Photo of Earth's Stratosphere with sun rising

Fall Meeting 2019:
Media Center

Welcome to the Media Center

Welcome to the Fall Meeting Media Center. Here you can find the information you need to cover Fall Meeting 2019. Find information about press registration and housing; access press releases and slides, videos and other materials from press conferences; find and list experts; and connect to the meeting’s Online Newsroom.

Fall Meeting 2019 will be held 9–13 December in San Francisco. Find out how to attend as a member of the media by reviewing our press registration eligibility requirements.

Press registrants receive, at no charge, a badge that provides access to all scientific sessions, the press room, and the press conference room. Some events and activities, including but not limited to invitation-only events and communications workshops, are not open to press badge holders. See the Who’s Coming list for an up-to-date list of approved press.

The Fall Meeting press room is located in Moscone South, room 305-306. The press registration counter is located in the lobby of Moscone North.

Press registration

Press registration is now open. We encourage you to register online.

Register now

Press information

Read on for information specific to press registration, events and the press room, housing, and more at Fall Meeting 2019.

Now open

We encourage all press registrants to register online. For press registration eligibility requirements, please visit the Press Registration Eligibility Requirements page. 

 

Press registrants receive, at no charge, a badge that provides access to all scientific sessions, the press room, and the press conference room. Some events and activities, including but not limited to invitation-only events and communications workshops, are not open to press badge holders. See the Who’s Coming list for an up-to-date list of approved press.

Photography and social media guidelinesAGU asks that participants at all AGU meetings, including Fall Meeting, observe these guidelines for social media use and photography. If you have a specific audio/video request you must contact us.

Browse the Scientific Program

The scientific program for Fall Meeting 2019 is now available online.

Fall Meeting press conferences will be streamed live on the AGU press events webpage. Reporters can visit this site throughout the meeting to watch press conferences in real time and ask questions via an online chat. Press conference recordings will be archived on AGU’s YouTube channel

Available for members of the press

AGU provides a press room where registered members of the press can work and mingle. Breakfast, lunch and refreshments will also be provided. In the press room, and in the Online Newsroom, AGU will make available copies of press releases about developments in Earth and space sciences and other news presented at the meeting. The press room is located on the third level of Moscone South, in room 305-306.

Reserve space to conduct interviews

During the meeting, registered members of the press will be able to reserve quiet rooms to conduct interviews. Reservations are given in 30-minute increments for up to one hour at a time, and are on a first-come, first-served basis. Quiet rooms can be reserved through this online calendar.

Participate in person or online

AGU will offer a series of press conferences about newsworthy scientific advances presented at Fall Meeting. The press conference schedule is below and available for download here. All press conferences take place in the press conference room on the third level of Moscone South, room 310-312.

AGU will offer a series of media roundtables to bring experts together with reporters in an informal, conversational setting. Roundtables are meant to provide background information about an upcoming project or ongoing area of research rather than present breaking news. The roundtable schedule is posted below and available for download here. Media roundtables are for onsite press only; they will not be live streamed or recorded. All roundtables take place in the press room, Moscone South, room 305-306. 

Media tools and information

Microphone on stand with dark background

Press conferences and other events at Fall Meeting 2019

AGU's Public Information Office will host a number of press events to help reporters cover new developments in the Earth and space sciences. There will be two formats for press events at Fall Meeting:

  • 1

    Press conferences: A small panel of speakers will share newsworthy findings being presented at the meeting. All press conferences take place in the press conference room, Moscone South, room 310-312, and are 45 minutes long. Times listed are Pacific Standard Time. All press conferences will be streamed live and archived on AGU's YouTube Channel. Slides and other materials will be available in the Online Newsroom.

  • 2

    Media roundtables: Media roundtables bring experts together with reporters in an informal, conversational setting. Roundtables are meant to provide background information about an upcoming project or ongoing area of research rather than present breaking news. Media roundtables are for onsite press only; they will not be live streamed or recorded. All roundtables take place in the press room, Moscone South, room 305-306, and are 45 minutes long. Times listed are Pacific Standard Time.

Sunrising over ice and snow covered stream

Press conference schedule

Monday (12/9)

Tuesday (12/10)

Wednesday (12/11)

Thursday (12/12)

8:00 AM

Press workshop: A year on the ice: MOSAiC at three months

9:00 AM

The importance and vulnerability of the world’s water towers

Press workshop: Climate change and El Niño: Does global warming matter for the climate of the tropics?

