2000 Spring Meeting

Special Sessions

Union (U)
Atmospheric Sciences (A)
Biogeosciences (B)
Education (ED)
Geodesy (G)
Geomagnetism and Paleomagnetism (GP)
Geochemical Society (GS)
Hydrology (H)
Mineralogical Society of America (MSA)
Ocean Sciences (OS)
Planetary Sciences (P)
Public Policy (PP)
Seismology (S)
Space Physics and Aeronomy (SPA)
SPA: Aeronomy (SA)
SPA: Solar and Heliospheric Physics (SH)
SPA: Magnetospheric Physics (SM)
Tectonophysics (T)
Volcanology, Geochemistry, and Petrology (V)

American Water Resource Association (AWRA)
Geological Society of America (GSA)
National Association of Geoscience Teachers (NAGT)
The Society for Sedimentary Geology (SEPM)
The Oceanography Society (TOS)



 

Union (U)

U01 Earth Sciences in the Cities
Today nearly half of Earth's five billion people live in cities, and projected trends indicate a rise to five out of eight billion by the year 2025. All cities become increasingly coupled with, and vulnerable to, their environment as they grow. For cities to be safe and sustainable we must be aware of the inter-relationships between natural processes and the urban environment, effects on the population, and-in turn-the effects of population on the environment. Many of these problems must be addressed via the geosciences, and researchers should be aware that the results of their work are important to solving urban problems. The sciences represented in at least seven of the ten sections that comprise the AGU can be applied to the urban problems of natural hazards and/or environmental sustainability. The symposium will highlight current contributions of the geosciences to the urban issues of disaster mitigation, environmental degradation, and planning and we seek contributions from the atmospheric sciences, hydrology, geodesy, ocean sciences, tectonophysics, seismology, and volcanology. The format will include invited and submitted talks, and a poster session for those contributions having numerous maps and diagrams.
Conveners: Grant Heiken, Los Alamos National Laboratory, MS F665, Los Alamos, NM 87545 USA, Tel: +1-505-667-8477, Fax: +1-505-665-3687, E-mail: heiken@lanl.gov (representing the International Union of Geodesy and Geophysics "Geosciences in the Cities Committee); Robert Fakundiny, New York State Geological Survey, CEC 3140, Empire State Plaza, Albany, NY 12230 USA, Tel: +1-518-474-5816, E-mail: rfakundi@mail.nysed.gov

U02 The Integrated Carbon Cycle
Improved understanding of the carbon cycle requires the integration of findings from many scientific disciplines and diverse investigative approaches applied to a broad range of spatial and temporal scales. This Union Session will present the results of coordinated studies of important terrestrial and oceanic sources and sinks of atmospheric carbon dioxide. Papers will be presented that illustrate the integration needed to test the hypotheses that: 1) there is a large terrestrial sink for anthropogenic CO2 in the Northern Hemisphere; and 2) the oceanic inventory of anthropogenic CO2 will continue to increase in response to rising atmospheric CO2 concentrations, but the rate of increase will be modulated by changes in ocean circulation, biology, and chemistry. Prospects for further advances in understanding the carbon cycle in the next few years will be discussed.
Conveners: Jorge Sarmiento, Princeton University, E-mail: jls@splash.Princeton.edu; Steve Wofsy, Harvard University, E-mail: scw@sol.harvard. edu; and Eric Sundquist, U.S. Geological Survey, E-mail: esundqui@nobska.er.usgs.gov

U03 The Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty: Issues of Verification and Monitoring
Shortly before the vote on the CTBT in October, 1999 AGU released a statement jointly written with the Seismological Society of America on the verifiability of the CTBT. During the brief Senate debate it was repeatedly stated that the Treaty was not verifiable, which is not consonant with the AGU/SSA statement. This Union session will revisit the issues of verifiability, and will consist of invited and submitted presentations by geophysicists, physicists, and others involved in nuclear weapons arms control that will focus on verification and monitoring but also include talks that put the technical issues into a more complete policy context, such as the reliability of U.S. nuclear weapons under a CTBT.
Conveners: Lynn R. Sykes, Columbia University, Tel: +1-914-359-8880, E-mail: sykes@ ldeo.columbia.edu; Terry C. Wallace, University of Arizona, Tel: +1-520-621-4849, E-mail: wallace@geo.arizona.edu; and Greg van der Vink, IRIS, Tel: +1-202-682-2220, E-mail: gvdv@iris.edu

U04 Ice Cores: Glaciology and Environmental Change
Variations in the physical, chemical, and isotopic content through layered snow and ice can provide substantial insight into past environmental conditions and climate variability. Retrieval and analysis of these signals have also led to significant advances in understanding the role of the cryosphere in global climate. In this session, we encourage submission of studies that pursue understanding of dynamic glaciologic problems as well as detectable natural and anthropogenic changes in climate conditions. We encourage submissions that link these studies to glaciologic modeling, oceanography, hydrology, and atmospheric science as this will facilitate the development of a broad earth system context. The spring meeting offers a new venue for this area of research that will facilitate rapid dissemination of recent activities in Antarctica such as US ITASE. Both oral and poster presentations are welcome.
Conveners: Christopher A. Shuman, Earth System Science Interdisciplinary Center, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742- 2424 USA, Tel: +1-301-405-8291, Fax: +1-301-405-8468, E-mail: shuman@buggam. umd.edu; Eric J. Steig, Department of Earth and Environmental Science, University of Pennsylvania, 251 Hayden Hall, 240 S. 33rd St., Philadelphia, PA 19104-6316 USA, Tel: +1-215-573-5978, Fax: +1-215-898-0964, E-mail: esteig@sas.upenn. edu; and James W. C. White, INSTAAR, University of Colorado, Campus Box 450, Boulder, CO 80309 USA, Tel: +1-303-492-5494, E-mail: james.white@ colorado.edu

U05 Life on Earth: Formation, Development, and Persistence
The conditions under which life first formed on the planet would be considered extremely hostile to most present forms of life. This session will explore the mechanisms potentially responsible for the formation of the first living organisms and ecosystems, as well as the ways their existence altered planetary environmental conditions. The session will also focus on the development and diversification of the biosphere over time, and the evolutionary and environmental conditions necessary for its persistence until the present day. Abstracts are solicited from all scientific fields pertaining to the origins of life on Earth, its evolution, interaction with the planetary environment, and responses to changing environmental conditions since planetary formation.
Convener: Jack Farmer, Department of Geology, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287 USA, Tel: +1-480-965-6748, Fax: +1-480-965-8102, E-mail: jfarmer@asu.edu

U06 Elemental and Isotopic Signatures of the Formation and Evolution of the Solar System
The various stages of evolution of our solar system, from a diffuse primordial nebula to its present state, composed of a wide range of planets (including solid bodies and their atmospheres), asteroids, comets, dust, and gas, have left their imprint on the elemental and isotopic abundances of each of these objects and their various components. The present day abundances will be detailed and their interpretation in terms of formative and evolutionary processes will be presented and discussed. Special attention will be paid to uncertainties in the current knowledge of primordial abundances and their implications for the understanding of the formation and evolution of the solar system. The session will also focus on compositional alterations by various processes, such as hydrothermal or biogenic activity. Although not the main focus of this session, papers on cosmological implications of solar system composition measurements are also solicited.
Conveners: Peter Bochsler, E-mail: bochsler@ soho.unibe.ch; and Robert F. Wimmer-Schweingruber, E-mail: wimmer@phim. unibe.ch

U07 Anomalous Transport in Scaling and Inhomogeneous Geophysical Media
Anomalous transport, i.e., transport which yields non-standard scaling (e.g., non Fickian diffusion), is ubiquitous in geophysics, e.g., mantle convection, underground hydrology, atmospheric and oceanographic diffusion, geophysical turbulence, solar wind, etc. There has been a renewed interest on this topic due to both a larger availability of the data and several recent theoretical proposals: fractal modeling, fractional transport equations, multifractal dispersion coefficients, multifractal advection equations, etc. This interdisciplinary session will focus on the confrontation between the new available data and the new theoretical developments on anomalous transport in scaling and inhomogeneous geophysical media.
Conveners: I. Tchigurinsakaia, ESE Department, Clemson University, 342 Computer Ct., Anderson, SC 29625 USA, Fax: +1-864-656-0672, E-mail: iouliat@clemson.edu; S. Painter, Southwest Research Institute, 6200 Cuiltera St., San Antonio, TX USA, E-mail: spainter@swri.edu; D. Schertzer, LMM, Case 162 Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, 4 Place Jussieu, F-75252 Paris Cedex 05, France, Fax: +33-1-44-27-5327 or +33-1-44-27-5259, E-mail: schertze@ccr.jussieu.fr; and S. Lovejoy, Physics Department, McGill University, 3600 University St., Montreal, QUE H3A 2T8, Canada, Fax: +1-514-398-8434, E-mail: lovejoy@physics.mcgill.ca

Atmospheric Sciences (A)

A01 Stratospheric Aerosols and PSCs: Benchmarks at the End of the Millennium
While the importance of volcanic aerosols for climate has been recognized since at least the time of Benjamin Franklin, the role of clouds and aerosols in stratospheric chemistry only gained recognition after the discovery of the Antarctic ozone "hole." As we enter the next millennium, many questions remain about these particles and the influence they have on atmospheric chemistry and climate. In this session, papers are requested addressing the role of aerosols in mid-latitude ozone loss, the mechanism of denitrification and its impact on future polar ozone loss, the impact of future volcanic eruptions on the stratospheric sulfate aerosol layer, the chemical composition of polar stratospheric clouds, and satellite remote sensing of stratospheric particle composition. Field measurements, laboratory studies and numerical modeling papers are all encouraged.
Conveners: Margaret A. Tolbert, CIRES and Department of Chemistry, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309-0216 USA, Tel: +1-303-492-3179, Fax:+1-303-492-1149, E-mail: tolbert@spot.colorado.edu; Owen B. Toon, LASP and Program in Atmospheric and Oceanic Science, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309-0392 USA, Tel: +1-303-492-1534, Fax: +1-303-492-6946, E-mail: toon@lasp.colorado.edu

A02 The Input of Chemicals to the Coastal Zone: The Importance of the Atmospheric Signal (Joint with OS)
Atmospheric deposition can be an important source of chemicals to the coastal environment. This session seeks papers dealing with the importance of wet and dry deposition processes in contributing chemicals (e.g., nutrients, trace metals and organic contaminants) to estuaries and the coastal ocean. Papers dealing with both direct inputs to the water surface, as well as studies assessing the transfer of chemicals through watersheds are sought. Papers focusing on quantifying the magnitude of atmospheric inputs relative to other sources are welcomed, as are studies looking at the importance of chemical processing and air-water exchange mechanisms inmitigating or enhancing the fate and transport of chemicals through the estuarine-coastal ocean continuum.
Conveners: Robert P. Mason, Chesapeake Biological Laboratory, University of Maryland, Solomons, MD 20688 USA, Tel: +1-410-326-7387, Fax:+1-410-326-7341, E-mail: mason@cbl.umces.edu; and Tom Church, College of Marine Studies, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716-3501 USA, Tel: +1-302-831-2558, Fax: +1-302-831-4575, E-mail: tchurch@udel.edu

A03 Photolysis Frequency Measurements and Modeling
Solar photolysis of various atmospheric molecules initiates many important processes that lead to the production of atmospheric oxidants. Photolysis rate coefficients, so-called j-values, are determined through several measurement techniques and estimated using radiative transfer calculations. We invite submittal of papers to this session addressing issues important to atmospheric photolysis research including field measurements, laboratory studies and modeling exercises. Particularly encouraged are papers that synthesize the results of these studies, to provide maximum value to the atmospheric chemistry community. As an example, in the summer of 1998, a ground-based comparison of a number of measurements and models of j(NO2) and j(O3O(1D)) was conducted. The results of this experiment, called IPMMI (International Photolysis frequency Measurement and Modeling Intercomparison), revealed interesting relationships between the various methods, and lead to specific recommendations for j-value use in models and field campaigns.
Conveners: Christopher A. Cantrell, National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO 80303 USA, Tel: +1-303-497-1479, Fax: +1-303-497-1492, E-mail: cantrell@ucar. edu; Richard E. Shetter, National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO 80303 USA, Tel: +1-303-497-1480, Fax: +1-303-497-1411, E-mail: shetter@ ucar.edu; Sasha Madronich, National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO 80303 USA, Tel: +1-303-497-1430, Fax: +1-303-497-1400, E-mail: sasha@ ucar.edu; and Jack G. Calvert, National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO 80303 USA, Tel: +1-303-497-1435, Fax: +1-303-497-1492, E-mail: calvert@ucar.edu

A04 Constituent Transport in the Troposphere and Lower Stratosphere
Mechanisms of trace constituent transport in the atmosphere are often studied using observational data analyses and transport or assimilation model output. This session will focus on aspects of large-scale constituent transport due to the general circulation of the troposphere and lower stratosphere. Topics of interest include transport associated with transient baroclinic waves, the Hadley-Walker circulation (including inter-hemispheric transport), monsoon variability, stratosphere-troposphere exchange (in both tropics and extratropics), age of air in extratropics, and 'mixing barriers' in both low and high latitudes. We encourage studies based on satellite and airborne observations and assimilation model results, as well as simulations from GCM's or highly idealized models.
Conveners: William Randel, National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO 80303 USA, Tel: +1-303-497-1439, Fax: +1-303-497-1492, E-mail: randel@ucar.edu; and Darryn Waugh, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218 USA, Tel: +1-410-516-8344, Fax: +1-410-516-7933, E-mail: waugh@jhu.edu

A05 Frontiers in U.S. GEWEX Research (Joint with H)
The National Research Council's (NRC) Global and Water Cycle Experiment (GEWEX) Panel is conducting a review of US contributions to GEWEX. The purpose of this review is to document progress, identify gaps, and help develop future US opportunities and coordination. For this special session, we invite reviews and original contributions to US GEWEX science. Areas of special GEWEX interest include contributions from the International Satellite Land Surface Climatology Project (ISLSCP), Project for Intercomparison of Land Surface Parameterizations (PILPS), Baseline Surface Radiation Network (BSRN), Shortwave Radiation Budget (SRB), GEWEX Water Vapor Project (GvaP), International Sattelite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP), GEWEX Cloud Systems Study (GCSS), Global Precipitation Climatology Project (GPCP), Global Areosol Climatology Project (GACP), and GEWEX Continental-Scale International Project (GCIP).
Conveners: John Roads, University of California, San Diego, UCSD-0224, La Jolla, CA 92093-0224 USA, Tel: +1-858-534-2099, Fax: +1-858-534-8561, E-mail: jroads@ucsd. edu; Peter Schultz, National Research Council, 2101 Constitution Ave., N.W., HA 476, Washington, DC 20418 USA, Tel: +1-202-334-1499, Fax: +1-202-334-3825, E-mail: pschultz@nas.edu

A06 The NASA/GTE Pacific Exploratory Mission B (PEM-Tropics B)
The NASA/GTE PEM-Tropics B aircraft mission was conducted in March-April 1999. Its objective was to improve knowledge of the factors controlling tropospheric ozone, OH, sulfur, and aerosol formation over the tropical Pacific. It used two aircraft, the NASA DC-8 and P-3, equipped with a large ensemble of chemical instrumentation. It complemented the PEM-Tropics A mission conducted over the same region in September-October 1996. The first results from PEM-Tropics B will be presented in this session.
Conveners: Doug Davis, School of Earth and Atmospheric Science, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332 USA, Tel: +1-404-894-9565, Fax: +1-404-894-1993, E-mail: dd16@prism.gatech.edu; and Daniel Jacob, Division of Engineering and Applied Science, Harvard University, 29 Oxford St., Cambridge, MA 02138 USA, Tel: +1-617-495-1794, Fax: +1-617-495-9837, E-mail: djj@io.harvard.edu

A07 Data Assimilation: Atmospheric, Oceanic, Chemical, and Space Weather (Joint with GP, OS, P, SA, SH, SM)
We solicit papers for a special session on model assimilation of geophysical data. Special emphasis is being given to problems with intrinsic time scales longer than numerical weather prediction and the development of assimilation products that are robust for climate and chemical applications. The following foci are of special interest:
* The treatment of model and observation bias in assimilation systems and the impact of bias on the quality of assimilated data sets.
* The treatment of large-scale ocean state estimation, covariance modeling of observational and model errors or validation of ocean assimilation analyses for climate studies.
* The treatment of observations of stratospheric and tropospheric constituent measurement in both chemical and climate applications, including study of transport processes.
* The treatment of ionospheric observations and development of coupled Sun-Earth and magnetospheric models for large-scale space-weather and geomagnetism applications.
The organizers will invite speakers to provide unifying themes and a framework for the contributed talks.
Conveners: Richard B. Rood, Data Assimilation Office, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 910.3, Greenbelt, MD 20771 USA, Tel: +1-301-614-6155, Fax: +1-301-614-6297, E-mail: rrood@dao.gsfc.nasa.gov; Michele M. Rienecker, Oceans and Ice Branch, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 971.0, Greenbelt, MD 20771 USA, Tel: +1-301-614-5642, Fax: +1-301-614-5644, E-mail: rienecke@mohawk.gsfc.nasa.gov; Peter M. Lyster, Data Assimilation Office, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 910.3, Greenbelt, MD 20771 USA, Tel: +1-301-614-6179, Fax: +1-301-614-6297, E-mail: plyster@dao.gsfc.nasa.gov; and David N. Anderson, University of Colorado, CIRES and NOAA Space Environment Center, NOAA/SEC, 325 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80303,  Tel: +1-303-497-7754,  Fax: +1-303-497-3645,  E-mail: danderson@sec.noaa.gov

A08 Remote Sensing Constraints on the Spatial and Temporal Patterns of Air-Sea CO2 Exchange (Joint with B, OS)
All topics related to remotely sensed variables that play a role in constraining the air-sea exchange of trace gases in general, and CO2 in particular, are the focus of this session. Descriptions of models that use SeaWifs and MODIS data to estimate carbon fixation and other processes that influence the surface ocean pCO2 are encouraged. The session also seeks studies that use remotely sensed surface winds, wind stresses, SSTs, mixed layer depths, diverse indices of surface turbulence and other quantities germane to the computation of air-sea gas exchange. While CO2 is the main target of this session, contributions dealing with DMS, CO, OCS, isoprene and other trace gases are also solicited.
Conveners: David J. Erickson, USRA/NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 910.3, Greenbelt, MD 20771 USA, Tel: +1-301-614-6146, E-mail: erickson@dao.gsfc.nasa.gov; and Wayne E. Esaias, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 971, Greenbelt, MD 20771 USA, Tel: +1-301-614-5709, E-mail: esaias@gsfc.nasa.gov

A09 Forty Years of Polar-Orbiting Operational Meteorological Satellites (Joint with OS)
The first TIROS was launched in 1960 and soon was followed by the first Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) satellites. These mutually supportive programs have been relatively successful in advancing operational weather forecasting, research on climate, oceanography, snow and ice, upper atmospheric physics, and national defense. This session will cover the development and successes of the program with a look to the future - NPOESS. Potential Speakers for 6 half-hour sessions are: Bill Smith - NASA Langley; Tom Vonder Haar, CSU; John McElroy, U Texas at Arlington; Jack Kelly, NWS; Marie Colton, ONR/NRL; and Bill Lindorfer, RCA/GE/Lockheed Martin.
Conveners: Eugene W. Bierly, American Geophysical Union, 2000 Florida Ave., N.W., Washington, DC 20009 USA, Tel: +1-202-777-7506, Fax: +1-202-328-0566, E-mail: ebierly@agu.org; Edward W. Cliver, Chair, History of Geophysics Committee, American Geophysical Union; and H. Frank Eden, BEST.

A10 Calibration of Meteorological Satellite Sensors and Validation of Derived Products (Joint with OS)
Pre- and post-launch calibration and characterization of meteorological satellite sensors are crucial to ensure the accuracy, continuity, and viability of satellite-derived geophysical products. Independent validation of the geophysical products thus derived will in turn establish the usability of the same in Earth system studies such as those envisaged under the World Climate Research Programme (WCRP), the International Geosphere Biosphere Program (IGBP), and the global climate, terrestrial, and ocean observing systems (G3OS). Accordingly, papers are solicited in the broad areas of (a) pre- and post-launch calibration of meteorological satellite sensors; (b) inter-sensor calibration; © rehabilitation of long-term satellite-derived geophysical records (e.g., NOAA/NASA Pathfinder data sets); (d) procedures for product validation: (e) product validation campaigns; and (f) international collaborative and cooperative efforts.
Conveners: C. R. Nagaraja Rao, Office of Research and Applications, NOAA/NESDIS, E/RA1, World Weather Building, Room 810, 5200 Auth Rd., Camp Springs, MD 20746 USA, Tel: +1-301-763-8136, Ext. 138, Fax: +1-301-763-8108 or +1-301-763-8034, E-mail: nrao@nesdis.noaa.gov

A11 Analyses, Model Studies, and Satellite Comparisons with SHADOZ (Southern Hemisphere Additional Ozonesondes) 1998-1999 Ozonesonde Data
A large body of balloon-borne ozonesonde measurements (> 600 profiles to 7 hPa in 1998-1999) has been collected by NASA, NOAA and international partners at 10 sites in the southern hemisphere tropics (Natal, Brazil; Ascension and Reunion Islands; Irene, South Africa; Nairobi; Java, Fiji, American Samoa, Tahiti and Galapagos. The data are provided to the community for purposes of satellite algorithm development, and for climatological, correlative and modeling studies of ozone in the tropics. Papers are welcome on the latter topics as well as on technical aspects of ozonesonde preparation, calibration and data processing.
Conveners: Anne M. Thompson, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771-0001 USA, Tel: +1-301-614-5731, Fax: +1-301-614-5903, E-mail: thompson@ gator1.gsfc.nasa.gov; and Samuel J. Oltmans, NOAA Climate Monitoring and Diagnostics Laboratory, Boulder, CO 80303-3328 USA, Tel: +1-303-497-6676, Fax: +1-303-497-5590, E-mail: soltmans@cmdl.noaa. gov

A12 First Atmospheric Results From the EOS Terra Instruments
New observations of the atmosphere often lead to the discovery of unexpected phenomena, and new insights into the atmosphere's behavior and interactions with the Earth system. The NASA Earth Observing System Terra spacecraft, (formerly known as EOS AM-1) was launched at the end of 1999 carrying 4 instruments making atmospheric observations. Therefore, for this session we solicit papers that describe and make atmospheric applications of the new data from CERES (Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System), MISR (Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer), MODIS (Moderate-Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) and MOPITT (Measurement Of Pollution In The Troposphere).
Conveners: John Gille, NCAR, PO Box 3000, Boulder, CO 80307-3000 USA, Tel: +1-303-497-8062, Fax: +1-303-497-2920, E-mail: gille@ucar.edu; and Daniel Ziskin, NCAR, PO Box 3000, Boulder, CO 80307-3000 USA, Tel: +1-303-497-2924, Fax: +1-303-497-2920, E-mail: ziskin@ucar.edu

A13 Advances in GCIP Research (Joint with H)
The Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment (GEWEX) Continental-Scale International Project (GCIP) was established in the Mississippi River Basin in 1992 in order to develop the capability to predict variations in water resources on time scales up to seasonal and interannual as an integral part of a climate prediction system. The GCIP Enhanced Observing Period (EOP) for water years 1998 and 1999 has just been completed over the Ohio River Basin (LSA-E). The purpose of this special session is to document GCIP progress, especially over the LSA-E, and determine issues that need to be incorporated into the GEWEX America Prediction Project (GAPP) science and implementation plans currently being developed to expand GCIP studies to other parts of the USA. Papers on physical process studies, model development, data assimilation, diagnostic studies, remote sensing, model validation, data acquisition, and applications to water resource management over the Ohio and Mississippi River Basins are encouraged.
Conveners: William M. Lapenta, GHCC/NASA, 977 Explorer Blvd., Huntsville, AL 25806 USA, Tel: +1-256-922-5834, Fax: +1-256-922-5723, E-mail: bill.lapenta@msfc. nasa.gov; and Michael F. Jasinski, Hydrological Sciences Branch, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 974, Greenbelt, MD 20771 USA, Tel: +1-301-614-5782, Fax: +1-301-614-5808, E-mail: Michael.F.Jasinski.1@ gsfc.nasa.gov

A14 The Common Land Model and Issues in Land-Surface Modeling (Joint with H)
Progress and development of the Common Land Model and future directions in the development of land-surface modeling will be addressed in this session. The Common Land Model (CLM) is an interdisciplinary effort to develop a state-of-the-art land surface model for use in climate studies that brings together a broader range of expertise than can be accomplished within anyone research group. Development and validation of the first version has proceeded with voluntary contributions from hydrologists, atmospheric scientists, biogeochemists and ecologists at 10 different centers within the U.S. CLM is made freely available to the research and academic communities. Additionally, we invite presentations on recent innovations and future directions in land-surface modeling. Recent research that integrates hydrology and biogeochemical interactions are of particular interest.
Conveners: Michael G. Bosilovich, USRA, Data Assimilation Office, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 910.3, Greenbelt, MD 20771 USA, Tel: +1-301-614-6147, Fax: +1-301-614-6297, E-mail: mikeb@dao.gsfc. nasa.gov; and Paul R. Houser, Hydrological Sciences Branch, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 974, Greenbelt, MD 20771 USA, Tel: +1-301-614-5772, Fax: +1-301-614-5808, E-mail: Paul.Houser@gsfc. nasa.gov

A15 Scientific Benefits of Long-Duration Satellite Data Sets
It is often the case that once a spacecraft and its instruments are successfully launched, the opportunity for very long, extended missions - missions of far longer duration than originally planned - are realized. The data sets resulting from such fortunate circumstances often provide unique and important scientific results that would not have been available from the originally designed, "limited duration" mission. This special session solicits presentation and discussion of uniform long-term data sets and the scientific discoveries that derive specifically from of the extended mission. The session will include both invited and contributed papers that discuss long-term changes in the solar input, constituents, and winds throughout the range from the troposphere to the lower thermosphere.
Conveners: Gary Rottman, LASP, University of Colorado, Campus Box 590, Boulder, CO 80309-0590 USA, Tel: +1-303-492-8324, Fax: +1-303-492-6444, E-mail: gary.rottman@ lasp.colorado.edu; and James Russell, Hampton University, PO Box 6075, Hampton, VA 23668 USA, Tel: +1-757-728-6893, Fax: +1-757-727-5090, E-mail: JAMES.RUSSEL@ hamptonu.edu.

A16 Atmospheric Ions: Roles in Aerosol Formation and Chemistry
Ions created by galactic cosmic rays and other sources are ubiquitous in the atmosphere. Background ionization is a key component of the atmospheric electrical system, contributing to the mobility and conductivity of air, as well as the charging of ambient aerosols, with subsequent influences on the particle microphysics and gas-to-particle conversion processes, including nucleation. Variations in atmospheric conductivity have been used, for example, as a diagnostic for particulate pollution. Electrical charging of aerosols leads to changes in their physical and chemical properties, which may influence particle lifetimes, gaseous uptake, and chemical reactions. New evidence now suggests that ions contribute to the formation of ultrafine particles in aircraft wakes, as well as in the background atmosphere. Accordingly, seemingly unconnected studies of natural ionization and charge effects carried out in the fields of atmospheric chemistry, aerosol microphysics, and atmospheric electricity may in fact be intimately coupled. This session will present current research results concerning the importance of ions relevant to the formation and physical-chemical properties of atmospheric particles. Papers based on laboratory experiments, field measurements, or modeling studies are invited that address the sources of natural ionization, the formation, evolution and properties of cluster ions and charged aerosols in air, and ion-related particle formation processes. Submissions exploring the potential links between aerosol microphysics (hence, their chemical, climatic, and health effects) and ionization processes (such as galactic cosmic ray deposition, lightning, and radioactivity) are also encouraged.
Conveners: Fangqun Yu, Department of Atmospheric Sciences, University of California, 405 Hilgard Avenue, Los Angeles, CA 90095 USA, Tel: +1-310-206-2710, Fax: +1-310-206-5219, E-mail: yfq@atmos.ucla.edu; and Richard P. Turco, Department of Atmospheric Sciences, University of California, 405 Hilgard Avenue, Los Angeles, CA 90095 USA, Tel: +1-310-825-6936, Fax: +1-310-206-5219, E-mail: turco@ucla.edu.

A17 Continuing the Future of Atmospheric Science
The goals of this session are to highlight research efforts of students in the atmospheric sciences and to provide students with a forum for meeting colleagues and discussing scientific and career directions and options in the future.  Students in all fields of Atmospheric Science are encouraged to present their work (or work in progress) in the poster session.  Experts in the field will share their experience and knowledge in a special panel discussion.  Topics to be covered will include career paths, keys to success and critical areas of research in the future.
Conveners: Jane M. Van Doren, College of the Holy Cross, Department of Chemistry, 1 College St., Worcester, MA 01610-2395 USA, Tel: +1-508-793-3376, Fax: +1-508-793-3530, E-mail: jvandore@holycross.edu; and Douglas Worsnop, Aerodyne Research, Inc., 45 Manning Rd., Billerica, MA 01821 USA, Tel: +1-978-663-9500, Fax: +1-978-663-4918, E-mail:
worsnop@aerodyne.com

B04 Remote Sensing of the Biosphere (Joint with A, H)
This session will focus on the information from remote sensing observations of the biosphere. An increasing number of satellites are being deployed for remote sensing of the Earth's surface and the processes thereon. These observations offer unique possibilities for studying the terrestrial and marine biosphere. Using various passive and active methods over a range of frequencies, the nature of the ecosystems can be described, and changes as a result of land use, climate change, and other factors can be monitored consistently over the long term (years to decades).
Conveners: Ruth Defries, Department of Geography, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742-8225 USA, Tel: +1-301-405-4884, Fax: +1-301-314-9299, E-mail: rd63@ umail.umd.edu; Ichtiaque Rasool, E-mail: 101650.56@compuserve.com; and G. James Collatz, Biospheric Sciences Branch, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 923, Greenbelt, MD 20771 USA, Tel: +1-301-286-1425, Fax: +1-301-286-1757, E-mail: jcollatz@ ltpsun.gsfc.nasa.gov

B07 Biogeography (Joint with A, GP, GSA)
The relationship between geographic position, climate, and ecosystems has been an important foundation for using paleontological records for determining past climates and paleogeography. Under conditions of rapid climate change, however, these relationships must be re-examined and the causal factors must be explored so that future biome distributions can be predicted. Abstracts are solicited from all fields of biogeography and their bearing on climate and paleogeography.
Conveners: Fred Ziegler, Department of Geophysical Sciences, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 USA, Tel: +1-773-702-8146, Fax: +1-773-702-9505, E-mail: ziegler@geol. uchicago.edu; and Thompson Webb III, Department of Geological Sciences, Brown University, Providence, RI 02912 USA, Tel: +1-401-863-3128, Fax: +1-401-863-2058, E-mail: thompson_webb_iii@brown.edu

H14 Remote Sensing of Precipitation (Poster Only) (Joint with A)
This special session will cover a broad range of topics related to all aspects of remote sensing of precipitation. The session will consist entirely of poster presentations. Papers are solicited on the estimation, validation, and error/uncertainty assessment of precipitation measured by ground-based remote sensors, such as radar (e.g., NEXRAD WSR-88D), airborne and satellite sensors (e.g., VIS, IR, SSM/I, TRMM). Analyses of ground-based sensors relevant for validation (e.g., raingauge, drop spectra devices, microwave links) are welcome as well. The session will highlight research and operational applications involving remotely-sensed precipitation. Presentations related to research programs such as the GEWEX Continental Scale International Project (GCIP), the TOGA Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Experiment (COARE), the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) and related recent field experiments, the Pan American Climate Studies (PACS), and the Mesoscale Alpine Program (MAP) are particularly encouraged. In addition, presentations that highlight operational aspects of the remote sensing of precipitation are welcome to contrast the research-oriented contributions.
Conveners: Matthias Steiner, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 USA, Tel: +1-609-258-4614, E-mail: msteiner@ radap.princeton.edu; and Richard A. Fulton, Hydrologic Research Laboratory, Office of Hydrology, National Weather Service, 1325 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD 20910 USA, Tel: +1-301-713-0640, ext. 138, E-mail: Richard.Fulton@noaa.gov

OS02 Breaking Waves, Turbulence, Bubbles, Sprays, and Aerosols (Joint with A, AGU Committee on Nonlinear Geophysics)
The main theme is concerned with the complex phenomena of oceanic surface wave breaking processes in both deep and shallow water including the surfzone. Their significant consequences, such as energy/momentum loses, turbulence generation, air entrainment, bubble generation, bubble distributions, spray formation, and marine aerosols (salt particles), are all integral parts of interests of this session. The acoustical, optical, and electrical effects from these various physical elements, resulting from wave breaking, shall be included too. Papers on both field/laboratory measurements and numerical/theoretical modeling of these dynamical problems are welcome.
Convener: Dr. Ming-Yang Su, Naval Research Laboratory, Code 7332, Stennis Space Center, MS 39529 USA, Tel: +1-228-688-5241, Fax: +1-228-688-5997, E-mail: su@nrlssc.navy.mil

OS03 Scientific Application of Spaceborne Scatterometer (Joint with A)
The radar scatterometer, SeaWinds, of the NASA Mission Quikscat, was launched in June 1999 and it is providing measurement of ocean surface wind speed and direction at 25 km resolution under both clear and cloudy conditions, covering almost the entire global ocean every day. Information on land vegetation and polar ice-cover can also be derived. Scatterometer observations from previous scatterometers, with less coverage, have been used in the studies of marine weather system, numerical weather prediction, wind-driven ocean circulation, coastal ecology, monsoons, El Nino and Southern Oscillation, sea ice, land vegetation, flooding, and snow over land. There are potential synergistic combination of scatterometer data with data from Tropical Rain Measuring Mission and the Topex/Poseidonmissions in scientific applications. Results on validation and scientific applications of spacebased scatterometer data are welcome for this special session.
Convener: W. Timothy Liu, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, 300-323, 4800 Oak Grove Dr., Pasadena, CA 91109-8099 USA, Tel: +1-818-354-2394, Fax: +1-818-393-6720, E-mail: liu@pacific.jpl.nasa.gov, Web site: http://airsea-www.jpl.nasa.gov

OS04 Holocene to Modern Carbon Dioxide Sources and Sinks (Joint with A, B, GS, H, MSA, AGU Committee on Global Environmental Change)
Efforts to balance the global carbon budget have focused on the so-called "missing sink" implied by the imbalance among identified modern annual sources and sinks of anthropogenic CO2. Relatively little attention has been devoted to the inherently historical nature of the anthropogenic CO2 budget imbalance. Estimates of identified annual CO2 fluxes, such as uptake by the oceans and net emissions from human land use, must be derived from calculation of cumulative effects over recent decades and centuries. Likewise, identification of "missing" CO2 sinks will require not only evidence in contemporary processes, but also consistency with the record of historical effects. The task of understanding the historical CO2 budget is made more difficult by the observation that the Holocence global carbon cycle was not at a steady state. Although the anthropogenic CO2 budget has overwhelmed the background of Holocene CO2 variations on a global scale, historical relationships between natural and anthropogenic effects may be less clear at the regional geographic scale required for identification of specific sources and sinks. This session will examine important Holocene to modern CO2 sources and sinks, with emphasis on reconstructing the global carbon budget of recent decades to millennia, and on quantifying relationships among uncertainties in the historical and modern CO2 budget.
Conveners: Eric Sundquist, U.S. Geological Survey, Woods Hole, MA USA; and A. Indermuehle, University of Bern, Switzerland

OS05 Mesozoic-Cenozoic Oceans: The Warm Bottom Water Puzzle (Joint with A, TOS)
The target of the session will be to examine the climate and deep-ocean conditions of the Mesozoic- Cenozoic, including data synthesis and interpretation and studies of the crucial warm saline bottom water hypothesis using atmospheric and ocean circulation models. Contributions on geologic data analyses and paleoclimate and paleoceanographic modeling will be welcomed.
Conveners: Dan Seidov, E-mail: dseidov@ essc.psu.edu; Mike Arthur, E-mail: arthur@ geosc.psu.edu; and Eric Barron, E-mail: eric@essc.psu.edu

ED05 Highlights of Education and Public Outreach Activities Under Way in the Space Physics and Aeronomy, Planetary Sciences, and Atmospheric Sciences Sections (Joint with A, P, SPA, NAGT, AGU Committee on Education and Human Resources)
Over the past several years, numerous programs and products have been developed that bring the excitement of our science field to the public as well as the pre-college education community. Innovative partnership have developed between scientists and educators, facilitating contributions from the scientific community in efforts to improve pre-college geoscience education. This session provides an opportunity to share highlights of new and ongoing education and public outreach programs related to space physics and aeronomy, atmospheric sciences, and planetary sciences. Both oral and poster presentations are solicited. We ask that developers of ongoing programs and existing products highlight what is new and emphasize the lessons learned from what has already been accomplished. Since 2000 is the year of solar maximum we especially encourage contributions on any products or programs related to this event.
Convener: Roberta Johnson, Space Physics Research Lab, University of Michigan, 2455 Hayward St., Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2143 USA, Tel: +1-734-647-3430, Fax: +1-734-763-0437, E-mail: rmjohnsn@umich.edu; Cherilynn A. Morrow, Manager for Education and Outreach, Space Science Institute, 3100 Marine Street, Room A353, Boulder, CO 80303-1058 USA, Tel: +1-303-492-7321, Fax: +1-303-492-3789, E-mail: camorrow@colorado.edu

