Land Cover and Land Use Changes
Changes in the biosphere, such as changes in land cover or land use, may substantially alter subsurface hydrology. Increased groundwater recharge rates might be one consequence resulting in rising water tables and salinization. This session will focus on the impacts on subsurface hydrology resulting from interactions between the biosphere and the subsurfaceenvironment. Papers are invited on relevant topics, including changes in subsurface water and/or solute fluxes due to changes in land cover and land use, effects of areal heterogeneity of land cover and land use, and the influence of global change on subsurface hydrologic processes in different biome types.
Conveners: M. Taniguchi, Department of Earth Sciences, Nara University of Education, Nara 630, Japan, tel: 81-742-279202, fax: 81-742-279291, e-mail: makoto@nara-edu.ac.jp; and H. Cresswell, CSIRO Division of Soils, GPO Box 639, Canberra, ACT 2601, Australia, tel: 61-6-2465933, fax: 61-6-2465965, e-mail: h.cresswell@cbr.soils.csiro.au

H06 Use of Natural Tracers for Determining Groundwater Flow
This session will present papers applying new tracer techniques, or new approaches using existing techniques, in regional aquifer systems. Papers that provide quantitative information about groundwater flow systems as well as studies that make use of CFC's, noble gases, and other anthropogenic tracers are particularly encouraged. Examples may include recharge rates, water residence time, dating, mixing, or multidisciplinary studies (combination of modeling and isotope studies, pollution studies, etc). This session also provides an opportunity to 'compare notes' on the various age-correction models used for C-14 dating as well as present case histories on innovative uses of carbon isotopes in groundwater.
Conveners: P. Cook, CSIRO, Division of Water Resources, Private Bag #2, Glen Osmond, SA 5064, Australia, tel: 61-8-3038744, fax: 61-8-3038750, e-mail: pgc@adl.dwr.csiro.au; A. Herczeg, CSIRO Water Resources, Private Bag #2, Glen Osmond, SA 5064, Australia, tel: 61-8-3038722, fax: 61-8-3038750, e-mail: alh@adl.dwr.csiro.au; and M. Cox, School of Geology, Queensland University of Technology, GPO Box 2434, Brisbane, QLD 4001, Australia, tel: 61-7-8641649, fax: 61-7-8641535, e-mail: m.cox@qut.edu.au

H07 Assessment and Provision of Environmental Flow Requirements
The general area of "environmental flows" is receiving much attention in the western Pacific region and in countries such as the USA. Governments, scientists, and water management professionals are attempting to reach some common understanding on the social, economic, ecological, and hydrological implications of specifying and providing flows to meet environmental needs. This aim of this session is to explore different approaches that are used in countries in the western Pacific region.
Convener: R. Argent, Centre for Environmental Applied Hydrology, University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC 3052, Australia, tel: 61-3-3444848, fax: 61-3-3446215, e-mail: argent@aqua.civag.unimelb.edu.au

H08 Land Surface Aspects of Continental-Scale Hydrology Projects
Land surface process modeling on the macroscale is a key input to understanding the effects of climate variability and change on water resources. Improvements in parameterizations of the land surface in hydrological, atmospheric, and coupled hydrological/atmospheric models will be presented. Effects of scale on the availability of observational data, the landsurface process models used, our understanding of the significant processes, and the sensitivity of model parameterization will be considered. A number of continental-scale hydrology projects are already underway or are planned in the region. Contributions on these and related research on land surface process modeling and scaling issues are encouraged.
Conveners: A. Hall, Office of Hydrology, NOAA/NWS, Silver Spring, MD 20910, tel: 301-713-1017, fax: 301-713-1051, e-mail: ahall@smtpgate.ssmc.noaa.gov; and T. Jakeman, Centre for Resource and Environmental Studies, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200, Australia, tel: 61-6-2494742, fax: 61-6-2490757, e-mail: tony@cres.anu.edu.au

H12 El-Nino/Southern Oscillation, Climate, and Hydrology
Many studies have shown significant teleconnections between El-Nino/Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and climate and hydrological variables. Various indicators of ENSO are used today with some success to forecast rainfall, streamflow, and other hydro climatological variables several months in advance. This session will provide a forum for exchange of ideas and presentation of the latest developments in ENSO and hydro climatology studies. Papers are invited on ENSO indicators, influence of ENSO and other large-scale circulation patterns on regional hydrologic processes and the potential and use of ENSO indicators to forecast climate, streamflow, and land-surface quantities for better management of land and water resources.
Conveners: F. Chiew, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC 3052, Australia, tel: 61-3-93446215, fax: 61-3-93446644, e-mail: fchs@engineering. unimelb.edu.au; and J. Dracup, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of California, Los Angeles, 5732 Boelter Hall, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1593, tel: 310-825-2176, fax: 310-206-7245, e-mail: dracup@seas.ucla.edu

Hydrology General Sessions:

H09 Surface Water and Climate
Convener: Warren Bond, CSIRO Division of Soils, GPO Box 639, Canberra, ACT 2601, Australia, tel: 61-6-2465948, fax: 61-6-2465965, e-mail: w.bond@cbr.soils.csiro.au

H10 Water and Contaminant Transport in the Vadose Zone
Convener: Warren Bond, CSIRO Division of Soils, GPO Box 639, Canberra, ACT 2601, Australia, tel: 61-6-2465948, fax: 61-6-2465965, e-mail: w.bond@cbr.soils.csiro.au

H11 Transport Processes in Groundwater Systems
Convener: James Davis, U.S. Geological Survey, 345 Middlefield Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025, tel: 415-329-4484, fax: 415-329-4453, e-mail: jadavis@rcamnl.wr.usgs.gov

Ocean Sciences

O01 Indo-Pacific Ocean Circulation Modeling
During the TOGA decade (1985-1995), the majority of tropical ocean modeling studies focused on the large-scale variability across the equatorial Pacific Ocean. During the next decade, going into the CLIVAR and GOALS programs, the interactions within and between the other tropical oceans, on the mesoscale to basin scale, and the exchanges with higher latitudes are topics that have been highlighted for emphasis. This session invites papers pertaining to basin scale modeling studies of the tropical Indian and/or Pacific Ocean circulation, regional modeling of the western Pacific warm pool and the Pacific cold tongue, and studies of the interaction and exchanges between the tropics and midlatitudes.
Conveners: A. Busalacchi, Hydrospheric Processes Laboratory, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, MC972 Bldg. 22, Greenbelt, MD 20771, tel: 301-286-6171, fax: 301-286-2717, e-mail: tonyb@neptune.gsfc.nasa.gov; and S. Xie, Graduate School of Environmental Earth Science, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060, Japan, tel: 81-11-706-2367, fax: 81-11-726-6234, e-mail: xie@eoas.hokudai.ac.jp O02 Ocean Dynamics Using Altimetry and Radar (Joint with Geodesy G05)
This symposium will focus on results from the analysis of open ocean dynamics as determined from space borne active sensors, either as stand-alone analyses or in conjunction with other data sets, such as conventional in situ data or numerical models. Fields of interest for the symposium include wind-driven dynamics, mesoscale and large-scale circulation studies, open ocean tides, surface waves, surface winds, and coastal circulation. Particular interest will be in studies using observations from the recently launched satellites such as TOPEX/POSEIDON and ERS-1.
Conveners: R. Coleman, Department of Surveying and SIS, University of Tasmania, GPO Box 252C, Hobart, TAS 7001, Australia, tel: 61-02-202108, fax: 61-02-240282, e-mail: Richard. Coleman@surv.utas.edu.au; and John Church, CSIRO Division of Oceanography, GPO Box 1538, Hobart, TAS 7001, Australia, fax: 61-02-32-5123, e-mail: church@ml.csiro.au

