2002 WPGM 2002 Western Pacific Geophysics Meeting
Wellington Convention Centre
Wellington, New Zealand
9-12 July 2002

(Tuesday through Friday)
   AGU  AIP  GSNZ  GNS  ILP  MSNZ  NIWA  
  NZGS  NZHS  NZMSS  RSNZ  VUW


Introduction: First Time Held in New Zealand!

This meeting is intended to serve the needs of geophysicists interested instudies in the western Pacific region, but papers on all related aspects ofgeophysical sciences are encouraged. The meeting will be organized similar toAGU's annual meetings held in the United States.

The Western Pacific Geophysics Meeting is open to geophysicists worldwidewithout regard to nationality of society membership. You should not miss thisunique opportunity to gather with your colleagues — for the first time in NewZealand.

The meeting venue for the 2002 WPGM will be the Wellington Convention Centre,in Wellington, New Zealand.


Sponsors

American Geophysical Union (AGU) is an international scientific society of 39,000 members, more than thirty percent of whom come from outside the U.S. As a society AGU is dedicated to advancing the understanding of Earth and its environment in space and making results available to the public.

Australian Institute of Physics

Geological Society of New Zealand

Institute of Geological and Nuclear Sciences

International Lithosphere Program

Meteorological Society of New Zealand

National Institute for Water and Atmospheric Research

New Zealand Geophysical Society

New Zealand Hydrological Society

New Zealand Marine Sciences Society

Royal Society of New Zealand

Victoria University of Wellington


Meeting Themes

The following themes have been chosen for the meeting. These are not intended to restrict the range of sessions or papers to be presented at the meeting. However, you may wish to categorize the session proposal under one of these themes.

Rheology and Deformation Along Major Plate Boundaries
Recent seismograph, GPS, and strainmeter networks from around the Pacific Rim are providing new data that bear on strain and rheology of rocks at all levels of the crust and upper mantle. Studies of seismic anisotropy are providing information on finite strain and the rock mechanics of the mantle, while GPS and strain networks are catching aseismic strain events that may or may not be the forerunner to larger seismic events. Active and passive source seismic experiments have provided images of fault zones and crustal roots in collision zones, while electrical methods have imaged high conductivity regions indicating the presence of fluids at depth. Geological field studies show evidence of past strain environments and numerical models of deformation show that rheological variations are a key factor in tectonic style. All these studies, and others, provide clues to how the earth deforms in plate boundary zones, and thus contribute to the more general topic of rheology.
Climate Variability and Change and Implications for the Antarctic and Pacific
Recent interest in assessing and attributing long-term trends in global climate has coincided with increased attention to the natural variability of aspects of regional climate on timescales from years to decades. The Pacific region has been a particular focus of many relevant studies, and recent years have seen the emergence of such issues as the long-period modulation of the El Nino/Southern Oscillation phenomenon, and the possibility of a distinct quasi- decadal oscillation focused in the extratropical North Pacific and affecting the whole Pacific basin. Of particular concern for many South Pacific nations are relationships between long-term variations/trends in climate and sea level variations, as many low- lying island states face the possibility of inundation during this century as a result of expected sea-level rises. There has been considerable effort in recent years to understand the global carbon cycle and to link physical climate and biological/biosphere variability. This has led to advances in our understanding of how primary productivity is controlled in the southern oceans, relationships between biological processes in the ocean and dimethyl sulfide production (and consequent atmospheric optical properties), and in how various fish stocks respond to climate variability and change. Special Sessions are sought relating to this theme, covering all aspects of observational, modeling, theoretical and predictive studies of the general climate system. In particular, sessions are sought that focus on the South Pacific, southern oceans and Antarctica, and/or that bring together aspects of research in atmosphere and ocean circulation, biological systems, and risk/hazard management.
Space Weather - Impacts and Prediction
Solar terrestrial physics research continues to improve our knowledge of the physical processes by which solar events lead ultimately to changes in the Earth's immediate environment, described collectively as Space Weather. The application of this knowledge to the development of reliable space weather forecasting techniques is essential for the reliable operation of space-related technologies. Hemispherical and regional differences can be expected in space weather effects due, for example, to the asymmetry of the Earth's magnetic field. Effects in the southern Pacific region can be quite different to other regions of the globe due to differences in ionospheric behaviour. Special Sessions under this theme are sought describing observations, modeling, forecasting and prediction methods relevant to Space Weather in general, but in the southern Pacific region (including Antarctica) in particular.
Cities on Active Faults
Many cities around the Pacific rim are vulnerable to large earthquakes. Wellington's position above a subduction zone, and on a network of strike slip faults makes the theme particularly appropriate for this conference. There will be an associated field trip looking at examples of active faults within the Wellington urban area, and the way that local government is attempting to manage these hazards. Current research is aiming to to understand the risks associated with living close to active faults: paleoseismicity, geodetic and seismic monitoring, probabilistic seismic hazard assessment, seismic wave modeling, microzoning, development of building and planning codes, and seismic design and construction, all contribute to an improved understanding of the hazard, risk, and potential effects of major fault rupture. Special sessions are sought to bring together some or all of these disciplines, and the participation of end-users such as emergency managers, city planners, economists, engineers, and the insurance industry is encouraged.