Geoscience Grab Bag 3: Rock arches, alien rain, and kidney stones

Geoscience Grab Bag 4: Lunar dust, Congo fish, illegal fishing, and collapsing tunnels

10:00 AM

Et tu Etna? New insights on classic eruptions of Etna, Vesuvius, and Santorini

New science from NASA’s Parker Solar Probe mission

11:00 AM

Explaining extreme events of 2018 from a climate perspective

Arctic Report Card 2019

Press workshop: Get ready to face the Sun with Solar Orbiter

X marks the spot: NASA’s OSIRIS-REx sample collection site announcement

12:00 PM 

LUNCH BREAK LUNCH BREAK Microplastics in unexpected places

LUNCH BREAK

1:30 PM

Ice in motion: Decades of satellite images illuminate change

What controlled the rise of oxygen on Earth?

 

Another giant polar cyclone discovered: Juno science results since jumping Jupiter’s shadow

2:30 PM

Media Availability: Updates to AGU’s climate change and data position statements

Postcards from the edge of space: New images, new phenomena, and new insights

 

Media availability: Recent fires in the Amazon, California and around the globe

3:30 PM

Geoscience Grab Bag 1: Sailing rocks, seafloor pockmarks, and atomic bombs

Geoscience Grab Bag 2: Mountain limits and earthquake teleconnections

Press conference descriptions

The importance and vulnerability of the world’s water towers

Monday, 9 December
9:00 a.m.

A quarter of the global population relies on water supplied by the world’s water towers: mountain regions that store and supply water via glaciers, lakes, and streams. In this briefing, climate scientists will highlight new research on the importance and vulnerability of one of the planet’s most vital life support systems.

Tobias Bolch, University of St. Andrews, Fife, Scotland, United Kingdom
Aurora Elmore, National Geographic Society, Washington, D.C., United States
Walter Immerzeel, Utrecht University, Utrecht, Netherlands

Presentations: GC52B-02, GC53G-1244


Explaining extreme events of 2018 from a climate perspective

Monday, 9 December
11:00 a.m.

Explaining Extreme Events of 2018 from a Climate Perspective is the eighth annual special issue of the Bulletin of American Meteorological Society presenting new, peer-reviewed research analyzing the role of anthropogenic climate change and natural weather variability in the intensity and evolution of a set of extreme weather events from the previous calendar year. This edition includes research papers that examine the influence of climate change on more than 25 extreme weather events in 2018, including the speed of Atlantic hurricanes, wildfires in the western U.S., drought in the Four Corners of the U.S. Southwest, extreme rains in the Mid-Atlantic, and exceptional heat waves in Europe, Spain, and northeast Asia.

Chris Funk, USGS and University of California Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, California, United States
Stephanie Herring, NOAA, Boulder, Colorado, United States
Walt Meier, National Snow and Ice Data Center, Boulder, Colorado, United States
Jeff Rosenfeld, American Meteorological Society, Santa Rosa, California, United States


Ice in motion: Decades of satellite images illuminate change

Monday, 9 December
1:30 p.m.

With a half-century’s worth of images from Earth-observing satellites, scientists are investigating how ice is changing in a warming climate. In this briefing, researchers will illustrate the story of how glaciers got to the state they’re in today and what changes are happening in the interior of Earth’s ice sheets. They will present time-lapse movies of individual glaciers in Alaska and the Yukon over the last 47 years, new findings about how Greenland glaciers have behaved over the past three decades, a new look at where lakes on top of the Greenland Ice Sheet are popping up, and new discoveries about meltwater buried under Antarctica.

Devon Dunmire, University of Colorado Boulder, Boulder, Colorado, United States
Mark Fahnestock, University of Alaska, Fairbanks, Alaska, United States
Michalea King, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio, United States
James Lea, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, United Kingdom

Presentations: C13C-1312, C21B-06, C31A-1483, U11C-13


Media Availability: Updates to AGU’s climate change and data position statements
Monday, 9 December
2:30 p.m.

AGU recently updated its position statements on data and climate change. The new AGU position on data accessibility reinforces the vital need to create a culture that supports, enables and nurtures responsible research. AGU updated its climate change position because the science demonstrates clearly that immediate and coordinated mitigation actions are urgently needed to address the growing crisis. In this panel, AGU’s executive director/CEO Chris McEntee and members of the committee that updated the climate change position statement will walk reporters through the updates and answer questions about the changes.