O03 Environmental Records From Corals
Massive corals contain annual banding patterns similar to tree rings and can live to be several hundred years old. Through their growth records and materials incorporated from the seawater into the coral skeleton during growth, massive corals are vast storehouses of information about past climatic and environmental conditions in the tropical oceans, areas poorly represented by other sources of high-resolution proxy climate data. Realization of the full potential of corals as proxy climate/environment recorders is in its infancy. Papers are invited on modeling and interpreting coral records and examples of records extracted from corals, with particular focus on the western Pacific.
Conveners: J.M. Lough and D.J. Barnes, Australian Institute of Marine Science, PMB 3, Townsville MC, QLD 4810, Australia, tel: 61-077-534248, fax: 61-077-725852, e-mail: J_Lough@aims.gov.au, D_Barnes@aims.gov.au.

O04 The Antarctic Circumpolar Current
The Southern Ocean has been a major focus of modeling and observational work in recent years. This session will review recent progress toward understanding the dynamics and thermodynamics of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current. Topics of interest include the transport and variability of the Circumpolar Current, formation of Southern Ocean water masses, exchange between the Southern Ocean and the subtropical gyres, the meridional circulation, eddy fluxes, and the role of the Southern Ocean in the global thermohaline circulation. Both modeling and observational studies are encouraged.
Conveners: S.R. Rintoul, CSIRO Division of Oceanography, GPO Box 1538, Hobart, TAS 7001, Australia, fax: 61-002-32-5123, e-mail: rintoul@ml.csiro.au; and Igor Belkin, Shirshov Institute of Oceanology, Moscow 117218, Russia, and presently visiting Ocean Climate Laboratory, NODC/NOAA, E/OC5, 1315 East-West Highway, Silver Soring, MD 20910-3282, tel: 301-713-3395, fax: 301-713-3303, e-mail: ibelkin@nodc.noaa.gov

O05 Antarctic Sea Ice and Southern Ocean Interactions
Interactions between sea ice and the ocean play an important role in determining the characteristics of deep water in the Southern Ocean and hence in the global ocean. The sea ice cover modifies the heat, mass, and momentum transfer between the ocean and the atmosphere. For example, the formation of sea ice and the associated brine rejection may destabilize the underlying water column, causing deep convection and the potential for water mass transformation. Heat and gas exchanges are also reduced in the presence of ice. Polynyas and leads in the ice cover and ice transport both have a role in determining heat and salt fluxes. We invite papers on Antarctic sea ice - ocean interaction, including observational, modeling, and theoretical studies.
Conveners: I. Allison and V. Lytle, Antarctic CRC, University of Tasmania, GPO Box 252C, Hobart, TAS 7001, Australia, tel: 61-02-207888, fax: 61-02-207650, e-mail: I.Allison@antcrc.utas. edu.au, V.Lytle@antcrc.utas.edu.au

O06 Tropical Air/Sea/Land Interaction
Papers are invited on the subject of air-sea-land interaction over the Warm Pool region of the western Pacific/eastern Indian Ocean. Time scales to be considered may range from the diurnal through the Madden-Julian (30-60 day) waves to ENSO phenomena; and the papers may involve observation, or modeling, or both. It is anticipated that the session will deal largely, but not exclusively, with the TOGA Coupled Ocean Atmosphere Response Experiment (COARE).
Conveners: J. S. Godfrey, CSIRO Division of Oceanography, GPO Box 1538, Hobart, TAS 7001, Australia, fax: 61-02-325123, e-mail: godfrey@aqueous.ml.csiro.au; and E.F. Bradley, CSIRO Centre for Environmental Mechanics, P.O. Box 821, Canberra, ACT 2601, Australia, tel: 61-06-2465575, fax: 61-06-2465560, e-mail: bradley@enmech.csiro.au

O07 Low Latitude Western Boundary Currents
Complex and energetic western boundary currents exists in all the tropical oceans (e.g., Mindanao Current, New Guinea Coastal Current, North Brazil Current, Somali Current). In the tropical Pacific these currents supply waters of higher-latitude origin to the equatorial current system and supply the waters participating in the Indonesian htroughflow. Papers are invited on observatons, simulation, and dynamics of the low-latitude western boundary currents and their reole in the general
Conveners: D. Hu, Institute of Oceanology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 7 Nanhai Road, Qingdao 266071, Shangdong, China, fax: 0532-2870882; E. Lindstrom, U.S. WOCE Interagency Office, 1825 Eye Street, NW, Suite 400, Washington, DC 20006, tel: 202-429-2039, fax: 202-429-2039, e-mail: woce@access.digex.net

O08 Indonesian Throughflow
The Indonesian throughflow is a system of currents in the upper ocean flowing from the Pacific to the Indian Ocean through the Indonesian archipelago. Studies of throughflow are difficult because of the complex topography, energetic variability of currents at all timescales, and intense tidally induced mixing. Several national and international programs have in recent years carried out observational studies, while numerical models with fine-scale gridding have been developed. This session invites papers on observations and modeling of the mass and heat transports, on comparison of observations and model results, and on the role of Indonesian throughflow in the climate system.
Conveners: G. Meyers and J. S. Godfrey, CSIRO Division of Oceanography, GPO Box 1538, Hobart, TAS 7001, Australia, tel: 61-02-325208, fax: 61-02-325123, e-mail: meyers@ml.csiro.au, godfrey@ml.csiro.au

O09 Coastal Ocean Modeling and Synthesis
Developments in observational systems and data assimilation algorithms and the increased availability of affordable supercomputing resources, have led to a growth in high-resolution three-dimensional modeling of the coastal ocean. The development of real-time nowcast/forecast systems for the coastal ocean now appears imminent. Papers are invited on aspects of high resolution regional modeling of the continental shelf and slope and adjacent deep ocean, including the assimilation of data, the integration of physical, biological, and chemical models and observations; the application of models to studies of coastal processes such as up welling and shelf-deep ocean exchange; and model data comparisons.
Conveners: J. Wilkin and P. Craig, CSIRO Division of Oceanography, GPO Box 1538, Hobart, TAS 7001, Australia, tel: 61-02-325294, fax: 61-02-325123, e-mail: John.Wilkin@ml.csiro.au; Peter.Craig@ml. csiro.au