Social Activities

Ice Breaker

Monday, 8 July 2002
5:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m.
Wellington Convention Centre
An ice-breaker with drinks and snacks will take place during registration. This event is free although a ticket is required to attend. Please indicate your attendance on the registration form.

Parliamentary Reception

Tuesday, 9 July 2002
6:00 p.m. to 7:30 p.m.
Banquet Hall of the New Zealand Parliament
The Western Pacific Geophysics Meeting has been honoured with an invitation to a Parliamentary Reception in the Banquet Hall of the New Zealand Parliament. The Parliament buildings are a 15-minute walk from the Wellington Convention Centre. Transportation will be provided from the Conference Centre in the event of inclement weather. Attendance is limited to the first 450 people.
$ US $16.00 per person (ticketed event)

Conference Dinner

Wednesday, 10 July 2002
7:00 p.m. to 11:00 p.m.
Te Papa Tongarewa
Tickets must be purchased with registration. The dinner will take place at the Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa (known as Te Papa), on Wednesday evening, 10 July from 6:30 p.m. to 11:00 p.m. The museum houses a number of attractions ranging from Earth sciences to Maori and Pacific cultures, from art galleries to exciting rides, and will be fully open throughout the evening. The format of the dinner will allow you to visit all parts of the museum and enjoy a variety of activities and entertainment.
$ US $28 per person (ticketed event)

Wine Tasting

Thursday, 11 July 2002
6:30 p.m. - 8:00 p.m
Duxton Hotel
Tickets must be purchased with registration to attend this event. Please book and pay for a wine tasting ticket along with registration. Attendance is limited to the first 140 people who register for this event.

Enjoy the flavours of a selection of New Zealand wines, including some that have achieved international reputations. This tutored session will be held at the Duxton Hotel, across the road from the Wellington Convention Centre.
$ US $17.50 per person (ticketed event)

Field Trips and Tours

Print Version
Top of Page

Geological Field Trips

Wellington Fault Geological Field Trip (M)

Monday, 8 July 2002
4 hours
The trip will include: fault rupture evidence; faulted terraces(repeat motion along the fault); building across a major fault; problems with existing developments on or near the fault; other hazards and hazard mitigation in the Wellington region; and a scenic overview of Wellington topography, geology, and cityscape
$ US $25 per person (ticketed event)

Wellington Fault Geological Field Trip (S)

Saturday, 13 July 2002
4 hours
The trip will include: fault rupture evidence; faulted terraces(repeat motion along the fault); building across a major fault; problems with existing developments on or near the fault; other hazards and hazard mitigation in the Wellington region; and a scenic overview of Wellington.
$ US $25 per person (ticketed event)

Uplifted Beach Terraces, Turakirae Head, Geological Field Trip (M)

Monday, 8 July 2002
4 hours
In 1855, rupture of the Wairarapa fault caused up to 6.4 m of uplift at Turakirae Head on the south coast of the North Island. This half-day field trip looks at evidence of the uplift and of earlier faulting episodes and associated fossil beaches. A short stop in Wainuiomata is also included, to discuss propagation of seismic waves through soft alluvial fill in a basin.
The cost is US $ 25 per person (ticketed event)

Uplifted Beach Terraces, Turakirae Head, Geological Field Trip (S)

Saturday, 13 July 2002
4 hours
In 1855, rupture of the Wairarapa fault caused up to 6.4 m of uplift at Turakirae Head on the south coast of the North Island. This half-day field trip looks at evidence of the uplift and of earlier faulting episodes and associated fossil beaches. A short stop in Wainuiomata is also included, to discuss propagation of seismic waves through soft alluvial fill in a basin. The cost is US $ 25 per person (ticketed event)
Top of Page

Accompanying Persons Tours

Accompanying persons must register for the meeting in order to participate in any of these programs. Daily refreshments and a meeting bag will be provided to all registered accompanying persons.