SA01 Frontiers in Understanding the Upper Atmosphere Energy Budgets of the Earth and Planets (Joint with A, P)
This session will include recent results directed toward a better understanding of the energy budget of the Earth's upper atmosphere, and of other planets in the context of how they relate to Earth. Papers are solicited in both the experimental and modeling areas. These include experiments that probe key reaction rates and product branching fractions, or energy transfer rates and pathways. Modeling studies of the photochemical and radiative components of the energy budget equation are also highly desired. Non-LTE effects play a critical role in both the heating and cooling of planetary upper atmospheres, and are often poorly quantified. The goal of this session is to provide a contemporary account of our knowledge of the energy budget of the Earth's upper atmosphere, as well as related information from other planets. We hope to identify the outstanding deficiencies, and point toward future directions in experimental and modeling research.
Conveners: James A. Dodd, Air Force Research Laboratory/Space Vehicles Directorate, 29 Randolph Rd., Hanscom Air Force Base, MA 01731-3010 USA, Tel: +1-781-377-4190, Fax: +1-781-377-8900, E-mail: dodd@ plh.af.mil; Marty Mlynczak, Atmospheric Sciences Research, NASA Langley Research Center, Mail Stop 420, Hampton, VA 23681-2199 USA, Tel: +1-757-864-5695, Fax: +1-757-864-7996, E-mail: m.g.mlynczak@ larc.nasa.gov

SA03 The Mesosphere/Lower Thermosphere Region: Structure, Dynamics, Composition, and Emission (Joint with A)
The mesosphere/lower thermosphere (MLT) region between about 80 and 150 km altitude hosts a complex interplay between radiative processes, chemistry, wave dissipation and turbulence, nonlinear dynamics and electrodynamics. This session is a forum wherein ground- and space-based measurements, theory and modeling results covering all aspects of MLT structure, dynamics, composition and emissions are solicited for presentation. The range of potential topics includes, but is not limited to: heat sources, radiative cooling and thermal structure; tides, planetary waves and gravity waves; wave-wave and wave-mean flow interactions; dynamical effects on minor species distributions and emission variations; neutral and ionized metallic layering phenomena; chemical effects of particle precipitation; electrojet studies.
Conveners: Scott E. Palo, Department of Aerospace Engineering Sciences, Campus Box 429, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309-0429 USA, Tel: +1-303-492-4289, Fax: +1-303-492-7881; and Michael J. Taylor, Space Dynamics Laboratory, Utah State University, 4145 Old Main Hill, Logan, UT 84322-4145 USA, Tel: +1-435-797-3919, Fax: +1-435-797-4044, E-mail: mtaylor@ cc.usu.edu

Biogeosciences (B)

B01 Forest Biogeochemistry
This session will focus on the role of forests in cycling carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus and other critical nutrients between the Earth's surface and the atmosphere. Forested ecosystems play a key role in the carbon cycle globally. Forest cover, deforestation and afforestation are becoming more prominent in the political arena, so more detailed understanding of the role of this critical global ecosystem is called for before detailed recommendations can be made regarding international protocols or biogeochemical model predictions.
Conveners: Kathy Hibbard, IGBP/GAIM, Climate Change Research Center, University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH 03824 USA, Tel: +1-603-862-4255, Fax: +1-603-862-3874, E-mail: kathyh@eos.sr.unh.edu; and Christopher J. Kucharik, Institute for Environmental Studies, Climate, People and Environment Program, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 USA, Tel: +1-608-262-5356, Fax: +1-608-263-4190, E-mail: kucharik@facstaff.wisc.edu

B02 Biogeochemistry of C and N in Soils (Joint with H)
This session will highlight papers on the global biogeochemical functioning and changes of soils. It will highlight microbial and abiotic processes controlling the transformation of organic material in soils and the role of these processes in sequestering or releasing important nutrients and other trace constituents in "natural" as well as agricultural systems. These processes range from the initial changes of litter on the soil surface to association of humic substances with iron and aluminum oxides in deeper soil zones. These processes are critical in determining the response of forests, grasslands and other biomes to anthropogenic change in nutrient loadings as well as to climate change. This session will also include presentations that address the cycling of carbon and nitrogen in ecosystems managed for rangeland and crop production, including issues sch as long-term storage and depletion of C and N in these ecosystems, and the adaptability of these systems to climate change.
Conveners: Ron Sass, Department of Ecology, Rice University, Houston, TX 77005 USA, Tel: +1-713-527-4066, Fax: +1-713-285-5232, E-mail: sass@pop.rice.edu; and Steve Frolking, Complex Systems Research Center, University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH 03824 USA, Tel: +1-603-862-0244, Fax: +1-603-862-0188, E-mail: steve. frolking@unh.edu

B03 Interactions Between Coastal Ecosystems and Sea-Level Change (Joint with OS)
This session will focus on the effects of sea level changes on coastal ecosystems and the role of these ecosystems in modulating other effects of anticipated future sea level rise. Coastal ecosystems play an important role in supporting marine ecosystems, biogeochemical processing of water and sediment, and physical protection of upland systems. Sea-level change since the last ice-age has formed the current coastlines and will continue to reshape them despite anthropogenic influences. However, human activities may serve to hasten the effect of global sea level rise on local coastlines and otherwise may exacerbate the impacts of sea level rise on coastal ecosystems by adding biogeochemical, physical, and geographical stresses to the systems. There have been numerous recent advances in coastal ecology regarding, for instance, the increasingly important role that primary producers play in the stability of coastal alluvial flood plains. Abstracts are solicited relating to any of the relationships between coastal ecosystems and sea level change.
Conveners: Andy Nyman, Department of Biology, University of Louisiana at Lafayette, PO Box 42451, Lafayette, LA 70504-2451 USA; and David Thomson, Department of Biology, Southeastern Louisiana University, Hammond, LA 70402 USA, Tel: +1-504-549-5294, Fax: +1-504-549-3851, E-mail: dthomson@selu.edu

B04 Remote Sensing of the Biosphere (Joint with A, H)
This session will focus on the information from remote sensing observations of the biosphere. An increasing number of satellites are being deployed for remote sensing of the Earth's surface and the processes thereon. These observations offer unique possibilities for studying the terrestrial and marine biosphere. Using various passive and active methods over a range of frequencies, the nature of the ecosystems can be described, and changes as a result of land use, climate change, and other factors can be monitored consistently over the long term (years to decades).
Conveners: Ruth Defries, Department of Geography, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742-8225 USA, Tel: +1-301-405-4884, Fax: +1-301-314-9299, E-mail: rd63@ umail.umd.edu; Ichtiaque Rasool, E-mail: 101650.56@compuserve.com; and G. James Collatz, Biospheric Sciences Branch, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 923, Greenbelt, MD 20771 USA, Tel: +1-301-286-1425, Fax: +1-301-286-1757, E-mail: jcollatz@ ltpsun.gsfc.nasa.gov

B05 Response of Coral Ecosystems to Changes in Terrestrial and Coastal Environments (Joint with OS)
This session will highlight the use of scleractinian reef corals as paleoceanographic recorders, and will include related types of paleoclimate records as well. Corals have begun to provide a wealth of information about past environments, particularly as a proxy time series for paleosea-surface temperatures, often with very fine sub-annual resolution. Most existing coral time series are from living corals, but precisely dated fossil corals are beginning to offer snapshots of ocean conditions back to at least mid-Quaternary times. However, one occasionally finds ambiguous and difficult-to-interpret coral isotope and minor-element data suggesting that much remains to be learned before we can confidently understand and interpret every coral record. Comparing existing coral records with one another, and with other marine or terrestrial paleoclimate records, may provide new insights. An example would be a mid-Holocene speleothem timeseries from a tropical island where it would be possible to generate a proxy coral climate record. Abstracts are solicited from all aspects of research pertaining to the above.
Conveners: Fred Taylor, Institute for Geophysics, University of Texas, Austin, TX 78759-8500 USA, Tel: +1-512-471-0453, Fax: +1-512-471-8844, E-mail: fred@utig.ig. utexas.edu; and G. Burr, Physics Department, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 USA, Tel: +1-520-621-8411, Fax: +1-520-621-4721, E-mail: burr@physics.arizona.edu

B06 Biogeophysics of Land Cover Change
As human populations increase, particularly in developing regions, forested and other "natural"land is being increasingly being pressed into service for agriculture and urbanization. This causes changes in the radiative properties of the Earth's surface. It also affects the exchange of water, carbon, and energy with the atmosphere, and thus regional and global climate. Abstracts are solicited pertaining to the relationship between land cover changes and climate, surface processes, and biogeochemical systems.
Conveners: Ruth Defries, Department of Geography, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742-8225 USA, Tel: +1-301-405-4884, Fax: +1-301-314-9299, E-mail: rd63@umail.umd.edu; and Jonathan Foley, Climate, People and Environment Program, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 USA, Tel: +1-608-265-5144, Fax: +1-608-262-5964, E-mail: jfoley@facstaff.wisc.edu

B07 Biogeography (Joint with A, GP, GSA, SEPM)
The relationship between geographic position, climate, and ecosystems has been an important foundation for using paleontological records for determining past climates and paleogeography. Under conditions of rapid climate change, however, these relationships must be re-examined and the causal factors must be explored so that future biome distributions can be predicted. Abstracts are solicited from all fields of biogeography and their bearing on climate and paleogeography.
Conveners: Fred Ziegler, Department of Geophysical Sciences, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 USA, Tel: +1-773-702-8146, Fax: +1-773-702-9505, E-mail: ziegler@geol. uchicago.edu; and Thompson Webb III, Department of Geological Sciences, Brown University, Providence, RI 02912 USA, Tel: +1-401-863-3128, Fax: +1-401-863-2058, E-mail: thompson_webb_iii@brown.edu

B08 Geobiology of Macroorganisms
This session will focus on the role of macroorganisms in biogeochemical processes, the interaction between macrobiota and the Earth's geophysical systems, the role of macrofossils as indicators of geochemical and geophysical processes and parameters, and the response of macroorganisms to past, current, and future global change. Abstracts are solicited from all disciplines involving macroorganisms in the Earth system including, but not limited to biogeochemical cycling, predation, bioturbation and biolandscaping, geomagnetic navigation, biogeography, extinction, speciation, ecosystem fragmentation, mutation, environmental bioindicators, and paleoenvironmental/geologic macrofossil indicators.
Conveners: Michal Kowalewski, Department of Geological Sciences, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, VA 24061 USA, Tel: +1-540-231-5951, Fax: +1-540-231-3386, E-mail: michalk@vt.edu; and Mark E. Patzkowsky, Department of Geosciences, Penn State University, University Park, PA 16802-2714 USA, Tel: +1-814-863-1959, Fax: +1-814-863-7823, E-mail: brachio@ geosc.psu.edu

B09 Kyoto Protocol: Modeling Political and Economic Response (Joint with PP)
This session will focus on modelling society's response to the Kyoto Protocol. The Protocol calls for significant economic costs and benefits to carbon release Vs sequestration, and involves different incentives for industrialized and developing countries. While there is no way to accurately predict individual responses to the Kyoto protocol, socioeconomic models can be used to identify key responses as well as "perverse reactions" such as rapid deforestation in the next few years. Such models, along with biogeochemical models, may ultimately be used as prognostic Earth System models, and the response to the Kyoto Protocol may provide a practical testing ground for the socioeconomic aspects.
Conveners: John Kimble, USDA-NRCS-NSSC, Federal Bldg., Room 152, MS 34 100, Centennial Mall North, Lincoln, NE 68508-3866 USA, Tel: +1-402-437-5376, Fax: +1-402-437-5336, E-mail: john.kimble@nssc.nrcs. usda.gov; Dork Sahagian, IGBP/GAIM, University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH 03824 USA, Tel: +1-603-862-3875, Fax: +1-603-862-3874, Email: gaim@unh.edu

B10 Paleolimnological Evidence for Anthropogenic Climate Change
Lake sediments provide can provide a detailed record of recent change that can be integrated across regions of the world. This session will present papers on the interpretation of paleolimnological records from sediments and other proxies for understanding natural variability in the hydrology and climate of the Holocene and for understanding the impacts of changes in land use, chemistry of atmospheric deposition and in regional climate.
Conveners: Alexander Wolfe, Institute of Arctic and Alpine Research, University of Colorado, CO 80309 USA, Tel: +1-303-492-6962, Fax: +1-303-492-6388, E-mail: alexander.wolfe@colorado.edu; and Peter Doran, Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Illinois, Chicago, IL 60612 USA, Tel: +1-312-413-7275, Fax: +1-312-413-2279, E-mail: PDoran@uic.edu

B11 A Paleo-Environmental Perspective on Future Ecosystem Sustainability
A paleo-environmental perspective on future ecosystem sustainability During the last two millennia, virtually all ecosystems, both managed and quasi-natural, have been subjected to greater fluctuations of climate than are captured by instrumental records. Over the same time-span, human impacts on ecosystems have varied and, in many cases, increased dramatically. Documenting and understanding the role of both types of process, and the interactions between them, in generating contemporary ecosystems, is vital for developing any realistic sense of future sustainability. Case studies from specific ecosystems and regions, as well as model simulations of ecosystem responses, are both required. The session will seek to: (i) present case studies illustrating the value of paleoecological studies in understanding ecosystem responses to climate change and human impacts, and (ii) foster development of a robust research framework for maximising the contribution of paleoecological information to understanding and enhancing future sustainability.
Conveners: Frank Oldfield, Executive Director PAGES IPO, Barenplatz 2, > CH-3011 Bern, Switzerland, e-mail: frank.oldfield@pages.unibe.ch, Phone: > +41 31 312 3133, FAX: +41 31 312 3168; Constance Millar, USFS, PSW Research > Station, 800 Buchanan St., Albany, CA 94710, email: cmillar/psw@fs.fed.us > Millar_Connie/psw@fs.fed.us, Phone: 510-559-6435, FAX: 510-559-6499

A08 Remote Sensing Constraints on the Spatial and Temporal Patterns of Air-Sea CO2 Exchange (Joint with B, OS)
All topics related to remotely sensed variables that play a role in constraining the air-sea exchange of trace gases in general, and CO2 in particular, are the focus of this session. Descriptions of models that use SeaWifs and MODIS data to estimate carbon fixation and other processes that influence the surface ocean pCO2 are encouraged. The session also seeks studies that use remotely sensed surface winds, wind stresses, SSTs, mixed layer depths, diverse indices of surface turbulence and other quantities germane to the computation of air-sea gas exchange. While CO2 is the main target of this session, contributions dealing with DMS, CO, OCS, isoprene and other trace gases are also solicited.
Conveners: David J. Erickson, USRA/NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 910.3, Greenbelt, MD 20771 USA, Tel: +1-301-614-6146, E-mail: erickson@dao.gsfc.nasa.gov; and Wayne E. Esaias, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 971, Greenbelt, MD 20771 USA, Tel: +1-301-614-5709, E-mail: esaias@gsfc.nasa.gov

GS02 Astrobiology Biosignatures (Joint with B, MSA, P)
The development of unambiguous criteria with which to assess the presence or absence of biological processes in geological settings forms a critical component of a successful astrobiology research program. Biosignatures research will guide site selection for extraterrestrial missions, as well as development of analytical protocols and equipment for analysis of returned samples. I propose a special AGU session to provide the astrobiology biosignatures research community an opportunity to present and discuss current research findings. Relevant topics include morphological, isotopic and mineralogical biosignatures, both in the modern environment as well as the geologic fossil record.
Convener: William W. (Bill) Barker, Geology and Geophysics University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI USA, Tel: +1-608-262-3738, E-mail: barker@geology.wisc.edu

GS03 Biological-Chemical Interactions in Hydrothermal Systems (Joint with B, OS)
Over the past 2 decades, hydrothermal systems have been extensively studied as sites of intense chemical and biological activity. There exists a close linkage between chemical reactions (i.e. sulfide generation) within the water-rock system and the surrounding fauna. Furthermore it has been proposed that the presence of mineral- catalyzed reactions within hydrothermal vents led to the eventual organization and establishment of the first life forms on Earth. Even after life's genesis the production of reduced compounds within hydrothermal systems may have played an important role in supporting Archaean life forms. This session seeks to bring together scientists examining these and other related processes to further our understanding of the connections between simple rock-fluid reactions and surrounding life forms.
Conveners: Jay A. Brandes, Marine Sciences Institute, University of Texas at Austin, 750 Channel View Dr., Port Aransas, TX 78373 USA, Tel: +1-361-749-6756, Fax: +1-361-749-6777, E-mail: brandes@utmsi.utexas. edu; and John A. Baross, Department of Oceanography, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98125 USA, E-mail: jbaross@u. washington.edu

H01 Biogeochemical Studies of Shenandoah National Park (Joint with B)
Shenandoah National Park in the Blue Ridge Mountains of Virginia has a diverse geology and biology, and in the last century has been subject to a variety of significant environmental disturbances. Early in the century the chestnut blight had a major effect on the ecosystems of the Park (as it did throughout the Blue Ridge). More recently, significant stresses have included acidic deposition, elevated ozone concentrations, and insect pests such as the gypsy moth and hemlock adelgid. A better understanding of the biogeochemical structure and function of natural systems within the Park, as well as their interaction with and response to a variety of environmental stressors, is necessary to allow informed management of this important resource. Our session will focus on recent biogeochemical research within and near the Park, with emphasis on integrated studies. We solicit contributions for both oral and poster sessions.
Conveners: Robbins Church, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 200 S.W. 35th St., Corvallis, OR 97333 USA, Tel: +1-541-754-4424, Fax: +1-541-745-4716, E-mail: church@ mail.cor.epa.gov; Jim Galloway, Department of Environmental Sciences, Clark Hall, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22903 USA, Tel: +1-804-924-0561, Fax: +1-804-982-2300, E-mail: jng@virginia.edu

H02 Fate of Agricultural Nitrogen in Drainage Basins (Joint with B, GS)
Elevated concentrations of nitrogen species (primarily nitrate) are a common occurrence in rivers and streams draining agricultural areas, and may be responsible for ecosystem degradation in estuarine and coastal marine environments such as the Chesapeake Bay and the Gulf of Mexico. Many environmental factors have been identified that influence the transport of agricultural nitrogen through drainage basins to coastal waters; however, the relative importance of various processes are difficult to quantify. Some important questions include: To what extent do organic-N and ammonium contribute to the mobile nitrogen budgets? How do agricultural practices such as irrigation and soil drainage systems influence nitrogen transport?, and What are the relative roles of denitrification in stream-channel, hyporheic, riparian, and ground-water subsystems? Presentations are encouraged that describe quantitative field studies or models of transport and transformation of agricultural nitrogen (especially nitrate) in drainage basins.
Conveners: J. K. Bohlke, U.S. Geological Survey, 431 National Center, Reston, VA 20192 USA, Tel: +1-703-648-6325, Fax: +1-703-648-5832, E-mail: jkbohlke@usgs.gov; and Patricia M. Glibert, Horn Point Environmental Laboratory, University of Maryland, PO Box 775, Cambridge, MD 21613 USA, Tel:+1-410-221-8422, Fax: +1-410-221-8490, E-mail: glibert@hpel.cees.edu

H04 The Interrelationship of Hydrology and Biogeochemistry in Wetlands (Joint with B)
Wetlands are valued for their ability to remove nutrients, sediment, and other pollutants that would otherwise enter surface waters. However, studies in wetlands have shown that pollutant removal rates vary widely, and in many instances wetlands serve as sources of contaminants to surface waters. Hydrology is one of the principal factors that affect contaminant transformation or removal by wetlands. The spatial distribution of topography, soil, vegetation, and other factors affect flow rates and flow paths through wetlands. The focus of this session is on studies of how wetland hydrology affects the rates of biogeochemical processes and types of chemical transformations that occur in wetlands. Contributions are welcomed from interdisciplinary studies of wetlands, studies in man-made wetland environments, and estuarine wetlands.
Conveners: Douglas A. Burns, U.S. Geological Survey, 425 Jordan Rd., Troy, NY 12180 USA, Tel: +1-518-285-5662, Fax: +1-518-285-5601, E-mail: daburns@usgs.gov; and Christopher P. Cirmo, Department of Geology, State University of New York at Cortland, Cortland, NY 13045 USA, Tel: +1-607-753-2924, Fax: +1-607-753-2927, E-mail: cirmoc@cortland.edu

H05 Hydrological, Geomorphological, and Biogeochemical Functions of Riparian Zones (Joint with B)
Riparian zones, the vegetated regions adjacent to streams, affect flood plain hydraulics, river channel morphology, sediment transport, and stream water quality (through biogeochemical processes). Riparian restoration efforts are undertaken to restore habitat and improve water quality, although the interactions among physical, chemical, and biological components of the riparian zone are poorly understood. The purpose of this session is to examine the physical, biological, biogeochemical, and ecological functions of vegetated flood plains and riparian zones. Topics of interest include runoff generation and storage, nutrient flux, erosion and sedimentation, flow resistance, flood plain-channel interactions, and ecological response.
Conveners: Karen Prestegaard, Department of Geology, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 USA, Tel: +1-301-405-6982, Fax +1-301-314-9661, E-mail: kpresto@ glue.umd.edu; and Jim Pizzuto, Department of Geology, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716, Tel: +1-302-831-2710, Fax: +1-302-831-4158, E-mail: pizzuto@udel.edu

H12 Animal Feeding Operations: Environmental Quality, Fluxes, Impacts, and Monitoring at the Local, Farm, and Water/Airshed Scale (Joint with B)
Recent regulatory focus on Animal Feeding Operations (AFOs, aka CAFOs or confined animal facilities, for dairy cows, cattle, swine, and poultry) for control of air- and water-borne contamination has renewed interest among scientists and engineers to better understand the environmental fluxes associated with large-scale AFOs. AFO-related effects on the environment have raised concerns about (1) the quality of surface- and ground-water resources; specifically, the occurrence and fate of phosphorus, nitrate/nitrite, salts, trace elements, pathogens, and pharmaceuticals; (2) gas emissions to the atmosphere; specifically, the release of ammonia, methane, dust, odorous compounds, pathogens; and (3) proliferation of biologic vectors (e.g., microorganisms, flies, mosquitoes) as a source of contamination and threat to human and environmental health. This session brings together scientists and applied researchers across a multidiscipline spectrum of the atmospheric, hydrologic, geochemical, and biologic sciences, to present the most recent research on the processes controlling environmental fluxes of AFO- related residuals and to present monitoring strategies used to quantify fluxes of these residuals and assess the efficacy of various management practices. This session will help promote a solid and integrated scientific understanding of the environmental processes affecting the quality of air, surface water, soil, and ground water across local AFO, watershed, and airshed scales, which is key toward developing integrated management solutions.
Conveners: Thomas Harter, Department of Land, Air and Water Resources, University of California, Davis, Kearney Agricultural Center, 9240 S. Riverbend Ave., Parlier, CA 93648 USA, Tel: +1-559-646-6569, Fax: +1-559-646-6593, E-mail: thharter@ucdavis. edu; and Franceska Wilde, U.S. Geological Survey, Office of Water Quality, National Center 412, Reston, VA 20192 USA, Tel: +1-703-648-6866, Fax: +1-703-648-5722, E-mail: fwilde@usgs.gov; Jerry Hatfield, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, National Soil Tilth Laboratory, 2150 Pammel Drive, Ames, IA 50011 USA, Tel: +1-515-294-5723, E-mail: hatfield@nstl.gov

H17 Biological and Hydrological Impacts of Land Use and Land Use Change in the Mid-Atlantic Region (Joint with B)
The Mid-Atlantic region of the United States consists of a toposequence of coastal plains, piedmont and ridge and valley terrain and contains the watersheds of the Chesapeake Bay, Delaware and Pamlico-Albemarle Sound. Within this region a complex landscape has been created by historical land settlement, current agricultural and forestry practices, urban development and suburban sprawl. The storage and flux of carbon, nutrients, water and energy in the land surface and lower atmosphere have been altered to various degrees by these processes with significant impacts on water supply, quality and flooding, micro and mesoscale climate dynamics, and ecosystem processes. An understanding of the dynamics of land use and land cover change and their impacts on land-atmosphere processes, coupled with modeling and strategic monitoring programs, is needed to develop effective management policies for the region. This session will emphasize land use and land cover change in this region, their impacts on biophysical processes, approaches to land use modeling, environmental monitoring techniques and other policy relevant topics.
Conveners: S. D. Prince, Mid Atlantic Regional Earth Science Applications Center, Department of Geography, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742-8225 USA, Tel: +1-301-405-4062, Fax: +1-301-314-9299, E-mail: sp43@umail.umd.edu; and L. E. Band, Department of Geography, University of North Carolina, CB #3220, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-3220 USA, Tel: +1-919-962-3921, Fax: +1-919-962-1537, E-mail: lband@email.unc.edu

OS04 Holocene to Modern Carbon Dioxide Sources and Sinks (Joint with A, B, GS, H, MSA, AGU Committee on Global Environmental Change)
Efforts to balance the global carbon budget have focused on the so-called "missing sink" implied by the imbalance among identified modern annual sources and sinks of anthropogenic CO2. Relatively little attention has been devoted to the inherently historical nature of the anthropogenic CO2 budget imbalance. Estimates of identified annual CO2 fluxes, such as uptake by the oceans and net emissions from human land use, must be derived from calculation of cumulative effects over recent decades and centuries. Likewise, identification of "missing" CO2 sinks will require not only evidence in contemporary processes, but also consistency with the record of historical effects. The task of understanding the historical CO2 budget is made more difficult by the observation that the Holocence global carbon cycle was not at a steady state. Although the anthropogenic CO2 budget has overwhelmed the background of Holocene CO2 variations on a global scale, historical relationships between natural and anthropogenic effects may be less clear at the regional geographic scale required for identification of specific sources and sinks. This session will examine important Holocene to modern CO2 sources and sinks, with emphasis on reconstructing the global carbon budget of recent decades to millennia, and on quantifying relationships among uncertainties in the historical and modern CO2 budget.
Conveners: Eric Sundquist, U.S. Geological Survey, Woods Hole, MA USA; and A. Indermuehle, University of Bern, Switzerland

Education (ED)

ED01 Portal to the Future: The Digital Library for Earth System Education (Joint with NAGT, AGU Committee on Education and Human Resources)
The Digital Library for Earth System Education (DLESE) is a community wide effort to develop a web-based facility that will provide: 1) convenient and organized access to high-quality Earth system education materials, 2) student friendly interfaces to Earth data, and 3) a community center for Earth system educators in K-12, undergraduate, graduate and informal venues. This session will showcase plans for library features and services developed by Earth system educators and digital librarians at the Portal to the Future workshop and report progress on initial phases of library development. In addition, papers will be solicited from each of the core Earth science disciplines describing the ways in which the library might meet their key needs. Contributed papers (oral and poster) responding to the initial library plans (geo_digital_library.ou.edu) and describing potential contributions to the library are invited.
Conveners: Ed Geary, Don Johnson, Mary Marlino, Dave Mogk, John Snow; and Cathryn A. Manduca, Keck Geology Consortium Coordinator, Carleton College, Northfield, MN 55057 USA, Tel: +1-507-646- 4425, Fax: +1-507-646-4400, E-mail: cmanduca@ carleton.edu

ED02 Getting Research-Based Approaches to Teaching Into the K-12 Science Classroom (Joint with NAGT, AGU Committee on Education and Human Resources)
National, state and local K-12 science education standards have increasingly emphasized inquiry- and process-based approaches to teaching and learning science. These methods embolden the science curriculum and enrich the science experience of students. Breaking the mold of traditional, content-driven science curricula can be accomplished in two ways: 1) exposing existing and prospective K-12 teachers to "real" science research experiences, which will facilitate 2) involving K-12 students in science research. These research experiences are particularly important in the ongoing debate about creationism and science. Effectively presenting the nature of scientific research will help to alleviate public misconceptions about the nature of scientific inquiry. Presenting research experiences to both K-12 teachers, and ultimately, K-12 students involve numerous challenges which are different from those faced by traditional science research institutions, and could involve unique collaborations between active researchers and the K-12 education community. The conveners invite papers which detail the efforts of educators to enhance the K-12 science curriculum with research-based approaches to teaching.
Conveners: Robert Schlichting, Department of Geology, 17 Cramer Hall, Portland State University, 1721 SW Broadway, Portland, OR 97201 USA, Tel: +1-503-232-8024, Fax: +1-503-725-3025, E-mail: rbs@imagina.com; and Andrew Fountain, Department of Geology, 17 Cramer Hall, Portland State University, 1721 SW Broadway, Portland, OR 97201 USA, Tel: +1-503-725-3386, Fax: +1-503-725-3025, E-mail: andrew@pdx.edu

ED03 Place and Culture in Geoscience Education (Joint with NAGT, AGU Committee on Education and Human Resources)
Under represented minority groups, including those indigenous to a particular place (such as Native Americans and Pacific Islanders) and groups now living in both rural and urban areas (such as African- Americans and Hispanic Americans), remain the least represented in the geosciences. A promising means of improving this situation is to enhance K-16 curricula and methods with place-specific and culturally-relevant content in schools serving predominantly minority communities. This may be accomplished by various means, including focusing field or lab exercises on local environments, using case studies of historical or modern local uses of Earth materials and features, or redesigning curricula to incorporate non-Euro- American empirical knowledge and interpretation of Earth systems (ethnogeoscience). Such activities have twofold value: they increase the relevance and attraction of the geosciences to students from under represented groups; and if shared with the community at large, can diversify geoscience curricula for mainstream students, pre-and in-service teachers, and possibly even mid-career professionals. The overall goal is to increase local control and understanding of geoscience issues to benefit communities and professionals alike. The co-conveners seek papers describing successful integrations of place, people, language, and culture into geoscience content or pedagogy for informal or K-16 teaching. If possible, oral, audio-visual, and poster presentations will be accommodated, but presenters are encouraged to be flexible.
Conveners: Steve Semken, Department of Natural Sciences/Navajo Dryland Environments Laboratory, Dine College, PO Box 580, Shiprock, NM 87420 USA, Tel: +1-505-368-2020, Fax: +1-505-368-2023, E-mail: scsemken@shiprock.ncc.cc.nm.us; and Eric Riggs, Department of Geological Sciences, San Diego State University, 5500 Campanile Dr., San Diego, CA 92182-1020 USA, Tel: +1-619-594-5592, Fax: +1-619-594-4372, E-mail: eriggs@geology.sdsu.edu

ED04 Geoscience Education and Outreach in the Next Phase of the Ocean Drilling Program: IODP Link
This session has been canceled.

ED05 Highlights of Education and Public Outreach Activities Under Way in the Space Physics and Aeronomy, Planetary Sciences, and Atmospheric Sciences Sections (Joint with A, P, SPA, NAGT, AGU Committee on Education and Human Resources)
Over the past several years, numerous programs and products have been developed that bring the excitement of our science field to the public as well as the pre-college education community. Innovative partnership have developed between scientists and educators, facilitating contributions from the scientific community in efforts to improve pre-college geoscience education. This session provides an opportunity to share highlights of new and ongoing education and public outreach programs related to space physics and aeronomy, atmospheric sciences, and planetary sciences. Both oral and poster presentations are solicited. We ask that developers of ongoing programs and existing products highlight what is new and emphasize the lessons learned from what has already been accomplished. Since 2000 is the year of solar maximum we especially encourage contributions on any products or programs related to this event.
Convener: Roberta Johnson, Space Physics Research Lab, University of Michigan, 2455 Hayward St., Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2143 USA, Tel: +1-734-647-3430, Fax: +1-734-763-0437, E-mail: rmjohnsn@umich.edu; Cherilynn A. Morrow, Manager for Education and Outreach, Space Science Institute, 3100 Marine Street, Room A353, Boulder, CO 80303-1058 USA, Tel: +1-303-492-7321, Fax: +1-303-492-3789, E-mail: camorrow@colorado.edu

ED06 Teaching Earth Systems Using Landsat and Other Remote Sensing Data Sets (Joint with NAGT, AGU Committee on Education and Human Resources)
With the launch of Landsat-7 and Terra in 1999, affordable remote sensing data sets are now available to educators for use in the K-12, community college, and undergraduate/graduate curriculums. Educational and outreach programs using older Landsat, AVHRR and other satellite data have increased in number over the past few years, which positions these programs to take advantage of the newer remote sensing data sets. In addition, the use of remote sensing data and image processing for teaching earth science, geography and mathematics concepts are increasing. The conveners invite contributions that describe innovative projects and programs that make use of remote sensing data in the classroom environment.
Conveners: Stephanie Stockman, Landsat 7 Project Science Office/SSAI, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 921, Greenbelt, MD 20771 USA, Tel: +1-301-614-6457, Fax: +1-301-614-6522, E-mail: stockman@core2. gsfc.nasa.gov; Carolyn Merry, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 USA, Tel: +1-614-292-6889, Fax: +1-614-292-3780, E-mail: merry.1@osu.edu

ED07 The Role of Professional and Scientific Societies and Government Agencies in Supporting an Integrated Approach to Geoscience Education Through Local, Regional, and National Partnerships: A Special Session in Memory of James V. O'Connor (Joint with NAGT, AGU Committee on Education and Human Resources)
The Washington, D.C. location of the Spring 2000 AGU meeting provides a unique opportunity to bring together professional and scientific societies and numerous federal agencies to provide an overview of their efforts that take an integrated approach to geoscience education. Through partnerships and with a dedication to the principle of teaching about the Earth from an integrated systems perspective, many area organizations are committed to the ideal of educating everyone about the physical world around them. This philosophy was eloquently exemplified in the life of James (Jim) V. O'Connor, Washington, D.C. city geologist, and long time supporter of education in the District of Columbia. Jim saw an opportunity to teach integrated science on every street corner and in the stonework of every building. He believed strongly that integrated science was the key to helping people understand the relevance of the sciences, and he modeled true partnership with many organizations in an effort to bring science to the city that he loved. In honor of Jim, this AGU session will highlight the efforts of professional and scientific societies and federal agencies that integrate science and education through partnerships to provide real understanding about the physical world that we live in to students, teachers and the general public.
Conveners: M. Frank Watt Ireton, American Geophysical Union, 2000 Florida Avenue, N.W., Washington, DC 20009 USA, Tel: +1-202-777-7508, Fax: +1-202-328-0566, E-mail: fireton@agu.org; Michael J. Smith, American Geological Institute, Tel: +1-703-379-2480, E-mail: msmith@agiweb.org; Stephanie A. Stockman, SSAI NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Tel: +1-301-614-6457, E-mail: stockman@core2.gsfc.nasa.gov; and Laure G. Wallace, U.S. Geological Survey, +1-703-648-6515, E-mail: lwallace@usgs.gov

ED08 Forum on Teacher Preparation for Earth Science Education: Needs, Practices, and the Role of Geoscience Societies (Joint with GSA, NAGT, AGU Committee on Education and Human Resources)
Many geoscience organizations have realized that the emphasis on Earth Science within the National Science Education Standards affords our community an unprecedented opportunity to build earth science literacy in the next generation. Many states have recently developed science standards that include earth and space science, and curriculum developers have produced programs based upon the vision of standards. Yet districts and schools that seek to implement earth and space science standards face additional obstacles. Among the most serious impediments is the scarcity of teachers with the content area knowledge and skills needed to implement standards-based programs. The forum will address this problem by asking three basic questions: 1) What needs must be met in teacher preparation, certification, and in-service training programs to generate a knowledgeable, skilled cadre of elementary and secondary earth science teachers? 2) What defines a successful preparation, certification, or in-service training program? Can "best practices" be identified? 3) What role can geoscience organizations serve toward meeting needs and supporting successes?
Conveners: Cathleen May, Director for Science and Outreach, Geological Society of America, 3300 Penrose Place, PO Box 9140, Boulder, CO 80301 USA, Tel: +1-303-447-2020, ext. 195, Fax: +1-303-447-1133, E-mail: cmay@geosociety.org; and Mike Smith, Director of Education, American Geological Institute, 4220 King Street, Alexandria, VA 22302-1502 USA, Tel: +1-703-379-2480, Fax: +1-703-379-7563, E-mail: msmith@agiweb.org, Web site: http://www.agiweb.org/earthcomm/

ED09 Exploration of Digital Data in Undergraduate Courses
Traditional undergraduate Earth Science courses are based on the lecture format, supplemented by the 'hands on' laboratory. This is changing rapidly as classrooms become increasingly better wired. The easy availability of numerous real-world, sometimes even real-time datasets on the web makes it possible for students to analyze and interpret the data during lecture or laboratory sessions. In many of the introductory and core courses, for which data were previously difficult to access and could take years to accumulate, data are now available with a few mouse clicks. Some of these data are even available in spectacularly rendered 3-D 'worlds.' This avalanche can be difficult to ride. To provide a forum in which we can learn from one another about techniques and strategies, we solicit contributions that demonstrate successes (and failures!) in the use of digital data in the earth science classroom and teaching laboratory.
Conveners: Jim Hays, E-mail: jimhays@ldeo.columbia.edu); Alex Moore, E-mail: moore@geology.geo.cornell.edu; Matt Becker and Marcus Bursik, Department of Geology, SUNY, Buffalo, NY 14260 USA, Tel: +1-716-645-6800, ext. 3992, Fax: +1-716-645-3999, E-mail: mwbecker@geology.buffalo.edu, mib@geology.buffalo.edu