O10 Coastal Embayments and Estuaries
Coastal embayments and estuaries comprise a complex zone forced by buoyancy, winds and tides, forming a highly dynamic interface between the land and the oceans. It is presently experiencing the greatest rate of environmental change in human history. Papers are invited which describe the use of models and observations to further our knowledge of physical processes in this zone. Particular emphasis will be given to applications which yield an increased understanding of anthropogenic influences on geobiochemical processes in bays and estuaries.
Conveners: C. Hearn, Department of Geography and Oceanography, University College, ADFA Campus of University of New South Wales, Canberra, NSW 2600, Australia, tel: 61-6-2688469, fax: 61-6- 2688313, e-mail: c-hearn@adfa.oz.au; and J. Hunter, CSIRO Division of Oceanography, GPO Box 1538, Hobart, TAS 7001, Australia, tel: 61-02-325213, fax: 61-02-325123, e-mail: hunter@ml.csiro.au

O11 The Biogeochemistry of the Western Pacific
In recent years a number of experimental programs in the Pacific have significantly improved our understanding of the various processes that affect the biomass and productivity of the region. These processes have been shown to vary on space scales ranging from tens of kilometers to basin scale, and on timescales of days to decades. Moreover many local effects depend strongly on events that are remote in both time and space. This session will focus on the carbon cycle in the Pacific Ocean, with an emphasis on the factors that control the fluxes of carbon and related elements between the atmosphere, euphonic zone, deep waters, and sediments.
Conveners: D. Mackey, CSIRO Division of Oceanography, GPO Box 1538, Hobart, TAS 7001, Australia, tel: 61-02-325213, fax: 61-02-325123, e-mail: mackey@ml.csiro.au; and Y. Nozaki, Ocean Research Institute, University of Tokyo, e-mail: nozaki@ori.u-tokyo.ac.jp

O12 Scientific Retrospective of Ocean Drilling Program Results From the Indo-Pacific (Joint with Tectonophysics T03)
Results from the Ocean Drilling Program have provided a wealth of information from the Indo-Pacific region regarding (1) the tectonic and geologic evolution of the ocean basins and continental margins, (2) large igneous provinces, and (3) paleoceanographic and paleoclimatic conditions. This session will focus on recent drilling results from the western Pacific and eastern Indian Oceans and their importance on both regional and global scales.
Conveners: R. J. Arculus, Department of Geology, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200, Australia, tel: 61-6-2492057, fax: 61-6-2495544, e-mail: Richard.Arculus@anu.edu.au; and T. Crawford, Geology Department, University of Tasmania, GPO Box 252C, Hobart, TAS 7000, Australia, fax: 61-02-232547, e-mail: Tony.Crawford@geol.utas.edu.au

Ocean Science General Sessions

O13 General Papers in Ocean Science
Convener: E. Lindstrom, WOCE Interagency Office, 1825 "Eye" St., NW, Washington, DC 20006, tel: 202-429-2039, fax: 202-857-5219, e-mail: woce@access1.digex.net

Planetology

P01 Asteroid and Meteorite Impacts: The Australian Record
Because of their geological stability, two regions of the world stand out as areas providing long-term records of the formation of impact craters on our planet: the Canadian Shield region and Australia. Twenty-three crater fields have been confirmed in Australia. Most of them are individual craters but some are multiple in nature due to fragmentation of the impactor (asteroid/comet), either as it met the atmosphere or in near-Earth space. An example is the Henbury Craters in the Northern Territory, where over a dozen individual craters were produced about 4200 years ago when a nickel-iron asteroid broke up prior to impact. This session will consist of presentations concerning what is known about Australian impact craters and why they are important with regard to our understanding of the global influx of asteroids and comets, and discussions of what further work is needed in order to exploit this important data resource.
Convener: Lloyd Hamilton, School of Geology, Queensland University of Technology, P.O. Box 2434, Brisbane, QLD 4001, Australia, tel: 61-7-38642600, fax: 61-7-38642600, e-mail: l.hamilton@qut.edu.au

Seismology

S01 Earthquake Genesis and Recurrence in Plate Boundary and Intraplate Regions
Earthquakes occur and recur in plate boundary regions largely in response to cyclic or quasi-cyclic strain accumulation due to plate motion and its seismic release. The causes of earthquake recurrence in intraplate regions that are remote from plate boundary processes are not clear, with both stress changes and fault strength changes, due to fluid pressure or otherwise, playing a part. It is likely, however, that strength change processes also occur in plate boundary regions. Contributions that address these issues are invited.
Conveners: E. Smith, Institute of Geophysics, Research School of Earth Sciences, Victoria University of Wellington, P.O. Box 600, Wellington, New Zealand, tel: 64-4-4721000 ext. 8411, fax: 64-4-4955186, e-mail: euan.smith@vuw.ac.nz; and R. Sibson, University of Otago, P.O. Box 56, Dunedin, New Zealand, fax: 64-3-4741607, e-mail: ougeology@rivendell.otago.ac.nz

S02 Seismic Hazard Assessment in Plate Boundary and Intraplate Regions
This session will focus on the quantification of regional and local seismic hazard using a range of geophysical and geological data. Hazard assessments in regions of either low to moderate Intra plate seismicity or interplate regions with high rates of seismicity are encouraged. A goal of the session will be to highlight the similarities and differences in hazard assessment approaches in the two environments. Papers are encouraged on topics ranging from hazard algorithms based on paleo- and recent seismicity to site response modeling and measurement.
Conveners: J. Taber, Victoria University, Wellington, New Zealand; fax: 64-4-4955186, e-mail: john.taber@vuw.ac.nz; and D. Denham, Australian Geological Survey Organization, Canberra, ACT 2601, Australia, fax: 61-6-2499986, e-mail: ddenham@agso.gov.au

S03 Time-Variable Hazard and Prediction
This session will focus on studies leading to the quantification of time-variable seismic hazard and the formulation of earthquake predictions from physical and statistical modeling and empirical observations of earthquake occurrence. Included are methods based on proposed precursory phenomena and on proposed regularities in seismicity patterns. Both long-term and short-term prediction will be considered. Reports on performance tests of proposed methods, or discussions of the appropriate methodology for such tests, will be especially welcome.
Conveners: D. Rhoades, Industrial Research Limited, P.O. Box 31-310, Lower Hutt, New Zealand, tel: 64-4-5690000, fax: 64-4-5690003, e-mail: d.rhoades@irl.cri.nz; and P. Reasenberg, USGS, Menlo Park, CA 94301, tel: 415-329-5002, fax: 415-329-5163, e-mail: reasen@hayward.wr.usgs.gov

S04 Shear-Wave Modeling and Seismic Anisotropy Implications for Compositional Models (on All Scales)
Analysis of shear waves is becoming more and more standard in interpretation of seismograms for determining Earth structure and tectonics. Shear wave velocity measurements can help us determine Poisson's ratio, which can provide limits on the composition of the crust and mantle. Similarly, seismic anisotropy determined through examination of shear-wave splitting is being used to examine stress and crack distributions in the near surface as well as the composition and deformation within the mantle. Papers are requested relating to the use of shear waves to study these and other processes.
Conveners: M. Savage, Victoria University of Wellington, P.O. Box 600, Wellington, New Zealand, fax: 64-4-4955186, e-mail martha.savage@vuw.ac.nz; K. Gledhill, Institute of Geological and Nuclear Sciences, P.O. Box 1320, Wellington, New Zealand, fax: 64-4-4710977, e-mail: k.gledhill@gns.cri.nz; and Karen Fischer, Department of Geological Sciences, Brown University, Providence, RI 02912, e-mail: karen@emma.geo.brown.edu