Maori Insight Tour

Tuesday, 9 July 2002
12:00 noon - 3:30 p.m.
The Maori Treasures Art Complex is located just 20 minutes from central Wellington in a living Maori Tribal Settlement. On this tour you can participate in a Maori welcome ceremony and be personally guided through the creative studios of a family of renowned Maori artists. There are hands-on activities and demonstrations, and you will create a memento to take home with you. The tour departs from the Wellington Convention Centre at 12 noon and returns at 3:30 pm. The cost is US $36 per person and includes lunch. This tour is limited to 11 people.
For additional information, see www.maoritreasures.com
$ US $36 per person (ticketed event)

Wellington City Bus Tour

Tuesday, 9 July 2002
2:00 p.m. - 4:00 p.m.
Take in the highlights of Wellington city, harbour, and bays in a deluxe coach. The tour departs from the Wellington Convention Centre at 2:00 p.m. and returns at 4:30 p.m. The cost is US $11 per person. This tour is limited to 28 people.
$ US $11 per person (ticketed event)

Wairarapa Experience

Wednesday, 10 July 2002
8:30 a.m. - 5:30 p.m.
Enjoy a deluxe coach trip over the Rimutaka Mountains to the scenic Wairarapa region, renowned for its boutique wineries and relaxed lifestyle. Tour the Paua Shell Factory in Carterton and see live displays of paua, New Zealand's abalone shellfish. Continue on to Mount Bruce National Wildlife Centre, New Zealand's showcase centre for captive breeding of threatened species. After lunch, visitors can go for an easy guided walk in the lush primeval rain forest and view the natural bush aviaries. See the Kiwi, New Zealand's national bird, in the nocturnal house and read the extensive displays. On the way back to Wellington, you will call in to the Gladstone Vineyard for a tour and tasting of their award-winning Sauvignon Blanc, Riesling, and Cabernet Sauvignon wines. With an idyllic setting, Gladstone estate is one of New Zealand's most beautiful vineyards. The tour departs from the Wellington Convention Centre at 8:30 a.m. and returns at 5:30 p.m. The cost US $38 per person.
For additional information, see these web sites: wairarapa.co.nz/tourism/carterton3.html; www.mtbruce.doc.govt.nz; www.gladstone.co.nz.
$ US $38 per person (ticketed event)

Scenic Kapiti Coast

Wednesday, 10 July 2002
9:00 a.m. - 1:00 p.m.
The Kapiti Coast, northern gateway to Wellington, enjoys a reputation as the sunshine coast and recreational playground of the lower North Island. Visit the top attractions of this area, including the Southward Car Museum, the most comprehensive privately owned collection of veteran and vintage cars in the Southern Hemisphere. Enjoy award-winning ice cream and cheeses made on the premises at the Lindale Tourist and Agricultural Centre. The tour departs from the Wellington Convention Centre at 9:00 a.m. and returns at 1:00 p.m. The cost is US $23 per person. This tour is limited to 28 people.
$ US $23 per person (ticketed event)

Kapiti Island Adventure

Thursday, 11 July 2002
8:00 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.
Kapiti Island is home to an internationally famed nature reserve protecting some of the world's rarest and most endangered birds. Enjoy a guided tour or trek to the top of the island for spectacular views. A 5-km boat ride from the mainland, Kapiti Island is not to be missed. The tour departs from the Wellington Convention Centre at 8:00 a.m. and returns at 4:30 p.m. The cost is US $42 and includes lunch. This tour is limited to 30 people.
$ US $42 per person (ticketed event)