GP05 The 400th Anniversary of Gilbert's "De Magnete" (Joint with ED, AGU History of Geophysics Committee)
In 1600, William Gilbert of Colchester published "De Magnete", the book which put magnetism on a firm scientific basis (and incidentally also the term 'electric force'). On this anniversary we will recount the role of Gilbert's writing and the history of geomagnetism from his time to ours.
Convener: David P. Stern, Planetary Magnetospheres Branch, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 695, Greenbelt, MD 20771 USA, Tel: +1-301-286-8292, Fax: +1-301-286-0212, E-mail: u5dps@lepvax.gsfc.nasa. gov

Geodesy (G)

G01 Densification of the ITRF Reference Frame in North America
The International Association of Geodesy (IAG) is undergoing growth and evolution, particularly regarding the aspects of providing and coordinating geodetic services. The most prominent recent example of new services is the International GPS Service (IGS), which promotes international standards for GPS acquisition and analysis, deploys and operates a global GPS tracking system, and distributes GPS data and data products, such as precise orbits and clock estimates. As a growing effort, the objective of the IGS Densification Program is to develop a dense reference frame, of few-millimeter accuracy, on a global basis. This objective is achieved through a distributed-processing approach, where Associate Analysis Centers provide regional coordinate solutions and covariance matrices to Global Network Associate Analysis Centers. This session is devoted to scientific procedures and methodologies to compute and maintain a North American Reference Frame (NAREF), coordinates, velocities, and covariances, development of weekly and cumulative solutions, and results from such time series. Examples of problems addressed in this session could include solution intercomparisons, covariance calibration, GPS station weighting schemes in network combinations, strategies for combining data sets derived from common data sources, effects of crustal motion, as along the western coast of North America and in the Caribbean, post-glacial rebound, participating GPS network status, and comparisons with other modern measurement techniques.
Conveners: Dennis G. Milbert, National Geodetic Survey, N/NGS, NOAA, 1315 East-West Hwy., Silver Spring, MD 20910-3282 USA, Tel: +1-301-713-3202, Fax: +1-301-713-4176, E-mail: Dennis.Milbert@noaa.gov; and Mike Craymer, Geodetic Survey Division, Natural Resources Canada, 615 Booth St., Ottawa, ONT K1A 0E9, Canada, Tel: +1-613-947-1829, Fax: +1-613-992-6628, E-mail: craymer@nrcan.gc.ca

G02 Radar Interferometry Tutorial and Science Results (Joint with S, T)
The application of Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry to geodetic and topographic mapping has led to some impressive results in a variety of science areas, including coseismic modeling of fault dislocations, understanding postseismic fluid transport, discovery of new aseismically creeping faults, and modeling of volcanic processes at depth. Yet the technique is still used by only a small part of the science community because data is either not available or affordable, software is only now becoming robust and affordable, and the methods are largely foreign to geoscientists. This session is designed to address some of these issues by providing insight into the methods and limitations of interferometry, available software packages and their characteristics, and directions for future developments in the science and techniques in anticipation of a host of orbiting radars in the next decade. This session will have two parts, one in the morning addressing techniques of interferometry, and the other in the afternoon oriented toward science results and future directions. The tutorial will focus on techniques for geodetic applications and surface change measurements. Conferees should come away from the session with an appreciation of the strengths and limitations of the method, the processing steps and data requirements for successful imaging geodesy, and an overview of available software. The afternoon science session will address the unique science afforded by spatially dense measurements, or that might be enabled given an optimized measurement set.
Conveners: Paul Rosen, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Mail Stop 300-235, 4800 Oak Grove Dr., Pasadena, CA 91109-8099 USA, Tel: +1-818-354-0023, E-mail: paul.rosen@jpl.nasa. gov; and Wayne Thatcher, USGS Menlo Park, 345 Middlefield Rd., MS 977, Menlo Park, CA 94025 USA, Tel: +1-650-329-4810, E-mail: thatcher@ usgs.gov

G03 Design of Geodetic/Seismic Networks for Geophysical Investigations (Joint with S)
Arrays of geodetic and seismic instrumentation are growing rapidly, and new initiatives involving very large/dense arrays of ~1000 stations are on the drawing board, including the Plate Boundary Observatory (Geodesy), and the U.S. Array (Seismology). Planned geodetic and seismic networks for geophysical investigations should have spatial and temporal sampling designed to optimize scientific return, subject to a variety of resource and environmental constraints. This session aims to explore how best to quantify and realize optimal network design in theory and practice, with approaches ranging from formal methods, to forward modeling and other heuristic approaches, and to rules-of-thumb learned from experience. Presentations are welcome on a broad variety of topics which in some way can contribute towards best practice in the design of geophysical arrays, whether they be on specific techniques (seismology, GPS, strainmeters, tiltmeters) directed at specific geophysical parameters; on optimal spatial configuration of specific arrays (PBO or U.S. Array); on case studies of existing arrays; on design features aimed at resolving correlated parameters; on multi-technique synergy; on temporal sampling; and on formal methods of experiment design.
Conveners: Geoff Blewitt, Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology and Seismological Laboratory, Mail Stop 178, University of Nevada, Reno, NV 89557-0088 USA, Tel: +1-775-784-6691, ext.171, Fax: +1-775-784-1709, E-mail: gblewitt@unr.edu, Web site: http://www.nbmg.unr.edu/staff/geoff.htm

G04 Monitoring Global Ocean Topography and Mean Sea Level With Satellite Altimetry (Joint with OS)
Ocean topography and mean sea level are powerful indicators of the state of the ocean circulation as well as the heat and water storage of the global oceans. Precision measurement of these variables from space with the technique of satellite radar altimetry has been demonstrated by the TOPEX/Poseidon and the ERS altimetric missions in the 1990s. The challenge in the next decade is to continue the measurement with new missions that will evolve into a permanent observing system for producing a long-term, continuous, and consistent data record for monitoring, understanding, and predicting the state of the ocean and its effect on climate. To meet this challenge, a host of technical issues need to be addressed: merging data collected from different missions; consistency in terms of orbit determination, geodetic reference frames, instrument and geophysical corrections; calibration and validation techniques (GPS, laser, DORIS, transponders, tide gauges, etc.); data assimilation by models for producing products of the state of the ocean. This special session is calling for papers addressing these issues as well as scientific results from analyzing the multiple-year data record from existing altimetric missions. Presentations on new measurement techniques and mission status are also encouraged.
Conveners: Lee-Lueng Fu, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 USA, Tel: +1-818-354-8167, Fax: +1-818-393-6720, E-mail: llf@pacific.jpl.nasa.gov; and Yves Menard, Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales, 18 Ave. E. Belin, Toulouse 31055, France, Tel: +33-5-61-27-48-72, Fax: +33-5-61-28-25-95, E-mail: yves.menard@cnes.fr

G05 GFO-1 CAL/VAL and Initial Science Results
This session has been canceled.

GP01 Decade of Geopotential Research (Joint with G)
The 'Decade of Geopotential Research', inaugurated with the launch of Orsted and Sunsat in February of 1999, is an international effort to promote and coordinate a continuous monitoring of the geopotential (magnetic and gravity) field variability in the near-Earth environment. Upcoming missions include the launch of SAC-C and CHAMP in early 2000 and GRACE in 2001. Contributions are solicited on these missions and on ground-based monitoring of the geopotential fields.
Conveners: John LaBrecque, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, 4800 Oak Grove Dr., Pasadena, CA 91109 USA, Tel: +1-818-354-7827, Fax: +1-818-393-3628, E-mail: jlabrecq@pop. jpl.nasa.gov; and Ben Chao, Space Geodesy Branch, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 USA, Tel: +1-301-614-6104, Fax: +1-301-614-6099, E-mail: chao@ bowie.gsfc.nasa.gov

Geomagnetism and Paleomagnetism (GP)

GP01 Decade of Geopotential Research (Joint with G)
The 'Decade of Geopotential Research', inaugurated with the launch of Orsted and Sunsat in February of 1999, is an international effort to promote and coordinate a continuous monitoring of the geopotential (magnetic and gravity) field variability in the near-Earth environment. Upcoming missions include the launch of SAC-C and CHAMP in early 2000 and GRACE in 2001. Contributions are solicited on these missions and on ground-based monitoring of the geopotential fields.
Conveners: John LaBrecque, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, 4800 Oak Grove Dr., Pasadena, CA 91109 USA, Tel: +1-818-354-7827, Fax: +1-818-393-3628, E-mail: jlabrecq@pop. jpl.nasa.gov; and Ben Chao, Space Geodesy Branch, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 USA, Tel: +1-301-614-6104, Fax: +1-301-614-6099, E-mail: chao@ bowie.gsfc.nasa.gov

GP02 Theoretical, Computational, and Experimental Dynamo Progress (Joint with AGU Committee on Mineral and Rock Physics, AGU Committee on Solid Earth and Deep Interior)
New computational horsepower and a new generation of liquid metal experiments are bringing vigor into the understanding of the dynamo generation mechanism for magnetic fields. This session will bring together researchers pursuing diverse approaches to understanding this complex physical process.
Conveners: Daniel P. Lathrop, 3319A A. V. Williams Bldg., Department of Physics, Institute for Plasma Research, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 USA, Tel: +1-301-405-1594, Fax: +1-301-405-1678, E-mail: dpl@complex.umd.edu; Peter Olson, Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218 USA, Tel: +1-410-516-7707, E-mail: olson@gibbs.eps.jhu.edu; and Weijia Kuang, Space Geodesy Branch, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 926, Greenbelt, MD 20771 USA, Tel: +1-301-614-6108, E-mail: kuang@bowie. gsfc.nasa.gov

GP03 Remanent Magnetism in Planetary Bodies (Joint with MSA, P)
Recent and upcoming space missions (Mars Global Surveyor, NEAR, Mercury Messenger) have included magnetometers to provide insight into the remanent magnetism of planetary materials. This session provides a forum for understanding that remanent magnetism and will include talks on the detection of remanent magnetic planetary fields, and the nature and origin of magnetic remanence in planetary crustal materials. Other topics include modelling of large scale magnetic anomalies, geologic setting of magnetic mineral distributions, and magnetic petrology.
Conveners: Gunther Kletetschka, Geodynamics and Astrochemistry Branches, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 691, Greenbelt, MD 20771 USA, Tel: +1-301-286-3804, E-mail: gunther@denali.gsfc.nasa.gov; and Robert Hargraves, Department of Geological and Geophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08540 USA, E-mail: robh@princeton.edu

GP04 Interpretation of Seismic and Geopotential Data Sets (Joint with S, T)
This session focuses on the use of geophysical surveys to distinguish among tectonic scenarios and for environmental monitoring.
Conveners: D. Ravat, Department of Geology, Southern Illinois University, Carbondale, IL 62901-4324 USA, Tel: +1-618-453-7352, Fax: +1-618-453-7393, E-mail: tiku@gauss. geo.siu.edu; and John H. McBride, Illinois State Geological Survey, University of Illinois at Champaign-Urbana, 615 E. Peabody Dr., Champaign, IL 61820 USA, Tel: +1-217-333-5107, Fax: +1-217-333-2830, E-mail: mcbride@isgs.uiuc.edu

GP05 The 400th Anniversary of Gilbert's "De Magnete" (Joint with ED, AGU History of Geophysics Committee)
In 1600, William Gilbert of Colchester published "De Magnete", the book which put magnetism on a firm scientific basis (and incidentally also the term 'electric force'). On this anniversary we will recount the role of Gilbert's writing and the history of geomagnetism from his time to ours.
Convener: David P. Stern, Planetary Magnetospheres Branch, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 695, Greenbelt, MD 20771 USA, Tel: +1-301-286-8292, Fax: +1-301-286-0212, E-mail: u5dps@lepvax.gsfc.nasa. gov

GP06 Generation and Propagation of Electromagnetic Fields in the Oceans (Joint with OS)
Electromagnetic fields are generated both by the motion of seawater in the Earth's main magnetic field and by time-varying external magnetic fields. The interpretation of these fields provides information on ocean flow, and on conductivity variations in the underlying and adjacent crust and mantle. Contributions which address these themes are solicited.
Conveners: Robert Tyler, Applied Physics Laboratory, Ocean Physics Department, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98105 USA, Tel: +1-206-221-2362, Fax: +1-206-543-6785, E-mail: tyler@apl.washington.edu; and Steven Constable, IGPP, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, La Jolla, CA 92093 USA, Tel: +1-858-534-2409, Fax: +1-858-534-8090, E-mail: sconstable@ucsd.edu

GP07 Rock and Paleo Magnetism
Contributions are solicited on the magnetic properties of rocks and minerals, as are contributions which address the science or applications of paleomagnetism.
Convener: John A. Stamatakos, CNWRA, Southwest Research Institute, San Antonio, TX 78228 USA, Tel: +1-210-522-5247, E-mail: jstam@swri.edu

A07 Data Assimilation: Atmospheric, Oceanic, Chemical, and Space Weather (Joint with GP, OS, P, SA, SH, SM)
We solicit papers for a special session on model assimilation of geophysical data. Special emphasis is being given to problems with intrinsic time scales longer than numerical weather prediction and the development of assimilation products that are robust for climate and chemical applications. The following foci are of special interest:
* The treatment of model and observation bias in assimilation systems and the impact of bias on the quality of assimilated data sets.
* The treatment of large-scale ocean state estimation, covariance modeling of observational and model errors or validation of ocean assimilation analyses for climate studies.
* The treatment of observations of stratospheric and tropospheric constituent measurement in both chemical and climate applications, including study of transport processes.
* The treatment of ionospheric observations and development of coupled Sun-Earth and magnetospheric models for large-scale space-weather and geomagnetism applications.
The organizers will invite speakers to provide unifying themes and a framework for the contributed talks.
Conveners: Richard B. Rood, Data Assimilation Office, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 910.3, Greenbelt, MD 20771 USA, Tel: +1-301-614-6155, Fax: +1-301-614-6297, E-mail: rrood@dao.gsfc.nasa.gov; Michele M. Rienecker, Oceans and Ice Branch, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 971.0, Greenbelt, MD 20771 USA, Tel: +1-301-614-5642, Fax: +1-301-614-5644, E-mail: rienecke@mohawk.gsfc.nasa.gov; and Peter M. Lyster, Data Assimilation Office, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 910.3, Greenbelt, MD 20771 USA, Tel: +1-301-614-6179, Fax: +1-301-614-6297, E-mail: plyster@dao.gsfc.nasa.gov

B07 Biogeography (Joint with A, GP, GSA)
The relationship between geographic position, climate, and ecosystems has been an important foundation for using paleontological records for determining past climates and paleogeography. Under conditions of rapid climate change, however, these relationships must be re-examined and the causal factors must be explored so that future biome distributions can be predicted. Abstracts are solicited from all fields of biogeography and their bearing on climate and paleogeography.
Conveners: Fred Ziegler, Department of Geophysical Sciences, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 USA, Tel: +1-773-702-8146, Fax: +1-773-702-9505, E-mail: ziegler@geol. uchicago.edu; and Thompson Webb III, Department of Geological Sciences, Brown University, Providence, RI 02912 USA, Tel: +1-401-863-3128, Fax: +1-401-863-2058, E-mail: thompson_webb_iii@brown.edu

P01 Mercury: Scientific Issues and Opportunities (Joint with GP, SPA)
The innermost planet is one of the least studied objects in the solar system, yet improving our knowledge of Mercury is fundamental to generalizing our understanding of the processes that have governed the formation, evolution, and dynamics of the terrestrial planets. Visited to date by only a single spacecraft a quarter of a century ago, Mercury is now the focus of forthcoming missions by several space agencies. In anticipation of these missions, this session will highlight the latest findings from Mercury as well as the principal issues to be addressed by spacecraft observations of that planet. Papers on Mercury's solid-body dynamics, interior structure, magnetic field, crustal composition, geological history, surface processes, and atmospheric and magnetospheric structure and dynamics are all welcome. We also invite contributions dealing with the properties of the Mercury environment in the inner heliosphere.
Conveners: Sean C. Solomon, Department of Terrestrial Magnetism, Carnegie Institution of Washington, 5241 Broad Branch Rd., N.W., Washington, DC 20015 USA, Tel: +1-202-686-4370, ext. 4444, Fax: +1-202-364-8726, E-mail: scs@dtm.ciw.edu; Mark S. Robinson, Department of Geological Sciences, Locy Hall 309, Northwestern University, 1847 Sheridan Road, Evanston, IL 60208-2150 USA, Tel: +1-847-467-1825, Fax: +1-847-491-8060, E-mail: robinson@earth.nwu.edu; and Thomas H. Zurbuchen, Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic, and Space Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 USA, Tel: +1-734-647-6835, Fax: +1-734-764-4585, E-mail: thomasz@umich.edu

S03 The Structure of the Earth's Deep Mantle and Core, and Implications for Dynamics and the Magnetic Field (Joint with GP, T, AGU Committee on Solid Earth and Deep Interior)
The deep mantle, core, and the interface between them attracts scientists working on a range of problems related to Earth's composition, dynamics, evolution, and its magnetic field. The base of the mantle plays an important role as one of the major boundary layers for mantle convection and defines the thermal and conductive boundary conditions for core dynamics and the geodynamo that generates and sustains Earth's magnetic field. In this session, we solicit contributions from seismic imaging, computational geodynamics, mantle mineralogy and phase chemistry, and geomagnetic studies that provide new constraints on lateral variation in elastic properties, density, composition, seismic anisotropy, the temperature profile across the boundary layer, and the topography of the CMB.
Conveners: Jeremy Bloxham, Earth and Planetary Sciences, Harvard University, 20 Oxford St., Cambridge, MA 02138 USA, Tel: +1-617-495-9517, E-mail: bloxham@geophysics.harvard.edu; Ed Garnero, Arizona State University, Tel: +1-480-965-7653, E-mail: garnero@asu.edu; and Rob van der Hilst, Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 USA, Tel: +1-617-253-6977, E-mail: hilst@mit.edu

T01 Initiation of Retroarc Foreland-Basin Development: Constraints and Models (Joint with GP, GSA)
Located on the continental interior side of contractional, continental-margin orogens, retroarc foreland basins are large, long-lived features. The mechanical and sedimentological development of mature retroarc foreland basins are increasingly understood. However, less well known are the earliest stages of formation, prior to significant sediment accumulation. The goal of this session is to provide a forum in which cross-disciplinary findings that are relevant to the processes of retroarc foreland-basin creation can be evaluated. Both theoretical and empirical presentations are encouraged from a variety of disciplines, such as sedimentology and stratigraphy, thermochronometry, reflection seismic profiling, rheological modeling, potential field modeling, and structural mapping. We further encourage field-based contributions both from large, well-developed basins, such as the Central Andean and Cretaceous Western (North America) Interior basins, and from smaller and/or lesser known basins. Fundamental questions that this session will address include: (1) What is the time scale over which retroarc foreland basins are created? (2) What is the role of strike-slip? (3) How does topography evolve in nascent retroarc foreland basins and any adjacent thrust belt? (4) What crustal conditions are necessary for basin formation?
Convener: Johan P. Erikson, Department of Earth Sciences, Dartmouth College, PO Box 407, Meriden, NH 03770 USA, Tel: +1-603-469-3529, Fax: +1-603-469-2040, E-mail: jerikson@kua.org

Geochemical Society (GS)

GS01 Accessory Minerals: The Current State of Knowledge from Isotopes, Experiments, and Trace Element Studies (Joint with MSA, V)
In the past few years there has been considerable growing interest throughout the geologic community regarding the role of accessory minerals in solving geological problems. These include analyzing extremely small fragments of minerals such as zircon, monazite, and titanite to high degrees of age precision, and using in situ techniques for measuring both radiogenetic and stable isotopes. Related to this, there have been several experimental studies on diffusive transport of elements and isotopes of interest to both the radiogenetic and stable isotope community. Many recent papers have presented results of studies using the electron microprobe to analyze trace elements and to determine the age of minerals such as monazite and xenotime, and on measuring trace elements in situ using laser ablation ICP-MS and SIMS in a wide range of accessory minerals. Several studies have integrated imaging techniques such as cathodoluminescence and back-scattered electron imaging to guide the analysis location of in situ analyses. This proposed session will bring together geologists and geochemists who do research within these different areas to present their methods and results, and to discuss ideas on expanding and perfecting these techniques.
Convener: John M. Hanchar, Geology, George Washington University, Tel: +1-202-994-4336, E-mail: jhanch@gwu.edu

GS02 Astrobiology Biosignatures (Joint with B, MSA, P)
The development of unambiguous criteria with which to assess the presence or absence of biological processes in geological settings forms a critical component of a successful astrobiology research program. Biosignatures research will guide site selection for extraterrestrial missions, as well as development of analytical protocols and equipment for analysis of returned samples. I propose a special AGU session to provide the astrobiology biosignatures research community an opportunity to present and discuss current research findings. Relevant topics include morphological, isotopic and mineralogical biosignatures, both in the modern environment as well as the geologic fossil record.
Convener: William W. (Bill) Barker, Geology and Geophysics University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI USA, Tel: +1-608-262-3738, E-mail: barker@geology.wisc.edu

GS03 Biological-Chemical Interactions in Hydrothermal Systems (Joint with B, OS)
Over the past 2 decades, hydrothermal systems have been extensively studied as sites of intense chemical and biological activity. There exists a close linkage between chemical reactions (i.e. sulfide generation) within the water-rock system and the surrounding fauna. Furthermore it has been proposed that the presence of mineral- catalyzed reactions within hydrothermal vents led to the eventual organization and establishment of the first life forms on Earth. Even after life's genesis the production of reduced compounds within hydrothermal systems may have played an important role in supporting Archaean life forms. This session seeks to bring together scientists examining these and other related processes to further our understanding of the connections between simple rock-fluid reactions and surrounding life forms.
Conveners: Jay A. Brandes, Marine Sciences Institute, University of Texas at Austin, 750 Channel View Dr., Port Aransas, TX 78373 USA, Tel: +1-361-749-6756, Fax: +1-361-749-6777, E-mail: brandes@utmsi.utexas. edu; and John A. Baross, Department of Oceanography, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98125 USA, E-mail: jbaross@u. washington.edu

H02 Fate of Agricultural Nitrogen in Drainage Basins (Joint with B, GS)
Elevated concentrations of nitrogen species (primarily nitrate) are a common occurrence in rivers and streams draining agricultural areas, and may be responsible for ecosystem degradation in estuarine and coastal marine environments such as the Chesapeake Bay and the Gulf of Mexico. Many environmental factors have been identified that influence the transport of agricultural nitrogen through drainage basins to coastal waters; however, the relative importance of various processes are difficult to quantify. Some important questions include: To what extent do organic-N and ammonium contribute to the mobile nitrogen budgets? How do agricultural practices such as irrigation and soil drainage systems influence nitrogen transport?, and What are the relative roles of denitrification in stream-channel, hyporheic, riparian, and ground-water subsystems? Presentations are encouraged that describe quantitative field studies or models of transport and transformation of agricultural nitrogen (especially nitrate) in drainage basins.
Conveners: J. K. Bohlke, U.S. Geological Survey, 431 National Center, Reston, VA 20192 USA, Tel: +1-703-648-6325, Fax: +1-703-648-5832, E-mail: jkbohlke@usgs.gov; and Patricia M. Glibert, Horn Point Environmental Laboratory, University of Maryland, PO Box 775, Cambridge, MD 21613 USA, Tel:+1-410-221-8422, Fax: +1-410-221-8490, E-mail: glibert@hpel.cees.edu

M01 Mineral Physics and Chemistry: Symposium in Honor of William A. Bassett (Joint with GS, T, V, AGU Committee on Mineral and Rock Physics, AGU Committee on Solid Earth and Deep Interior)
Knowledge of the structure, dynamics, and evolution of the Earth relies on our ability of performing precise in-situ experiments on minerals over a vast range of P-T conditions. During the past 40 years, Bill Bassett has either initiated or made major contributions to most recent breakthroughs in these areas. He introduced the diamond cell to the earth science community and developed it into an extremely versatile probe for geophysical and geochemical investigations. His discoveries include the first determination of the high-pressure crystal structure of iron (a major component of the core), and the first experimental observation of a lower mantle phase transition (in Fe2SiO4). He invented the laser technique for heating high-pressure samples to temperatures in excess of those of the Earth's core. He initiated high-pressure single-crystal x-ray crystallography, and pioneered the application of synchrotron radiation in mineral physics. He originated the method of determining elasticity of minerals at ultrahigh pressures by Brillouin spectroscopy for direct comparison with seismological observations. His recent diamond-cell research on high-pressure rheology, ultrasonic velocities, phase transition kinetics, hydrothermal reactions, and x-ray spectroscopy continue to open up exciting new directions in geophysics and geochemistry. His contributions have thus become crucial for nearly all aspects of experimental study of the Earth's interior, from its crust to its core. This special session honors Bill Basset's career, and we invite contributions from all who have been influenced by his research and teaching.
Conveners: Ho-Kwang (David) Mao, Geophysical Laboratory and Center for High Pressure Research, Carnegie Institution of Washington, 5251 Broad Branch Rd., N.W., Washington, DC 20015-1305, Tel: +1-202-686-4454 or +1-202-686-2410, ext. 2467 (voice mail), Fax: +1-202-686-2419, E-mail: mao@gl.ciw.edu; and Russell Hemley, Geophysical Laboratory and Center for High Pressure Research, Carnegie Institution of Washington, 5251 Broad Branch Rd., N.W., Washington, DC 20015-1305, E-mail: hemley@ gl.ciw.edu

M02 Mineral Surface Chemistry and the Origin of Life (Joint with GS, V)
The role of minerals as catalysts, templates and reactants in prebiotic organic syntheses remains an important aspect of the study of the origins of life. The interaction of minerals with an early atmosphere and hydrosphere on earth and other planets is thought to have influenced to a large extent the prebiotic budgets of reduced carbon, sulfur and nitrogen. Experimental, theoretical and field-related investigations addressing a wide variety of questions related to the origin of life ranging from possible geochemical constraints on prebiotic scenarios to the role of minerals mimicking biochemical processes are invited to contribute to this special session. In addition to invited presentations, contributed papers are solicited that also discuss photochemical aspects, redox chemistry, polymerization pathways, catalytic reaction networks, molecular spectroscopic studies and hydrothermal geochemistry emphasizing the potential role of minerals in the context of the origin of life.
Conveners: Joakim Bebie and Timothy Filley, Geophysical Laboratory, Carnegie Institution of Washington, 5251 Broad Branch Rd., N.W., Washington, DC 20015, Tel: +1-202-686 2410, ext. 2478, Fax: +1-202-686-2419

M03 Advances in Mineral Structure Analysis (Joint with GS, V)
Over nearly a century, mineralogists have determined the atomic structures of thousands of minerals and mineral-related materials, and these achievements have provided fundamental insights into the relationship between atomic structure and mineral behavior under a range of conditions. Recent advances in diffraction, electron microscopy, spectroscopy and surface techniques have ushered in a new age of mineral structure research. This symposium will highlight some of the most exciting methodologies and observations in modern structure analysis. Papers are encouraged from a broad range of research areas involving minerals and mineral-related materials, e.g., powder and single-crystal diffraction (at all temperatures and pressures), surface crystal structures and reactions, spectroscopy, phase transitions, electron microscopy, structure modeling, etc.
Conveners: Jeffrey E. Post, Department of Mineral Sciences, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC 20560-0119 USA, Tel: +1-202-357-4009, Fax: +1-202-357-2476, E-mail: post.jeffrey@nmnh.si.edu; and Peter J. Heaney, Department of Geosciences, Penn State University, 309 Deike Building, University Park, PA 16802 USA, Tel: +1-814-865-6821, Fax: +1-814-863-7823, E-mail: heaney@geosc.psu.edu

OS04 Holocene to Modern Carbon Dioxide Sources and Sinks (Joint with A, B, GS, H, MSA, AGU Committee on Global Environmental Change)
Efforts to balance the global carbon budget have focused on the so-called "missing sink" implied by the imbalance among identified modern annual sources and sinks of anthropogenic CO2. Relatively little attention has been devoted to the inherently historical nature of the anthropogenic CO2 budget imbalance. Estimates of identified annual CO2 fluxes, such as uptake by the oceans and net emissions from human land use, must be derived from calculation of cumulative effects over recent decades and centuries. Likewise, identification of "missing" CO2 sinks will require not only evidence in contemporary processes, but also consistency with the record of historical effects. The task of understanding the historical CO2 budget is made more difficult by the observation that the Holocence global carbon cycle was not at a steady state. Although the anthropogenic CO2 budget has overwhelmed the background of Holocene CO2 variations on a global scale, historical relationships between natural and anthropogenic effects may be less clear at the regional geographic scale required for identification of specific sources and sinks. This session will examine important Holocene to modern CO2 sources and sinks, with emphasis on reconstructing the global carbon budget of recent decades to millennia, and on quantifying relationships among uncertainties in the historical and modern CO2 budget.
Conveners: Eric Sundquist, U.S. Geological Survey, Woods Hole, MA USA; and A. Indermuehle, University of Bern, Switzerland

V01 Volatiles in Magmas: The Current Perspective (Joint with GS, MSA)
The purpose of this session is to promote and enhance discussion among the groups of geologists working on volatiles in magma but with different or opposing perspectives. Volatiles in magmas affect the density, rheology, and transport properties of magma, and power explosive volcanic eruptions. Many papers have been published in the last 5 years on the subject. Major progresses have been made but there have also been disagreements and confusion. The session aims at bringing groups of scientists to discuss the current state of volatiles in magma, bubble growth and volcanic eruptions, and examining whether different approaches can be reconciled. Session topics will include: calibration for measurement of volatile concentrations in silicate glasses and melts, the effect of volatile concentrations on the density of silicate melts, different approaches (quench vs. in situ) to the speciation of dissolved H2O in silicate melts, solubility data and models, diffusion of volatile components in melts and the effect of volatiles to the diffusion of other components, kinetics of the species reactions and application as geospeedometer, viscosity data and models for hydrous melts, bubble growth data and models, strength of hydrous melt, fragmentation of magma, and related subjects.
Conveners: Youxue Zhang, Department of Geological Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1063 USA, Tel: +1-734-763-0947, Fax: +1-734-763-4690, E-mail: youxue@umich.edu; and Donald B. Dingwell, Bayerisches Geoinstitut, Universitaet Bayreuth, D-95440 Bayreuth, Germany, Tel: +49-921-55-3708, Fax: +49-921-55-3769, E-mail: don.dingwell@uni-bayreuth.de

V02 Origin and Evolution of a Large Oceanic Plateau, the Kerguelen Plateau, and Broken Ridge: Geological, Geochemical and Geophysical Results From the 1998/99 ODP Leg 183 and Related Research Projects (Note: this is a corrected title. The title as it was originally listed was incorrect, and we regret the error.) (Joint with GS, T)
The Kerguelen Plateau-Broken Ridge and Ontong Java Plateau are the two largest oceanic igneous provinces. The former was the focus of ODP Leg 183 and the latter will be the focus of ODP Leg 193. The scientific objectives of Leg 183 focused on four major problems. 1) Chronology of Kerguelen Plateau/Broken Ridge Magmatism: the goal is to quantify magma flux as a function of time. 2) Petrogenesis of Basement Igneous Rocks: the goal is to constrain the mineralogy and composition of the mantle sources that contributed to magmatism, the melting processes that created the magmas, the post-melting magmatic evolution, and the relative role of the Kerguelen Plume, asthenosphere and continental lithosphere in the magmatism that formed the different domains of the Kerguelen Plateau and Broken Ridge. 3) Environmental Impact: the goal is to understand the post-magmatic processes that affected the igneous crust and evaluate the effects of the magmatism on the environment. 4) Tectonic History: the goal is to identify and interpret relationships between tectonism, magmatic construction and subsequent evolution of the plateau. These objectives have also been addressed by recent geophysical studies and research on the Kerguelen Archipelago, Heard Island and intervening seamounts. In this session we seek to define the state of our progress in achieving these objectives.
Conveners: Fred Frey, Department of Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 USA, Tel: +1-617-253-2818, Fax: +1-617-253-7102, E-mail: fafrey@mit.edu; Dominic Weis, E-mail: dweis@ulb.ac.be; Paul Wallace, E-mail: Paul_Wallace@odp. tamu.edu; and Michael Coffin, E-mail: mikec@utig.ig.utexas.edu

V04 Recent Advances in Re-Os Geochemistry (Joint with GS, OS)
The past decade has brought a surge in the understanding of the geochemical behavior of the Re-Os isotopic system. As analytical techniques have been improved, applications of the Re-Os system have been extended in new and exciting directions. This session will focus on new applications of the Re-Os system and recent results in fields, such as weathering, deposition of sediments, geochronology, hydrothermal processes, melting and melt transport and experimental partitioning studies that will help to improve our understanding of the behavior of Re and Os within the earth's dynamic environment.
Conveners: Harry Becker, Department of Geology, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 USA, Tel: +1-301-405-0084, Fax: +1-301-314-9661, E-mail: hbecker@geol. umd.edu; and John T. Chesley, Department of Geosciences, Gould-Simpson Bldg. # 77, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 USA, Tel: +1-520-621-9639, Fax: +1-520-621-2672, E-mail: jchesley@geo.arizona.edu

Hydrology (H)

H01 Biogeochemical Studies of Shenandoah National Park (Joint with B)
Shenandoah National Park in the Blue Ridge Mountains of Virginia has a diverse geology and biology, and in the last century has been subject to a variety of significant environmental disturbances. Early in the century the chestnut blight had a major effect on the ecosystems of the Park (as it did throughout the Blue Ridge). More recently, significant stresses have included acidic deposition, elevated ozone concentrations, and insect pests such as the gypsy moth and hemlock adelgid. A better understanding of the biogeochemical structure and function of natural systems within the Park, as well as their interaction with and response to a variety of environmental stressors, is necessary to allow informed management of this important resource. Our session will focus on recent biogeochemical research within and near the Park, with emphasis on integrated studies. We solicit contributions for both oral and poster sessions.
Conveners: Robbins Church, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 200 S.W. 35th St., Corvallis, OR 97333 USA, Tel: +1-541-754-4424, Fax: +1-541-745-4716, E-mail: church@ mail.cor.epa.gov; Jim Galloway, Department of Environmental Sciences, Clark Hall, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22903 USA, Tel: +1-804-924-0561, Fax: +1-804-982-2300, E-mail: jng@virginia.edu

H02 Fate of Agricultural Nitrogen in Drainage Basins (Joint with B, GS)
Elevated concentrations of nitrogen species (primarily nitrate) are a common occurrence in rivers and streams draining agricultural areas, and may be responsible for ecosystem degradation in estuarine and coastal marine environments such as the Chesapeake Bay and the Gulf of Mexico. Many environmental factors have been identified that influence the transport of agricultural nitrogen through drainage basins to coastal waters; however, the relative importance of various processes are difficult to quantify. Some important questions include: To what extent do organic-N and ammonium contribute to the mobile nitrogen budgets? How do agricultural practices such as irrigation and soil drainage systems influence nitrogen transport?, and What are the relative roles of denitrification in stream-channel, hyporheic, riparian, and ground-water subsystems? Presentations are encouraged that describe quantitative field studies or models of transport and transformation of agricultural nitrogen (especially nitrate) in drainage basins.
Conveners: J. K. Bohlke, U.S. Geological Survey, 431 National Center, Reston, VA 20192 USA, Tel: +1-703-648-6325, Fax: +1-703-648-5832, E-mail: jkbohlke@usgs.gov; and Patricia M. Glibert, Horn Point Environmental Laboratory, University of Maryland, PO Box 775, Cambridge, MD 21613 USA, Tel:+1-410-221-8422, Fax: +1-410-221-8490, E-mail: glibert@hpel.cees.edu

H03 Nitrogen Budgets in Hydrologic Systems: Where Do Gases Fit In?
Defining nitrogen budgets in hydrologic systems is an important step in understanding the source and fate of nitrogen in the environment. Yet, some aspects of the budget remain poorly quantified, particularly the gaseous components (N2O, N2). This session will focus on quantifying the gaseous components of the nitrogen budget. Potential topics could include assessing the occurrence and distribution of nitrogen gases (N2O, N2) in rivers and aquifers, identifying environmental factors that affect rates of nitrogen gas production, new methods for measuring in situ rates of the nitrogen gas production, and methods for sampling nitrogen gases in hydrologic systems. Presentations on these and other novel aspects of the gaseous component of nitrogen budgets are welcome.
Conveners: Peter B. McMahon, U.S. Geological Survey, Bldg. 53, MS 415, Denver, CO 80225 USA, Tel: +1-303-236-4882, Fax: +1-303-236-4912, E-mail: pmcmahon@usgs. gov; Kevin F. Dennehy, U.S. Geological Survey, Bldg. 53, MS 415, Denver, CO 80225 USA, Tel: +1-303-236-4882, Fax: +1-303-236-4912, E-mail: kdennehy@usgs.gov; and Kevin Hiscock, School of Environmental Sciences, University of East Anglia, Norwich NR4 7TJ, United Kingdom, Tel. + 44-1603-593104, Fax + 44-1603-507719, E-mail: k.hiscock@uea.ac.uk