S05 Tomography: New Techniques and Applications
This session will focus chiefly on new developments and improvements in tomographic analysis. Many seismic tomography studies now involve more than travel time data and extend to include the use of polarizations, amplitudes, and multi phase information. Algorithms often differ in their ability to invert using different classes of data and in the degree to which they provide insight into the character and errors of the solution. Contributions are invited on tomographic techniques, for studies at all scales, as well as on the application of tomographic techniques.
Conveners: S. Bannister, Institute of Geological and Nuclear Sciences, P.O. Box 1320, Wellington, New Zealand, fax: 64-4-4710977, e-mail: s.bannister@gns.cri.nz; and Malcolm Sambridge, Research School of Earth Sciences, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200, Australia, tel: 61-6-2490339, fax: 61-6-2495443, e-mail: malcolm@rses.anu.edu.au

S06 Poro-elastic Media
The propagation of seismic waves through media that are heterogeneous because of the presence of fluid inclusions has become important in many problems, such as borehole tomography and reservoir modeling. Contributions are sought that address any aspect of this topic, including theoretical methods and applications, on all scales from engineering through resource exploration to deep crustal structure.
Conveners: J. Haines, Institute of Geological and Nuclear Sciences, P.O. Box 1320, Wellington, New Zealand, fax: 64-4-4710977, e-mail: j.haines@gns.cri.nz; and D. Woodward, Institute of Geological and Nuclear Sciences, P.O. Box 1320, Wellington, New Zealand, fax: 64-4-4710977, e-mail: d.woodward@gns.cri.nz

Solar-Planetary Space Physics and Aeronomy

SP01 Helioseismology
The GONG, IRIS, BISON, and TON networks of ground-based helioseismology instruments and the SoHO spacecraft's SOI-MDI, VIRGO, and GOLF experiments will be providing a tremendous injection of new data about the internal structure and dynamics of the Sun. This special session will provide the forum for the discussion of these new results, and for their confrontation with theory.
Conveners: D. Cole, IPS - Radio and Space Services, P.O. Box 1548 Chatswood, NSW 2057, Australia, tel: 61-2-4148334, e-mail: david@ips.oz.au; and J. Leibacher, National Solar Observatory, P.O. Box 26732, Tucson, AZ 85726, tel: 520-318-8305, e-mail: jleibacher@noao.edu

SP02 The Solar Corona and Transition Region
This special session will discuss observations, theoretical studies, and mathematical models of the solar corona and transition region. Results from the Yohkoh mission, which has successfully observed the Sun for the past four years, are particularly relevant for this session, and results from other observations are also welcome. The session will include a range of solar activity problems: flares, active region studies, filament eruptions, as well as quiet Sun phenomena and long-term manifestations of the solar cycle as observed in the corona and transition region.
Conveners: T. Watanabe, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Mitaka, Tokyo, Japan, tel: 81-422-343714, fax: 81-422-343700, e-mail: watanabe@uvlab.mtk.nao.ac.jp; and J. R. Lemen, Lockheed Palo Alto Research Laboratory, Dept 91-30, Bldg 252, 3251 Hanover St., Palo Alto, CA 94304, tel: 415-354-5378, e-mail: lemen@sag.space.lockheed.com

SP03 The SoHO (Solar and Heliospheric Observatory) Mission
This special session examines the scientific objectives and mission status of SoHO, to be launched in late 1995 or early 1996. Papers pertaining to any of the scientific areas to be addressed by SOHO are welcome. Papers discussing the initial results of the mission are particularly solicited.
Conveners: H. V. Cane, Physics Department, University of Tasmania, GPO Box 252C, Hobart, TAS 7001, Australia; tel: 61-02-202 398, fax: 61-02-202410, e-mail: hcane@physvax.phys.utas.edu.au; and R. Howard, NRL, tel: 202-767-3137, e-mail: howard@maple.nrl.navy.mil

SP04 Waves and Instabilities
This session will discuss observational and theoretical studies of plasma waves and instabilities in space plasma environments such as the ionosphere, magnetosphere, magnetotail, boundary layers of the magnetosphere, polar/cusp regions, and the solar wind. Waves and instabilities related to the planetary plasmas are also within the interests of the current session. The frequency range of interest is from ULF/ELF and VLF up to HF or higher. The modes of interest cover both electromagnetic and electrostatic waves and related instabilities. In addition to contributions from recent observations from the ground and spacecraft such as the ISTP fleet, those from theoretical and computer simulation studies on waves and instabilities of linear and nonlinear nature are also encouraged, as are contributions to the application of plasma waves in space plasma environment diagnosis and space weather prediction.
Conveners: Y.D. Hu, Department of Physics, University of Newcastle, Newcastle, NSW 2308, Australia, tel: 61-49-215566, fax: 61-49-216907; e-mail: physpuls2@cc.newcastle.edu.au; and H. Matsumoto, Radio Atmospheric Science Center (RASC), Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto 611, Japan, tel: 81-774-33-2532, fax: 81-774-31-8463, e-mail: matsumot@kurasc.kyoto-u.ac.jp

SP05 Coupling Processes in the Equatorial Atmosphere and Ionosphere
This session will focus on the various coupling processes that are unique to the equatorial atmosphere and ionosphere. Contributions are solicited that deal with observational, theoretical, and modeling studies of interactions in the equatorial atmosphere and ionosphere, including the role played by atmospheric waves, the coupling between dynamics, electrodynamics, radiation and chemistry, the coupling among large and small ionospheric processes, etc. Contributions that deal with coupling processes between phenomena at equatorial and higher latitudes are also encouraged.
Conveners: R.A. Vincent, Department of Physics and Mathematical Physics, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, SA 5005, Australia, tel: 61-8-303-5758, fax: 61-8-303-4380, e-mail: rvincent@physics. adelaide.edu.au; and S. Fukao, Radio Atmospheric Science Center, University of Kyoto, Uji, Kyoto 611, Japan, tel: 81-774-33-5343, fax: 81-774-318463, e-mail: fukao@kurasc.kyoto-u.ac.jp