Wellington Wilderness

Thursday, 11 July 2002
12 noon - 4:00 p.m.
Enjoy a relaxed lunch at The Skyline Restaurant and experience panoramic views of Wellington City. Then board a deluxe coach to the Karori Wildlife Sanctuary, a secret valley only 2 km from the city centre. The tour departs from the Wellington Convention Centre at 12 noon and returns at 4:00 p.m. The cost is US $25 and includes lunch. This tour is limited to 40 people.
$ US $25 per person (ticketed event)

Maori Insight Tour

Thursday, 11 July 2002
12 noon - 3:30 p.m.
The Maori Treasures Art Complex is located just 20 minutes from central Wellington in a living Maori Tribal Settlement. On this tour you can participate in a Maori welcome ceremony and be personally guided through the creative studios of a family of renowned Maori artists. There are hands-on activities and demonstrations, and you will create a memento to take home with you. The tour departs from the Wellington Convention Centre at 12 noon and returns at 3:30 pm. The cost is US $36 per person and includes lunch. This tour is limited to 11 people. For additional information, see www.maoritreasures.com
$ US $36 per person (ticketed event)

Pencarrow - Southern Wilderness Tour

Friday, 12 July 2002
9:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.
Guarding the eastern entrance to Wellington Harbour and set atop high sea cliffs lies Pencarrow Station. One of New Zealand's first sheep stations, this 2000-acre farm is in a spectacular natural setting. Travel right around scenic Wellington Harbour to the station, where New Zealand's oldest lighthouse is also located. You will have a guided tour of the farm, followed by a farm style morning tea at the Lodge. Hear stories about the region and enjoy the spectacular ocean views. Optional golf, clay bird shooting, petanque, and sheep mustering are available at a small extra charge.
The tour departs from the Wellington Convention Centre at 9:00 a.m. and returns at 12:30 p.m. The cost is US $15 per person and includes morning tea. A minimum of 40 people is required.
For additional information, see www.pencarrowlodge.co.nz
$ US $15 per person (ticketed event)
Top of Page

Pre and Post Meeting Tours-North Island

Long-haul flights enter and leave New Zealand through international airports in Auckland and Christchurch,usually early in the morning. As an alternative to short internal flights to and from the conference venue in Wellington, we have arranged bus tours with two overnight stops: North Island tour for those using the Auckland airport, with stops at the resorts of Rotorua and Ruapehu on the volcanic plateau, where there is much to see, and South Island tour for those using Christchurch airport, with stops at the resorts of Franz Josef and Punakaiki on the west coast, where there is also much to see. If enough people apply, there will be North and South Island premeeting and postmeeting tours.

In addition to the many conventionally documented tourist sights along the tour routes, there will be information and copies of papers about scientific aspects of sites along the way likely to be of interest to AGU conference attendees. The following notes outline some of those aspects. Those interested in attending a tour must email their intent to particate on which tour, by 30 March 2002 to Martez Taylor, AGU Meetings Department, mtaylor@agu.org. The more people that attend the field trip the less expensive the per-person cost will be. Group pricing is available under each field trip based on the number of people. Once preliminary reservations are received, you will be contacted about the cost for the field trip. Payment in full is required not later than 25 April 2002.

North Island

option 1: Saturday, 6 July through Monday, 8 July
option 2: Saturday, 13 July through Monday 15 July

Visits will be made to the following:

Top of Page

Pre and Post Meeting Tours-South Island

Long-haul flights enter and leave New Zealand through international airports in Auckland and Christchurch,usually early in the morning. As an alternative to short internal flights to and from the conference venue in Wellington, we have arranged bus tours with two overnight stops: North Island tour for those using the Auckland airport, with stops at the resorts of Rotorua and Ruapehu on the volcanic plateau, where there is much to see, and South Island tour for those using Christchurch airport, with stops at the resorts of Franz Josef and Punakaiki on the west coast, where there is also much to see. If enough people apply, there will be North and South Island premeeting and postmeeting tours.

In addition to the many conventionally documented tourist sights along the tour routes, there will be information and copies of papers about scientific aspects of sites along the way likely to be of interest to AGU conference attendees. The following notes outline some of those aspects.

Those interested in attending a tour must email their intent to particate on which tour, by 30 March 2002 to Martez Taylor, AGU Meetings Department, mtaylor@agu.org. The more people that attend the field trip the less expensive the per-person cost will be. Group pricing is available under each field trip based on the number of people. Once preliminary reservations are received, you will be contacted about the cost for the field trip. Payment in full is required not later than 25 April 2002.