H04 The Interrelationship of Hydrology and Biogeochemistry in Wetlands (Joint with B)
Wetlands are valued for their ability to remove nutrients, sediment, and other pollutants that would otherwise enter surface waters. However, studies in wetlands have shown that pollutant removal rates vary widely, and in many instances wetlands serve as sources of contaminants to surface waters. Hydrology is one of the principal factors that affect contaminant transformation or removal by wetlands. The spatial distribution of topography, soil, vegetation, and other factors affect flow rates and flow paths through wetlands. The focus of this session is on studies of how wetland hydrology affects the rates of biogeochemical processes and types of chemical transformations that occur in wetlands. Contributions are welcomed from interdisciplinary studies of wetlands, studies in man-made wetland environments, and estuarine wetlands.
Conveners: Douglas A. Burns, U.S. Geological Survey, 425 Jordan Rd., Troy, NY 12180 USA, Tel: +1-518-285-5662, Fax: +1-518-285-5601, E-mail: daburns@usgs.gov; and Christopher P. Cirmo, Department of Geology, State University of New York at Cortland, Cortland, NY 13045 USA, Tel: +1-607-753-2924, Fax: +1-607-753-2927, E-mail: cirmoc@cortland.edu

H05 Hydrological, Geomorphological, and Biogeochemical Functions of Riparian Zones (Joint with B)
Riparian zones, the vegetated regions adjacent to streams, affect flood plain hydraulics, river channel morphology, sediment transport, and stream water quality (through biogeochemical processes). Riparian restoration efforts are undertaken to restore habitat and improve water quality, although the interactions among physical, chemical, and biological components of the riparian zone are poorly understood. The purpose of this session is to examine the physical, biological, biogeochemical, and ecological functions of vegetated flood plains and riparian zones. Topics of interest include runoff generation and storage, nutrient flux, erosion and sedimentation, flow resistance, flood plain-channel interactions, and ecological response.
Conveners: Karen Prestegaard, Department of Geology, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 USA, Tel: +1-301-405-6982, Fax +1-301-314-9661, E-mail: kpresto@ glue.umd.edu; and Jim Pizzuto, Department of Geology, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716, Tel: +1-302-831-2710, Fax: +1-302-831-4158, E-mail: pizzuto@udel.edu

H06 Water Quality of Hydrologic Systems (Poster Only)
Poster presentations are invited on all aspects of water quality and tracers in hydrology, including field, laboratory, or theoretical work, directed at groundwater or surface water, at any spatial scale. Presentations may range from the use of solutes purely as tracers of water movement to investigations focused mainly or solely on geochemical processes/reactions. Research on contaminants and/or naturally occurring chemical species is appropriate for this session.
Conveners: Aaron Packman, Department of Civil and Architectural Engineering, Drexel University,3141 Chestnut St., Philadelphia, PA 19104 USA, Tel: +1-215-895-2087, Fax: +1-215-895-1363, E-mail: packmaai@ drexel.edu; and Joseph Ryan, Department of Civil, Environmental, and Architectural Engineering, University of Colorado, Engineering Center OT 517, Boulder, CO 80309-0428, Tel: +1-303-492-0772, Fax: +1-801-327-7112, E-mail: joe.ryan@ colorado.edu

H07 Water Policy and the Interaction of Groundwater and Surface Water: A Disconnect?
Exchange of water, nutrients, and contaminants between surface and subsurface water bodies is important to hydrology and water quality. This surface/subsurface interaction is increasingly important due to growing demands on water supplies world- wide. However, government policy regarding utilization and protection of water resources often considers surface water and groundwater separately, without regard for their close physical and chemical connections. Submissions are welcomed on: the current state of policy in this area, approaches to incorporating groundwater-surface water interactions into policy, case studies where groundwater-surface water interactions are a significant component of the decision-making process, and methods for field characterization of this interaction that address the needs of policy makers.
Conveners: David Ahlfeld, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003, Tel: +1-413-545-2681, Fax: +1-413-545-2202, E-mail: ahlfeld@ecs.umass.edu; Tom Bullen, USGS Menlo Parl, 345 Middlefield Rd., MS 434, Menlo Park, CA 94025 USA, Tel: +1-650-329-4577, Fax: +1-650-329-4538, E-mail: tdbullen@usgs.gov

H08 Watershed Processes and Drinking Water Quality
Urbanization pressures are changing land use patterns in watersheds of surface reservoirs supplying drinking water to many communities. What are the hydrologic and water quality effects of the land use changes? How do land use changes effect trihalomethane formation potential? pathogen transport to the reservoir? What hydrologic pathways are changed, and to what extent? Can the changes in hydrology be used as a rational design basis for best management practices on the watershed? This session will focus on linkages between terrestrial processes and water quality, with particular emphasis on issues of drinking water quality. Work that investigates the hydrology of urbanizing systems is strongly encouraged. Submissions could include both field-based and model studies. Policy studies relating land uses and water quality should be of particular interest in this session. The session should appeal to hydrologists, water resources engineers, landscape architects and policy makers with an interest in the hydrology of anthropogenically disturbed systems.
Convener: James M. Hassett, Faculty of Environmental Resources and Forest Engineering, 312 Bray Hall, State University of New York College of Environmental Science and Forestry, Syracuse, NY 13210 USA, Tel: +1-315-470-6637, Fax: +1-315-470-6958, E-mail: jhassett@esf.edu

H09 Lumped Versus Distributed Modeling: Issues in Real World Applications
A persistent issue in hydrologic modeling has been the level of model complexity necessary for a specific application. Physically-based distributed parameter models take advantage of new high resolution data and can model processes at basin interior points. Traditional lumped models are perhaps easier to calibrate and apply for basin outlet simulations, especially in a forecasting environment. However, it is not clear which scenarios warrant the use of more complex models. Nor is it clear under which conditions a distributed model will consistently outperform lumped models. A special emphasis of this session will be placed on comparisons of simulations from distributed and simpler lumped models to observed data. Work related to parameterization, calibration, and validation of distributed parameter models is also encouraged. Contributions related to the application of both types of models to operational forecasting are also welcome.
Convener: Mike Smith, Hydrologic Research Laboratory, National Weather Service, Silver Spring, MD USA, Tel: +1-301-713-0640, ext. 128, E-mail: michael.smith@noaa.gov

H10 Diagnosing and Modeling Rate-Limiting Processes in Soil Hydrology
Throughout the hydrologic cycle, hydrologic processes of interest occur across interfaces over which the dominant physical mechanisms governing flow change dramatically. Often these processes are crucial to understanding and quantifying flows between various reservoirs (atmosphere, vadose zone, groundwater). Whether the ultimate aim of a given study is to create integrated models (e.g., soil- atmosphere- vegation transfer models of heat and water vapor) or simply to better understand what determines the current hydrologic balance and how it might change under different climate forcings or land surface characteristics, a useful question to ask is whether or not there is a dominant rate-limiting process present in the system. As one example, soil evaporation might involve complex coupled heat and mass transfer processes in the top few centimeters near the landsurface, but be rate-limited by (readily determined) upward liquid flow from deeper in the soil. This special session is open to papers addressing methods for diagnosing and exploiting the existence of rate-limiting processes in generally complicated hydrologic systems. We hope to receive abstracts describing both methods and case studies. Topical areas are unrestricted and could include runoff generation, evaporation, transpiration, recharge and groundwater flow.
Conveners: Guido D. Salvucci, Boston University, E-mail: gdsalvuc@bu.edu; and Jeff McDonnell, Richardson Chair in Watershed Science, Department of Forest Engineering, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97331-5706 USA, Tel: +1-541-737-8720, Fax: +1-541-737-4316, E-mail: Jeff.McDonnell@orst.edu

H11 Hydrologic Forecasting and Prediction: Are We Planning for the Future?
Throughout the world, and recently in the eastern United States, hydrologic extremes have produced both human and economic loss. Recent droughts and floods have also created concerns regarding adequate water quantity and water quality. Such devastating losses are either the result of inadequate planning given sound hydrologic forecasts or inadequacies in either our forecasting abilities or the assumptions of our forecasting models. This session will focus on new methodology in the prediction and forecasting of future hydrologic events, with particular emphasis on droughts and floods. Work that considers the use of regional information, the nonstationarity of hydrologic records, and/or the impacts of global climate fluctuations on hydrologic prediction is strongly encouraged. It is expected that submissions will take both a statistical and/or deterministic approach to hydrologic modeling.
Convener: Chuck Kroll, Environmental Resources Engineering, College of Environmental Science and Forestry, State University of New York, Syracuse, NY USA, E-mail: cnkroll@syr.edu

H12 Animal Feeding Operations: Environmental Quality, Fluxes, Impacts, and Monitoring at the Local, Farm, and Water/Airshed Scale (Joint with B)
Recent regulatory focus on Animal Feeding Operations (AFOs, aka CAFOs or confined animal facilities, for dairy cows, cattle, swine, and poultry) for control of air- and water-borne contamination has renewed interest among scientists and engineers to better understand the environmental fluxes associated with large-scale AFOs. AFO-related effects on the environment have raised concerns about (1) the quality of surface- and ground-water resources; specifically, the occurrence and fate of phosphorus, nitrate/nitrite, salts, trace elements, pathogens, and pharmaceuticals; (2) gas emissions to the atmosphere; specifically, the release of ammonia, methane, dust, odorous compounds, pathogens; and (3) proliferation of biologic vectors (e.g., microorganisms, flies, mosquitoes) as a source of contamination and threat to human and environmental health. This session brings together scientists and applied researchers across a multidiscipline spectrum of the atmospheric, hydrologic, geochemical, and biologic sciences, to present the most recent research on the processes controlling environmental fluxes of AFO- related residuals and to present monitoring strategies used to quantify fluxes of these residuals and assess the efficacy of various management practices. This session will help promote a solid and integrated scientific understanding of the environmental processes affecting the quality of air, surface water, soil, and ground water across local AFO, watershed, and airshed scales, which is key toward developing integrated management solutions.
Conveners: Thomas Harter, Department of Land, Air and Water Resources, University of California, Davis, Kearney Agricultural Center, 9240 S. Riverbend Ave., Parlier, CA 93648 USA, Tel: +1-559-646-6569, Fax: +1-559-646-6593, E-mail: thharter@ucdavis. edu; and Franceska Wilde, U.S. Geological Survey, Office of Water Quality, National Center 412, Reston, VA 20192 USA, Tel: +1-703-648-6866, Fax: +1-703-648-5722, E-mail: fwilde@usgs.gov; Jerry Hatfield, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, National Soil Tilth Laboratory, 2150 Pammel Drive, Ames, IA 50011 USA, Tel: +1-515-294-5723, E-mail: hatfield@nstl.gov

H13 Probabilistic Forecasting in Hydrology
Probabilistic hydrologic forecasts require an ability to model hydrometeorological systems under a unified framework that transforms probabilistic quantitative meteorological forecasts into probabilistic forecasts of streamflow or other streamflow-related variables over a range of forecast periods. The system should be able to deal with uncertainties associated with future meteorological conditions as well as other major sources of uncertainties, such as uncertainties in estimates of the current state of the hydrologic processes or hydrologic model uncertainties. The objective of this session is to share recent developments and issues in end-to-end probabilistic hydrometeorological forecast systems. We seek contributions addressing theoretical, methodological and practical aspects of the process. Relevant topics include, but are not limited to meteorological forecast uncertainty quantification at spatial and temporal scales at which these forecasts are issued, approaches used for adjusting probabilistic meteorological forecasts to make them hydrologically more useful, analysis of the effects of uncertainty in any component of the forecast procedure on total hydrologic uncertainty, ensemble techniques in hydrologic forecasting, implementation of probabilistic forecasts for water resources management.
Conveners: Sanja Perica, Office of Hydrology, National Weather Service, 1325 East-West Hwy., Silver Spring, MD 20910 USA, Tel: +1-301-713-0640, ext. 109, E-mail: Sanja.Perica@noaa.gov; and Roman Krzysztofowicz, University of Virginia, Thornton Hall, SE, Charlottesville, VA 22903 USA, E-mail: rk@virginia.edu

H14 Remote Sensing of Precipitation (Poster Only) (Joint with A)
This special session will cover a broad range of topics related to all aspects of remote sensing of precipitation. The session will consist entirely of poster presentations. Papers are solicited on the estimation, validation, and error/uncertainty assessment of precipitation measured by ground-based remote sensors, such as radar (e.g., NEXRAD WSR-88D), airborne and satellite sensors (e.g., VIS, IR, SSM/I, TRMM). Analyses of ground-based sensors relevant for validation (e.g., raingauge, drop spectra devices, microwave links) are welcome as well. The session will highlight research and operational applications involving remotely-sensed precipitation. Presentations related to research programs such as the GEWEX Continental Scale International Project (GCIP), the TOGA Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Experiment (COARE), the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) and related recent field experiments, the Pan American Climate Studies (PACS), and the Mesoscale Alpine Program (MAP) are particularly encouraged. In addition, presentations that highlight operational aspects of the remote sensing of precipitation are welcome to contrast the research-oriented contributions.
Conveners: Matthias Steiner, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 USA, Tel: +1-609-258-4614, E-mail: msteiner@ radap.princeton.edu; and Richard A. Fulton, Hydrologic Research Laboratory, Office of Hydrology, National Weather Service, 1325 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD 20910 USA, Tel: +1-301-713-0640, ext. 138, E-mail: Richard.Fulton@noaa.gov

H15 Contributions of Hydrologic Science to Water Resources Management
Large-scale science initiatives combined with widely deployed technologies for remote sensing and data management are dramatically advancing operational hydrologic forecasting capability over a broad range of spatial and temporal scales. From extensive monitoring and prediction of the El Ni±o Southern Oscillation, to the availability of weather radar data and mesoscale weather predictions, advances in hydroclimatology and hydrometeorology are poised to provide an unprecedented portfolio of weather and climate information to water resource managers. Indeed, many of the large-scale science programs, including GCIP and the U.S. Weather Research Program, and the modernization of the National Weather Service, have recognized the enormous potential value of these advances to the water resource management community. This session is intended to identify and explore the opportunities, needs and obstacles to successfully realizing the potential of these science advances in water resources management. We seek presentations that specifically address the integration of emerging hydrologic science in water resources management, including the nature and needs of water managers in risk-based decision making, verification and validation of probabilistic forecasts, and the relationship between forecast quality and forecast value for water resources management.
Conveners: A. A. Bradley, Institute of Hydraulic Research, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242 USA, Tel: +1-319-335-6117, Fax: +1-319-335-5238, E-mail: allen-bradley@ uiowa.edu; and S. S. Schwartz, 3605 Bernwood Pl. #75, San Diego, CA 92130 USA, Tel: +1-619-509-9519, E-mail: sss@san.rr.com

H16 Hydrophobicity in Soils
Water repellency of soils, once seemingly restricted to certain vegetation types or wildfire-prone areas, has emerged as a common phenomenon across most agricultural, forest and rangeland ecosystems and was most noticeable in the eastern U.S during this summer's drought. Moderate to severe water repellency drastically reduce the infiltration potential of soils, increases the potential for soil erosion, and reduces plant available water. Even minor amounts of soil hydrophobicity can cause unstable wetting fronts, leading to fingered flow of water and solutes, resulting in increased leaching of chemical constituents and possibility decreased evaporative losses. These processes as well as microbial and chemical related conditions that trigger water repellency lacks full understanding. Knowledge on water repellent soils is scattered among researchers of different disciplines in different continents. The purpose of the proposed special session is to bring together this interdisciplinary group of scientists. Contributions are solicited from experimentalists and modelers in hydrology, soil science, organic chemistry, and/or microbiology
Conveners: Tammo Steenhuis, Department of Agricultural and Biological Engineering, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 USA, Tel: +1-607-255-2489, Fax: +1-607-255-4080, E-mail: tss1@cornell.edu; Louis Dekker and Coen Ritsema, Landuse and Soil Processes, Staring Centre, Wageningen, The Netherlands, E-mail: Dekker@sc.dlo.nl, E-mail: C.J.Ritsema@sc.dlo.nl; and John Nieber, Department of Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering, University of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN 55108 USA, Tel: +1-612-625-6724, Fax: +1-612-624-3005, E-mail: nieber@gaia.bae. umn.edu

H17 Biological and Hydrological Impacts of Land Use and Land Use Change in the Mid-Atlantic Region (Joint with B)
The Mid-Atlantic region of the United States consists of a toposequence of coastal plains, piedmont and ridge and valley terrain and contains the watersheds of the Chesapeake Bay, Delaware and Pamlico-Albemarle Sound. Within this region a complex landscape has been created by historical land settlement, current agricultural and forestry practices, urban development and suburban sprawl. The storage and flux of carbon, nutrients, water and energy in the land surface and lower atmosphere have been altered to various degrees by these processes with significant impacts on water supply, quality and flooding, micro and mesoscale climate dynamics, and ecosystem processes. An understanding of the dynamics of land use and land cover change and their impacts on land-atmosphere processes, coupled with modeling and strategic monitoring programs, is needed to develop effective management policies for the region. This session will emphasize land use and land cover change in this region, their impacts on biophysical processes, approaches to land use modeling, environmental monitoring techniques and other policy relevant topics.
Conveners: S. D. Prince, Mid Atlantic Regional Earth Science Applications Center, Department of Geography, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742-8225 USA, Tel: +1-301-405-4062, Fax: +1-301-314-9299, E-mail: sp43@umail.umd.edu; and L. E. Band, Department of Geography, University of North Carolina, CB #3220, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-3220 USA, Tel: +1-919-962-3921, Fax: +1-919-962-1537, E-mail: lband@email.unc.edu

H18 Land Data Assimilation System
Land surface states, such as soil moisture and temperature, play an integral role in regulating land surface energy and water balances, which strongly influence both weather and climate predictions. As such, the Land Data Assimilation System (LDAS), a multi-institutional research project, has been initiated to improve representation of land surface states and land surface models (LSM). The framework created enables multiple LSMs to operate on a 1/8th degree grid over the United States, in real-time and retrospective fashion, using common vegetation, soil, and forcing parameters. Forcing data currently includes observed shortwave radiation (NESDIS/GOES) and precipitation (NCEP Stage IV), and further incorporation of remotely sensed products is expected for use both during run-time data assimilation and for validation purposes. The session will emphasize issues related to LDAS in particular and land-surface modeling in general. Specific areas should include: improving resolution and quality of forcing parameters, data assimilation, and validation efforts. Papers that are related to the topics above, but not specifically labeled LDAS are highly encouraged. For more information on the LDAS project, please see http://ldas.gsfc.nasa.gov
Conveners: Paul Houser, Hydrological Sciences Branch and Data Assimilation Office, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Mail Code 974, Greenbelt, MD 20771 USA, Tel: +1-301-614-5772, Fax: +1-301-614-5808, E-mail: Paul.Houser@gsfc.nasa.gov; and Jared Entin, Hydrological Sciences Branch, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Mail Code 974, Greenbelt, MD 20771 USA, Tel: +1-301-614-5825, Fax: +1-301-614-5808, E-mail: Jared.Entin@gsfc.nasa.gov

H19 Remote Sensing, Land Surface Hydrology, and Field Experiments
Recent advances in ground, aircraft and satellite remote sensing techniques have provided hydrologists with new and unique views of land surface hydrological processes. This session seeks to present recent results of experiments in land surface hydrology that incorporate remote sensing. Satellite data can be utilized by land surface hydrological models as input and/or validation and/or assimilation. The hydrological processes include (but are not limited to) soil moisture, surface temperature, evapotranspitation, runoff, and streamflow. Papers dealing with retrieval algorithms for aircraft and satellites, field experimentation, and small to global scale hydrologic modeling are solicited. Papers can examine comparison of aircraft and satellite retrieved variables with 1) measurements at the ground surface, 2) output from land models, or 3) measurements from other satellite/aircraft sensors of the same variables. In addition to a general oral session, there will a poster session that will focus on the Southern Great Plains 99 (SGP-99) field experiment, however, other papers will also be considered.
Conveners: Venkat Lakshmi, Department of Geological Sciences, University of South Carolina, Columbia SC 29208 USA, Tel: +1-803-777-3552, Fax: +1-803-777-6610, E-mail: vlakshmi@geol.sc.edu; and Thomas J. Jackson, Agricultural Research Service, Hydrology Lab, U.S. Department of Agriculture, 104 Bldg. 007, BARC-West, Beltsville, MD 20705 USA, Tel: +1-301-504-8511, Fax: +1-301-504-8931, E-mail: tjackson@hydrolab.arsusda. gov

H20 Linking Hydrologic Sciences and Water Policy in the 21st Century (Joint with AWRA, PP, AGU Committee on Public Affairs)
The world's water resources are coming under increasing pressure from growing populations, increasing urbanization and industrialization, and climate change. Demands for policies ensuring equitable access to water are also increasing in most jurisdictions. Concurrently, significant advances are occurring in understanding of the hydrologic sciences, in modeling and prediction capabilities, and in satellite systems capable of monitoring individual components of the water cycle. However, policy needs and the outputs of scientific advances are not converging rapidly. Although scientists and policy analysts have many common concerns, their paradigms and the processes of scientific investigation and policy development are so different that there is generally little interaction between the two communities. Scientists are often insensitive to the context in which decisions must be made and policy processes that frequently demand definitive answers before resolution of all scientific uncertainties. Policy makers often appear to disregard new scientific research results or only selectively choose results that support particular policy perspectives. This session will focus on frameworks for making multi-jurisdictional water policy decisions and ways in which the scientific process can be more effectively coupled with policy decisions. To make discussions concrete, the session will begin with overviews of priority water issues, including linkages between water and health, international security, ecosystem and agricultural productivity, and 'natural' hazards. Presentations are solicited that will provide perspectives and theoretical frameworks for how water policy can use information from the hydrologic sciences, how hydrology and related sciences can more effectively contribute to water policy, and examples of effective interchanges between hydrologic science and water policy development. Other issues of interest include priority research needs of policy makers, the role of new satellite information in policy development, transboundary data and information exchange, and the appropriate role of hydrologic models in policy development.
Conveners: Rick Lawford, Office of Global Programs, NOAA, 1100 Wayne Ave., Suite 1225, Silver Spring, MD 20910 USA, Tel: +1-301-427-2089, ext. 146, Fax: +1-301-427-2073, E-mail: lawford@ogp.noaa.gov; Tim Cohn, USGS Reston, 107 National Center, Reston, VA 20192 USA, Tel: +1-703-648-5711, Fax: +1-703-648-5470, E-mail: tacohn@usgs.gov; and David W. Moody, Inter-American Water Resources Network, PO Box 717, Alstead, NH 03602 USA, Tel: +1-603-835-7900, Fax: +1-603-835-6279, E-mail: dwmoody@aol.com

H21 Water Resource Management in the United States: Linking Science and Practice
Although the United States has a relatively large amount of fresh water per capita by global standards, this water is not uniformly distributed across the country. In addition, water quality is often adversely affected by agricultural uses (e.g., irrigation, farm practices) and by industrial waste. Increasingly, attempts are made to manage water on a basin scale, with decisions made on the basis of mutual interests of a plethora of governments, landowners, and industries within the basin. Regional water management entities often experience difficulties linking recent scientific advances with policy formulation and management practices. This session welcomes presentations from policy makers, resource managers, and scientists on case studies where scientific information has been used to affect water policy and management decisions. Presentations should highlight the research results and types of information that proved most useful for policy makers, and emphasize how scientific information contributed to the quality of the decisions that were made.
Conveners: Holly C. Hartmann, Department of Hydrology and Water Resources, University of Arizona, PO Box 210011, Tucson, AZ 85721 USA, Tel: +1-520-621-3973, Fax: +1-520-621-1422, E-mail: hollyh@hwr.arizona. edu; and Rick Lawford, Office of Global Programs, NOAA, 1100 Wayne Ave., Suite 1225, Silver Spring, MD 20910 USA, Tel: +1-301-427-2089, ext. 146, Fax: +1-301-427-2073, E-mail: lawford@ogp.noaa.gov

H22 International Water Resource Management: Linking Science and Practice
Around the globe, societies are facing difficulties regarding access to useable water for many different reasons. In some cases, there is growing tension among nations because use of water by one country is seen by surrounding countries as arbitrary and self serving, particularly by downstream users. This scenario occurs even within nations and is affected by cultural, as well as socio-economic, conditions. Resolving international water issues is very complex due to the variety of levels and types of governance involved and differences in the treatment of water due to national infrastructure and cultural attitudes. Several international bodies have either implemented or suggested programs to ensure that hydrologic sciences are used more effectively in the service of these nations and their water management needs. For example, the World Water Council has undertaken the World Water Vision (WWV) Initiative, while UNESCO and WMO are collaborating on the HELP (Hydrology for Environment, Life, and Policy) Program. This session will draw from case studies of watersheds around the globe (both national and international), where problems related to the sustainability of water resources have arisen. Presentations showing how hydrologic data and research findings have been used to improve management of international basins are especially encouraged. Also, papers related to ongoing international initiatives (e.g., WWV and HELP) directed at using scientific information to resolve water problems are solicited.
Conveners: Jake Peters, USGS Atlanta, 3039 Amwiler Rd., Suite 130, Atlanta, GA 30360 USA, Tel: +1-770-903-9145, Fax: +1-770-903-9199, E-mail: nepeters@usgs.gov; Mike Bonell, UNESCO Division of Water Sciences, 1 rue Miollis, 75732 Paris Cedex 15, France, Tel: +33-1-45-68-40-02, Fax: +33-1-45-68-58-11, E-mail: ihp@unesco.org

H23 Recent Advances in Direct-Push Technology for Characterization of Physical and Chemical Variations in Unconsolidated Formations
Chemical Variations in Unconsolidated Formations Over the last decade, direct-push technology has become a widely used tool for collection of soil-gas and ground-water samples in near-surface unconsolidated formations. Recent advances in this technology, ranging from miniature CCD cameras to laser-induced fluorescence systems to electrical conductivity sensors, have greatly increased its utility for a wide variety of site-characterization activities. This technology can now provide information concerning the physical and chemical characteristics of unconsolidated formations at a level of detail that has not previously been possible by any practical means. We encourage contributions that demonstrate the capabilities and potential of this technology to provide detailed information about the physical and chemical variations in subsurface flow systems.
Conveners: Jim Butler, Kansas Geological Survey, 1930 Constant Ave., Campus West, University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS 66047 USA, Tel: +1-785-864-3965, E-mail: jbutler@kgs.ukans.edu; and David E. Dougherty, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Vermont, 213 Votey Bldg., Burlington, VT 05405 USA, Tel: +1-802-656-3800, Fax: +1-802-656-8446, E-mail: David.Dougherty@uvm.edu

H24 Recent Advances in Using Tracers for Interpreting Hydrogeologic Systems
Papers and posters presenting recent field tracer investigations for interpreting hydrogeologic systems are being solicited. Tracers may include natural, or introduced reactive species (lithium); non-reactive species (chloride, pentafluorobenzoate); gases (chlorofluorocarbons); radioisotopes (tritium, chlorine-36, nitrogen-15); thermal pulses; and polystyrene microspheres (to simulate colloids). Innovative presentations are requested from both US and international scientists who are actively analyzing and quantifying hydrologic and geochemical rates, parameters, and processes using tracer data. This session will focus on interpretative tracer studies for conceptualizing and quantifying hydrogeologic systems in the unsaturated and saturated zones. An important aspect of the conceptualization involves the use of tracer data to quantify hydrologic flow (e. g., infiltration, deep percolation, ground-water recharge, pathway delineation, dilution, and fracture/matrix interactions over a range of scales) and geochemical transport (e.g., colloids, matrix diffusion, dispersion and sorption) conditions and parameters. One important application would be the use of tracer studies to test assumptions in the hydrogeologic system conceptualization (e.g., confirmation of laboratory-derived parameters used to predict field-scale transport).
Conveners: William Dam, Division of Waste Management, Office of Nuclear Material Safety and Safeguards, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, MS T-7C6, Washington, DC 20555 USA, Tel: +1-301-415-6710, Fax: +1-301-415-5399, E-mail: wld@nrc.gov; and Thomas J. Nicholson, Division of Risk Analysis and Applications, Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, MS T-9F31, Washington, DC 20555 USA, Tel: +1-301-415-6268, Fax: +1-301-415-5389, E-mail: tjn@nrc.gov

H25 Channel Change in Urban Rivers
Human impacts on urban rivers are abundant and diverse, varying in time and space in response to complex changes in water and sediment supply. Although the outline of these impacts has been known for decades, we lack the understanding needed to reliably predict rates or even directions of channel change. With increasing efforts to restore degraded channels, develop riparian corridors, and protect channels in developing areas, there is a need to understand and predict erosion, sedimentation and channel change in urban rivers. We welcome contributions that describe, explain, or model the behavior of urban streams.
Conveners: Peter Wilcock, Geography and Environmental Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218 USA, Tel: +1-410-516-5421, Fax: +1-410-516-8996, E-mail: wilcock@jhu.edu; and Stanley Trimble, Geography, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90024 USA, Tel: +1-310-825-1314 or +1-310-825-1071, Fax: +1-310-206-5976, E-mail: trimble@geog.ucla.edu

H26 Scientific Basis for Stream Restoration
Stream restoration projects have become common in the United States and many other locations. The range of methods and techniques used, and the failure of some projects, demonstrate the absence of a consistent and complete basis for restoration designs. What are the appropriate approaches and the essential information required for a successful restoration? What is a successful restoration? Rather than criticize failed projects, can we identify the general principles and procedures needed to define and achieve successful stream restoration? Although case studies are welcome, we particularly encourage contributions that help define the scientific basis for stream restoration.
Conveners: Sean Smith, Maryland Geological Survey, 2300 N. St. Paul St., Baltimore, MD 21218 USA, Tel: +1-410-554-5521, Fax: +1-410-554-5502, E-mail: ssmith@mgs.md.gov; and Derek Booth, Center for Urban Water Resources Management, Department of Civil Engineering, University of Washington, Box 352700, Seattle, WA 98195 USA, Tel: +1-206-543-7923, Fax: +1-206-685-3836; E-mail: dbooth@u.washington.edu

H27 Hillslope and Fluvial Processes (Poster Only)
Studies of hillslope or fluvial processes and their interactions are solicited for this long-running session. We encourage submission of both field and theoretical studies that will hopefully range from detailed studies of individual field sites to continental-scale modeling of landscape evolution and associated sediment yields. Submissions concerning tropical, polar, temperate, and arid landscapes are equally encouraged. The session will only include poster presentations. Please send a copy of your abstract to one of the conveners in addition to sending it to AGU Headquarters.
Conveners: Kelin Whipple, Department of Earth, Atmospheric and Planetary Sciences, Room 54-1016, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 USA, Tel: +1-617-253-2578, Fax: +1-617-252-1800, E-mail: kxw@mit.edu; and Karen Prestegaard, Department of Geology, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 USA, Tel: +1-301-405-6982, Fax: +1-301-314-9661, E-mail: kpresto@glue.umd.edu

H28 Parameter Estimation in Strongly Heterogenous and Fractured Aquifers
In fractured rock aquifers, a large contrast often exists between the permeability of the interconnected fracture network and that of the host-rock matrix. Under such strongly heterogenous conditions, the bulk of groundwater flow occurs within a relatively small fraction of the aquifer volume and, because the structural fabric of fractures, faults, and bedding may result in anisotropic permeability, groundwater flow is not necessarily in the direction of the hydraulic gradient. When flow in interconnected fractures zones is sufficiently localized, porous media continuum approaches for estimating bulk hydraulic and transport properties may no longer apply at the scale of interest. The focus of this session is on the estimation of hydraulic and transport parameters in fractured and faulted rock formations such as granites, volcanic tuffs, basalts, and carbonates (karst terranes), and under similar strongly heterogenous conditions such as buried stream channels that might incise clay or silt deposits. Presentation topics appropriate for this session include: the use of field methods for estimating aquifer hydraulic and transport parameters; scale dependence of estimated aquifer parameters; successes, failures, and limitations of modeling approaches to predict flow and transport pathways; and alternative theoretical and modeling approaches. We especially encourage presentations that highlight the integration of borehole-based testing with larger-scale geologic data to predict aquifer anisotropy or other structural controls on flow and transport.

Conveners: Jim Winterle, Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses, Southwest Research Institute, San Antonio, TX USA, Tel: +1-210-522-5249, E-mail: jwinterle@swri. edu; Budhi Sagar, Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses, Southwest Research Institute, San Antonio, TX USA; and Latif Hamden, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Rockville, MD USA, Tel: +1-301-415-6615, E-mail: nmc@nrc.gov

H29 Coupled Biogeochemical Processes Affecting the Transport of Contaminants in the Subsurface
The speciation, mobility, and reactivity of contaminants can be affected dramatically by multiple, coupled, geochemical and microbiological processes. Geochemical processes affecting contaminant transport include aqueous complexation, adsorption to mineral surfaces and/or humic materials, and precipitation/dissolution. Microbial activity inevitably impacts groundwater chemistry, particularly Eh-pH conditions, which feeds back upon abiotic processes. Clearly, microbial and geochemical processes are inherently linked and should be considered together in the evaluation of natural or engineered remediation actions. The development of accurate process descriptors and their practical numerical solution presents an exciting challenge. Presentations should emphasize the role of aqueous (bio)geochemistry and/or numerical modeling in the quantitative description of coupled biogeochemical processes.
Conveners: Karen Salvage, Assistant Professor, Department of Geological Sciences and Environmental Studies, State University of New York at Binghamton, Binghamton, NY 13902 Tel: (607) 777 - 4588 Fax: (607) 777 - 2288 Email: ksalvage@binghamton.edu Christian J. McGrath, Research Physical Scientist, CEERD-ES-Q, U.S. Army Engineer R&D Center, Waterways Experiment Station, 3909 Halls Ferry Road, Vicksburg, MS 39160-6199 Tel: (601) 634-3798 Fax: (601) 634-3129 Email: mcgratc@wes.army.mil

H30 Environmental Geohydrology

Conveners: Nina Rosenberg, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, L-206, Livermore, CA 94551 USA, Tel: +1-510-424-5212, E-mail: rosenberg4@llnl.gov; and James Saiers, Yale Environmental Studies, Yale University, 370 Prospect St., New Haven, CT 06511 USA, Tel: +1-203-432-5121, Fax: +1-203-432-3929, E-mail: james.saiers@yale.edu

A05 Frontiers in U.S. GEWEX Research (Joint with H)
The National Research Council's (NRC) Global and Water Cycle Experiment (GEWEX) Panel is conducting a review of US contributions to GEWEX. The purpose of this review is to document progress, identify gaps, and help develop future US opportunities and coordination. For this special session, we invite reviews and original contributions to US GEWEX science. Areas of special GEWEX interest include contributions from the International Satellite Land Surface Climatology Project (ISLSCP), Project for Intercomparison of Land Surface Parameterizations (PILPS), Baseline Surface Radiation Network (BSRN), Shortwave Radiation Budget (SRB), GEWEX Water Vapor Project (GvaP), International Sattelite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP), GEWEX Cloud Systems Study (GCSS), Global Precipitation Climatology Project (GPCP), Global Areosol Climatology Project (GACP), and GEWEX Continental-Scale International Project (GCIP).
Conveners: John Roads, University of California, San Diego, UCSD-0224, La Jolla, CA 92093-0224 USA, Tel: +1-858-534-2099, Fax: +1-858-534-8561, E-mail: jroads@ucsd. edu; Peter Schultz, National Research Council, 2101 Constitution Ave., N.W., HA 476, Washington, DC 20418 USA, Tel: +1-202-334-1499, Fax: +1-202-334-3825, E-mail: pschultz@nas.edu

A13 Advances in GCIP Research (Joint with H)
The Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment (GEWEX) Continental-Scale International Project (GCIP) was established in the Mississippi River Basin in 1992 in order to develop the capability to predict variations in water resources on time scales up to seasonal and interannual as an integral part of a climate prediction system. The GCIP Enhanced Observing Period (EOP) for water years 1998 and 1999 has just been completed over the Ohio River Basin (LSA-E). The purpose of this special session is to document GCIP progress, especially over the LSA-E, and determine issues that need to be incorporated into the GEWEX America Prediction Project (GAPP) science and implementation plans currently being developed to expand GCIP studies to other parts of the USA. Papers on physical process studies, model development, data assimilation, diagnostic studies, remote sensing, model validation, data acquisition, and applications to water resource management over the Ohio and Mississippi River Basins are encouraged.
Conveners: William M. Lapenta, GHCC/NASA, 977 Explorer Blvd., Huntsville, AL 25806 USA, Tel: +1-256-922-5834, Fax: +1-256-922-5723, E-mail: bill.lapenta@msfc. nasa.gov; and Michael F. Jasinski, Hydrological Sciences Branch, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 974, Greenbelt, MD 20771 USA, Tel: +1-301-614-5782, Fax: +1-301-614-5808, E-mail: Michael.F.Jasinski.1@ gsfc.nasa.gov

B02 Biogeochemistry of C and N in Soils (Joint with H)
This session will highlight papers on the global biogeochemical functioning and changes of soils. It will highlight microbial and abiotic processes controlling the transformation of organic material in soils and the role of these processes in sequestering or releasing important nutrients and other trace constituents in "natural" as well as agricultural systems. These processes range from the initial changes of litter on the soil surface to association of humic substances with iron and aluminum oxides in deeper soil zones. These processes are critical in determining the response of forests, grasslands and other biomes to anthropogenic change in nutrient loadings as well as to climate change. This session will also include presentations that address the cycling of carbon and nitrogen in ecosystems managed for rangeland and crop production, including issues sch as long-term storage and depletion of C and N in these ecosystems, and the adaptability of these systems to climate change.
Conveners: Ron Sass, Department of Ecology, Rice University, Houston, TX 77005 USA, Tel: +1-713-527-4066, Fax: +1-713-285-5232, E-mail: sass@pop.rice.edu; and Steve Frolking, Complex Systems Research Center, University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH 03824 USA, Tel: +1-603-862-0244, Fax: +1-603-862-0188, E-mail: steve. frolking@unh.edu