SP06 Solar Terrestrial Research in Antarctica
This special session will focus on studies of the polar middle and upper atmosphere and magnetosphere performed with measure-ments made in Antarctica. New instruments (e.g., HF radars, imaging riometers, lidars, FPIs) and new facilities (e.g., automatic geophysical observatoriesor AGOs) have greatly expanded the range of phenomena that can be covered from Antarctica, providing for a comprehensive approach to the investigation of the near-Earth plasma environment. Papers on all aspects of Antarctic research, including conjugate ground and satellite coordination, dealing with the wide variety of phenomena that can be classed under the general heading of mesosphere-ionosphere- magnetosphere coupling are encouraged.
Conveners: R. Morris, Antarctic Division, Channel Hwy, Kingston, TAS 7050, Australia, tel: 61-02-323315, fax: 61 02 323 351, e-mail: ray_mor@antdiv.gov.au; and T. Rosenberg, Institute for Physical Science and Technology, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742-2431, tel: 301-405-4895, fax: 301-314-9363, e-mail: rosenberg@uap.umd.edu

SP07 Remote Sensing of Mesosphere, Ionosphere, and Magnetosphere Events
This session is devoted to remote sensing of mesospheric, ionospheric, and magnetospheric processes with primary emphasis on transient and dynamic phenomena varying on timescales of 1 ms to 1 hour. Phenomena such as red sprites, cloud-ionosphere discharge (CID), airglow flash, whistler-induced electron precipitation, auroral intensifications, electric field, convection, and current system dynamics are all appropriate for presentation. High-latitude remote-sensing observations from Antarctica are particularly appropriate for this session, as are observations showing coupling of transient processes between different regions of the atmosphere, ionosphere, and magnetosphere.
Conveners: R.L. Dowden, Physics Department, University of Otago, P.O. Box 56, Dunedin, New Zealand, tel: 64-3-4797752, fax: 64-3-4790964, e-mail: dowden@physics.otago.ac.nz; and R.A. Greenwald, Applied Physics Laboratory, Johns Hopkins University, Johns Hopkins Road, Laurel, MD 20723, tel: 301-953-5408, fax: 301-953-6670, e-mail: ray_greenwald@jhuapl.edu

SP09 Mesosphere-Thermosphere Dynamics
This session will focus on the dynamics of the mesosphere and thermosphere. Contributions are solicited that consider observational, theoretical, and modeling studies of the dynamics of these regions, including the role of atmospheric gravity waves, planetary waves, winds and coupling between the regions and with the ionosphere. Contributions on related properties of the mesosphere and thermosphere are also encouraged.
Conveners: P.L. Dyson, School of Physics, La Trobe University, Bundoora, VIC 3083, Australia, tel: 61-3-94792735, fax: 61-3-94791522, e-mail: p.dyson@latrobe.edu.au; and T.L. Killeen, Space Physics Research Laboratory, University of Michigan, 2455 Hayward Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2143, tel: 313-747-3435, fax: 313-747-3803, e-mail: tkilleen@umich.edu

SP10 Exploration of Inner Solar System
This session will focus on the planets of the inner solar system, including Mars, Venus, and Mercury. Contributions are solicited that deal with the observation and modeling of the atmospheres and solar wind interactions of these planets, or surface and solid planet studies that relate to the formation and/or loss of the atmospheres and their intrinsic magnetic fields, past and present. Papers on plans for new missions addressing these areas are also encouraged.
Conveners: J.G. Luhmann, Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720, tel: 510-642-2545, fax: 510-643-8302, e-mail: jgluhman@sunspot.ssl.berkeley.edu; and K. Tsuruda, ISAS, 3-1-1, Yoshinodai, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 229, Japan, tel: 81-427-513940, fax: 81-427-594236, e-mail: tsuruda@gtl.isas.ac.jp

SP11 Outer Planets and Their Satellites
This session will attempt to bring together our latest understanding of the outer planets and their satellites from the latest findings of the Galileo mission, from the International Jupiter Watch and other ground-based programs, from Hubble Space Telescope observations, and from the Voyager mission. Contributions on all aspects of the outer planets, their interiors, atmospheres, ionospheres, magnetospheres and satellites are solicited, from theory to modeling to observations from Earth and from spacecraft.
Conveners: C.T. Russell, Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1567, tel: 310-825-3188, fax: 310-206-3051, e-mail: ctrussell@igpp.ucla.edu; R.F. Beebe, Astronomy Department, New Mexico State University, P.O. Box 30001, Dept 4500, Las Cruces, NM, 88003, tel: 505-646-1938, fax: 505-646-1602, e-mail: rbeebe@nmsu.edu; and H. Oya, Tohoku University, Geophysical Institute, Sendai 980, Japan, tel: 81-222221800, e-mail: oya@stpp.geophys.tohoku.ac.jp

SP12 Impacts of Comet SL-9 with Jupiter
This session will attempt to bring together the latest estimates of the timing and photometry of the impact events, images and spectra of the plume and impact site evolution, and radio observations of magnetospheric phenomena. Topics to be discussed will therefore include the energetics of the impact events, composition and abundances of impact-related species, and the effects of the impacts on the Jovian magnetosphere.
Conveners: V. Meadows, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109, tel: 818-354-0528, fax: 818-393-4619, e-mail: vsm@frisky.jpl.nasa.gov; and D. Crisp, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena CA 91109, tel: 818-354-2224, fax: 818-393-4619, e-mail: dc@crispy.jpl.nasa.gov

SP13 Deformation of Thick Lithospheres of Earth and Venus
Thick-skinned vs. thin-skinned models for deformation in terrestrial orogenic zones have long sparked geological controversy, and it is now recognized that both mechanisms contribute in important ways. Images of Venus returned from the Magellan mission have revealed folded mountain belts and thrust faulting. Thin-skinned detachments might be absent on Venus owing to lack of water and lack of weak zones in the upper crust, so almost all deformation there could be thick-skinned. Terrestrial examples (some controversial) of thick-skinned tectonics include the Pyrenees, the North American Wind River Thrust, and the Grenville Front in Canada. The basin and arch structure of central Australia, with through going crustal thrust faults, is a well-studied example of thick-skinned tectonics. The formation of thick-skinned fold and thrust regimes can be interpreted in terms of tectonic forces acting on strength-stratified lithospheres, including the response to lateral strength heterogeneities. The purpose of this session is to bring together the results of numerical modeling of thick-skinned deformation with geological and geophysical observations of such deformation, on both Earth and Venus, to better understand the characteristics of the deformation and the conditions under which it may develop. Contributions are invited from those involved in terrestrial field studies and Magellan image/topography interpretations, as well as those concerned with lithospheric deformation modeling.
Conveners: R.J. Phillips, Earth and Planetary Science, Washington University, St. Louis, MO 63130-4899, tel: 314-935-6356, fax: 314-935-7361, e-mail: phillips@wustite.wustl.edu; and M. Zuber, Earth and Planetary Science, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore MD, 21218, tel: 410-516-8241, fax: 410-516-7933, e-mail: zuber@tharsis.gsfc.nasa.gov

Solar-Planetary Space Physics and Aeronomy General Sessions

SP14 Space Physics and Aeronomy
This is a general session covering aspects of solar and heliospheric physics, magnetospheric physics and ionospheric physics, and aeronomy not included in the special sessions. Papers will be grouped on a topic basis. This session will also allow for late breaking research.
Convener: R.L. Dowden, Physics Department, University of Otago, P.O. Box 56, Dunedin, New Zealand, tel: 64-3-4797752, fax: 64-3-4790964, e-mail: dowden@physics.otago.ac.nz