South Island Tour

option 1: Saturday, 6 July through Monday, 8 July
option 2: Saturday, 13 July through Monday 15 July

Visits will be made to the following:

The Waitangitoana River flowed north after crossing the fault until 1967, when it changed course to flow west. It now flows into Lake Wahapo, formed when ice melted 20,000 years ago. This lake has survived with a small catchment but will now be filled with sediment in 100 years. In 1982 degradation in the captured river caused the spectacular failure of a highway bridge.

This region is too far south for extratropical cyclones to cause the largest floods, and the standard procedures for estimating the “probable maximum precipitation” in river basins upstream of dams and developed riparian land are poorly developed for any other kind of flood. The atmospheric processes that cause heavy rain have been studied using instrumented aircraft and vertically pointed weather radar, deployed during storms.


Program Committee

Chair and Union (U), Geodesy (G)

John R. Beavan
Institute of Geological and Nuclear Sciences
P.O. Box 30-368
Lower Hutt 6009
NEW ZEALAND
e-mail: j.beavan@gns.cri.nz

Atmospheric Sciences (AS)

James A. Renwick
NIWA Greta Point
P.O. Box 14901
Wellington 6003
NEW ZEALAND
e-mail: j.renwick@niwa.cri.nz

Kevin P. Hamilton
University of Hawaii
International Pacific Research Center
SOEST
Post Building 401
Honolulu, HI 96822
e-mail: kph@soest.hawaii.edu

Biogeosciences (B)

Submit your proposals to A, H, or OS sections.

Hydrology (H)

Ross A. Woods
NIWA
Box 8602
Christchurch
NEW ZEALAND
e-mail: r.woods@niwa.cri.nz

Ocean Sciences (OS)

Scott A. Condie
CSIRO Marine Laboratories
GPO Box 1538
Hobart, TAS 7001
AUSTRALIA
e-mail: Scott.Condie@marine.csiro.au

Sang-Mook Lee
Korea Ocean Research and Development Institute
Deepsea Research Center
Ansan P.O. Box 29
Seoul 425-600
KOREA
e-mail: smlee@kordi.re.kr

Seismology (S)

Donna Eberhart-Phillips
Institute of Geological Nuclear
Private Bag 1930
Dunedin 9020
NEW ZEALAND
e-mail: d.eberhart@gns.cri.nz

Cheng-Horng Lin
Academia Sinica
Institute of Earth Science
POB 1-55 Nankang
Taipei, TAIWAN
e-mail: lin@earth.sinica.edu.tw

Space Physics and Aeronomy (SPA), Planetary Sciences (P)

Peter L. Dyson
LaTrobe University
Department of Physics
Room 403, PS1 Building
Bundoora, VIC 3083
AUSTRALIA
e-mail: p.dyson@latrobe.edu.au

Tectonophysics (T), Geomagnetism and Paleomagnetism (GP)

Tim A. Stern
Victoria University of Wellington
School of Earth Sciences
P.O. Box 600
Wellington, NEW ZEALAND
e-mail: tim.stern@vuw.ac.nz

Masanori Matsui
Himeji Institute of Technology
Faculty of Science
3-2-1 Kouto
Kamigochiro Akogun, HY 678-1297
JAPAN
e-mail: m.matsui@sci.himeji-tech.ac.jp

Volcanology, Geochemistry and Petrology (V)

James D. L. White
Otago University
Geology Department
P.O. Box 56
Dunedin 90015
NEW ZEALAND
e-mail: James.white@stonebow.otago.ac.nz

Young Kwan Sohn
Seoul National University
Department of Oceanography
Seoul 425-600
KOREA
e-mail: yksohn@nongae.gsnu.ac.kr


For Additional Information

CONTACT:

AGU Meetings Department
2002 Western Pacific Geophysics Meeting
2000 Florida Avenue, NW
Washington, DC 20009
Phone:+1-202-462-6900 (in D.C. or outside North America) or
+1-800-966-2481 (toll-free in North America)
Fax: +1-202-328-0566
E-Mail: wp-help@agu.org



Return to AGU Meetings
Back to AGU Home Page