B04 Remote Sensing of the Biosphere (Joint with A, H)
This session will focus on the information from remote sensing observations of the biosphere. An increasing number of satellites are being deployed for remote sensing of the Earth's surface and the processes thereon. These observations offer unique possibilities for studying the terrestrial and marine biosphere. Using various passive and active methods over a range of frequencies, the nature of the ecosystems can be described, and changes as a result of land use, climate change, and other factors can be monitored consistently over the long term (years to decades).
Conveners: Ruth Defries, Department of Geography, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742-8225 USA, Tel: +1-301-405-4884, Fax: +1-301-314-9299, E-mail: rd63@ umail.umd.edu; Ichtiaque Rasool, E-mail: 101650.56@compuserve.com; and G. James Collatz, Biospheric Sciences Branch, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 923, Greenbelt, MD 20771 USA, Tel: +1-301-286-1425, Fax: +1-301-286-1757, E-mail: jcollatz@ ltpsun.gsfc.nasa.gov

OS04 Holocene to Modern Carbon Dioxide Sources and Sinks (Joint with A, B, GS, H, MSA, AGU Committee on Global Environmental Change)
Efforts to balance the global carbon budget have focused on the so-called "missing sink" implied by the imbalance among identified modern annual sources and sinks of anthropogenic CO2. Relatively little attention has been devoted to the inherently historical nature of the anthropogenic CO2 budget imbalance. Estimates of identified annual CO2 fluxes, such as uptake by the oceans and net emissions from human land use, must be derived from calculation of cumulative effects over recent decades and centuries. Likewise, identification of "missing" CO2 sinks will require not only evidence in contemporary processes, but also consistency with the record of historical effects. The task of understanding the historical CO2 budget is made more difficult by the observation that the Holocence global carbon cycle was not at a steady state. Although the anthropogenic CO2 budget has overwhelmed the background of Holocene CO2 variations on a global scale, historical relationships between natural and anthropogenic effects may be less clear at the regional geographic scale required for identification of specific sources and sinks. This session will examine important Holocene to modern CO2 sources and sinks, with emphasis on reconstructing the global carbon budget of recent decades to millennia, and on quantifying relationships among uncertainties in the historical and modern CO2 budget.
Conveners: Eric Sundquist, U.S. Geological Survey, Woods Hole, MA USA; and A. Indermuehle, University of Bern, Switzerland

Mineralogical Society of America (MSA)

M01 Mineral Physics and Chemistry: Symposium in Honor of William A. Bassett (Joint with GS, T, V, AGU Committee on Mineral and Rock Physics, AGU Committee on Solid Earth and Deep Interior)
Knowledge of the structure, dynamics, and evolution of the Earth relies on our ability of performing precise in-situ experiments on minerals over a vast range of P-T conditions. During the past 40 years, Bill Bassett has either initiated or made major contributions to most recent breakthroughs in these areas. He introduced the diamond cell to the earth science community and developed it into an extremely versatile probe for geophysical and geochemical investigations. His discoveries include the first determination of the high-pressure crystal structure of iron (a major component of the core), and the first experimental observation of a lower mantle phase transition (in Fe2SiO4). He invented the laser technique for heating high-pressure samples to temperatures in excess of those of the Earth's core. He initiated high-pressure single-crystal x-ray crystallography, and pioneered the application of synchrotron radiation in mineral physics. He originated the method of determining elasticity of minerals at ultrahigh pressures by Brillouin spectroscopy for direct comparison with seismological observations. His recent diamond-cell research on high-pressure rheology, ultrasonic velocities, phase transition kinetics, hydrothermal reactions, and x-ray spectroscopy continue to open up exciting new directions in geophysics and geochemistry. His contributions have thus become crucial for nearly all aspects of experimental study of the Earth's interior, from its crust to its core. This special session honors Bill Basset's career, and we invite contributions from all who have been influenced by his research and teaching.
Conveners: Ho-Kwang (David) Mao, Geophysical Laboratory and Center for High Pressure Research, Carnegie Institution of Washington, 5251 Broad Branch Rd., N.W., Washington, DC 20015-1305, Tel: +1-202-686-4454 or +1-202-686-2410, ext. 2467 (voice mail), Fax: +1-202-686-2419, E-mail: mao@gl.ciw.edu; and Russell Hemley, Geophysical Laboratory and Center for High Pressure Research, Carnegie Institution of Washington, 5251 Broad Branch Rd., N.W., Washington, DC 20015-1305, E-mail: hemley@ gl.ciw.edu

M02 Mineral Surface Chemistry and the Origin of Life (Joint with GS, V)
The role of minerals as catalysts, templates and reactants in prebiotic organic syntheses remains an important aspect of the study of the origins of life. The interaction of minerals with an early atmosphere and hydrosphere on earth and other planets is thought to have influenced to a large extent the prebiotic budgets of reduced carbon, sulfur and nitrogen. Experimental, theoretical and field-related investigations addressing a wide variety of questions related to the origin of life ranging from possible geochemical constraints on prebiotic scenarios to the role of minerals mimicking biochemical processes are invited to contribute to this special session. In addition to invited presentations, contributed papers are solicited that also discuss photochemical aspects, redox chemistry, polymerization pathways, catalytic reaction networks, molecular spectroscopic studies and hydrothermal geochemistry emphasizing the potential role of minerals in the context of the origin of life.
Conveners: Joakim Bebie and Timothy Filley, Geophysical Laboratory, Carnegie Institution of Washington, 5251 Broad Branch Rd., N.W., Washington, DC 20015, Tel: +1-202-686 2410, ext. 2478, Fax: +1-202-686-2419

M03 Advances in Mineral Structure Analysis (Joint with GS, V)
Over nearly a century, mineralogists have determined the atomic structures of thousands of minerals and mineral-related materials, and these achievements have provided fundamental insights into the relationship between atomic structure and mineral behavior under a range of conditions. Recent advances in diffraction, electron microscopy, spectroscopy and surface techniques have ushered in a new age of mineral structure research. This symposium will highlight some of the most exciting methodologies and observations in modern structure analysis. Papers are encouraged from a broad range of research areas involving minerals and mineral-related materials, e.g., powder and single-crystal diffraction (at all temperatures and pressures), surface crystal structures and reactions, spectroscopy, phase transitions, electron microscopy, structure modeling, etc.
Conveners: Jeffrey E. Post, Department of Mineral Sciences, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC 20560-0119 USA, Tel: +1-202-357-4009, Fax: +1-202-357-2476, E-mail: post.jeffrey@nmnh.si.edu; and Peter J. Heaney, Department of Geosciences, Penn State University, 309 Deike Building, University Park, PA 16802 USA, Tel: +1-814-865-6821, Fax: +1-814-863-7823, E-mail: heaney@geosc.psu.edu

GP03 Remanent Magnetism in Planetary Bodies (Joint with MSA, P)
Recent and upcoming space missions (Mars Global Surveyor, NEAR, Mercury Messenger) have included magnetometers to provide insight into the remanent magnetism of planetary materials. This session provides a forum for understanding that remanent magnetism and will include talks on the detection of remanent magnetic planetary fields, and the nature and origin of magnetic remanence in planetary crustal materials. Other topics include modelling of large scale magnetic anomalies, geologic setting of magnetic mineral distributions, and magnetic petrology.
Conveners: Gunther Kletetschka, Geodynamics and Astrochemistry Branches, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 691, Greenbelt, MD 20771 USA, Tel: +1-301-286-3804, E-mail: gunther@denali.gsfc.nasa.gov; and Robert Hargraves, Department of Geological and Geophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08540 USA, E-mail: robh@princeton.edu

GS01 Accessory Minerals: The Current State of Knowledge from Isotopes, Experiments, and Trace Element Studies (Joint with MSA, V)
In the past few years there has been considerable growing interest throughout the geologic community regarding the role of accessory minerals in solving geological problems. These include analyzing extremely small fragments of minerals such as zircon, monazite, and titanite to high degrees of age precision, and using in situ techniques for measuring both radiogenetic and stable isotopes. Related to this, there have been several experimental studies on diffusive transport of elements and isotopes of interest to both the radiogenetic and stable isotope community. Many recent papers have presented results of studies using the electron microprobe to analyze trace elements and to determine the age of minerals such as monazite and xenotime, and on measuring trace elements in situ using laser ablation ICP-MS and SIMS in a wide range of accessory minerals. Several studies have integrated imaging techniques such as cathodoluminescence and back-scattered electron imaging to guide the analysis location of in situ analyses. This proposed session will bring together geologists and geochemists who do research within these different areas to present their methods and results, and to discuss ideas on expanding and perfecting these techniques.
Convener: John M. Hanchar, Geology, George Washington University, Tel: +1-202-994-4336, E-mail: jhanch@gwu.edu

GS02 Astrobiology Biosignatures (Joint with B, MSA, P)
The development of unambiguous criteria with which to assess the presence or absence of biological processes in geological settings forms a critical component of a successful astrobiology research program. Biosignatures research will guide site selection for extraterrestrial missions, as well as development of analytical protocols and equipment for analysis of returned samples. I propose a special AGU session to provide the astrobiology biosignatures research community an opportunity to present and discuss current research findings. Relevant topics include morphological, isotopic and mineralogical biosignatures, both in the modern environment as well as the geologic fossil record.
Convener: William W. (Bill) Barker, Geology and Geophysics University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI USA, Tel: +1-608-262-3738, E-mail: barker@geology.wisc.edu

OS04 Holocene to Modern Carbon Dioxide Sources and Sinks (Joint with A, B, GS, H, MSA, AGU Committee on Global Environmental Change)
Efforts to balance the global carbon budget have focused on the so-called "missing sink" implied by the imbalance among identified modern annual sources and sinks of anthropogenic CO2. Relatively little attention has been devoted to the inherently historical nature of the anthropogenic CO2 budget imbalance. Estimates of identified annual CO2 fluxes, such as uptake by the oceans and net emissions from human land use, must be derived from calculation of cumulative effects over recent decades and centuries. Likewise, identification of "missing" CO2 sinks will require not only evidence in contemporary processes, but also consistency with the record of historical effects. The task of understanding the historical CO2 budget is made more difficult by the observation that the Holocence global carbon cycle was not at a steady state. Although the anthropogenic CO2 budget has overwhelmed the background of Holocene CO2 variations on a global scale, historical relationships between natural and anthropogenic effects may be less clear at the regional geographic scale required for identification of specific sources and sinks. This session will examine important Holocene to modern CO2 sources and sinks, with emphasis on reconstructing the global carbon budget of recent decades to millennia, and on quantifying relationships among uncertainties in the historical and modern CO2 budget.
Conveners: Eric Sundquist, U.S. Geological Survey, Woods Hole, MA USA; and A. Indermuehle, University of Bern, Switzerland

V01 Volatiles in Magmas: The Current Perspective (Joint with GS, MSA)
The purpose of this session is to promote and enhance discussion among the groups of geologists working on volatiles in magma but with different or opposing perspectives. Volatiles in magmas affect the density, rheology, and transport properties of magma, and power explosive volcanic eruptions. Many papers have been published in the last 5 years on the subject. Major progresses have been made but there have also been disagreements and confusion. The session aims at bringing groups of scientists to discuss the current state of volatiles in magma, bubble growth and volcanic eruptions, and examining whether different approaches can be reconciled. Session topics will include: calibration for measurement of volatile concentrations in silicate glasses and melts, the effect of volatile concentrations on the density of silicate melts, different approaches (quench vs. in situ) to the speciation of dissolved H2O in silicate melts, solubility data and models, diffusion of volatile components in melts and the effect of volatiles to the diffusion of other components, kinetics of the species reactions and application as geospeedometer, viscosity data and models for hydrous melts, bubble growth data and models, strength of hydrous melt, fragmentation of magma, and related subjects.
Conveners: Youxue Zhang, Department of Geological Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1063 USA, Tel: +1-734-763-0947, Fax: +1-734-763-4690, E-mail: youxue@umich.edu; and Donald B. Dingwell, Bayerisches Geoinstitut, Universitaet Bayreuth, D-95440 Bayreuth, Germany, Tel: +49-921-55-3708, Fax: +49-921-55-3769, E-mail: don.dingwell@uni-bayreuth.de

Ocean Sciences (OS)

OS01 Ocean Sciences and Early Results from EOS/Terra
This session has been canceled.

OS02 Breaking Waves, Turbulence, Bubbles, Sprays, and Aerosols (Joint with A, AGU Committee on Nonlinear Geophysics)
The main theme is concerned with the complex phenomena of oceanic surface wave breaking processes in both deep and shallow water including the surfzone. Their significant consequences, such as energy/momentum loses, turbulence generation, air entrainment, bubble generation, bubble distributions, spray formation, and marine aerosols (salt particles), are all integral parts of interests of this session. The acoustical, optical, and electrical effects from these various physical elements, resulting from wave breaking, shall be included too. Papers on both field/laboratory measurements and numerical/theoretical modeling of these dynamical problems are welcome.
Convener: Dr. Ming-Yang Su, Naval Research Laboratory, Code 7332, Stennis Space Center, MS 39529 USA, Tel: +1-228-688-5241, Fax: +1-228-688-5997, E-mail: su@nrlssc.navy.mil

OS03 Scientific Application of Spaceborne Scatterometer (Joint with A)
The radar scatterometer, SeaWinds, of the NASA Mission Quikscat, was launched in June 1999 and it is providing measurement of ocean surface wind speed and direction at 25 km resolution under both clear and cloudy conditions, covering almost the entire global ocean every day. Information on land vegetation and polar ice-cover can also be derived. Scatterometer observations from previous scatterometers, with less coverage, have been used in the studies of marine weather system, numerical weather prediction, wind-driven ocean circulation, coastal ecology, monsoons, El Nino and Southern Oscillation, sea ice, land vegetation, flooding, and snow over land. There are potential synergistic combination of scatterometer data with data from Tropical Rain Measuring Mission and the Topex/Poseidonmissions in scientific applications. Results on validation and scientific applications of spacebased scatterometer data are welcome for this special session.
Convener: W. Timothy Liu, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, 300-323, 4800 Oak Grove Dr., Pasadena, CA 91109-8099 USA, Tel: +1-818-354-2394, Fax: +1-818-393-6720, E-mail: liu@pacific.jpl.nasa.gov, Web site: http://airsea-www.jpl.nasa.gov; and Robert Atlas, Head, NASA Data Assimilation Office, Code 910.3, Goddard Space Flight Center,
Greenbelt, MD 20771 USA, Tel: +1-301-614-6140, Fax: +1-301-614-6297, E-mail: atlas@dao.gsfc.nasa.gov

OS04 Holocene to Modern Carbon Dioxide Sources and Sinks (Joint with A, B, GS, H, MSA, AGU Committee on Global Environmental Change)
Efforts to balance the global carbon budget have focused on the so-called "missing sink" implied by the imbalance among identified modern annual sources and sinks of anthropogenic CO2. Relatively little attention has been devoted to the inherently historical nature of the anthropogenic CO2 budget imbalance. Estimates of identified annual CO2 fluxes, such as uptake by the oceans and net emissions from human land use, must be derived from calculation of cumulative effects over recent decades and centuries. Likewise, identification of "missing" CO2 sinks will require not only evidence in contemporary processes, but also consistency with the record of historical effects. The task of understanding the historical CO2 budget is made more difficult by the observation that the Holocence global carbon cycle was not at a steady state. Although the anthropogenic CO2 budget has overwhelmed the background of Holocene CO2 variations on a global scale, historical relationships between natural and anthropogenic effects may be less clear at the regional geographic scale required for identification of specific sources and sinks. This session will examine important Holocene to modern CO2 sources and sinks, with emphasis on reconstructing the global carbon budget of recent decades to millennia, and on quantifying relationships among uncertainties in the historical and modern CO2 budget.
Conveners: Eric Sundquist, U.S. Geological Survey, Woods Hole, MA USA; and A. Indermuehle, University of Bern, Switzerland

OS05 Mesozoic-Cenozoic Oceans: The Warm Bottom Water Puzzle (Joint with A, SEPM, TOS)
The target of the session will be to examine the climate and deep-ocean conditions of the Mesozoic- Cenozoic, including data synthesis and interpretation and studies of the crucial warm saline bottom water hypothesis using atmospheric and ocean circulation models. Contributions on geologic data analyses and paleoclimate and paleoceanographic modeling will be welcomed.
Conveners: Dan Seidov, E-mail: dseidov@ essc.psu.edu; Mike Arthur, E-mail: arthur@ geosc.psu.edu; and Eric Barron, E-mail: eric@essc.psu.edu

OS06 Coasts in Crisis---Now PP01

OS07 Global Change Impacts and the Arctic Ocean
The magnitude of global changes are expected to be amplified in the Arctic compared to other regions of the world. Current observations, such as changes in ocean circulation, altered population characteristics of major marine species or the decrease in sea ice thicknesses are but a few indications supporting this hypothesis. The impacts or consequences of such changes are difficult to assess, yet they are of significant importance for Arctic residents and their future perspectives. The session is going to present a state-of-the-art appraisal of current research on global change impacts related to physical characteristics and marine ecosystems of the Arctic Ocean. The spatial scope will be regional, focusing on the European Arctic and the Bering Sea region, respectively. Topics to be discussed will comprise climate, physical and chemical characteristics of Arctic Seas, sea ice properties, primary and secondary production and fishery biology, thus embracing environmental to societal issues relevant in global change impact research. The geosciences in general and geophysics in particular play major roles in global change impact assessments. Although cooperation between geophysicists and scientists from other disciplines represents a major challenge, it also offers unique opportunities to enlarge the field of activities of the geosciences.
Convener: Manfred A. Lange, Institute for Geophysics and Center for Environmental Research, University of Muenster, Corrensstrasse 24, D-48149 Muenster, Germany, Tel: +49-0251-833-3591, Fax: +49-0251-833-6100, E-mail: langema@uni-muenster.de, or manfred.a.lange@t-online.de

OS08 Ice Sheet Evolution from Antarctic Margin Sediments
This session is intended to report the results of recent investigations aimed at resolving Cenozoic Antarctic ice sheet history by sampling Antarctic continental margin sediments. Particular attention will be paid to three recent drilling campaigns: ODP Leg 178 to the Antarctic Peninsula margin is now 2 years post-cruise, and interesting results are emerging from detailed onshore studies. ODP Leg 188 will only just have completed drilling the Prydz Bay margin of East Antarctica by April 2000, and should have some exciting initial results to report. Drilling on fast ice at Cape Roberts in the western Ross Sea completed its third and final year in December 1999, and has provided interesting information on Ross Sea palaeoclimate and the uplift history of the Transantarctic Mountains. These efforts and others planned are taking place within an overall scheme intended to extract the entire Cenozoic history of Antarctic glaciation by drilling on several parts of the Antarctic margin, combining the results by use of numerical models of ice sheet development.
Conveners: Peter .F Barker, British Antarctic Survey, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0ET, UK, Tel: +44-1223-221577, Fax: +44-1223-362616, E-mail: P.Barker@bas.ac.uk OR pfba@pcmail.nerc-bas.ac.uk; and Alan K. Cooper, Department of Geological and Environmental Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 USA, Tel: +1-650-723-0817, Fax: +1-650-725-2199, E-mail: akcooper@pangea.stanford.edu OR akcooper@pacbell.net

OS09 How Beaches Work
Controversy surrounds scientific efforts to predict beach processes and resulting shoreline evolution. Data from recent large-scalenearshore field experiments provide, for the first time, the ability to thoroughly test physics-based models for beach evolution. At the same time, decades of on-going geological research has established the importance of geologically imposed boundary conditions for such models. This session seeks to bridge fluid-dynamic and geological perspectives; to find common ground and define critical areas for future research; and to inform scientists outside of the debate about the state-of-the-art in beach prediction.
Conveners: Tom Drake, North Carolina State University, 1125 Jordan Hall, NCSU Box 8208, Raleigh, NC 27695-8208 USA, Tel: +1-919-515-7838, Fax: +1-919-515-7802, E-mail: drake@ncsu.edu; and Jim Kirby, University of Delaware, Center for Applied Coastal Research, Newark, DE 19716 USA, Tel: +1-302-831-2438, Fax: +1-302-831-1228, E-mail: kirby@udel.edu

OS10 Ocean Carbon Sequestration
This session seeks papers on scientific research relating to ocean carbon sequestration. It has been suggested that adverse environmental impacts of fossil-fuel burning might be diminished if the carbon could be sequestered in the deep ocean instead of the atmosphere. Proposed sequestration strategies include direct CO2 injection and stimulation of the ocean's food web by fertilization. Other options will also be considered. Papers are requested that address the physical, chemical, biological, and environmental aspects of carbon sequestration research.
Conveners: Ken Caldeira, Co-Director, Lawrence Livermore National Lab, 7000 East Ave., L-103, Livermore, CA 94550 USA, Tel: +1-925-423-4191, Fax: +1-925-422-6388, E-mail: kenc@llnl.gov; and Jim Bishop, Co-Directo, Lawrence Berkeley National Lab, One Cyclotron Road, M/S 90-1116, Berkeley, CA 9472, USA, Tel: +1-510-495-2457, Fax: +1-510-486-5686, E-mail: JKBishop@lbl.gov

A02 The Input of Chemicals to the Coastal Zone: The Importance of the Atmospheric Signal (Joint with OS)
Atmospheric deposition can be an important source of chemicals to the coastal environment. This session seeks papers dealing with the importance of wet and dry deposition processes in contributing chemicals (e.g., nutrients, trace metals and organic contaminants) to estuaries and the coastal ocean. Papers dealing with both direct inputs to the water surface, as well as studies assessing the transfer of chemicals through watersheds are sought. Papers focusing on quantifying the magnitude of atmospheric inputs relative to other sources are welcomed, as are studies looking at the importance of chemical processing and air-water exchange mechanisms inmitigating or enhancing the fate and transport of chemicals through the estuarine-coastal ocean continuum.
Conveners: Robert P. Mason, Chesapeake Biological Laboratory, University of Maryland, Solomons, MD 20688 USA, Tel: +1-410-326-7387, Fax:+1-410-326-7341, E-mail: mason@cbl.umces.edu; and Tom Church, College of Marine Studies, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716-3501 USA, Tel: +1-302-831-2558, Fax: +1-302-831-4575, E-mail: tchurch@udel.edu

A07 Data Assimilation: Atmospheric, Oceanic, Chemical, and Space Weather (Joint with GP, OS, P, SA, SH, SM)
We solicit papers for a special session on model assimilation of geophysical data. Special emphasis is being given to problems with intrinsic time scales longer than numerical weather prediction and the development of assimilation products that are robust for climate and chemical applications. The following foci are of special interest:
* The treatment of model and observation bias in assimilation systems and the impact of bias on the quality of assimilated data sets.
* The treatment of large-scale ocean state estimation, covariance modeling of observational and model errors or validation of ocean assimilation analyses for climate studies.
* The treatment of observations of stratospheric and tropospheric constituent measurement in both chemical and climate applications, including study of transport processes.
* The treatment of ionospheric observations and development of coupled Sun-Earth and magnetospheric models for large-scale space-weather and geomagnetism applications.
The organizers will invite speakers to provide unifying themes and a framework for the contributed talks.
Conveners: Richard B. Rood, Data Assimilation Office, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 910.3, Greenbelt, MD 20771 USA, Tel: +1-301-614-6155, Fax: +1-301-614-6297, E-mail: rrood@dao.gsfc.nasa.gov; Michele M. Rienecker, Oceans and Ice Branch, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 971.0, Greenbelt, MD 20771 USA, Tel: +1-301-614-5642, Fax: +1-301-614-5644, E-mail: rienecke@mohawk.gsfc.nasa.gov; and Peter M. Lyster, Data Assimilation Office, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 910.3, Greenbelt, MD 20771 USA, Tel: +1-301-614-6179, Fax: +1-301-614-6297, E-mail: plyster@dao.gsfc.nasa.gov

A08 Remote Sensing Constraints on the Spatial and Temporal Patterns of Air-Sea CO2 Exchange (Joint with B, OS)
All topics related to remotely sensed variables that play a role in constraining the air-sea exchange of trace gases in general, and CO2 in particular, are the focus of this session. Descriptions of models that use SeaWifs and MODIS data to estimate carbon fixation and other processes that influence the surface ocean pCO2 are encouraged. The session also seeks studies that use remotely sensed surface winds, wind stresses, SSTs, mixed layer depths, diverse indices of surface turbulence and other quantities germane to the computation of air-sea gas exchange. While CO2 is the main target of this session, contributions dealing with DMS, CO, OCS, isoprene and other trace gases are also solicited.
Conveners: David J. Erickson, USRA/NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 910.3, Greenbelt, MD 20771 USA, Tel: +1-301-614-6146, E-mail: erickson@dao.gsfc.nasa.gov; and Wayne E. Esaias, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 971, Greenbelt, MD 20771 USA, Tel: +1-301-614-5709, E-mail: esaias@gsfc.nasa.gov

A09 Forty Years of Polar-Orbiting Operational Meteorological Satellites (Joint with OS)
The first TIROS was launched in 1960 and soon was followed by the first Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) satellites. These mutually supportive programs have been relatively successful in advancing operational weather forecasting, research on climate, oceanography, snow and ice, upper atmospheric physics, and national defense. This session will cover the development and successes of the program with a look to the future - NPOESS. Potential Speakers for 6 half-hour sessions are: Bill Smith - NASA Langley; Tom Vonder Haar, CSU; John McElroy, U Texas at Arlington; Jack Kelly, NWS; Marie Colton, ONR/NRL; and Bill Lindorfer, RCA/GE/Lockheed Martin.
Conveners: Eugene W. Bierly, American Geophysical Union, 2000 Florida Ave., N.W., Washington, DC 20009 USA, Tel: +1-202-777-7506, Fax: +1-202-328-0566, E-mail: ebierly@agu.org; Edward W. Cliver, Chair, History of Geophysics Committee, American Geophysical Union; and H. Frank Eden, BEST.

A10 Calibration of Meteorological Satellite Sensors and Validation of Derived Products (Joint with OS)
Pre- and post-launch calibration and characterization of meteorological satellite sensors are crucial to ensure the accuracy, continuity, and viability of satellite-derived geophysical products. Independent validation of the geophysical products thus derived will in turn establish the usability of the same in Earth system studies such as those envisaged under the World Climate Research Programme (WCRP), the International Geosphere Biosphere Program (IGBP), and the global climate, terrestrial, and ocean observing systems (G3OS). Accordingly, papers are solicited in the broad areas of (a) pre- and post-launch calibration of meteorological satellite sensors; (b) inter-sensor calibration; © rehabilitation of long-term satellite-derived geophysical records (e.g., NOAA/NASA Pathfinder data sets); (d) procedures for product validation: (e) product validation campaigns; and (f) international collaborative and cooperative efforts.
Conveners: C. R. Nagaraja Rao, Office of Research and Applications, NOAA/NESDIS, E/RA1, World Weather Building, Room 810, 5200 Auth Rd., Camp Springs, MD 20746 USA, Tel: +1-301-763-8136, Ext. 138, Fax: +1-301-763-8108 or +1-301-763-8034, E-mail: nrao@nesdis.noaa.gov

A14 The Common Land Model and Issues in Land-Surface Modeling (Joint with H)
Progress and development of the Common Land Model and future directions in the development of land-surface modeling will be addressed in this session. The Common Land Model (CLM) is an interdisciplinary effort to develop a state-of-the-art land surface model for use in climate studies that brings together a broader range of expertise than can be accomplished within anyone research group. Development and validation of the first version has proceeded with voluntary contributions from hydrologists, atmospheric scientists, biogeochemists and ecologists at 10 different centers within the U.S. CLM is made freely available to the research and academic communities. Additionally, we invite presentations on recent innovations and future directions in land-surface modeling. Recent research that integrates hydrology and biogeochemical interactions are of particular interest.
Conveners: Michael G. Bosilovich, USRA, Data Assimilation Office, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 910.3, Greenbelt, MD 20771 USA, Tel: +1-301-614-6147, Fax: +1-301-614-6297, E-mail: mikeb@dao.gsfc. nasa.gov; and Paul R. Houser, Hydrological Sciences Branch, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 974, Greenbelt, MD 20771 USA, Tel: +1-301-614-5772, Fax: +1-301-614-5808, E-mail: Paul.Houser@gsfc. nasa.gov

B03 Interactions Between Coastal Ecosystems and Sea-Level Change (Joint with OS)
This session will focus on the effects of sea level changes on coastal ecosystems and the role of these ecosystems in modulating other effects of anticipated future sea level rise. Coastal ecosystems play an important role in supporting marine ecosystems, biogeochemical processing of water and sediment, and physical protection of upland systems. Sea-level change since the last ice-age has formed the current coastlines and will continue to reshape them despite anthropogenic influences. However, human activities may serve to hasten the effect of global sea level rise on local coastlines and otherwise may exacerbate the impacts of sea level rise on coastal ecosystems by adding biogeochemical, physical, and geographical stresses to the systems. There have been numerous recent advances in coastal ecology regarding, for instance, the increasingly important role that primary producers play in the stability of coastal alluvial flood plains. Abstracts are solicited relating to any of the relationships between coastal ecosystems and sea level change.
Conveners: Andy Nyman, Department of Biology, University of Louisiana at Lafayette, PO Box 42451, Lafayette, LA 70504-2451 USA; and David Thomson, Department of Biology, Southeastern Louisiana University, Hammond, LA 70402 USA, Tel: +1-504-549-5294, Fax: +1-504-549-3851, E-mail: dthomson@selu.edu

B05 Response of Coral Ecosystems to Changes in Terrestrial and Coastal Environments (Joint with OS)
This session will highlight the use of scleractinian reef corals as paleoceanographic recorders, and will include related types of paleoclimate records as well. Corals have begun to provide a wealth of information about past environments, particularly as a proxy time series for paleosea-surface temperatures, often with very fine sub-annual resolution. Most existing coral time series are from living corals, but precisely dated fossil corals are beginning to offer snapshots of ocean conditions back to at least mid-Quaternary times. However, one occasionally finds ambiguous and difficult-to-interpret coral isotope and minor-element data suggesting that much remains to be learned before we can confidently understand and interpret every coral record. Comparing existing coral records with one another, and with other marine or terrestrial paleoclimate records, may provide new insights. An example would be a mid-Holocene speleothem timeseries from a tropical island where it would be possible to generate a proxy coral climate record. Abstracts are solicited from all aspects of research pertaining to the above.
Conveners: Fred Taylor, Institute for Geophysics, University of Texas, Austin, TX 78759-8500 USA, Tel: +1-512-471-0453, Fax: +1-512-471-8844, E-mail: fred@utig.ig. utexas.edu; and G. Burr, Physics Department, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 USA, Tel: +1-520-621-8411, Fax: +1-520-621-4721, E-mail: burr@physics.arizona.edu

G04 Monitoring Global Ocean Topography and Mean Sea Level With Satellite Altimetry (Joint with OS)
Ocean topography and mean sea level are powerful indicators of the state of the ocean circulation as well as the heat and water storage of the global oceans. Precision measurement of these variables from space with the technique of satellite radar altimetry has been demonstrated by the TOPEX/Poseidon and the ERS altimetric missions in the 1990s. The challenge in the next decade is to continue the measurement with new missions that will evolve into a permanent observing system for producing a long-term, continuous, and consistent data record for monitoring, understanding, and predicting the state of the ocean and its effect on climate. To meet this challenge, a host of technical issues need to be addressed: merging data collected from different missions; consistency in terms of orbit determination, geodetic reference frames, instrument and geophysical corrections; calibration and validation techniques (GPS, laser, DORIS, transponders, tide gauges, etc.); data assimilation by models for producing products of the state of the ocean. This special session is calling for papers addressing these issues as well as scientific results from analyzing the multiple-year data record from existing altimetric missions. Presentations on new measurement techniques and mission status are also encouraged.
Conveners: Lee-Lueng Fu, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 USA, Tel: +1-818-354-8167, Fax: +1-818-393-6720, E-mail: llf@pacific.jpl.nasa.gov; and Yves Menard, Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales, 18 Ave. E. Belin, Toulouse 31055, France, Tel: +33-5-61-27-48-72, Fax: +33-5-61-28-25-95, E-mail: yves.menard@cnes.fr

GP06 Generation and Propagation of Electromagnetic Fields in the Oceans (Joint with OS)
Electromagnetic fields are generated both by the motion of seawater in the Earth's main magnetic field and by time-varying external magnetic fields. The interpretation of these fields provides information on ocean flow, and on conductivity variations in the underlying and adjacent crust and mantle. Contributions which address these themes are solicited.
Conveners: Robert Tyler, Applied Physics Laboratory, Ocean Physics Department, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98105 USA, Tel: +1-206-221-2362, Fax: +1-206-543-6785, E-mail: tyler@apl.washington.edu; and Steven Constable, IGPP, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, La Jolla, CA 92093 USA, Tel: +1-858-534-2409, Fax: +1-858-534-8090, E-mail: sconstable@ucsd.edu

GS03 Biological-Chemical Interactions in Hydrothermal Systems (Joint with B, OS)
Over the past 2 decades, hydrothermal systems have been extensively studied as sites of intense chemical and biological activity. There exists a close linkage between chemical reactions (i.e. sulfide generation) within the water-rock system and the surrounding fauna. Furthermore it has been proposed that the presence of mineral- catalyzed reactions within hydrothermal vents led to the eventual organization and establishment of the first life forms on Earth. Even after life's genesis the production of reduced compounds within hydrothermal systems may have played an important role in supporting Archaean life forms. This session seeks to bring together scientists examining these and other related processes to further our understanding of the connections between simple rock-fluid reactions and surrounding life forms.
Conveners: Jay A. Brandes, Marine Sciences Institute, University of Texas at Austin, 750 Channel View Dr., Port Aransas, TX 78373 USA, Tel: +1-361-749-6756, Fax: +1-361-749-6777, E-mail: brandes@utmsi.utexas. edu; and John A. Baross, Department of Oceanography, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98125 USA, E-mail: jbaross@u. washington.edu

V04 Recent Advances in Re-Os Geochemistry (Joint with GS, OS)
The past decade has brought a surge in the understanding of the geochemical behavior of the Re-Os isotopic system. As analytical techniques have been improved, applications of the Re-Os system have been extended in new and exciting directions. This session will focus on new applications of the Re-Os system and recent results in fields, such as weathering, deposition of sediments, geochronology, hydrothermal processes, melting and melt transport and experimental partitioning studies that will help to improve our understanding of the behavior of Re and Os within the earth's dynamic environment.
Conveners: Harry Becker, Department of Geology, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 USA, Tel: +1-301-405-0084, Fax: +1-301-314-9661, E-mail: hbecker@geol. umd.edu; and John T. Chesley, Department of Geosciences, Gould-Simpson Bldg. # 77, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 USA, Tel: +1-520-621-9639, Fax: +1-520-621-2672, E-mail: jchesley@geo.arizona.edu

Planetary Sciences (P)

P01 Mercury: Scientific Issues and Opportunities (Joint with GP, SPA)
The innermost planet is one of the least studied objects in the solar system, yet improving our knowledge of Mercury is fundamental to generalizing our understanding of the processes that have governed the formation, evolution, and dynamics of the terrestrial planets. Visited to date by only a single spacecraft a quarter of a century ago, Mercury is now the focus of forthcoming missions by several space agencies. In anticipation of these missions, this session will highlight the latest findings from Mercury as well as the principal issues to be addressed by spacecraft observations of that planet. Papers on Mercury's solid-body dynamics, interior structure, magnetic field, crustal composition, geological history, surface processes, and atmospheric and magnetospheric structure and dynamics are all welcome. We also invite contributions dealing with the properties of the Mercury environment in the inner heliosphere.
Conveners: Sean C. Solomon, Department of Terrestrial Magnetism, Carnegie Institution of Washington, 5241 Broad Branch Rd., N.W., Washington, DC 20015 USA, Tel: +1-202-686-4370, ext. 4444, Fax: +1-202-364-8726, E-mail: scs@dtm.ciw.edu; Mark S. Robinson, Department of Geological Sciences, Locy Hall 309, Northwestern University, 1847 Sheridan Road, Evanston, IL 60208-2150 USA, Tel: +1-847-467-1825, Fax: +1-847-491-8060, E-mail: robinson@earth.nwu.edu; and Thomas H. Zurbuchen, Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic, and Space Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 USA, Tel: +1-734-647-6835, Fax: +1-734-764-4585, E-mail: thomasz@umich.edu

P02 Io: A World of Accelerated Geologic Activity (joint with V, T)
Close flybys of Io by the Galileo spacecraft in late 1999 and February 2000 are revolutionizing our understanding of the most volcanically active body in the Solar System.  Io is a natural laboratory for studying active volcanic, tectonic, and other processes on large scales.  On the terrestrial planets such processes must be inferred from the incomplete geologic records. New Io observations and models will be presented along with comparisons to the terrestrial planets.
Conveners: Alfred S. McEwen, Department of Planetary Sciences, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 USA, Tel: +1-520-621-4573, Fax: +1-520-621-9628, E-mail: mcewen@lpl.arizona.edu; and Rosaly Lopes-Gautier, Jet Propulsion Lab, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109 USA, Tel: +1-818-393-4584, Fax: +1-818-393-3218, E-mail: rlopes@jpluvs.jpl.nasa.gov