Tectonophysics

T01 Structure and History of the Australia-Pacific Plate Boundary From New Zealand South
The Australian-Pacific plate boundary in the vicinity of New Zealand displays classical characteristics of convergent and strike-slip tectonics. These include an active subduction zone with andesitic volcanism and back arc spreading (Hikurangi Trench and Taupo rift zone), foreland basin formation with thick-skinned thrusting (Taranaki basin), continent-continent convergence with mountain building (Southern Alps), and strike-slip transform (the Alpine Fault) connecting two subduction zones of opposing polarity (Hikurangi and Puyseger trenches). Recent initiatives to study this margin have included an international GPS survey, a joint U.S.-New Zealand geophysical transect of the plate boundary, and two recent marine cruises (Australian-U.S. and French-New Zealand) to explore the offshore basins to the South of New Zealand (Emerald Basin and Solander Trough) and the nature and origin of the Macquarie Ridge Complex. The purpose of the session is to provide a single forum for the international research community working in this region.
Conveners: T. Stern, Research School of Earth Sciences, Victoria University, Wellington, New Zealand, tel: 64-4-472-1000 ext. 8382, fax: 64-4-495-5186, e-mail: tims@tartarus.rses.vuw.ac.nz; and G. Karner, Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, New York, USA, tel: 914-365-8355, fax: 914-365-8165, e-mail: garry@ldeo.columbia.edu

T02 Tectonics of the New Guinea Region
The mountainous island of New Guinea and the adjacent small ocean basins and islands have been a focus of much recent research because the region encapsulates the various forms of interaction between the obliquely convergent Pacific and Australian plates. Facets of the interaction include the development of micro plates and the interaction between those plates, the propagation of sea floor spreading from the Woodlark Basin into the continental crust of southeast Papua, the Finisterre collision and the progressive closure of the Solomon Sea by double subduction, the exhumation of a Late Cretaceous subduction complex that includes a coherent ophiolote complex and a metamorphic suite that grades from zeolite facies to eclogite, extensional tectonism expressed in a 500-km-long detachment fault, and a foreland thrust belt that extends for 1400 kilometers along the southern flank of the main central cordillera.
Conveners: B. Taylor, SOEST, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI 96822, tel: 808-956-6624, fax: 808-956-2538, e-mail: taylor@mano.soest.hawaii.edu; and H. Davies, Department of Geological Sciences, University of Papua New Guinea, Port Moresby, Papua New Guinea, tel: 675-260268-9341, fax: 675-267187, e-mail: 100353.155@compuserve.com

T03 Scientific Retrospective of Ocean Drilling Program Results From the Indo-Pacific (Joint with Ocean Sciences O12)
Results from the Ocean Drilling Program have provided a wealth of information from the Indo-Pacific region regarding: (1) the tectonic and geologic evolution of the ocean basins and continental margins, (2) large igneous provinces, and (3) paleoceanographic and paleoclimatic conditions. This session will focus on recent drilling results from the western Pacific and eastern Indian Oceans and their importance on both regional and global scales.
Conveners: R.J. Arculus, Department of Geology, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200, Australia, tel: 61-6-2492057, fax: 61-6-2495544, e-mail: Richard.Arculus@anu.edu.au; and T. Crawford, Geology Department, University of Tasmania, GPO Box 252C, Hobart, TAS 7000, Australia, fax: 61-02-232547, e-mail: Tony.Crawford@geol. utas.edu.au

T04 Hydrothermal Activity and Its Setting in Marginal Basins of the Western and Southwestern Pacific (Joint with V05)
Recent years have seen a number of successful research cruises focused on modern sea floor hydrothermal activity in back arc basins, intra-arc rifts, and other continental margin environments of the western and southwestern Pacific. This session will draw together new observations and interpretations, including tectonic and volcanological settings as well as hydrothermal processes and their products, which create a knowledge base for assessing equivalent hydrothermal ore environments in sequences ranging back to the earliest Archaean.
Conveners: R. Binns, CSIRO Division of Exploration and Mining, P.O. Box 136, North Ryde, NSW 2113, Australia, tel: 61-2-8878741, fax: 61-2-8878921, e-mail: R.Binns@syd.dem.csiro.au; and K. Crook, HURL-SOEST, University of Hawaii, 1000 Pope Road MSB303-B, Honolulu, HI 96822, fax: 808-956-9772, e-mail: crook@soest.hawaii.edu

T05 Western Pacific Tectonics
This session covers existing and new results for the western Pacific region obtained from conventional and deep-crustal seismic surveys, ocean-bottom and land seismometer networks, ODP site surveys, aeromagnetics, multibeam swath mapping, and gravity and magnetics. We seek a better understanding of the collision tectonics, tectonic structures, geology, plate models, and reconstructions of the fascinating island arcs, marginal basins, and continental margins.
Conveners: C. Lee, Australian Geological Survey Organisation, GPO Box 378, Canberra, ACT 2601, Australia, tel: 61-6-2499439, fax: 61-6-2499980, e-mail: cslee@agso.gov.au; K. Tamaki, Ocean Research Institute, University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan, e-mail: tamaki@ori.u-tokyo.ac.jp, fax: 81-3-5351-6445; and F. Wu, Department of Geological Science, New York State University, Binghamton, NY 13902-6000, fax: 607-777-2288, e-mail: wu@sunquakes.geol.binghamton.edu

T06 Continental and Lithospheric Mechanics
This session will consider conceptual frameworks and constitutive relationships appropriate for the deformation of geological materials in different environments. Suggested areas of focus would be the predictive modeling of complex, interacting systems with time, the need and capability for modeling coupled mechanical-terminal-fluid-flow-chemical systems, and the application of this capacity to the simulation of the evolution of remarkable mineral and petroleum systems.
Convener: Alison Ord, CSIRO Exploration and Mining, P.O. Box 437, Nedlands, WA 6009, Australia, tel: 61-9-3898421, fax: 61-9-3891906, e-mail: a.Ord@ned.dem.csiro.au

TW WORKSHOP: SOPAC Workshop on Southwest Pacific Hydrothermal Activity
This workshop is for participants involved in planning future research cruises concerned with sea floor hydrothermal activity in the western and southwestern Pacific. Topics will include science objectives, coordination, and collaboration. The workshop is run jointly with SOPAC and the Australian Department of Industry, Science, and Technology. (Attendance by invitation only.)
Conveners: R. Binns, CSIRO Division of Exploration and Mining, P.O. Box 136, North Ryde, NSW 2113, Australia, tel: 61-2-8878741, fax: 61-2-8878921, e-mail: R.Binns@syd.dem.csiro.au; and K. Crook, HURL-SOEST, University of Hawaii, 1000 Pope Road MSB303-B, Honolulu, HI 96822, fax: 808-956-9772, e-mail: crook@soest.hawaii.edu

TD DISCUSSION: Manusflux Submersible Cruise to the Manus Basin
A post-cruise discussion for co-chief scientists. (Attendance by invitation only).
Convener: R. Binns, CSIRO Division of Exploration and Mining, P.O. Box 136, North Ryde, NSW 2113, Australia, tel: 61-2-8878741, fax: 61-2-8878921, e-mail: R.Binns@syd.dem.csiro.au

Volcanology, Geochemistry, and Petrology

V01 Living With Large Eruptions: Lessons From Recent Volcanic Events
This decade has seen a sequence of large or prolonged eruptions in the western Pacific, resulting in a need for protracted interaction between volcanologists and civil authorities. Recent events at volcanoes like Pinatubo, Rabaul and Unzen, their prehistorical analogues, and the interface between science and eruption response, are the focus of this session.
Convenor: Chris Stephens, School of Geology, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane Q 4072, Australia, tel: 61-7-3864 2330, fax: 61-7-3864 2324, e-mail: c.stephens@qut.edu.au, and Wally Johnson, Australian Geological Survey Organisation, GPO Box 378, Canberra ACT 2601, Australia, tel: 61-6-249 9377, fax: 61-6-2499983, e-mail: wjohnson@agso.gov.au

V02 Magmatic Volatiles: Timing of Release and Role in Explosive Eruptions
New exciting models for the nucleation and growth of vesicles in magmas over a wide range of viscosity offer explanation for variations in size and style of explosive eruptions. This session focuses on physical, and to a lesser extend chemical, evidence for the role of magmatic gases in pyroclastic eruptions.
Convener: Bruce Houghton, Institute of Geological and Nuclear Sciences, Wairakei Research Centre, Taupo, New Zealand, tel: 64-7-3748211, fax: 64-7-3748199, e-mail: b.houghton@gns.cri.nz

V03 Lava Flow Emplacement Mechanisms
This session will focus on the rates and styles at which lavas of all rheologies and compositions are erupted and transported on the Earth's surface. Determining eruption rates and styles of lava flows of all rheologies is critical for volcanic hazard assessment, and has important implications for understanding global climate. This session provides an opportunity to explore the relationship between eruption rates and flow styles, evidence for thermal and mechanical erosion in lava channels, the relationship between degassing, crystallization, cooling and rheology during eruption and emplacement, and other related topics.
Convener: Katharine Cashman, Department of Geological Sciences, University of Oregon, Eugene, OR 97403-1272, tel: 503-346-4323, fax: 503-346-4692, e-mail: cashman@oregon.uoregon.edu

V04 Andesitic Volcanism and Petrogenesis of Subduction-Related Magmas
Western Pacific volcanism is dominated by the production and eruption of subduction-related magma. This session uses physical and chemical approaches to understanding andesitic petrogenesis and eruption processes.
Convener: Dave Gust, School of Geology, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, QLD, Australia, tel: 61-7-8642324, fax: 61-7-8641535, e-mail: d.gust@qut.edu.au

V05 Hydrothermal Activity and Its Setting in Marginal Basins of the Western and Southwestern Pacific (Joint with Tectonophysics T04)
Recent years have seen a number of successful research cruises focused on modern sea floor hydrothermal activity in back arc basins, intra-arc rifts, and other continental margin environments of the western and southwestern Pacific. This session will draw together new observations and interpretations, including tectonic and volcanological settings as well as hydrothermal processes and their products, which create a knowledge base for assessing equivalent hydrothermal ore environments in sequences ranging back to the earliest Archaean.
Conveners: R. Binns, CSIRO Division of Exploration and Mining, P.O. Box 136, North Ryde, NSW 2113, Australia, tel: 61-2-8878741, fax: 61-2-8878921, e-mail: R.Binns@syd.dem.csiro.au; and K. Crook, HURL-SOEST, University of Hawaii, 1000 Pope Road MSB303-B, Honolulu, HI 96822, fax: 808-956-9772, e-mail: crook@soest. hawaii.edu

V06 Ancient Volcanic Successions: Evolution, Facies Architecture, and Mineralization?
This session focuses on research that applies recent advances in physical volcanology to the study of ancient volcanic successions. Insights into the facies complexity and evolution of volcanic terranes emerging from studies of ancient exhumed volcanic successions are included. The interplay between volcanic processes, volcanic facies architecture, and mineralization in both subaerial and subaqueous settings will be explored.
Conveners: J. McPhie, CODES, University of Tasmania, GPO Box 252C, Hobart, TAS 7001, Australia, tel: 61-02-202472, fax: 61-02-207662, e-mail: J.McPhie@geol.utas.edu.au; and R. Cas, Department of Earth Sciences, Monash University, Clayton, VIC 3168, Australia, tel: 61-3-905 4898, fax: 61-3-9053865, e-mail: rcas@artemis.earth.monash.edu.au

SG2 Symposium: Structure and Dynamics of the Australian Lithosphere
(Organized by the Specialist Group on Solid-Earth Geophysics, Geological Society of Australia) The objectives of this symposium are (1) to review our knowledge of geological processes in the system formed by the Australian lithospheric plate, its boundaries, and the underlying mantle, (2) to make a comparison with the structure and dynamics of continental lithosphere elsewhere, and, in particular, (3) to identify outstanding problems in lithospheric studies. An explicitly multi disciplinary program is envisaged with active interaction between earth scientists from different specializations. To achieve this, keynote speakers will provide an overview of a wide range of issues pertinent to continental lithosphere in general and to the Australian continent in particular. All participants are encouraged to discuss in their presentations the uncertainties in results and to formulate the information required from other disciplines to improve interpretation or further modeling. The keynote addresses will introduce partly overlapping central themes that are used to focus contributions from the different fields and to promote interaction. Information about this symposium can be found on the World Wide Web at: http://www.rses.anu.edu.au (under either Seismology or Geodynamics). Address general enquiries to Jean Braun or Rob van der Hilst; enquiries about specific sessions should be addressed to session conveners (addresses given below).

SG2.00 Large Scale Structure of Continental Lithosphere
Even though the Australian continent will be central in the discussions, this session will address several general aspects of continental lithosphere and mantle. Contributions are invited addressing such questions as the following. What is the crust-mantle (Moho) interface (petrological, seismological) and its evolution through time? What controls lateral variations in the depth to the Moho and the "sharpness" of this interface? How thick is the lithosphere? What are the major tectonic units constituting the Australian continent? Is there evidence for an Australian tectosphere? What is the nature, origin, and importance of greenstone belts? How do paleosuture zones in Australia compare to similar structure and mineral deposits?
Conveners: Bruce Goleby, Australian Geological Survey Organization, Canberra, ACT 2601, Australia, tel: 61-6-2499404, e-mail: bgoleby@agso.gov.au; and Rob van der Hilst, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, e-mail: rvdh@MIT.edu or rob@rses.anu.edu.au