P03 NEAR at Eros
In this session we will present the latest results from the Near Earth Asteroid Rendezvous (NEAR) mission.  NEAR is the first mission to orbit around an asteroid, the S-type Near-Earth object 433 Eros. We will present comprehensive measurements of the geology, mineralogy and composition of Eros, using images with an unprecedented resolution of tens of meters and near-infrared spectra with a resolution of hundreds of meters. First results on the composition of Eros from x-ray and gamma ray spectrometry, on shape and topography from the laser altimeter, on magnetic fields at Eros from the magnetometer, and on density and gravity determinations from radio science will also be presented. Contributions are welcome on related topics, particularly ground-based telescopic observations, laboratory measurements, and modeling of
asteroid surface processes.
Conveners: Louise Prockter and Andrew Cheng, Applied Physics Laboratory, MS 7-366, 11100 Johns Hopkins Road, Laurel, MD 20723-6099 USA, Tel: +1-240-228 6769, Fax: +1-240-228-6670, E-mail: Louise.Prockter@jhuapl.edu

A07 Data Assimilation: Atmospheric, Oceanic, Chemical, and Space Weather (Joint with GP, OS, P, SA, SH, SM)
We solicit papers for a special session on model assimilation of geophysical data. Special emphasis is being given to problems with intrinsic time scales longer than numerical weather prediction and the development of assimilation products that are robust for climate and chemical applications. The following foci are of special interest:
* The treatment of model and observation bias in assimilation systems and the impact of bias on the quality of assimilated data sets.
* The treatment of large-scale ocean state estimation, covariance modeling of observational and model errors or validation of ocean assimilation analyses for climate studies.
* The treatment of observations of stratospheric and tropospheric constituent measurement in both chemical and climate applications, including study of transport processes.
* The treatment of ionospheric observations and development of coupled Sun-Earth and magnetospheric models for large-scale space-weather and geomagnetism applications.
The organizers will invite speakers to provide unifying themes and a framework for the contributed talks.
Conveners: Richard B. Rood, Data Assimilation Office, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 910.3, Greenbelt, MD 20771 USA, Tel: +1-301-614-6155, Fax: +1-301-614-6297, E-mail: rrood@dao.gsfc.nasa.gov; Michele M. Rienecker, Oceans and Ice Branch, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 971.0, Greenbelt, MD 20771 USA, Tel: +1-301-614-5642, Fax: +1-301-614-5644, E-mail: rienecke@mohawk.gsfc.nasa.gov; and Peter M. Lyster, Data Assimilation Office, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 910.3, Greenbelt, MD 20771 USA, Tel: +1-301-614-6179, Fax: +1-301-614-6297, E-mail: plyster@dao.gsfc.nasa.gov

ED05 Highlights of Education and Public Outreach Activities Under Way in the Space Physics and Aeronomy, Planetary Sciences, and Atmospheric Sciences Sections (Joint with A, P, SPA, NAGT, AGU Committee on Education and Human Resources)
Over the past several years, numerous programs and products have been developed that bring the excitement of our science field to the public as well as the pre-college education community. Innovative partnership have developed between scientists and educators, facilitating contributions from the scientific community in efforts to improve pre-college geoscience education. This session provides an opportunity to share highlights of new and ongoing education and public outreach programs related to space physics and aeronomy, atmospheric sciences, and planetary sciences. Both oral and poster presentations are solicited. We ask that developers of ongoing programs and existing products highlight what is new and emphasize the lessons learned from what has already been accomplished. Since 2000 is the year of solar maximum we especially encourage contributions on any products or programs related to this event.
Convener: Roberta Johnson, Space Physics Research Lab, University of Michigan, 2455 Hayward St., Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2143 USA, Tel: +1-734-647-3430, Fax: +1-734-763-0437, E-mail: rmjohnsn@umich.edu; Cherilynn A. Morrow, Manager for Education and Outreach, Space Science Institute, 3100 Marine Street, Room A353, Boulder, CO 80303-1058 USA, Tel: +1-303-492-7321, Fax: +1-303-492-3789, E-mail: camorrow@colorado.edu

GP03 Remanent Magnetism in Planetary Bodies (Joint with MSA, P)
Recent and upcoming space missions (Mars Global Surveyor, NEAR, Mercury Messenger) have included magnetometers to provide insight into the remanent magnetism of planetary materials. This session provides a forum for understanding that remanent magnetism and will include talks on the detection of remanent magnetic planetary fields, and the nature and origin of magnetic remanence in planetary crustal materials. Other topics include modelling of large scale magnetic anomalies, geologic setting of magnetic mineral distributions, and magnetic petrology.
Conveners: Gunther Kletetschka, Geodynamics and Astrochemistry Branches, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 691, Greenbelt, MD 20771 USA, Tel: +1-301-286-3804, E-mail: gunther@denali.gsfc.nasa.gov; and Robert Hargraves, Department of Geological and Geophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08540 USA, E-mail: robh@princeton.edu

GS02 Astrobiology Biosignatures (Joint with B, MSA, P)
The development of unambiguous criteria with which to assess the presence or absence of biological processes in geological settings forms a critical component of a successful astrobiology research program. Biosignatures research will guide site selection for extraterrestrial missions, as well as development of analytical protocols and equipment for analysis of returned samples. I propose a special AGU session to provide the astrobiology biosignatures research community an opportunity to present and discuss current research findings. Relevant topics include morphological, isotopic and mineralogical biosignatures, both in the modern environment as well as the geologic fossil record.
Convener: William W. (Bill) Barker, Geology and Geophysics University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI USA, Tel: +1-608-262-3738, E-mail: barker@geology.wisc.edu

SA01 Frontiers in Understanding the Upper Atmosphere Energy Budgets of the Earth and Planets (Joint with A, P)
This session will include recent results directed toward a better understanding of the energy budget of the Earth's upper atmosphere, and of other planets in the context of how they relate to Earth. Papers are solicited in both the experimental and modeling areas. These include experiments that probe key reaction rates and product branching fractions, or energy transfer rates and pathways. Modeling studies of the photochemical and radiative components of the energy budget equation are also highly desired. Non-LTE effects play a critical role in both the heating and cooling of planetary upper atmospheres, and are often poorly quantified. The goal of this session is to provide a contemporary account of our knowledge of the energy budget of the Earth's upper atmosphere, as well as related information from other planets. We hope to identify the outstanding deficiencies, and point toward future directions in experimental and modeling research.
Conveners: James A. Dodd, Air Force Research Laboratory/Space Vehicles Directorate, 29 Randolph Rd., Hanscom Air Force Base, MA 01731-3010 USA, Tel: +1-781-377-4190, Fax: +1-781-377-8900, E-mail: dodd@ plh.af.mil; Marty Mlynczak, Atmospheric Sciences Research, NASA Langley Research Center, Mail Stop 420, Hampton, VA 23681-2199 USA, Tel: +1-757-864-5695, Fax: +1-757-864-7996, E-mail: m.g.mlynczak@ larc.nasa.gov

SH01 Physics of Mass-Loaded Plasmas (Joint with SM, P)
The addition of mass, but no momentum or energy, to a supersonically flowing fluid has the effect of slowing down the fluid and is a consequence of the conservation of momentum. This mass-loading process in space plasmas requires an external plasma flow, the presence of neutrals, and a source of ionization. In space plasmas, newly created plasma is assimilated into the "external" plasma flow primarily via collisionless processes in which wave-particle interactions play an important role. Examples of mass-loading in the solar system include the mass loading of the solar wind due to ionization of interstellar neutrals, mass-loading of the solar wind near planets and comets, and mass loading of magnetospheric plasmas near planetary satellites and in planetary torii. In this session, a few invited review papers will summarize recent progress. Contributed papers on all aspects of this interesting topic are welcome.
Conveners: Thomas E. Cravens, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS 66045 USA, Tel: +1-785-864-4739, Fax: +1-785-864-5262, E-mail: cravens@kuplas.phsx.ukans.edu; Karoly Szego, KFKI Research Institute for Particle and Nuclear Physics, Budapest, Hungary, Tel: +36-1-395-92-89, Fax: +36-1-395-91-51, E-mail: szego@rmki.kfki.hu; and Karl-Heinz Glassmeier, TU Branschweig, Germany, Tel: +49-531-391-5215, E-mail: kh.glassmeier@ tu-bs.de

SM04 Ionospheric Outflow Causes and Magnetospheric Consequences (Joint with P, SA)
Ionospheres are common among the planets and some of their moons, wherever appreciable atmospheres exist. Created by variable solar ultraviolet light and solar wind energy deposition, ionospheres exist in diverse contexts of planetary magnetization and solar wind coupling. For this session, papers are solicited that deal with the variability of solar driving effects (both photoelectric and electrodynamic) on ionospheric outflows, and with the consequences of variable mass loading of internal magnetospheric plasma flows. Observations, theoretical work, and simulations involving ionospheric outflows and their consequences are all relevant and solicited. The goal of this session will be the identification of unifying principles that apply across the full range of planetary ionosphere-magnetosphere contexts.
Conveners: Thomas E. Moore, Interplanetary Physics Branch, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Mail Code 692, Bldg.2-Rm.138, Greenbelt, MD 20771 USA, Tel: +1-301-286-5236, Fax: +1-707-988-7835, E-mail: thomas.e.moore@gsfc.nasa.gov, Web site: http://tem692.gsfc.nasa.gov; Dr. R. J. Strangeway, IGPP, University of California, 405 Hilgard, Los Angeles, CA 90024-1567 USA, Tel: +1-310-825-8070, E-mail: strange@igpp.ucla.edu; and Dr. B. H. Mauk, Applied Physics Laboratory, Johns Hopkins University, Laurel, MD 20723-6099 USA, Tel: +1-240-228-6023, E-mail: Barry.Mauk@jhuapl.edu

Public Policy (PP)

PP01 Coasts in Crisis: Addressing 21st Century Coastal Issues with IntegrativeScience (Joint with GSA, SEPM) [formerly OS06]
Coastal systems and their natural processes interact with socio-economic systems and their processes in complex ways. The effects of each upon the other range from the continuous to the episodic, from the subtle to the dramatic, and from the immediate to the millennial and beyond. In this session, we will examine the tight interactions between coastal systems and socio-economic systems from the perspective of the latter. Societal decisions about the impact of people on coasts, and coasts on people should be based in part on scientific information and understanding. Unless the greater scientific community itself integrates among geoscience, ecosystem and biological science, social and economic science, and the science of human health--and provides integrated information and understanding relevant to decision-making--society will address coastal issues without the benefit of the best that science can provide. This session will feature representatives of: 1) those who supply the science *for social science, a demographer (TBD) working on coastal development trends, 2) those who integrate scientific information into decision-support efforts *a decision-support system modeler working on coastal issues and, 3) those who apply information and understanding to make decisions --an elected policy-maker (preferably senator of a coastal state) --an appointed decision-maker (preferably a coastal county or municipal planner) --a representative of the insurance industry who deals with coastal hazards. The session "book-ends" will be: Keynote: Charles Groat, Director USGS (confirmed), speaking on behalf of USGS and GSA, will introduce the session in the context of the roles of our organizations in enabling the integrative science that can address coastal issues, and then provide an overview of the issues themselves. Endnote: Corey Dean, NY Times Science Chief (confirmed), will synthesize the session in the context of interpreting coastal science, issues, and policies to ultimate decision-makers--individual members of society.
Conveners: Janet Hren, Science Advisor for Environment, Office of the Director, USGS Reston, 107 National Center, Reston, VA 20192 USA, Tel: +1-703-648-4480, Fax: +1-703-648-5470, E-mail: jhren@usgs.gov; and Dr. Cathleen L. May, Director for Science, Geological Society of America, 3300 Penrose Pl., PO Box 9140, Boulder, CO 80301 USA, Tel: +1-303-447-2020, ext. 195, Fax: +1-303-447-1133, E-mail: cmay@geosociety.org

B09 Kyoto Protocol: Modeling Political and Economic Response (Joint with PP)
This session will focus on modelling society's response to the Kyoto Protocol. The Protocol calls for significant economic costs and benefits to carbon release Vs sequestration, and involves different incentives for industrialized and developing countries. While there is no way to accurately predict individual responses to the Kyoto protocol, socioeconomic models can be used to identify key responses as well as "perverse reactions" such as rapid deforestation in the next few years. Such models, along with biogeochemical models, may ultimately be used as prognostic Earth System models, and the response to the Kyoto Protocol may provide a practical testing ground for the socioeconomic aspects.
Conveners: John Kimble, USDA-NRCS-NSSC, Federal Bldg., Room 152, MS 34 100, Centennial Mall North, Lincoln, NE 68508-3866 USA, Tel: +1-402-437-5376, Fax: +1-402-437-5336, E-mail: john.kimble@nssc.nrcs. usda.gov; Dork Sahagian, IGBP/GAIM, University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH 03824 USA, Tel: +1-603-862-3875, Fax: +1-603-862-3874, Email: gaim@unh.edu

H20 Linking Hydrologic Sciences and Water Policy in the 21st Century (Joint with AWRA, PP, AGU Committee on Public Affairs)
The world's water resources are coming under increasing pressure from growing populations, increasing urbanization and industrialization, and climate change. Demands for policies ensuring equitable access to water are also increasing in most jurisdictions. Concurrently, significant advances are occurring in understanding of the hydrologic sciences, in modeling and prediction capabilities, and in satellite systems capable of monitoring individual components of the water cycle. However, policy needs and the outputs of scientific advances are not converging rapidly. Although scientists and policy analysts have many common concerns, their paradigms and the processes of scientific investigation and policy development are so different that there is generally little interaction between the two communities. Scientists are often insensitive to the context in which decisions must be made and policy processes that frequently demand definitive answers before resolution of all scientific uncertainties. Policy makers often appear to disregard new scientific research results or only selectively choose results that support particular policy perspectives. This session will focus on frameworks for making multi-jurisdictional water policy decisions and ways in which the scientific process can be more effectively coupled with policy decisions. To make discussions concrete, the session will begin with overviews of priority water issues, including linkages between water and health, international security, ecosystem and agricultural productivity, and 'natural' hazards. Presentations are solicited that will provide perspectives and theoretical frameworks for how water policy can use information from the hydrologic sciences, how hydrology and related sciences can more effectively contribute to water policy, and examples of effective interchanges between hydrologic science and water policy development. Other issues of interest include priority research needs of policy makers, the role of new satellite information in policy development, transboundary data and information exchange, and the appropriate role of hydrologic models in policy development.
Conveners: Rick Lawford, Office of Global Programs, NOAA, 1100 Wayne Ave., Suite 1225, Silver Spring, MD 20910 USA, Tel: +1-301-427-2089, ext. 146, Fax: +1-301-427-2073, E-mail: lawford@ogp.noaa.gov; and Tim Cohn, USGS Reston, 107 National Center, Reston, VA 20192 USA, Tel: +1-703-648-5711, Fax: +1-703-648-5470, E-mail: tacohn@usgs.gov

Seismology (S)

S01 Seismicity and Seismic Hazards in Eastern North America
It is generally agreed that seismicity and seismic hazards are relatively low in eastern North America, especially when compared with the western edge of the continent. However, the risk that attends the hazards can nevertheless be high in the densely urbanized corridors of eastern North America, which feature large inventories of unreinforced masonry construction. The purpose of this session is to bring together recent results that lead to a better quantification of seismic hazard and risk in eastern North America, especially in the urban areas.
Conveners: Thomas C. Hanks, USGS Reston, MS 905A, 12201 Sunrise Valley Dr., Reston, VA 20192 USA, Tel: +1-703-648-6710, E-mail: thanks@usgs.gov; and John Ebel, Weston Observatory, Boston College, 381 Concord Rd., Weston, MA 02193-1340 USA, Tel: +1-617-552-8300, ext. 3399, E-mail: ebel@bc.edu

S02 Recent Advances in Theoretical and Numerical Seismology (Joint with AGU Committee on Solid Earth and Deep Interior)
On a global scale, tomographic studies have revealed strong lateral heterogeneities in the upper- and lowermost mantle. On a local/regional scale, detailed models of sedimentary basins have been developed. The purpose of this special session is to discuss the accurate calculation of synthetic seismograms in three- dimensional Earth models. The intend is to present an overview of the various techniques that have been developed for this purpose, such as ray, coupled-mode, direct-solution, path-average, finite-difference, finite- element, global pseudospectral, and spectral-element methods.
Conveners: Dimitri Komatitsch, Earth and Planetary Sciences, Harvard University, 20 Oxford St., Cambridge, MA 02138 USA, Tel: +1-617-495-2350, E-mail: komatits@harvard.seismology.edu; and Jeroen Tromp, Earth and Planetary Sciences, Harvard University, 20 Oxford St., Cambridge, MA 02138 USA, Tel: +1-617-496-5344, E-mail: tromp@ harvard.seismology.edu

S03 The Structure of the Earth's Deep Mantle and Core, and Implications for Dynamics and the Magnetic Field (Joint with GP, T, AGU Committee on Solid Earth and Deep Interior)
The deep mantle, core, and the interface between them attracts scientists working on a range of problems related to Earth's composition, dynamics, evolution, and its magnetic field. The base of the mantle plays an important role as one of the major boundary layers for mantle convection and defines the thermal and conductive boundary conditions for core dynamics and the geodynamo that generates and sustains Earth's magnetic field. In this session, we solicit contributions from seismic imaging, computational geodynamics, mantle mineralogy and phase chemistry, and geomagnetic studies that provide new constraints on lateral variation in elastic properties, density, composition, seismic anisotropy, the temperature profile across the boundary layer, and the topography of the CMB.
Conveners: Jeremy Bloxham, Earth and Planetary Sciences, Harvard University, 20 Oxford St., Cambridge, MA 02138 USA, Tel: +1-617-495-9517, E-mail: bloxham@geophysics.harvard.edu; Ed Garnero, Arizona State University, Tel: +1-480-965-7653, E-mail: garnero@asu.edu; and Rob van der Hilst, Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 USA, Tel: +1-617-253-6977, E-mail: hilst@mit.edu

S04 Transportable Broadband Seismology: Past, Present, and Future
Recent advances in transportable high-resolution broadband seismometery have enabled temporary seismometer arrays to be deployed in areas of every continent, as well as in many oceanic settings. With the advent of facilities such as the IRIS PASSCAL program, it is now possible for seismologists to install and gather high-quality data from an array in a relatively short amount of time. As a result, significant progress has been made in refining our understanding of tectonic processes at the local, regional, and global levels, as well as in the development of new analysis methods. The success of several years of installations has also led to proposals for future generations of larger-scale seismic arrays, such as the USArray initiative. The aim of this special session is to highlight: (1) results from past array studies; (2) preliminary results from experiments in progress; and (3) plans for upcoming projects. Papers concerning new analytical techniques developed from these experiments are especially encouraged.
Conveners: Matthew J. Fouch, Department of Terrestrial Magnetism, Carnegie Institution of Washington, 5241 Broad Branch Road, NW Washington, DC 20015 USA, Tel: +1-202-686-4370, ext. 4385, Fax: +1-202-364-8726, E-mail: matt@dtm.ciw.edu; and David E. James, Department of Terrestrial Magnetism, Carnegie Institution of Washington, 5241 Broad Branch Road, NW Washington, DC 20015 USA, Tel: +1-202-686-4370, ext. 4384, Fax: +1-202-364-8726, E-mail: james@dtm.ciw.edu

S05 Space-Time Coupling of Major Earthquakes
In 1999, major earthquakes occurred in succession, either on the same fault system (or in close proximity) in Turkey, Taiwan, and California. In the past such paired events occurred in New Madrid, China, Turkmenistan, and other places. The purpose of this session is to investigate the mechanisms of these double events, including the mechanisms of stress redistribution and the response of fault systems to changes in stress after major earthquakes. An assessment of the potential for one major quake "triggering" other major event(s) would be an important outcome from the session. Both observational and theoretical papers are encouraged.
Conveners: Nafi Toksoz, Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 USA, Tel: +1-617-253-7852, E-mail: nafi@erl.mit.edu; and Brad Hager, Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 USA, Tel: +1-617-253-0126, E-mail: brad@chandler.mit.edu

S06 New Challenges in Data Analysis With Large Dense Seismic Arrays
The massive amounts of seismic data that will be produced by new generations of dense seismograph networks will render conventional techniques for data processing and analysis inadequate. (For instance, USArray - a dense, continent-scale, real-time seismic array that is proposed to be one of the first components of the NSF-EAR Earthscope Initiative that investigates Earth's structure beneath and seismicity in North America) is expected to produce 2.5 times as much data annually as the IRIS GSN and PASSCAL, and all will be available in near-real time.) We need to anticipate these developments and begin to develop new software and techniques not only for data flow between sensors, data centers, and - from there - to individual scientists but also for efficient data analysis and interpretation. Some techniques may already exist. For example, dense data recording permits analysis that is routinely used in exploration industry, such as multi- channel data processing and 3D migration. Such methods have to be adapted or redeveloped to make optimal use of the three-component wavefield, the Earth's spherical geometry, and the source-receiver geometries imposed by the earthquake experiment. New theories and applications will need to be developed also. In this session we invite papers that will explore the capabilities of dense seismograph networks, such as those envisaged as part of USArray, for both structural and earthquake source imaging. We are particularly interested in novel techniques of data processing and creative theories for the interpretation of the densely sampled (3-component, broad-band) wavefield. In addition, we also encourage contributions which consider the larger Earth science data handling problem: How seismic data can be combined with nonseismic data to make best use of all available information. Information about USArray and other components of Earthscope can be found at www.earthscope.org, www.iris.iris.edu//USArray.gsa.html, www.iris.iris.edu/newsletter/EE.Fall98.web/usarray.html, terra.rice.edu/department/USArray, and in the Fall/Winter 1998 IRIS Newsletter (Ekstrom et al.), the June 1, 1999 EOS (Levander et al.), and the November, 1999, GSA Today (Meltzer et al.).
Conveners: Alan Levander, Department of Geology and Geophysics, Rice University, 6100 Main St., Houston TX 77005 USA, Tel: +1-713-737-6064, E-mail: alan@geophysics.rice.edu; Guust Nolet, Department of Geosciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08540 USA, Tel: +1-609-258-4128, E-mail: nolet@princeton.edu; and Anne S. Meltzer, Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Lehigh University, 31 Williams Dr., Bethlehem, PA 18015 USA, Tel: +1-610-758-3673, E-mail: asm3@lehigh.edu

G02 Radar Interferometry Tutorial and Science Results (Joint with S, T)
The application of Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry to geodetic and topographic mapping has led to some impressive results in a variety of science areas, including coseismic modeling of fault dislocations, understanding postseismic fluid transport, discovery of new aseismically creeping faults, and modeling of volcanic processes at depth. Yet the technique is still used by only a small part of the science community because data is either not available or affordable, software is only now becoming robust and affordable, and the methods are largely foreign to geoscientists. This session is designed to address some of these issues by providing insight into the methods and limitations of interferometry, available software packages and their characteristics, and directions for future developments in the science and techniques in anticipation of a host of orbiting radars in the next decade. This session will have two parts, one in the morning addressing techniques of interferometry, and the other in the afternoon oriented toward science results and future directions. The tutorial will focus on techniques for geodetic applications and surface change measurements. Conferees should come away from the session with an appreciation of the strengths and limitations of the method, the processing steps and data requirements for successful imaging geodesy, and an overview of available software. The afternoon science session will address the unique science afforded by spatially dense measurements, or that might be enabled given an optimized measurement set.
Conveners: Paul Rosen, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Mail Stop 300-235, 4800 Oak Grove Dr., Pasadena, CA 91109-8099 USA, Tel: +1-818-354-0023, E-mail: paul.rosen@jpl.nasa. gov; and Wayne Thatcher, USGS Menlo Park, 345 Middlefield Rd., MS 977, Menlo Park, CA 94025 USA, Tel: +1-650-329-4810, E-mail: thatcher@ usgs.gov

G03 Design of Geodetic/Seismic Networks for Geophysical Investigations (Joint with S)
Arrays of geodetic and seismic instrumentation are growing rapidly, and new initiatives involving very large/dense arrays of ~1000 stations are on the drawing board, including the Plate Boundary Observatory (Geodesy), and the U.S. Array (Seismology). Planned geodetic and seismic networks for geophysical investigations should have spatial and temporal sampling designed to optimize scientific return, subject to a variety of resource and environmental constraints. This session aims to explore how best to quantify and realize optimal network design in theory and practice, with approaches ranging from formal methods, to forward modeling and other heuristic approaches, and to rules-of-thumb learned from experience. Presentations are welcome on a broad variety of topics which in some way can contribute towards best practice in the design of geophysical arrays, whether they be on specific techniques (seismology, GPS, strainmeters, tiltmeters) directed at specific geophysical parameters; on optimal spatial configuration of specific arrays (PBO or U.S. Array); on case studies of existing arrays; on design features aimed at resolving correlated parameters; on multi-technique synergy; on temporal sampling; and on formal methods of experiment design.
Conveners: Geoff Blewitt, Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology and Seismological Laboratory, Mail Stop 178, University of Nevada, Reno, NV 89557-0088 USA, Tel: +1-775-784-6691, ext.171, Fax: +1-775-784-1709, E-mail: gblewitt@unr.edu, Web site: http://www.nbmg.unr.edu/staff/geoff.htm

GP04 Interpretation of Seismic and Geopotential Data Sets (Joint with S, T)
This session focuses on the use of geophysical surveys to distinguish among tectonic scenarios and for environmental monitoring.
Conveners: D. Ravat, Department of Geology, Southern Illinois University, Carbondale, IL 62901-4324 USA, Tel: +1-618-453-7352, Fax: +1-618-453-7393, E-mail: tiku@gauss. geo.siu.edu; and John H. McBride, Illinois State Geological Survey, University of Illinois at Champaign-Urbana, 615 E. Peabody Dr., Champaign, IL 61820 USA, Tel: +1-217-333-5107, Fax: +1-217-333-2830, E-mail: mcbride@isgs.uiuc.edu

Space Physics and Aeronomy (SPA)

ED05 Highlights of Education and Public Outreach Activities Under Way in the Space Physics and Aeronomy, Planetary Sciences, and Atmospheric Sciences Sections (Joint with A, P, SPA, NAGT, AGU Committee on Education and Human Resources)
Over the past several years, numerous programs and products have been developed that bring the excitement of our science field to the public as well as the pre-college education community. Innovative partnership have developed between scientists and educators, facilitating contributions from the scientific community in efforts to improve pre-college geoscience education. This session provides an opportunity to share highlights of new and ongoing education and public outreach programs related to space physics and aeronomy, atmospheric sciences, and planetary sciences. Both oral and poster presentations are solicited. We ask that developers of ongoing programs and existing products highlight what is new and emphasize the lessons learned from what has already been accomplished. Since 2000 is the year of solar maximum we especially encourage contributions on any products or programs related to this event.
Convener: Roberta Johnson, Space Physics Research Lab, University of Michigan, 2455 Hayward St., Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2143 USA, Tel: +1-734-647-3430, Fax: +1-734-763-0437, E-mail: rmjohnsn@umich.edu; Cherilynn A. Morrow, Manager for Education and Outreach, Space Science Institute, 3100 Marine Street, Room A353, Boulder, CO 80303-1058 USA, Tel: +1-303-492-7321, Fax: +1-303-492-3789, E-mail: camorrow@colorado.edu

P01 Mercury: Scientific Issues and Opportunities (Joint with GP, SPA)
The innermost planet is one of the least studied objects in the solar system, yet improving our knowledge of Mercury is fundamental to generalizing our understanding of the processes that have governed the formation, evolution, and dynamics of the terrestrial planets. Visited to date by only a single spacecraft a quarter of a century ago, Mercury is now the focus of forthcoming missions by several space agencies. In anticipation of these missions, this session will highlight the latest findings from Mercury as well as the principal issues to be addressed by spacecraft observations of that planet. Papers on Mercury's solid-body dynamics, interior structure, magnetic field, crustal composition, geological history, surface processes, and atmospheric and magnetospheric structure and dynamics are all welcome. We also invite contributions dealing with the properties of the Mercury environment in the inner heliosphere.
Conveners: Sean C. Solomon, Department of Terrestrial Magnetism, Carnegie Institution of Washington, 5241 Broad Branch Rd., N.W., Washington, DC 20015 USA, Tel: +1-202-686-4370, ext. 4444, Fax: +1-202-364-8726, E-mail: scs@dtm.ciw.edu; Mark S. Robinson, Department of Geological Sciences, Locy Hall 309, Northwestern University, 1847 Sheridan Road, Evanston, IL 60208-2150 USA, Tel: +1-847-467-1825, Fax: +1-847-491-8060, E-mail: robinson@earth.nwu.edu; and Thomas H. Zurbuchen, Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic, and Space Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 USA, Tel: +1-734-647-6835, Fax: +1-734-764-4585, E-mail: thomasz@umich.edu

SPA: Aeronomy (SA)

SA01 Frontiers in Understanding the Upper Atmosphere Energy Budgets of the Earth and Planets (Joint with A, P)
This session will include recent results directed toward a better understanding of the energy budget of the Earth's upper atmosphere, and of other planets in the context of how they relate to Earth. Papers are solicited in both the experimental and modeling areas. These include experiments that probe key reaction rates and product branching fractions, or energy transfer rates and pathways. Modeling studies of the photochemical and radiative components of the energy budget equation are also highly desired. Non-LTE effects play a critical role in both the heating and cooling of planetary upper atmospheres, and are often poorly quantified. The goal of this session is to provide a contemporary account of our knowledge of the energy budget of the Earth's upper atmosphere, as well as related information from other planets. We hope to identify the outstanding deficiencies, and point toward future directions in experimental and modeling research.
Conveners: James A. Dodd, Air Force Research Laboratory/Space Vehicles Directorate, 29 Randolph Rd., Hanscom Air Force Base, MA 01731-3010 USA, Tel: +1-781-377-4190, Fax: +1-781-377-8900, E-mail: dodd@ plh.af.mil; Marty Mlynczak, Atmospheric Sciences Research, NASA Langley Research Center, Mail Stop 420, Hampton, VA 23681-2199 USA, Tel: +1-757-864-5695, Fax: +1-757-864-7996, E-mail: m.g.mlynczak@ larc.nasa.gov

SA02 The High Latitude Ionosphere: A Global Driver? (Joint with SM)
The high latitude Ionosphere/Thermosphere (IT) system acts as an intermediary, transferring energy imparted to it by the magnetosphere to other regions around the globe. Some of the energy changes the state of the high latitude IT system, modulating the energy input from the magnetosphere. The energy is redistributed by heating and cooling, winds and waves. These processes are extremely dynamic in nature and their global influence maximizes during storms and substorms. The goal of this special session is to address a few fundamental questions about the role of the high latitude IT system in driving the global response. The fundamental questions that come to mind are: (1)To what degree does the high-latitude IT system drive global processes?, (2) How does the high-latitude IT system modulate the energy transferred from the magnetosphere?, and (3) What is the relative importance of the different processes in the energy redistribution?
Conveners: Mihail Codrescu, CIRES/CU and SEC/NOAA, R/E/SE, 325 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80303 USA, Tel: +1-303 497-6763, Fax: +1-303-497-3645, E-mail: codrescu@sec. noaa.gov; and Jeff Thayer, SRI International, 333 Ravenswood Ave., Menlo Park, CA 94025 USA, Tel: +1-650-859-3557, Fax: +1-650-322-2318, E-mail: thayer@sri.com

SA03 The Mesosphere/Lower Thermosphere Region: Structure, Dynamics, Composition, and Emission (Joint with A)
The mesosphere/lower thermosphere (MLT) region between about 80 and 150 km altitude hosts a complex interplay between radiative processes, chemistry, wave dissipation and turbulence, nonlinear dynamics and electrodynamics. This session is a forum wherein ground- and space-based measurements, theory and modeling results covering all aspects of MLT structure, dynamics, composition and emissions are solicited for presentation. The range of potential topics includes, but is not limited to: heat sources, radiative cooling and thermal structure; tides, planetary waves and gravity waves; wave-wave and wave-mean flow interactions; dynamical effects on minor species distributions and emission variations; neutral and ionized metallic layering phenomena; chemical effects of particle precipitation; electrojet studies.
Conveners: Scott E. Palo, Department of Aerospace Engineering Sciences, Campus Box 429, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309-0429 USA, Tel: +1-303-492-4289, Fax: +1-303-492-7881, E-mail: palo@odo.Colorado.edu; and Michael J. Taylor, Space Dynamics Laboratory, Utah State University, 4145 Old Main Hill, Logan, UT 84322-4145 USA, Tel: +1-435-797-3919, Fax: +1-435-797-4044, E-mail: mtaylor@ cc.usu.edu

SA04 Properties of the Polar Summer Mesosphere: New Findings
Recent studies of the polar summer mesosphere have revealed this region to be one of unusual properties and characteristics. New findings, using in situ rocket techniques coupled with ground based radar, lidar, and airglow measurements, show this region to be extremely active in both an electrodynamical and dynamical sense. This session concentrates on these features with special emphasis on polar mesospheric summer echoes (PMSEs) and noctilucent clouds (NLCs). Other theoretical and experimental studies relating to mesospheric layers, wave structure and breaking will also be included.