SG2.02 Archean and Proterozoic Evolution of the Australian Cratons
This session addresses the processes responsible for the deformation of the Australian continental lithosphere, with an emphasis on the partitioning between in-plate forces originating along plate boundaries, local forces originating from lithosphere-mantle interactions, and local forces originating from within the lithosphere, and seeks answers to questions such as the following. How did the Australian lithosphere evolve from the Archean nucleus to its present-day state? What is the relationship between upper mantle structures and processes and past and present crustal fabrics? How was the Australian continent affected by the Rodinia-Gondwana transition? What is the importance of continental deformation of rheological layering, thermo-mechanical coupling, and variations in tectonic rates? What is the relationship between deformation and fluid flow in the lithosphere? What is the relationship between crustal deformation and the formation of mineral deposits?
Convener: Jean Braun, Research School of Earth Sciences, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200, Australia, tel: 61-6-2495512, fax: 61-6-2495443, e-mail: Jean.Braun@anu.edu.au

SG2.03 Phanerozoic History of Eastern Australia and Surrounding Plate Boundaries
This session reviews plate tectonic models of, for instance, the accretion of eastern Australian, the subsequent eastward migration of the eastern plate boundary and associated basin formation (the Eromanga-Carpentaria-Surat basin system, Coral and Tasman seas, Fiji basin), and the transition from passive to active margin in the New Guinea Orogen/Banda arc system. We aim to refine the geochronology of processes by constraints on positions through time from paleomagnetic data and the analysis of magmatic activity. The session includes three-dimensional structure of the Australasian upper mantle from seismic imaging and the modeling of the subduction process and discusses the role of a tectosphere in the evolution of mantle structure beneath, or as part of, a northward moving Australian plate.
Conveners: Rob van der Hilst, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, e-mail: rvdh@MIT.edu or rob@rses.anu.edu.au; and Chris Klootwijk, Australian Geological Survey Organization, Canberra, ACT 2601, Australia, tel: 61-6-2499324, fax: 61-6-2499986, e-mail: cklootwi@agso.gov.au

SEDI Fifth International Symposium

The fifth SEDI Symposium is being held as part of the 1996 Western Pacific Geophysics Meeting. Abstracts should be submitted to AGU, following the instructions in this issue of Eos. A copy of each abstract should also be sent to the SEDI symposium program chair: K. Lambeck, RSES, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200, Australia, fax: 61-6-249-5443 e-mail: Chair.SEDI@anu.edu.au. For abstracts submitted to session SD01.2 an additional copy should be sent to O. L. Anderson (address below). As for other WPGM abstracts the deadline is March 15, 1996. Enquiries about the SEDI program may be addressed to K. Lambeck, as above; inquiries about specific sessions should be addressed to session chairs listed below.

SD01.1 High-Pressure Properties of Silicates, Oxides, and the Deep Mantle
Knowledge of the properties of high-pressure phases, especially silicate perovskite and magnesiowustite, is needed for an understanding of the lower mantle. Experimental and theoretical papers on thermoelasticity, thermal and electrical conductivity, and their variations with composition and pressure are especially solicited. Reports on evidence of lower mantle composition, the presence of minor elements and phases and their influence on observed properties are also sought.
Convener: I.N.S. Jackson, RSES, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200, Australia, fax: 61-6-249-0738, e-mail: Ian.Jackson@anu.edu.au

SD01.2 Phases and Properties of Iron and the Core
We may be approaching an unambiguous high-pressure phase diagram of iron, but it is certainly more complicated than was envisaged until recently. To understand the core, we need to know the phase(s) of solid iron at several megabars pressure, the effect of impurities on it, and the nature and properties of liquid iron in equilibrium with the various solid phases. Especially important are melting point, its depression by impurities, and also electrical conductivity.
Conveners: Orson L. Anderson, Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA 90024, fax: 310-206-3051; and Surendra Saxena, Department Mineralogy and Petrology, University of Uppsala, POB 555, Uppsala, S-75122, Sweden, tel: 46-18-2559, fax: 46-18-182591

SD02.1 Seismology: Structure of the Core and Lower Mantle, Especially D" and the Transition Zone
Heterogeneity of the mantle at all levels is believed to be closely linked to the Earth's tectonic history and current activity. The nature of D", the core-mantle boundary, and the transition zone are particular targets of this session, but evidence of either thermal or compositional variations will be welcomed.
Convener: B.L.N. Kennett, RSES, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200, Australia, fax: 61-6-257-2737, e-mail: Brian@rses.anu.edu.au

SD02.2 Seismology: Anisotropy and Attenuation in the Lower Mantle and Core
Attenuation of seismic waves appears stronger in D" and in the outer layers of the inner core than in adjacent regions. Is the attenuation laterally variable and is it explained as a temperature effect? Anisotropy in the inner core is now well accepted and must be interpreted in terms of the process of inner core formation. Anisotropy in D" is also reported. Is this evidence of flow in a hot, soft layer? This session will concentrate on seismic evidence of these effects.
Convener: B.L.N. Kennett, RSES, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200, Australia, fax: 61-6-257-2737, e-mail: Brian@rses.anu.edu.au

SD03.1 The Dynamo: Theoretical and Numerical Advances and Observational Constraints
Reports of theoretical, numerical and model studies of dynamo action are invited. Studies of turbulence, anisotropy of eddy viscosity, thermodynamics of the power source and other physics bearing directly on the dynamo mechanism are also sought.
Convener: D. Ivers, School of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Sydney, F07, Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia, fax: 61-6-692-4534, e-mail: ivers_d@maths.su.oz.au

SD03.2 Mantle Influences on Dynamo Behavior
The characteristic time scale for changes in the frequency of geomagnetic reversals is of the order of 108 years and points to control by the mantle, since this is the time scale for changes in mantle flow, more than 105 times slower than core flow. The evidence is derived entirely from palaeomagnetism. Contributions are also invited on possible mechanisms and related changes in mantle behavior or properties.
Convener: P. McFadden, Australian Geological Survey Organizaton, GPO Box 378, Canberra, ACT 2601, Australia, fax: 61-6-249-9986, e-mail: pmcfadde@agso.gov.au

SD04.1 Geodesy: Mantle Viscosity, Core Ellipticity, and Related Problems
A number of geophysical, geodetic, and geological observations provide constraints on the viscosity of the mantle. The session will emphasize information on the deeper layers, recognizing that results for the upper and lower layers are closely linked. The session will also address the issue of the departure of the core ellipticity from its equilibrium value; any new geodetic evidence or explanations will be particularly welcomed.
Convener: K. Lambeck, RSES, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200, Australia, fax: 61-6-249-5443, e-mail: chair.SEDI@anu.edu.au

SD05.1 Mantle Convection, Depth of Subduction, and the Source(s) of Plumes
There are two obvious driving mechanisms for mantle convection: the sources of buoyancy, positive or negative at the upper and lower boundaries. Slab subduction from the upper boundary is well documented, but the ultimate fate of the lithospheric slabs is not. Similarly the core-mantle boundary must be a source of heat, but are surface hot spots direct expressions of plumes driven by core heat? What influence does the transition zone have on these processes? Papers on these and similar fundamental questions on mantle convection are invited.
Convener: G. Houseman, Department of Earth Sciences, Monash University, Clayton, VIC 3168, Australia, fax: 61-3-99054903, e-mail: greg@artemis.earth.monash.edu.au

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