Conveners: R. A. Goldberg, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 690, Greenbelt, MD 20771 USA, Tel: +1-301-286-8603, Fax: +1-301-286-1648, E-mail: goldberg@pop600. gsfc.nasa.gov; and C. L. Croskey, Department of Electrical Engineering, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 USA, E-mail: clcece@engr.psu.edu

SA05 Remote Sensing of the Low- and Mid- Latitude Thermosphere and Ionosphere from the Ground and from Space
The low- and mid-latitude thermosphere and ionosphere are dynamic regions exhibiting strong and complex coupling. There is coupling between charged and neutral species, between different altitudes, and between equatorial and nonequatorial latitudes. Contributions are solicited which address the observation and interpretation of low- or mid-latitude thermospheric and ionospheric phenomena at altitudes above 120 km. Observations and modeling studies on all length scales (global, regional, and local) are of interest. The emphasis will be on determinations of the composition and temperature of the ionosphere and thermosphere and how these variables are affected by dynamics, electric fields, photochemistry, and geomagnetic and solar forcing. Of particular interest are observations that occurred in conjunction with the World Day in September 1999 (on or about 10-17 September 1999).
Conveners: K. F. Dymond, Code 7623, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375, tel: 202-767-2816, email: dymond@tip.nrl.navy.mil; P. A. Bernhardt, Code 6794, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375; tel: 202-767-0196, email: bern@ppdu.nrl.navy.mil

A07 Data Assimilation: Atmospheric, Oceanic, Chemical, and Space Weather (Joint with GP, OS, P, SA, SH, SM)
We solicit papers for a special session on model assimilation of geophysical data. Special emphasis is being given to problems with intrinsic time scales longer than numerical weather prediction and the development of assimilation products that are robust for climate and chemical applications. The following foci are of special interest:
* The treatment of model and observation bias in assimilation systems and the impact of bias on the quality of assimilated data sets.
* The treatment of large-scale ocean state estimation, covariance modeling of observational and model errors or validation of ocean assimilation analyses for climate studies.
* The treatment of observations of stratospheric and tropospheric constituent measurement in both chemical and climate applications, including study of transport processes.
* The treatment of ionospheric observations and development of coupled Sun-Earth and magnetospheric models for large-scale space-weather and geomagnetism applications.
The organizers will invite speakers to provide unifying themes and a framework for the contributed talks.
Conveners: Richard B. Rood, Data Assimilation Office, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 910.3, Greenbelt, MD 20771 USA, Tel: +1-301-614-6155, Fax: +1-301-614-6297, E-mail: rrood@dao.gsfc.nasa.gov; Michele M. Rienecker, Oceans and Ice Branch, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 971.0, Greenbelt, MD 20771 USA, Tel: +1-301-614-5642, Fax: +1-301-614-5644, E-mail: rienecke@mohawk.gsfc.nasa.gov; and Peter M. Lyster, Data Assimilation Office, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 910.3, Greenbelt, MD 20771 USA, Tel: +1-301-614-6179, Fax: +1-301-614-6297, E-mail: plyster@dao.gsfc.nasa.gov

ED05 Highlights of Education and Public Outreach Activities Under Way in the Space Physics and Aeronomy, Planetary Sciences, and Atmospheric Sciences Sections (Joint with A, P, SPA, NAGT, AGU Committee on Education and Human Resources)
Over the past several years, numerous programs and products have been developed that bring the excitement of our science field to the public as well as the pre-college education community. Innovative partnership have developed between scientists and educators, facilitating contributions from the scientific community in efforts to improve pre-college geoscience education. This session provides an opportunity to share highlights of new and ongoing education and public outreach programs related to space physics and aeronomy, atmospheric sciences, and planetary sciences. Both oral and poster presentations are solicited. We ask that developers of ongoing programs and existing products highlight what is new and emphasize the lessons learned from what has already been accomplished. Since 2000 is the year of solar maximum we especially encourage contributions on any products or programs related to this event.
Convener: Roberta Johnson, Space Physics Research Lab, University of Michigan, 2455 Hayward St., Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2143 USA, Tel: +1-734-647-3430, Fax: +1-734-763-0437, E-mail: rmjohnsn@umich.edu; Cherilynn A. Morrow, Manager for Education and Outreach, Space Science Institute, 3100 Marine Street, Room A353, Boulder, CO 80303-1058 USA, Tel: +1-303-492-7321, Fax: +1-303-492-3789, E-mail: camorrow@colorado.edu

SM01 First Light from IMAGE (Joint with SA)
IMAGE (Imager for Magnetopause-to-Aurora Global Exploration) is the first NASA MIDEX mission and the first mission dedicated to imaging the Earth's magnetosphere. IMAGE will obtain images of the ionospheric ion outflow, the inner plasma sheet, the cusp and the ring current with three neutral atom imagers operating in different energy ranges. It will obtain global extreme ultraviolet images of the helium ion component of the plasmasphere and far ultraviolet images of the electron and proton auroras. Finally, it will use a radio sounder to image total plasma densities from the ionosphere out to the dayside magnetopause. This session will cover initial data and image inversion results from all the IMAGE instruments. A unique aspect of the mission is its completely open data set, and procedures for accessing, processing and analyzing the IMAGE data will be described.
Convener: James L. Burch, Southwest Research Institute, PO Drawer 28510, San Antonio, TX 78228-0510 USA, Tel: +1-210-522- 2526, Fax: +1-210-520-9935, E-mail: jburch@swri.edu

SM02 Active Experiments (Joint with SA)
This session will be devoted to the study of space plasma processes in the ionosphere and magnetosphere using active experimental techniques. Active experiments in space represent a powerful technique that allow controlled and repeatable experiments to be conducted in a way that tests and contributes to our knowledge of space plasma processes such as plasma wave generation, wave-particle interactions, and magnetospheric- ionospheric coupling. Examples of active experiments include the injection or release of plasma jets or beams, electron beams, chemicals, electromagnetic fields, RF ionospheric heating, and tether-space environment interactions. Papers are solicited that include experiment results, theory, and numerical simulations of active experiments in space.
Convener: Robert E. Erlandson, Applied Physics Laboratory, Johns Hopkins University, Johns Hopkins Rd., Laurel, MD 20723 USA, Tel: +1-240-228-6918, Fax: +1-240-228-1093, E-mail: erlandson@jhuapl.edu

SM04 Ionospheric Outflow Causes and Magnetospheric Consequences (Joint with P, SA)
Ionospheres are common among the planets and some of their moons, wherever appreciable atmospheres exist. Created by variable solar ultraviolet light and solar wind energy deposition, ionospheres exist in diverse contexts of planetary magnetization and solar wind coupling. For this session, papers are solicited that deal with the variability of solar driving effects (both photoelectric and electrodynamic) on ionospheric outflows, and with the consequences of variable mass loading of internal magnetospheric plasma flows. Observations, theoretical work, and simulations involving ionospheric outflows and their consequences are all relevant and solicited. The goal of this session will be the identification of unifying principles that apply across the full range of planetary ionosphere-magnetosphere contexts.
Conveners: Thomas E. Moore, Interplanetary Physics Branch, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Mail Code 692, Bldg.2-Rm.138, Greenbelt, MD 20771 USA, Tel: +1-301-286-5236, Fax: +1-707-988-7835, E-mail: thomas.e.moore@gsfc.nasa.gov, Web site: http://tem692.gsfc.nasa.gov; Dr. R. J. Strangeway, IGPP, University of California, 405 Hilgard, Los Angeles, CA 90024-1567 USA, Tel: +1-310-825-8070, E-mail: strange@igpp.ucla.edu; and Dr. B. H. Mauk, Applied Physics Laboratory, Johns Hopkins University, Laurel, MD 20723-6099 USA, Tel: +1-240-228-6023, E-mail: Barry.Mauk@jhuapl.edu

SM05 Auroral Morphology as Constraints on Substorm Modeling (Joint with SA)
After more than three decades of substorm research, there still appears to be no well-accepted theory that can explain the aurora during a substorm. This special session will therefore attempt to return to the original definition of a substorm, that is, auroral breakup, and to place constraints on substorm models based upon the observations of the aurora during a substorm. In this special session we therefore wish to emphasize studies that make use of auroral observations to provide constraints on substorm models. We thus encourage the submission of papers that critically test substorm models based on auroral observations and strongly encourage papers that can predict the evolution of the aurora from their models.
Conveners: Wynne Calvert, 219 Friendship Street, Iowa City, IA 52245 USA, Tel: +1-319-337-6368, Fax: +1-319-354-2170, E-mail: wcx@home.com; Shin-ichi Ohtani, Applied Physics Laboratory, Johns Hopkins University, Johns Hopkins Road, Laurel, MD 20723-6099 USA, Tel: +1-240-228-3641, Fax: +1-240-228-6670, E-mail: ohtani@fluxgate.jhuapl.edu; and Michael Henderson, MS D436, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 USA, Tel: +1-505-665-7425, Fax: +1-505-665-4414, E-mail: mghenderson@lanl.gov

SM06 Solar-Terrestrial Events as Part of a Global System (Joint with SA, SH)
Last year the CEDAR, GEM, and SHINE communities initiated the Magnetic Storms Campaign, whose purpose is to compare and contrast a small number of well-observed coronal mass ejection - magnetic cloud events with the aim of isolating and understanding the key science issues involving the generation of CMEs, their association with interplanetary magnetic clouds, the interaction of magnetic clouds with the interplanetary medium, and the response of the ionosphere and thermosphere. Three event periods were selected for the first study phase: 1) 15-18 May 1997; 2) 24 September - 1 October 1998; and 3) 18-31 October 1998. This session will provide a forum for integrating ongoing solar, interplanetary, magnetospheric, ionospheric and atmospheric research efforts focused on these three magnetic storm intervals. However, all data analysis and modeling efforts which facilitate a more comprehensive understanding of solar-terrestrial events as a part of a global system are welcome. An evening workshop is also planned to analyze results and discuss future plans. The time and place of this workshop will be announced at a later date.
Conveners: Roger Smith, Geophysical Institute, University of Alaska, Fairbanks, AK USA, Tel: +1-907-474-7416, Fax: +1-907-474-7290, E-mail: Roger.Smith@gi.alaska.edu; Janet Kozyra, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Min USA, Tel: +1-734-647-3550, Fax: +1-734-647-3083, E-mail: jukozyra@engin.umich.edu; and David Webb, ISR, Boston College, AFRL/VSBS, 29 Randolph Road, Hanscom AFB, MA 01731-3010 USA, Tel: +1-781-377-3086, Fax: +1-781-377-3061, E-mail: webb@plh.af.mil

SPA: Solar and Heliospheric Physics (SH)

SH01 Physics of Mass-Loaded Plasmas (Joint with SM, P)
The addition of mass, but no momentum or energy, to a supersonically flowing fluid has the effect of slowing down the fluid and is a consequence of the conservation of momentum. This mass-loading process in space plasmas requires an external plasma flow, the presence of neutrals, and a source of ionization. In space plasmas, newly created plasma is assimilated into the "external" plasma flow primarily via collisionless processes in which wave-particle interactions play an important role. Examples of mass-loading in the solar system include the mass loading of the solar wind due to ionization of interstellar neutrals, mass-loading of the solar wind near planets and comets, and mass loading of magnetospheric plasmas near planetary satellites and in planetary torii. In this session, a few invited review papers will summarize recent progress. Contributed papers on all aspects of this interesting topic are welcome.
Conveners: Thomas E. Cravens, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS 66045 USA, Tel: +1-785-864-4739, Fax: +1-785-864-5262, E-mail: cravens@kuplas.phsx.ukans.edu; Karoly Szego, KFKI Research Institute for Particle and Nuclear Physics, Budapest, Hungary, Tel: +36-1-395-92-89, Fax: +36-1-395-91-51, E-mail: szego@rmki.kfki.hu; and Karl-Heinz Glassmeier, TU Branschweig, Germany, Tel: +49-531-391-5215, E-mail: kh.glassmeier@ tu-bs.de

SH02 The Sun, Corona, and Heliosphere at Mid to High Latitudes During Solar Maximum
This session solicits papers about the corona, the solar wind, energetic particles, and the Sun at mid to high latitudes during the approach to solar maximum. Topics of interest include: 1) the solar wind, including its properties, source region, magnetic field, and composition; 2) Coronal Mass Ejections; 3) solar energetic Particles; 4) cosmic rays; and 5) solar topics related to the preceding. Observational, theoretical, and predictive papers are solicited.
Conveners: Bruce E. Goldstein, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, 169-506, 4800 Oak Grove Dr., Pasadena, CA 91109 USA, Tel: +1-818-354-7366, Fax: +1-818-354-8895, E-mail: bgoldstein@jplsp2.jpl.nasa.gov; and Bernard V. Jackson, E-mail: bjackson@cass01.ucsd. edu

SH03 Plasma-Dust Interaction in the Heliosphere
Dust populates our heliosphere and interstellar medium and is fundamental for the formation of stellar systems and planets. There has been speculation that solar-wind dust interaction in the heliosphere should give rise to a population of pickup ions, in addition to the well-known interstellar pickup ion population. Recent observations from Ulysses/SWICS have confirmed this. It is possible that this new pickup ion population is also a source of energetic particles and anomalous cosmic rays. In this session observations, implications, and modelling of heliospheric dust populations, plasma-dust interaction, pickup ion production, and subsequent acceleration to high energies and anomalous cosmic ray energies are discussed.
Conveners: Nathan Schwadron, Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic and Space Science, University of Michigan, 2455 Hayward, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2143 USA, E-mail: nathanas@umich.edu; Mihaly Horani, Lab of Atmospheric & Space Physics, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309-0392 USA, E-mail: horanyi@styx.colorado.edu; and Alan Cummings, MC 220-47, Caltech, Pasadena, CA 91125 USA, E-mail: ace@srl.caltech.edu

A07 Data Assimilation: Atmospheric, Oceanic, Chemical, and Space Weather (Joint with GP, OS, P, SA, SH, SM)
We solicit papers for a special session on model assimilation of geophysical data. Special emphasis is being given to problems with intrinsic time scales longer than numerical weather prediction and the development of assimilation products that are robust for climate and chemical applications. The following foci are of special interest:
* The treatment of model and observation bias in assimilation systems and the impact of bias on the quality of assimilated data sets.
* The treatment of large-scale ocean state estimation, covariance modeling of observational and model errors or validation of ocean assimilation analyses for climate studies.
* The treatment of observations of stratospheric and tropospheric constituent measurement in both chemical and climate applications, including study of transport processes.
* The treatment of ionospheric observations and development of coupled Sun-Earth and magnetospheric models for large-scale space-weather and geomagnetism applications.
The organizers will invite speakers to provide unifying themes and a framework for the contributed talks.
Conveners: Richard B. Rood, Data Assimilation Office, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 910.3, Greenbelt, MD 20771 USA, Tel: +1-301-614-6155, Fax: +1-301-614-6297, E-mail: rrood@dao.gsfc.nasa.gov; Michele M. Rienecker, Oceans and Ice Branch, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 971.0, Greenbelt, MD 20771 USA, Tel: +1-301-614-5642, Fax: +1-301-614-5644, E-mail: rienecke@mohawk.gsfc.nasa.gov; and Peter M. Lyster, Data Assimilation Office, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 910.3, Greenbelt, MD 20771 USA, Tel: +1-301-614-6179, Fax: +1-301-614-6297, E-mail: plyster@dao.gsfc.nasa.gov

SM03 Energetic Particle Dynamics and Associated Space Weather Effects (Joint with SH)
Highly energetic particles in Earth's space environment are important in several ways. The processes by which thermal particles are accelerated to high energies are of great significance on a wide range of scales. In addition, the resulting high-energy particles can also cause spacecraft anomalies and failures and impose a danger to astronauts. Earth's space environment is accessible to galactic cosmic rays, anomalous cosmic rays, and solar energetic particles, and it also has its own trapped radiation belts. It provides a natural laboratory to study energetic particle dynamics. Understanding the near-Earth particle environment is also necessary to assess space weather effects on instrumentation and humans in space. This special session is devoted to: (1) recent advances in observing and modeling the near-Earth energetic particle environment, including studies of particle composition, spatial and temporal variations, and energy spectra, and (2) space weather effects associated with energetic particles, including single-event upsets and deep-dielectric discharge effects on spacecraft systems and the assessment of radiation exposures for astronauts. We seek contributions of observational as well as theoretical papers to this session.
Conveners:Xinlin Li, Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics, University of Colorado, 1234 Innovation Drive, Boulder, CO 80303-7814 USA, Tel: +1-303-492-3514, Fax: +1-303-492-6444, E-mail: lix@lasp.colorado.edu; Richard Mewaldt, Space Radiation Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 USA, Tel: +1-626-395-6612, Fax: +1-626-449-8676, E-mail: mewaldt@srl.caltech.edu; and Joseph Fennell, The Aerospace Corporation, Los Angeles, CA 90009-2957, USA, Tel: +1-310-336-7075, Fax: +1-310-336-1636, E-mail: Joseph.F.Fennell@aero.org

SM06 Solar-Terrestrial Events as Part of a Global System (Joint with SA, SH)
Last year the CEDAR, GEM, and SHINE communities initiated the Magnetic Storms Campaign, whose purpose is to compare and contrast a small number of well-observed coronal mass ejection - magnetic cloud events with the aim of isolating and understanding the key science issues involving the generation of CMEs, their association with interplanetary magnetic clouds, the interaction of magnetic clouds with the interplanetary medium, and the response of the ionosphere and thermosphere. Three event periods were selected for the first study phase: 1) 15-18 May 1997; 2) 24 September - 1 October 1998; and 3) 18-31 October 1998. This session will provide a forum for integrating ongoing solar, interplanetary, magnetospheric, ionospheric and atmospheric research efforts focused on these three magnetic storm intervals. However, all data analysis and modeling efforts which facilitate a more comprehensive understanding of solar-terrestrial events as a part of a global system are welcome. An evening workshop is also planned to analyze results and discuss future plans. The time and place of this workshop will be announced at a later date.
Conveners: Roger Smith, Geophysical Institute, University of Alaska, Fairbanks, AK USA, Tel: +1-907-474-7416, Fax: +1-907-474-7290, E-mail: Roger.Smith@gi.alaska.edu; Janet Kozyra, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Min USA, Tel: +1-734-647-3550, Fax: +1-734-647-3083, E-mail: jukozyra@engin.umich.edu; and David Webb, ISR, Boston College, AFRL/VSBS, 29 Randolph Road, Hanscom AFB, MA 01731-3010 USA, Tel: +1-781-377-3086, Fax: +1-781-377-3061, E-mail: webb@plh.af.mil

SPA: Magnetospheric Physics (SM)

SM01 First Light from IMAGE (Joint with SA)
IMAGE (Imager for Magnetopause-to-Aurora Global Exploration) is the first NASA MIDEX mission and the first mission dedicated to imaging the Earth's magnetosphere. IMAGE will obtain images of the ionospheric ion outflow, the inner plasma sheet, the cusp and the ring current with three neutral atom imagers operating in different energy ranges. It will obtain global extreme ultraviolet images of the helium ion component of the plasmasphere and far ultraviolet images of the electron and proton auroras. Finally, it will use a radio sounder to image total plasma densities from the ionosphere out to the dayside magnetopause. This session will cover initial data and image inversion results from all the IMAGE instruments. A unique aspect of the mission is its completely open data set, and procedures for accessing, processing and analyzing the IMAGE data will be described.
Convener: James L. Burch, Southwest Research Institute, PO Drawer 28510, San Antonio, TX 78228-0510 USA, Tel: +1-210-522- 2526, Fax: +1-210-520-9935, E-mail: jburch@swri.edu

SM02 Active Experiments (Joint with SA)
This session will be devoted to the study of space plasma processes in the ionosphere and magnetosphere using active experimental techniques. Active experiments in space represent a powerful technique that allow controlled and repeatable experiments to be conducted in a way that tests and contributes to our knowledge of space plasma processes such as plasma wave generation, wave-particle interactions, and magnetospheric- ionospheric coupling. Examples of active experiments include the injection or release of plasma jets or beams, electron beams, chemicals, electromagnetic fields, RF ionospheric heating, and tether-space environment interactions. Papers are solicited that include experiment results, theory, and numerical simulations of active experiments in space.
Convener: Robert E. Erlandson, Applied Physics Laboratyro, Johns Hopkins University, Johns Hopkins Rd., Laurel, MD 20723 USA, Tel: +1-240-228-6918, Fax: +1-240-228-1093, E-mail: erlandson@jhuapl.edu

SM03 Energetic Particle Dynamics and Associated Space Weather Effects (Joint with SH)
Highly energetic particles in Earth's space environment are important in several ways. The processes by which thermal particles are accelerated to high energies are of great significance on a wide range of scales. In addition, the resulting high-energy particles can also cause spacecraft anomalies and failures and impose a danger to astronauts. Earth's space environment is accessible to galactic cosmic rays, anomalous cosmic rays, and solar energetic particles, and it also has its own trapped radiation belts. It provides a natural laboratory to study energetic particle dynamics. Understanding the near-Earth particle environment is also necessary to assess space weather effects on instrumentation and humans in space. This special session is devoted to: (1) recent advances in observing and modeling the near-Earth energetic particle environment, including studies of particle composition, spatial and temporal variations, and energy spectra, and (2) space weather effects associated with energetic particles, including single-event upsets and deep-dielectric discharge effects on spacecraft systems and the assessment of radiation exposures for astronauts. We seek contributions of observational as well as theoretical papers to this session.
Conveners:Xinlin Li, Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics, University of Colorado, 1234 Innovation Drive, Boulder, CO 80303-7814 USA, Tel: +1-303-492-3514, Fax: +1-303-492-6444, E-mail: lix@lasp.colorado.edu; Richard Mewaldt, Space Radiation Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 USA, Tel: +1-626-395-6612, Fax: +1-626-449-8676, E-mail: mewaldt@srl.caltech.edu; and Joseph Fennell, The Aerospace Corporation, Los Angeles, CA 90009-2957, USA, Tel: +1-310-336-7075, Fax: +1-310-336-1636, E-mail: Joseph.F.Fennell@aero.org

SM04 Ionospheric Outflow Causes and Magnetospheric Consequences (Joint with P, SA)
Ionospheres are common among the planets and some of their moons, wherever appreciable atmospheres exist. Created by variable solar ultraviolet light and solar wind energy deposition, ionospheres exist in diverse contexts of planetary magnetization and solar wind coupling. For this session, papers are solicited that deal with the variability of solar driving effects (both photoelectric and electrodynamic) on ionospheric outflows, and with the consequences of variable mass loading of internal magnetospheric plasma flows. Observations, theoretical work, and simulations involving ionospheric outflows and their consequences are all relevant and solicited. The goal of this session will be the identification of unifying principles that apply across the full range of planetary ionosphere-magnetosphere contexts.
Conveners: Thomas E. Moore, Interplanetary Physics Branch, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Mail Code 692, Bldg.2-Rm.138, Greenbelt, MD 20771 USA, Tel: +1-301-286-5236, Fax: +1-707-988-7835, E-mail: thomas.e.moore@gsfc.nasa.gov, Web site: http://tem692.gsfc.nasa.gov; Dr. R. J. Strangeway, IGPP, University of California, 405 Hilgard, Los Angeles, CA 90024-1567 USA, Tel: +1-310-825-8070, E-mail: strange@igpp.ucla.edu; and Dr. B. H. Mauk, Applied Physics Laboratory, Johns Hopkins University, Laurel, MD 20723-6099 USA, Tel: +1-240-228-6023, E-mail: Barry.Mauk@jhuapl.edu

SM05 Auroral Morphology as Constraints on Substorm Modeling (Joint with SA)
After more than three decades of substorm research, there still appears to be no well-accepted theory that can explain the aurora during a substorm. This special session will therefore attempt to return to the original definition of a substorm, that is, auroral breakup, and to place constraints on substorm models based upon the observations of the aurora during a substorm. In this special session we therefore wish to emphasize studies that make use of auroral observations to provide constraints on substorm models. We thus encourage the submission of papers that critically test substorm models based on auroral observations and strongly encourage papers that can predict the evolution of the aurora from their models.
Conveners: Wynne Calvert, 219 Friendship Street, Iowa City, IA 52245 USA, Tel: +1-319-337-6368, Fax: +1-319-354-2170, E-mail: wcx@home.com; Shin-ichi Ohtani, Applied Physics Laboratory, Johns Hopkins University, Johns Hopkins Road, Laurel, MD 20723-6099 USA, Tel: +1-240-228-3641, Fax: +1-240-228-6670, E-mail: ohtani@fluxgate.jhuapl.edu; and Michael Henderson, MS D436, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 USA, Tel: +1-505-665-7425, Fax: +1-505-665-4414, E-mail: mghenderson@lanl.gov

SM06 Solar-Terrestrial Events as Part of a Global System (Joint with SA, SH)
Last year the CEDAR, GEM, and SHINE communities initiated the Magnetic Storms Campaign, whose purpose is to compare and contrast a small number of well-observed coronal mass ejection - magnetic cloud events with the aim of isolating and understanding the key science issues involving the generation of CMEs, their association with interplanetary magnetic clouds, the interaction of magnetic clouds with the interplanetary medium, and the response of the ionosphere and thermosphere. Three event periods were selected for the first study phase: 1) 15-18 May 1997; 2) 24 September - 1 October 1998; and 3) 18-31 October 1998. This session will provide a forum for integrating ongoing solar, interplanetary, magnetospheric, ionospheric and atmospheric research efforts focused on these three magnetic storm intervals. However, all data analysis and modeling efforts which facilitate a more comprehensive understanding of solar-terrestrial events as a part of a global system are welcome. An evening workshop is also planned to analyze results and discuss future plans. The time and place of this workshop will be announced at a later date.
Conveners: Roger Smith, Geophysical Institute, University of Alaska, Fairbanks, AK USA, Tel: +1-907-474-7416, Fax: +1-907-474-7290, E-mail: Roger.Smith@gi.alaska.edu; Janet Kozyra, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Min USA, Tel: +1-734-647-3550, Fax: +1-734-647-3083, E-mail: jukozyra@engin.umich.edu; and David Webb, ISR, Boston College, AFRL/VSBS, 29 Randolph Road, Hanscom AFB, MA 01731-3010 USA, Tel: +1-781-377-3086, Fax: +1-781-377-3061, E-mail: webb@plh.af.mil

SM07 Multispacecraft/Multipoint Studies of Magnetospheric Processes
This special session will focus on the methods and results obtained from multispacecraft and multipoint studies of the magnetosphere in order to establish the knowledge base just prior to the launch of CLUSTER II, and to prepare for the Cluster mission. Single point measurements suffer from a spatial/temporal ambiguity that can only be resolved by multipoint measurements which can simultaneously obtain both the spatial and temporal scale of a process. Previous in situ multipoint measurements have made use of chance conjunctions of spacecraft and purposely designed missions such as ISEE, DE, and ISTP. Arrays of ground-based instruments provide a complementary method of simultaneously resolving spatial and temporal scales of ionospheric phenomena that reflect magnetospheric processes. The spatial and temporal scales that can be resolved depend on the spacing of the spacecraft or observatories and the sampling rate, respectively. Papers that address the resolution of both spatial and temporal scales of processes in the solar wind, the magnetosphere and the ionosphere are solicited for this session. The goal of this session will be to illustrate how measurements that resolve space and time can answer current questions in solar wind-magnetospheric-ionospheric coupling, and to raise questions that need to be resolved by future measurements.
Conveners: Karlheinz J. Trattner, Lockheed Martin ATC, 3251 Hanover St., L9-42, B255, Palo Alto, CA 94304-1191, USA, Tel.: +1 650 424 2445, Fax: +1-650 424 3333, E-mail: trattner@mail.spasci.com; and W.J. Hughes, Center for Space Physics, Boston University, 725 Commonwealth Ave., Boston MA 02215 USA, Tel: +1-617-353-2471, Fax: +1-617-353-6463, E-mail: hughes@bu.edu

A07 Data Assimilation: Atmospheric, Oceanic, Chemical, and Space Weather (Joint with GP, OS, P, SA, SH, SM)
We solicit papers for a special session on model assimilation of geophysical data. Special emphasis is being given to problems with intrinsic time scales longer than numerical weather prediction and the development of assimilation products that are robust for climate and chemical applications. The following foci are of special interest:
* The treatment of model and observation bias in assimilation systems and the impact of bias on the quality of assimilated data sets.
* The treatment of large-scale ocean state estimation, covariance modeling of observational and model errors or validation of ocean assimilation analyses for climate studies.
* The treatment of observations of stratospheric and tropospheric constituent measurement in both chemical and climate applications, including study of transport processes.
* The treatment of ionospheric observations and development of coupled Sun-Earth and magnetospheric models for large-scale space-weather and geomagnetism applications.
The organizers will invite speakers to provide unifying themes and a framework for the contributed talks.
Conveners: Richard B. Rood, Data Assimilation Office, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 910.3, Greenbelt, MD 20771 USA, Tel: +1-301-614-6155, Fax: +1-301-614-6297, E-mail: rrood@dao.gsfc.nasa.gov; Michele M. Rienecker, Oceans and Ice Branch, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 971.0, Greenbelt, MD 20771 USA, Tel: +1-301-614-5642, Fax: +1-301-614-5644, E-mail: rienecke@mohawk.gsfc.nasa.gov; and Peter M. Lyster, Data Assimilation Office, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 910.3, Greenbelt, MD 20771 USA, Tel: +1-301-614-6179, Fax: +1-301-614-6297, E-mail: plyster@dao.gsfc.nasa.gov

SA02 The High Latitude Ionosphere: A Global Driver? (Joint with SM)
The high latitude Ionosphere/Thermosphere (IT) system acts as an intermediary, transferring energy imparted to it by the magnetosphere to other regions around the globe. Some of the energy changes the state of the high latitude IT system, modulating the energy input from the magnetosphere. The energy is redistributed by heating and cooling, winds and waves. These processes are extremely dynamic in nature and their global influence maximizes during storms and substorms. The goal of this special session is to address a few fundamental questions about the role of the high latitude IT system in driving the global response. The fundamental questions that come to mind are: (1)To what degree does the high-latitude IT system drive global processes?, (2) How does the high-latitude IT system modulate the energy transferred from the magnetosphere?, and (3) What is the relative importance of the different processes in the energy redistribution?
Conveners: Mihail Codrescu, CIRES/CU and SEC/NOAA, R/E/SE, 325 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80303 USA, Tel: +1-303 497-6763, Fax: +1-303-497-3645, E-mail: codrescu@sec. noaa.gov; and Jeff Thayer, SRI International, 333 Ravenswood Ave., Menlo Park, CA 94025 USA, Tel: +1-650-859-3557, Fax: +1-650-322-2318, E-mail: thayer@sri.com

SH01 Physics of Mass-Loaded Plasmas (Joint with SM, P)
The addition of mass, but no momentum or energy, to a supersonically flowing fluid has the effect of slowing down the fluid and is a consequence of the conservation of momentum. This mass-loading process in space plasmas requires an external plasma flow, the presence of neutrals, and a source of ionization. In space plasmas, newly created plasma is assimilated into the "external" plasma flow primarily via collisionless processes in which wave-particle interactions play an important role. Examples of mass-loading in the solar system include the mass loading of the solar wind due to ionization of interstellar neutrals, mass-loading of the solar wind near planets and comets, and mass loading of magnetospheric plasmas near planetary satellites and in planetary torii. In this session, a few invited review papers will summarize recent progress. Contributed papers on all aspects of this interesting topic are welcome.
Conveners: Thomas E. Cravens, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS 66045 USA, Tel: +1-785-864-4739, Fax: +1-785-864-5262, E-mail: cravens@kuplas.phsx.ukans.edu; Karoly Szego, KFKI Research Institute for Particle and Nuclear Physics, Budapest, Hungary, Tel: +36-1-395-92-89, Fax: +36-1-395-91-51, E-mail: szego@rmki.kfki.hu; and Karl-Heinz Glassmeier, TU Branschweig, Germany, Tel: +49-531-391-5215, E-mail: kh.glassmeier@ tu-bs.de

Tectonophysics (T)

T01 Initiation of Retroarc Foreland-Basin Development: Constraints and Models (Joint with GP, GSA)
Located on the continental interior side of contractional, continental-margin orogens, retroarc foreland basins are large, long-lived features. The mechanical and sedimentological development of mature retroarc foreland basins are increasingly understood. However, less well known are the earliest stages of formation, prior to significant sediment accumulation. The goal of this session is to provide a forum in which cross-disciplinary findings that are relevant to the processes of retroarc foreland-basin creation can be evaluated. Both theoretical and empirical presentations are encouraged from a variety of disciplines, such as sedimentology and stratigraphy, thermochronometry, reflection seismic profiling, rheological modeling, potential field modeling, and structural mapping. We further encourage field-based contributions both from large, well-developed basins, such as the Central Andean and Cretaceous Western (North America) Interior basins, and from smaller and/or lesser known basins. Fundamental questions that this session will address include: (1) What is the time scale over which retroarc foreland basins are created? (2) What is the role of strike-slip? (3) How does topography evolve in nascent retroarc foreland basins and any adjacent thrust belt? (4) What crustal conditions are necessary for basin formation?
Convener: Johan P. Erikson, Department of Earth Sciences, Dartmouth College, PO Box 407, Meriden, NH 03770 USA, Tel: +1-603-469-3529, Fax: +1-603-469-2040, E-mail: jerikson@kua.org

T02 Granular Mechanics of Shear Zones
This session will focus on the mechanics of gouge-filled shear zones. Natural faults commonly contain wear material, the presence and characteristics of which determine key aspects of macroscopic sliding. Understanding the physical processes and interactions occurring on a grain scale is therefore crucial in understanding earthquake mechanics and faulting. In this session we aim to bring together recent studies on the deformation of granular assemblages from a range of disciplines. Key points we wish to discuss include: 1) the role of physical properties of grains (e.g. grain size distribution, grain shape, porosity, packing arrangements, order, interstitial fluids, mineralogy) in determining the macroscopic behavior of the granular aggregate, such as apparent friction; 2) the influence of the physical properties of the granular aggregate and loading conditions on the mechanisms by which strain is accommodated (grain rotation, grain sliding, grain fracture) and whether strain is localized or distributed; 3) the factors affecting the formation and collapse of load bearing stress-chains of particles; and 4) how these processes correlate with the resulting macroscopic mechanical response of fault zones and the seismic signature of earthquakes occurring on them. We invite contributions from laboratory, modeling and field studies that address this topic.
Conveners: Karen Mair,Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 54-710, 77 Mass Ave., Cambridge, MA 02139 USA, Tel: +1-617-253-5810, Fax: +1-617-258-0620, E-mail: kmair@mit.edu; and Einat Aharonov, Lamont Doherty Earth Observatory, Route 9W, Palisades, NY 10964 USA, Tel: +1-914-365-8853, Fax: +1-914-365-8150, E-mail: einat@ldeo.columbia.edu

T03 Tectonics of Active Intracontinental Extensional and Contractional Fault Systems
A diverse collection of observational and theoretical experiments constrain extensional and contractional processes in the continents. Observational constraints arise from geological field studies, geo- and thermochronology, geodesy, paleoseismology, seismicity, and a variety of other geological and geophysical investigations. Modeling techniques range from the simplest elastic dislocations to more sophisticated models which consider the detailed thermo-mechanical behavior and the rheology and composition of faults zones and the continental crust. Although particular observation types and models have been investigated in tandem (e.g., geodetic measurements and dislocation models), a more integrated, multidisciplinary approach will be necessary in order to further our understanding of the contemporary behavior and evolution of these fault systems. This session will focus on interdisciplinary studies of the neotectonics of intracontinental extensional and contractional fault systems.
Conveners: Anke Friedrich, E-mail: anke@ gps.caltech.edu; and Rick Bennett, E-mail: rbennett@cfa.harvard.edu

T04 Toward Quantifying a Global Strain Rate Field
This session will address the possibility of quantifying a globally self-consistent velocity field and strain rate field model for the Earth. We welcome papers that address ways to infer globally self-consistent crustal velocity fields as well as papers that address new methods to quantify strain rates within zones of diffuse deformation given geophysical, geodetic, and geological observations. It is hoped that this session will lead to new ideas and methods that will complement the current International Lithosphere Program project to determine a "Global Strain Rate Map".
Conveners: Bill Holt, E-mail: wholt@horizon.ess.sunysb.edu; and Rick Bennett, E-mail: rbennett@cfa.harvard.edu

G02 Radar Interferometry Tutorial and Science Results (Joint with S, T)
The application of Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry to geodetic and topographic mapping has led to some impressive results in a variety of science areas, including coseismic modeling of fault dislocations, understanding postseismic fluid transport, discovery of new aseismically creeping faults, and modeling of volcanic processes at depth. Yet the technique is still used by only a small part of the science community because data is either not available or affordable, software is only now becoming robust and affordable, and the methods are largely foreign to geoscientists. This session is designed to address some of these issues by providing insight into the methods and limitations of interferometry, available software packages and their characteristics, and directions for future developments in the science and techniques in anticipation of a host of orbiting radars in the next decade. This session will have two parts, one in the morning addressing techniques of interferometry, and the other in the afternoon oriented toward science results and future directions. The tutorial will focus on techniques for geodetic applications and surface change measurements. Conferees should come away from the session with an appreciation of the strengths and limitations of the method, the processing steps and data requirements for successful imaging geodesy, and an overview of available software. The afternoon science session will address the unique science afforded by spatially dense measurements, or that might be enabled given an optimized measurement set.
Conveners: Paul Rosen, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Mail Stop 300-235, 4800 Oak Grove Dr., Pasadena, CA 91109-8099 USA, Tel: +1-818-354-0023, E-mail: paul.rosen@jpl.nasa. gov; and Wayne Thatcher, USGS Menlo Park, 345 Middlefield Rd., MS 977, Menlo Park, CA 94025 USA, Tel: +1-650-329-4810, E-mail: thatcher@ usgs.gov

GP04 Interpretation of Seismic and Geopotential Data Sets (Joint with S, T)
This session focuses on the use of geophysical surveys to distinguish among tectonic scenarios and for environmental monitoring.
Conveners: D. Ravat, Department of Geology, Southern Illinois University, Carbondale, IL 62901-4324 USA, Tel: +1-618-453-7352, Fax: +1-618-453-7393, E-mail: tiku@gauss. geo.siu.edu; and John H. McBride, Illinois State Geological Survey, University of Illinois at Champaign-Urbana, 615 E. Peabody Dr., Champaign, IL 61820 USA, Tel: +1-217-333-5107, Fax: +1-217-333-2830, E-mail: mcbride@isgs.uiuc.edu

M01 Mineral Physics and Chemistry: Symposium in Honor of William A. Bassett (Joint with GS, T, V, AGU Committee on Mineral and Rock Physics, AGU Committee on Solid Earth and Deep Interior)
Knowledge of the structure, dynamics, and evolution of the Earth relies on our ability of performing precise in-situ experiments on minerals over a vast range of P-T conditions. During the past 40 years, Bill Bassett has either initiated or made major contributions to most recent breakthroughs in these areas. He introduced the diamond cell to the earth science community and developed it into an extremely versatile probe for geophysical and geochemical investigations. His discoveries include the first determination of the high-pressure crystal structure of iron (a major component of the core), and the first experimental observation of a lower mantle phase transition (in Fe2SiO4). He invented the laser technique for heating high-pressure samples to temperatures in excess of those of the Earth's core. He initiated high-pressure single-crystal x-ray crystallography, and pioneered the application of synchrotron radiation in mineral physics. He originated the method of determining elasticity of minerals at ultrahigh pressures by Brillouin spectroscopy for direct comparison with seismological observations. His recent diamond-cell research on high-pressure rheology, ultrasonic velocities, phase transition kinetics, hydrothermal reactions, and x-ray spectroscopy continue to open up exciting new directions in geophysics and geochemistry. His contributions have thus become crucial for nearly all aspects of experimental study of the Earth's interior, from its crust to its core. This special session honors Bill Basset's career, and we invite contributions from all who have been influenced by his research and teaching.
Conveners: Ho-Kwang (David) Mao, Geophysical Laboratory and Center for High Pressure Research, Carnegie Institution of Washington, 5251 Broad Branch Rd., N.W., Washington, DC 20015-1305, Tel: +1-202-686-4454 or +1-202-686-2410, ext. 2467 (voice mail), Fax: +1-202-686-2419, E-mail: mao@gl.ciw.edu; and Russell Hemley, Geophysical Laboratory and Center for High Pressure Research, Carnegie Institution of Washington, 5251 Broad Branch Rd., N.W., Washington, DC 20015-1305, E-mail: hemley@ gl.ciw.edu

P02 Io: A World of Accelerated Geologic Activity (joint with V, T)
Close flybys of Io by the Galileo spacecraft in late 1999 and February 2000 are revolutionizing our understanding of the most volcanically active body in the Solar System.  Io is a natural laboratory for studying active volcanic, tectonic, and other processes on large scales.  On the terrestrial planets such processes must be inferred from the incomplete geologic records. New Io observations and models will be presented along with comparisons to the terrestrial planets.
Conveners: Alfred S. McEwen, Department of Planetary Sciences, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 USA, Tel: +1-520-621-4573, Fax: +1-520-621-9628, E-mail: mcewen@lpl.arizona.edu; and Rosaly Lopes-Gautier, Jet Propulsion Lab, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109 USA, Tel: +1-818-393-4584, Fax: +1-818-393-3218, E-mail: rlopes@jpluvs.jpl.nasa.gov

S03 The Structure of the Earth's Deep Mantle and Core, and Implications for Dynamics and the Magnetic Field (Joint with GP, T, AGU Committee on Solid Earth and Deep Interior)
The deep mantle, core, and the interface between them attracts scientists working on a range of problems related to Earth's composition, dynamics, evolution, and its magnetic field. The base of the mantle plays an important role as one of the major boundary layers for mantle convection and defines the thermal and conductive boundary conditions for core dynamics and the geodynamo that generates and sustains Earth's magnetic field. In this session, we solicit contributions from seismic imaging, computational geodynamics, mantle mineralogy and phase chemistry, and geomagnetic studies that provide new constraints on lateral variation in elastic properties, density, composition, seismic anisotropy, the temperature profile across the boundary layer, and the topography of the CMB.
Conveners: Jeremy Bloxham, Earth and Planetary Sciences, Harvard University, 20 Oxford St., Cambridge, MA 02138 USA, Tel: +1-617-495-9517, E-mail: bloxham@geophysics.harvard.edu; Ed Garnero, Arizona State University, Tel: +1-480-965-7653, E-mail: garnero@asu.edu; and Rob van der Hilst, Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 USA, Tel: +1-617-253-6977, E-mail: hilst@mit.edu

V02 Origin and Evolution of a Large Oceanic Plateau, the Kerguelen Plateau, and Broken Ridge: Geological, Geochemical and Geophysical Results From the 1998/99 ODP Leg 183 and Related Research Projects (Note: this is a corrected title. The title as it was originally listed was incorrect, and we regret the error.) (Joint with GS, T)
The Kerguelen Plateau-Broken Ridge and Ontong Java Plateau are the two largest oceanic igneous provinces. The former was the focus of ODP Leg 183 and the latter will be the focus of ODP Leg 193. The scientific objectives of Leg 183 focused on four major problems. 1) Chronology of Kerguelen Plateau/Broken Ridge Magmatism: the goal is to quantify magma flux as a function of time. 2) Petrogenesis of Basement Igneous Rocks: the goal is to constrain the mineralogy and composition of the mantle sources that contributed to magmatism, the melting processes that created the magmas, the post-melting magmatic evolution, and the relative role of the Kerguelen Plume, asthenosphere and continental lithosphere in the magmatism that formed the different domains of the Kerguelen Plateau and Broken Ridge. 3) Environmental Impact: the goal is to understand the post-magmatic processes that affected the igneous crust and evaluate the effects of the magmatism on the environment. 4) Tectonic History: the goal is to identify and interpret relationships between tectonism, magmatic construction and subsequent evolution of the plateau. These objectives have also been addressed by recent geophysical studies and research on the Kerguelen Archipelago, Heard Island and intervening seamounts. In this session we seek to define the state of our progress in achieving these objectives.
Conveners: Fred Frey, Department of Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 USA, Tel: +1-617-253-2818, Fax: +1-617-253-7102, E-mail: fafrey@mit.edu; Dominic Weis, E-mail: dweis@ulb.ac.be; Paul Wallace, E-mail: Paul_Wallace@odp. tamu.edu; and Michael Coffin, E-mail: mikec@utig.ig.utexas.edu

Volcanology, Geochemistry, and Petrology (V)

V01 Volatiles in Magmas: The Current Perspective (Joint with GS, MSA)
The purpose of this session is to promote and enhance discussion among the groups of geologists working on volatiles in magma but with different or opposing perspectives. Volatiles in magmas affect the density, rheology, and transport properties of magma, and power explosive volcanic eruptions. Many papers have been published in the last 5 years on the subject. Major progresses have been made but there have also been disagreements and confusion. The session aims at bringing groups of scientists to discuss the current state of volatiles in magma, bubble growth and volcanic eruptions, and examining whether different approaches can be reconciled. Session topics will include: calibration for measurement of volatile concentrations in silicate glasses and melts, the effect of volatile concentrations on the density of silicate melts, different approaches (quench vs. in situ) to the speciation of dissolved H2O in silicate melts, solubility data and models, diffusion of volatile components in melts and the effect of volatiles to the diffusion of other components, kinetics of the species reactions and application as geospeedometer, viscosity data and models for hydrous melts, bubble growth data and models, strength of hydrous melt, fragmentation of magma, and related subjects.
Conveners: Youxue Zhang, Department of Geological Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1063 USA, Tel: +1-734-763-0947, Fax: +1-734-763-4690, E-mail: youxue@umich.edu; and Donald B. Dingwell, Bayerisches Geoinstitut, Universitaet Bayreuth, D-95440 Bayreuth, Germany, Tel: +49-921-55-3708, Fax: +49-921-55-3769, E-mail: don.dingwell@uni-bayreuth.de

V02 Origin and Evolution of a Large Oceanic Plateau, the Kerguelen Plateau, and Broken Ridge: Geological, Geochemical and Geophysical Results From the 1998/99 ODP Leg 183 and Related Research Projects (Note: this is a corrected title. The title as it was originally listed was incorrect, and we regret the error.) (Joint with GS, T)
The Kerguelen Plateau-Broken Ridge and Ontong Java Plateau are the two largest oceanic igneous provinces. The former was the focus of ODP Leg 183 and the latter will be the focus of ODP Leg 193. The scientific objectives of Leg 183 focused on four major problems. 1) Chronology of Kerguelen Plateau/Broken Ridge Magmatism: the goal is to quantify magma flux as a function of time. 2) Petrogenesis of Basement Igneous Rocks: the goal is to constrain the mineralogy and composition of the mantle sources that contributed to magmatism, the melting processes that created the magmas, the post-melting magmatic evolution, and the relative role of the Kerguelen Plume, asthenosphere and continental lithosphere in the magmatism that formed the different domains of the Kerguelen Plateau and Broken Ridge. 3) Environmental Impact: the goal is to understand the post-magmatic processes that affected the igneous crust and evaluate the effects of the magmatism on the environment. 4) Tectonic History: the goal is to identify and interpret relationships between tectonism, magmatic construction and subsequent evolution of the plateau. These objectives have also been addressed by recent geophysical studies and research on the Kerguelen Archipelago, Heard Island and intervening seamounts. In this session we seek to define the state of our progress in achieving these objectives.
Conveners: Fred Frey, Department of Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 USA, Tel: +1-617-253-2818, Fax: +1-617-253-7102, E-mail: fafrey@mit.edu; Dominic Weis, E-mail: dweis@ulb.ac.be; Paul Wallace, E-mail: Paul_Wallace@odp. tamu.edu; and Michael Coffin, E-mail: mikec@utig.ig.utexas.edu

V03 Particle-Fluid Suspensions and Flow Behavior in Magmatic Systems: Theory and New Insights (Joint with AGU Committee on Nonlinear Geophysics)
Although most volcanological and magmatic processes involve the flow of particle-fluid mixtures, the details of particle interactions and fluctuations that govern these flows are not well understood. Recent developments in civil and process engineering - in particular the development of a predictive continuum theory for some granular flows, offer a new way of quantifying the dynamic behaviour of magmatic suspensions. The session will bring together volcanologists, petrologists and engineers to discuss how theories on granular flow can be applied to magmatic systems, and what new insights may arise.
Conveners: Nick Petford, School of Geological Sciences, Kingston University, Kingston Upon Thames, Surrey KT1 2EE, United Kingdom, Tel: +44-181-547-7518, Fax: +44-181-547-7497, E-mail: GL_S471@kingston.ac.uk; and Kathy Cashman, Department of Geology, University of Oregon, Eugene, OR USA

V04 Recent Advances in Re-Os Geochemistry (Joint with GS, OS)
The past decade has brought a surge in the understanding of the geochemical behavior of the Re-Os isotopic system. As analytical techniques have been improved, applications of the Re-Os system have been extended in new and exciting directions. This session will focus on new applications of the Re-Os system and recent results in fields, such as weathering, deposition of sediments, geochronology, hydrothermal processes, melting and melt transport and experimental partitioning studies that will help to improve our understanding of the behavior of Re and Os within the earth's dynamic environment.
Conveners: Harry Becker, Department of Geology, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 USA, Tel: +1-301-405-0084, Fax: +1-301-314-9661, E-mail: hbecker@geol. umd.edu; and John T. Chesley, Department of Geosciences, Gould-Simpson Bldg. # 77, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 USA, Tel: +1-520-621-9639, Fax: +1-520-621-2672, E-mail: jchesley@geo.arizona.edu

V05 Status of Decay Constants and Related Issues in Geo- and Cosmochronology
Twenty three years have now elapsed since the IUGS recommendations for decay constants and isotopic abundances were published for a few important radioisotopic decay schemes. Since then, many more radioisotopes have become important as chronometers of geological and cosmological processes. An increasing data base reveals that some of the 1977 constants are less accurate than commonly believed; there is a fundamental need for re-evaluation of these as well as appraisal of data relevant to subsequently developed systems such as Sm-Nd, Lu-Hf, and Re-Os. In addition to decay constants, isotopic abundances and data for standards must be refined and their uncertainties characterized. These values control the absolute accuracy of geo- and cosmo-chronological methods, and in many cases more than an order of magnitude more uncertain than isotopic measurement precision. This session seeks contributions from diverse approaches, including disintegration counting, between-system comparisons, and laboratory ingrowth experiments, and is intended to stimulate interaction between geochronologists, cosmochronologists, nuclear chemists, and nuclear physicists.
Conveners: Paul Renne and Ken Ludwig, Berkeley Geochronology Center, 2455 Ridge Rd., Berkeley, CA 94709 USA, Tel: +1-510-644-9200, Fax: +1-510-644-9201, E-mail: prenne@bgc.org, E-mail: kludwig@bgc.org; Igor Villa, University of Bern, Isotopengeologie, Erlachstrasse 9a, 3012 Bern, Switzerland, Tel: +41-31-631-8777, Fax: +41-31-631-4988, E-mail: igor@mpi.unibe.ch; and Richard Walker, Department of Geology, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 USA, Tel: +1-301-405-6966, Fax: +1-301-314-9661, E-mail: rjwalker@geol.umd. edu

GS01 Accessory Minerals: The Current State of Knowledge from Isotopes, Experiments, and Trace Element Studies (Joint with MSA, V)
In the past few years there has been considerable growing interest throughout the geologic community regarding the role of accessory minerals in solving geological problems. These include analyzing extremely small fragments of minerals such as zircon, monazite, and titanite to high degrees of age precision, and using in situ techniques for measuring both radiogenetic and stable isotopes. Related to this, there have been several experimental studies on diffusive transport of elements and isotopes of interest to both the radiogenetic and stable isotope community. Many recent papers have presented results of studies using the electron microprobe to analyze trace elements and to determine the age of minerals such as monazite and xenotime, and on measuring trace elements in situ using laser ablation ICP-MS and SIMS in a wide range of accessory minerals. Several studies have integrated imaging techniques such as cathodoluminescence and back-scattered electron imaging to guide the analysis location of in situ analyses. This proposed session will bring together geologists and geochemists who do research within these different areas to present their methods and results, and to discuss ideas on expanding and perfecting these techniques.
Convener: John M. Hanchar, Geology, George Washington University, Tel: +1-202-994-4336, E-mail: jhanch@gwu.edu

M01 Mineral Physics and Chemistry: Symposium in Honor of William A. Bassett (Joint with GS, T, V, AGU Committee on Mineral and Rock Physics, AGU Committee on Solid Earth and Deep Interior)
Knowledge of the structure, dynamics, and evolution of the Earth relies on our ability of performing precise in-situ experiments on minerals over a vast range of P-T conditions. During the past 40 years, Bill Bassett has either initiated or made major contributions to most recent breakthroughs in these areas. He introduced the diamond cell to the earth science community and developed it into an extremely versatile probe for geophysical and geochemical investigations. His discoveries include the first determination of the high-pressure crystal structure of iron (a major component of the core), and the first experimental observation of a lower mantle phase transition (in Fe2SiO4). He invented the laser technique for heating high-pressure samples to temperatures in excess of those of the Earth's core. He initiated high-pressure single-crystal x-ray crystallography, and pioneered the application of synchrotron radiation in mineral physics. He originated the method of determining elasticity of minerals at ultrahigh pressures by Brillouin spectroscopy for direct comparison with seismological observations. His recent diamond-cell research on high-pressure rheology, ultrasonic velocities, phase transition kinetics, hydrothermal reactions, and x-ray spectroscopy continue to open up exciting new directions in geophysics and geochemistry. His contributions have thus become crucial for nearly all aspects of experimental study of the Earth's interior, from its crust to its core. This special session honors Bill Basset's career, and we invite contributions from all who have been influenced by his research and teaching.
Conveners: Ho-Kwang (David) Mao, Geophysical Laboratory and Center for High Pressure Research, Carnegie Institution of Washington, 5251 Broad Branch Rd., N.W., Washington, DC 20015-1305, Tel: +1-202-686-4454 or +1-202-686-2410, ext. 2467 (voice mail), Fax: +1-202-686-2419, E-mail: mao@gl.ciw.edu; and Russell Hemley, Geophysical Laboratory and Center for High Pressure Research, Carnegie Institution of Washington, 5251 Broad Branch Rd., N.W., Washington, DC 20015-1305, E-mail: hemley@ gl.ciw.edu

M02 Mineral Surface Chemistry and the Origin of Life (Joint with GS, V)
The role of minerals as catalysts, templates and reactants in prebiotic organic syntheses remains an important aspect of the study of the origins of life. The interaction of minerals with an early atmosphere and hydrosphere on earth and other planets is thought to have influenced to a large extent the prebiotic budgets of reduced carbon, sulfur and nitrogen. Experimental, theoretical and field-related investigations addressing a wide variety of questions related to the origin of life ranging from possible geochemical constraints on prebiotic scenarios to the role of minerals mimicking biochemical processes are invited to contribute to this special session. In addition to invited presentations, contributed papers are solicited that also discuss photochemical aspects, redox chemistry, polymerization pathways, catalytic reaction networks, molecular spectroscopic studies and hydrothermal geochemistry emphasizing the potential role of minerals in the context of the origin of life.
Conveners: Joakim Bebie and Timothy Filley, Geophysical Laboratory, Carnegie Institution of Washington, 5251 Broad Branch Rd., N.W., Washington, DC 20015, Tel: +1-202-686 2410, ext. 2478, Fax: +1-202-686-2419

M03 Advances in Mineral Structure Analysis (Joint with GS, V)
Over nearly a century, mineralogists have determined the atomic structures of thousands of minerals and mineral-related materials, and these achievements have provided fundamental insights into the relationship between atomic structure and mineral behavior under a range of conditions. Recent advances in diffraction, electron microscopy, spectroscopy and surface techniques have ushered in a new age of mineral structure research. This symposium will highlight some of the most exciting methodologies and observations in modern structure analysis. Papers are encouraged from a broad range of research areas involving minerals and mineral-related materials, e.g., powder and single-crystal diffraction (at all temperatures and pressures), surface crystal structures and reactions, spectroscopy, phase transitions, electron microscopy, structure modeling, etc.
Conveners: Jeffrey E. Post, Department of Mineral Sciences, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC 20560-0119 USA, Tel: +1-202-357-4009, Fax: +1-202-357-2476, E-mail: post.jeffrey@nmnh.si.edu; and Peter J. Heaney, Department of Geosciences, Penn State University, 309 Deike Building, University Park, PA 16802 USA, Tel: +1-814-865-6821, Fax: +1-814-863-7823, E-mail: heaney@geosc.psu.edu

P02 Io: A World of Accelerated Geologic Activity (joint with V, T)
Close flybys of Io by the Galileo spacecraft in late 1999 and February 2000 are revolutionizing our understanding of the most volcanically active body in the Solar System.  Io is a natural laboratory for studying active volcanic, tectonic, and other processes on large scales.  On the terrestrial planets such processes must be inferred from the incomplete geologic records. New Io observations and models will be presented along with comparisons to the terrestrial planets.
Conveners: Alfred S. McEwen, Department of Planetary Sciences, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 USA, Tel: +1-520-621-4573, Fax: +1-520-621-9628, E-mail: mcewen@lpl.arizona.edu; and Rosaly Lopes-Gautier, Jet Propulsion Lab, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109 USA, Tel: +1-818-393-4584, Fax: +1-818-393-3218, E-mail: rlopes@jpluvs.jpl.nasa.gov

American Water Resource Association (AWRA)

H20 Linking Hydrologic Sciences and Water Policy in the 21st Century (Joint with AWRA, PP, AGU Committee on Public Affairs)
The world's water resources are coming under increasing pressure from growing populations, increasing urbanization and industrialization, and climate change. Demands for policies ensuring equitable access to water are also increasing in most jurisdictions. Concurrently, significant advances are occurring in understanding of the hydrologic sciences, in modeling and prediction capabilities, and in satellite systems capable of monitoring individual components of the water cycle. However, policy needs and the outputs of scientific advances are not converging rapidly. Although scientists and policy analysts have many common concerns, their paradigms and the processes of scientific investigation and policy development are so different that there is generally little interaction between the two communities. Scientists are often insensitive to the context in which decisions must be made and policy processes that frequently demand definitive answers before resolution of all scientific uncertainties. Policy makers often appear to disregard new scientific research results or only selectively choose results that support particular policy perspectives. This session will focus on frameworks for making multi-jurisdictional water policy decisions and ways in which the scientific process can be more effectively coupled with policy decisions. To make discussions concrete, the session will begin with overviews of priority water issues, including linkages between water and health, international security, ecosystem and agricultural productivity, and 'natural' hazards. Presentations are solicited that will provide perspectives and theoretical frameworks for how water policy can use information from the hydrologic sciences, how hydrology and related sciences can more effectively contribute to water policy, and examples of effective interchanges between hydrologic science and water policy development. Other issues of interest include priority research needs of policy makers, the role of new satellite information in policy development, transboundary data and information exchange, and the appropriate role of hydrologic models in policy development.
Conveners: Rick Lawford, Office of Global Programs, NOAA, 1100 Wayne Ave., Suite 1225, Silver Spring, MD 20910 USA, Tel: +1-301-427-2089, ext. 146, Fax: +1-301-427-2073, E-mail: lawford@ogp.noaa.gov; and Tim Cohn, USGS Reston, 107 National Center, Reston, VA 20192 USA, Tel: +1-703-648-5711, Fax: +1-703-648-5470, E-mail: tacohn@usgs.gov

Geological Society of America (GSA)

B07 Biogeography (Joint with A, GP, GSA)
The relationship between geographic position, climate, and ecosystems has been an important foundation for using paleontological records for determining past climates and paleogeography. Under conditions of rapid climate change, however, these relationships must be re-examined and the causal factors must be explored so that future biome distributions can be predicted. Abstracts are solicited from all fields of biogeography and their bearing on climate and paleogeography.
Conveners: Fred Ziegler, Department of Geophysical Sciences, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 USA, Tel: +1-773-702-8146, Fax: +1-773-702-9505, E-mail: ziegler@geol. uchicago.edu; and Thompson Webb III, Department of Geological Sciences, Brown University, Providence, RI 02912 USA, Tel: +1-401-863-3128, Fax: +1-401-863-2058, E-mail: thompson_webb_iii@brown.edu

ED08 Forum on Teacher Preparation for Earth Science Education: Needs, Practices, and the Role of Geoscience Societies (Joint with GSA, NAGT, AGU Committee on Education and Human Resources)
Many geoscience organizations have realized that the emphasis on Earth Science within the National Science Education Standards affords our community an unprecedented opportunity to build earth science literacy in the next generation. Many states have recently developed science standards that include earth and space science, and curriculum developers have produced programs based upon the vision of standards. Yet districts and schools that seek to implement earth and space science standards face additional obstacles. Among the most serious impediments is the scarcity of teachers with the content area knowledge and skills needed to implement standards-based programs. The forum will address this problem by asking three basic questions: 1) What needs must be met in teacher preparation, certification, and in-service training programs to generate a knowledgeable, skilled cadre of elementary and secondary earth science teachers? 2) What defines a successful preparation, certification, or in-service training program? Can "best practices" be identified? 3) What role can geoscience organizations serve toward meeting needs and supporting successes?
Conveners: Cathleen May, Director for Science and Outreach, Geological Society of America, 3300 Penrose Place, PO Box 9140, Boulder, CO 80301 USA, Tel: +1-303-447-2020, ext. 195, Fax: +1-303-447-1133, E-mail: cmay@geosociety.org; and Mike Smith, Director of Education, American Geological Institute, 4220 King Street, Alexandria, VA 22302-1502 USA, Tel: +1-703-379-2480, Fax: +1-703-379-7563, E-mail: msmith@agiweb.org, Web site: http://www.agiweb.org/earthcomm/

PP01 Coasts in Crisis: Addressing 21st Century Coastal Issues with IntegrativeScience (Joint with GSA)
Coastal systems and their natural processes interact with socio-economic systems and their processes in complex ways. The effects of each upon the other range from the continuous to the episodic, from the subtle to the dramatic, and from the immediate to the millennial and beyond. In this session, we will examine the tight interactions between coastal systems and socio-economic systems from the perspective of the latter. Societal decisions about the impact of people on coasts, and coasts on people should be based in part on scientific information and understanding. Unless the greater scientific community itself integrates among geoscience, ecosystem and biological science, social and economic science, and the science of human health--and provides integrated information and understanding relevant to decision-making--society will address coastal issues without the benefit of the best that science can provide. This session will feature representatives of: 1) those who supply the science *for social science, a demographer (TBD) working on coastal development trends, 2) those who integrate scientific information into decision-support efforts *a decision-support system modeler working on coastal issues and, 3) those who apply information and understanding to make decisions --an elected policy-maker (preferably senator of a coastal state) --an appointed decision-maker (preferably a coastal county or municipal planner) --a representative of the insurance industry who deals with coastal hazards. The session "book-ends" will be: Keynote: Charles Groat, Director USGS (confirmed), speaking on behalf of USGS and GSA, will introduce the session in the context of the roles of our organizations in enabling the integrative science that can address coastal issues, and then provide an overview of the issues themselves. Endnote: Corey Dean, NY Times Science Chief (confirmed), will synthesize the session in the context of interpreting coastal science, issues, and policies to ultimate decision-makers--individual members of society.
Conveners: Janet Hren, Science Advisor for Environment, Office of the Director, USGS Reston, 107 National Center, Reston, VA 20192 USA, Tel: +1-703-648-4480, Fax: +1-703-648-5470, E-mail: jhren@usgs.gov; and Dr. Cathleen L. May, Director for Science, Geological Society of America, 3300 Penrose Pl., PO Box 9140, Boulder, CO 80301 USA, Tel: +1-303-447-2020, ext. 195, Fax: +1-303-447-1133, E-mail: cmay@geosociety.org

T01 Initiation of Retroarc Foreland-Basin Development: Constraints and Models (Joint with GP, GSA)
Located on the continental interior side of contractional, continental-margin orogens, retroarc foreland basins are large, long-lived features. The mechanical and sedimentological development of mature retroarc foreland basins are increasingly understood. However, less well known are the earliest stages of formation, prior to significant sediment accumulation. The goal of this session is to provide a forum in which cross-disciplinary findings that are relevant to the processes of retroarc foreland-basin creation can be evaluated. Both theoretical and empirical presentations are encouraged from a variety of disciplines, such as sedimentology and stratigraphy, thermochronometry, reflection seismic profiling, rheological modeling, potential field modeling, and structural mapping. We further encourage field-based contributions both from large, well-developed basins, such as the Central Andean and Cretaceous Western (North America) Interior basins, and from smaller and/or lesser known basins. Fundamental questions that this session will address include: (1) What is the time scale over which retroarc foreland basins are created? (2) What is the role of strike-slip? (3) How does topography evolve in nascent retroarc foreland basins and any adjacent thrust belt? (4) What crustal conditions are necessary for basin formation?
Convener: Johan P. Erikson, Department of Earth Sciences, Dartmouth College, PO Box 407, Meriden, NH 03770 USA, Tel: +1-603-469-3529, Fax: +1-603-469-2040, E-mail: jerikson@kua.org

National Association of Geoscience Teachers (NAGT)

ED01 Portal to the Future: The Digital Library for Earth System Education (Joint with NAGT, AGU Committee on Education and Human Resources)
The Digital Library for Earth System Education (DLESE) is a community wide effort to develop a web-based facility that will provide: 1) convenient and organized access to high-quality Earth system education materials, 2) student friendly interfaces to Earth data, and 3) a community center for Earth system educators in K-12, undergraduate, graduate and informal venues. This session will showcase plans for library features and services developed by Earth system educators and digital librarians at the Portal to the Future workshop and report progress on initial phases of library development. In addition, papers will be solicited from each of the core Earth science disciplines describing the ways in which the library might meet their key needs. Contributed papers (oral and poster) responding to the initial library plans (geo_digital_library.ou.edu) and describing potential contributions to the library are invited.
Conveners: Ed Geary, Don Johnson, Mary Marlino, Dave Mogk, John Snow; and Cathryn A. Manduca, Keck Geology Consortium Coordinator, Carleton College, Northfield, MN 55057 USA, Tel: +1-507-646- 4425, Fax: +1-507-646-4400, E-mail: cmanduca@ carleton.edu

ED02 Getting Research-Based Approaches to Teaching Into the K-12 Science Classroom (Joint with NAGT, AGU Committee on Education and Human Resources)
National, state and local K-12 science education standards have increasingly emphasized inquiry- and process-based approaches to teaching and learning science. These methods embolden the science curriculum and enrich the science experience of students. Breaking the mold of traditional, content-driven science curricula can be accomplished in two ways: 1) exposing existing and prospective K-12 teachers to "real" science research experiences, which will facilitate 2) involving K-12 students in science research. These research experiences are particularly important in the ongoing debate about creationism and science. Effectively presenting the nature of scientific research will help to alleviate public misconceptions about the nature of scientific inquiry. Presenting research experiences to both K-12 teachers, and ultimately, K-12 students involve numerous challenges which are different from those faced by traditional science research institutions, and could involve unique collaborations between active researchers and the K-12 education community. The conveners invite papers which detail the efforts of educators to enhance the K-12 science curriculum with research-based approaches to teaching.
Conveners: Robert Schlichting, Department of Geology, 17 Cramer Hall, Portland State University, 1721 SW Broadway, Portland, OR 97201 USA, Tel: +1-503-232-8024, Fax: +1-503-725-3025, E-mail: rbs@imagina.com; and Andrew Fountain, Department of Geology, 17 Cramer Hall, Portland State University, 1721 SW Broadway, Portland, OR 97201 USA, Tel: +1-503-725-3386, Fax: +1-503-725-3025, E-mail: andrew@pdx.edu

ED03 Place and Culture in Geoscience Education (Joint with NAGT, AGU Committee on Education and Human Resources)
Under represented minority groups, including those indigenous to a particular place (such as Native Americans and Pacific Islanders) and groups now living in both rural and urban areas (such as African- Americans and Hispanic Americans), remain the least represented in the geosciences. A promising means of improving this situation is to enhance K-16 curricula and methods with place-specific and culturally-relevant content in schools serving predominantly minority communities. This may be accomplished by various means, including focusing field or lab exercises on local environments, using case studies of historical or modern local uses of Earth materials and features, or redesigning curricula to incorporate non-Euro- American empirical knowledge and interpretation of Earth systems (ethnogeoscience). Such activities have twofold value: they increase the relevance and attraction of the geosciences to students from under represented groups; and if shared with the community at large, can diversify geoscience curricula for mainstream students, pre-and in-service teachers, and possibly even mid-career professionals. The overall goal is to increase local control and understanding of geoscience issues to benefit communities and professionals alike. The co-conveners seek papers describing successful integrations of place, people, language, and culture into geoscience content or pedagogy for informal or K-16 teaching. If possible, oral, audio-visual, and poster presentations will be accommodated, but presenters are encouraged to be flexible.
Conveners: Steve Semken, Department of Natural Sciences/Navajo Dryland Environments Laboratory, Dine College, PO Box 580, Shiprock, NM 87420 USA, Tel: +1-505-368-2020, Fax: +1-505-368-2023, E-mail: scsemken@shiprock.ncc.cc.nm.us; and Eric Riggs, Department of Geological Sciences, San Diego State University, 5500 Campanile Dr., San Diego, CA 92182-1020 USA, Tel: +1-619-594-5592, Fax: +1-619-594-4372, E-mail: eriggs@geology.sdsu.edu

ED05 Highlights of Education and Public Outreach Activities Under Way in the Space Physics and Aeronomy, Planetary Sciences, and Atmospheric Sciences Sections (Joint with A, P, SPA, NAGT, AGU Committee on Education and Human Resources)
Over the past several years, numerous programs and products have been developed that bring the excitement of our science field to the public as well as the pre-college education community. Innovative partnership have developed between scientists and educators, facilitating contributions from the scientific community in efforts to improve pre-college geoscience education. This session provides an opportunity to share highlights of new and ongoing education and public outreach programs related to space physics and aeronomy, atmospheric sciences, and planetary sciences. Both oral and poster presentations are solicited. We ask that developers of ongoing programs and existing products highlight what is new and emphasize the lessons learned from what has already been accomplished. Since 2000 is the year of solar maximum we especially encourage contributions on any products or programs related to this event.
Convener: Roberta Johnson, Space Physics Research Lab, University of Michigan, 2455 Hayward St., Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2143 USA, Tel: +1-734-647-3430, Fax: +1-734-763-0437, E-mail: rmjohnsn@umich.edu; Cherilynn A. Morrow, Manager for Education and Outreach, Space Science Institute, 3100 Marine Street, Room A353, Boulder, CO 80303-1058 USA, Tel: +1-303-492-7321, Fax: +1-303-492-3789, E-mail: camorrow@colorado.edu

ED06 Teaching Earth Systems Using Landsat and Other Remote Sensing Data Sets (Joint with NAGT, AGU Committee on Education and Human Resources)
With the launch of Landsat-7 and Terra in 1999, affordable remote sensing data sets are now available to educators for use in the K-12, community college, and undergraduate/graduate curriculums. Educational and outreach programs using older Landsat, AVHRR and other satellite data have increased in number over the past few years, which positions these programs to take advantage of the newer remote sensing data sets. In addition, the use of remote sensing data and image processing for teaching earth science, geography and mathematics concepts are increasing. The conveners invite contributions that describe innovative projects and programs that make use of remote sensing data in the classroom environment.
Conveners: Stephanie Stockman, Landsat 7 Project Science Office/SSAI, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 921, Greenbelt, MD 20771 USA, Tel: +1-301-614-6457, Fax: +1-301-614-6522, E-mail: stockman@core2. gsfc.nasa.gov; Carolyn Merry, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 USA, Tel: +1-614-292-6889, Fax: +1-614-292-3780, E-mail: merry.1@osu.edu

ED07 The Role of Professional and Scientific Societies and Government Agencies in Supporting an Integrated Approach to Geoscience Education Through Local, Regional, and National Partnerships: A Special Session in Memory of James V. O'Connor (Joint with NAGT, AGU Committee on Education and Human Resources)
The Washington, D.C. location of the Spring 2000 AGU meeting provides a unique opportunity to bring together professional and scientific societies and numerous federal agencies to provide an overview of their efforts that take an integrated approach to geoscience education. Through partnerships and with a dedication to the principle of teaching about the Earth from an integrated systems perspective, many area organizations are committed to the ideal of educating everyone about the physical world around them. This philosophy was eloquently exemplified in the life of James (Jim) V. O'Connor, Washington, D.C. city geologist, and long time supporter of education in the District of Columbia. Jim saw an opportunity to teach integrated science on every street corner and in the stonework of every building. He believed strongly that integrated science was the key to helping people understand the relevance of the sciences, and he modeled true partnership with many organizations in an effort to bring science to the city that he loved. In honor of Jim, this AGU session will highlight the efforts of professional and scientific societies and federal agencies that integrate science and education through partnerships to provide real understanding about the physical world that we live in to students, teachers and the general public.
Conveners: M. Frank Watt Ireton, American Geophysical Union, 2000 Florida Avenue, N.W., Washington, DC 20009 USA, Tel: +1-202-777-7508, Fax: +1-202-328-0566, E-mail: fireton@agu.org; Michael J. Smith, American Geological Institute, Tel: +1-703-379-2480, E-mail: msmith@agiweb.org; Stephanie A. Stockman, SSAI NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Tel: +1-301-614-6457, E-mail: stockman@core2.gsfc.nasa.gov; and Laure G. Wallace, U.S. Geological Survey, +1-703-648-6515, E-mail: lwallace@usgs.gov

ED08 Forum on Teacher Preparation for Earth Science Education: Needs, Practices, and the Role of Geoscience Societies (Joint with GSA, NAGT, AGU Committee on Education and Human Resources)
Many geoscience organizations have realized that the emphasis on Earth Science within the National Science Education Standards affords our community an unprecedented opportunity to build earth science literacy in the next generation. Many states have recently developed science standards that include earth and space science, and curriculum developers have produced programs based upon the vision of standards. Yet districts and schools that seek to implement earth and space science standards face additional obstacles. Among the most serious impediments is the scarcity of teachers with the content area knowledge and skills needed to implement standards-based programs. The forum will address this problem by asking three basic questions: 1) What needs must be met in teacher preparation, certification, and in-service training programs to generate a knowledgeable, skilled cadre of elementary and secondary earth science teachers? 2) What defines a successful preparation, certification, or in-service training program? Can "best practices" be identified? 3) What role can geoscience organizations serve toward meeting needs and supporting successes?
Conveners: Cathleen May, Director for Science and Outreach, Geological Society of America, 3300 Penrose Place, PO Box 9140, Boulder, CO 80301 USA, Tel: +1-303-447-2020, ext. 195, Fax: +1-303-447-1133, E-mail: cmay@geosociety.org; and Mike Smith, Director of Education, American Geological Institute, 4220 King Street, Alexandria, VA 22302-1502 USA, Tel: +1-703-379-2480, Fax: +1-703-379-7563, E-mail: msmith@agiweb.org, Web site: http://www.agiweb.org/earthcomm/

The Society of Sedimetary Geology (SEPM)

B07 Biogeography (Joint with A, GP, GSA, SEPM)
The relationship between geographic position, climate, and ecosystems has been an important foundation for using paleontological records for determining past climates and paleogeography. Under conditions of rapid climate change, however, these relationships must be re-examined and the causal factors must be explored so that future biome distributions can be predicted. Abstracts are solicited from all fields of biogeography and their bearing on climate and paleogeography.
Conveners: Fred Ziegler, Department of Geophysical Sciences, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 USA, Tel: +1-773-702-8146, Fax: +1-773-702-9505, E-mail: ziegler@geol. uchicago.edu; and Thompson Webb III, Department of Geological Sciences, Brown University, Providence, RI 02912 USA, Tel: +1-401-863-3128, Fax: +1-401-863-2058, E-mail: thompson_webb_iii@brown.edu

OS05 Mesozoic-Cenozoic Oceans: The Warm Bottom Water Puzzle (Joint with A, SEPM, TOS)
The target of the session will be to examine the climate and deep-ocean conditions of the Mesozoic- Cenozoic, including data synthesis and interpretation and studies of the crucial warm saline bottom water hypothesis using atmospheric and ocean circulation models. Contributions on geologic data analyses and paleoclimate and paleoceanographic modeling will be welcomed.
Conveners: Dan Seidov, E-mail: dseidov@ essc.psu.edu; Mike Arthur, E-mail: arthur@ geosc.psu.edu; and Eric Barron, E-mail: eric@essc.psu.edu

PP01 Coasts in Crisis: Addressing 21st Century Coastal Issues with IntegrativeScience (Joint with GSA, SEPM) [formerly OS06]
Coastal systems and their natural processes interact with socio-economic systems and their processes in complex ways. The effects of each upon the other range from the continuous to the episodic, from the subtle to the dramatic, and from the immediate to the millennial and beyond. In this session, we will examine the tight interactions between coastal systems and socio-economic systems from the perspective of the latter. Societal decisions about the impact of people on coasts, and coasts on people should be based in part on scientific information and understanding. Unless the greater scientific community itself integrates among geoscience, ecosystem and biological science, social and economic science, and the science of human health--and provides integrated information and understanding relevant to decision-making--society will address coastal issues without the benefit of the best that science can provide. This session will feature representatives of: 1) those who supply the science *for social science, a demographer (TBD) working on coastal development trends, 2) those who integrate scientific information into decision-support efforts *a decision-support system modeler working on coastal issues and, 3) those who apply information and understanding to make decisions --an elected policy-maker (preferably senator of a coastal state) --an appointed decision-maker (preferably a coastal county or municipal planner) --a representative of the insurance industry who deals with coastal hazards. The session "book-ends" will be: Keynote: Charles Groat, Director USGS (confirmed), speaking on behalf of USGS and GSA, will introduce the session in the context of the roles of our organizations in enabling the integrative science that can address coastal issues, and then provide an overview of the issues themselves. Endnote: Corey Dean, NY Times Science Chief (confirmed), will synthesize the session in the context of interpreting coastal science, issues, and policies to ultimate decision-makers--individual members of society.
Conveners: Janet Hren, Science Advisor for Environment, Office of the Director, USGS Reston, 107 National Center, Reston, VA 20192 USA, Tel: +1-703-648-4480, Fax: +1-703-648-5470, E-mail: jhren@usgs.gov; and Dr. Cathleen L. May, Director for Science, Geological Society of America, 3300 Penrose Pl., PO Box 9140, Boulder, CO 80301 USA, Tel: +1-303-447-2020, ext. 195, Fax: +1-303-447-1133, E-mail: cmay@geosociety.org

The Oceanography Society (TOS)

OS05 Mesozoic-Cenozoic Oceans: The Warm Bottom Water Puzzle (Joint with A, TOS)
The target of the session will be to examine the climate and deep-ocean conditions of the Mesozoic- Cenozoic, including data synthesis and interpretation and studies of the crucial warm saline bottom water hypothesis using atmospheric and ocean circulation models. Contributions on geologic data analyses and paleoclimate and paleoceanographic modeling will be welcomed.
Conveners: Dan Seidov, E-mail: dseidov@ essc.psu.edu; Mike Arthur, E-mail: arthur@ geosc.psu.edu; and Eric Barron, E-mail: eric@essc.psu.edu