Don Boesch, University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science, Cambridge, Maryland, United States
Robert E. Kopp, Rutgers University, Rutgers, New Jersey, United States
Chris McEntee, Executive Director/CEO, AGU, Washington, DC, United States


Geoscience Grab Bag 1: Sailing rocks, seafloor pockmarks, and atomic bombs

Monday, 9 December
3:30 p.m.

Unlike traditional press conferences that focus on one topic or mission, this Geoscience Grab Bag will highlight three unrelated research presentations across Earth and space science being presented at Fall Meeting 2019. This Grab Bag briefing will include:

  • New clues on the origin of roughly 5,000 pockmarks on the seafloor near the California coast
  • New insights into the connection between “sailing rocks” and dinosaur footprints
  • New seafloor maps detailing the craters left by atomic bomb tests in the Pacific Ocean

Paul Olsen, Columbia University of New York, Palisades, New York, United States
Charles Paull, Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute, Moss Landing, California, United States
Arthur Trembanis, University of Delaware, Newark, Delaware, United States

Presentations: EP11B-02, EP23C-2277, OS13C-1559


Press workshop: A year on the ice: MOSAiC at three months

Tuesday, 10 December
8:00 a.m.

A German icebreaker has been frozen in Arctic sea ice near the North Pole for weeks, after departing Norway in September. Hear some of the science, stories, and challenges from participants in one of the most ambitious research missions in the central Arctic: The Multidisciplinary Drifting Observatory for the Study of Arctic Climate (MOSAiC). The panel, including two scientists who will phone in from the frozen icebreaker, will discuss why we need to better understand Arctic changes and the challenges of collecting data at the remote and beautiful top of the world.

Stephanie Arndt, Alfred Wegener Institute, Bremerhaven, Germany
Sally McFarlane, U.S. Department of Energy, Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility, Germantown, Maryland, United States
Markus Rex, Alfred Wegener Institute, Bremerhaven, Germany (aboard RV Polarstern)
Matthew Shupe, CIRES/University of Colorado/NOAA, Boulder, Colorado, United States (aboard RV Polarstern)
Melinda Webster, University of Alaska Fairbanks, Fairbanks, Alaska, United States

Presentations: A44C-01, A52A-01, C23D-1594, C32B-03, C32B-08, GC12A-03


Press workshop: Climate change and El Niño: Does global warming matter for the climate of the tropics?

Tuesday, 10 December
9:00 a.m.

In 1969, Jacob Bjerknes first proposed that the El Niño phenomenon in the east Pacific was part of a larger tropical climatic pattern influencing the globe. Today, scientists are focusing on the effects of global warming on El Niño and the tropical oceans, where they believe the effects of global warming will be most strongly felt. In this workshop, climate experts will explain how they use modern and ancient climate evidence to predict the future effects of El Niño and La Niña on vulnerable communities and ecosystems as we enter a new era of climate uncertainty.

Mark Cane, The Earth Institute, Columbia University, New York, New York, United States
Pedro DiNezio, University of Texas, Austin, Texas, United States
Christina Karamperidou, University of Hawaii at Mānoa, Honolulu, Hawaii, United States
Jessica Tierney, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona, United States

Presentations: GC24A-01, GC24A-08, PP24C-08, PP31A-03, PP53A-01


Et tu Etna? New insights on classic eruptions of Etna, Vesuvius, and Santorini

Tuesday, 10 December
10:00 a.m.

In 44 BCE, the year Julius Caesar made himself dictator for life of the Roman Republic and was murdered, a volcano erupted somewhere on Earth. Traces of the eruption can be found in ice cores from Greenland and Antarctica, in signs of cold weather in tree rings, and records of agricultural disaster from Egypt to China. researchers will present new evidence that a previously underestimated eruption at Mt. Etna, Sicily, could account for the observed global effects and may have influenced events in Rome. In a separate study, researchers will discuss findings about the mysterious fate of residents following a catastrophic eruption that destroyed much of the Greek island of Santorini 3,500 years ago, burying city buildings and artifacts, but leaving behind no bodies.

Rafael Castro, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, California, United States
Krista Evans, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Manoa, Hawaii, United States
Morgan King, College of St. Benedict and St. John’s University, Collegeville, Minnesota, United States

Presentations: V23I-0297, V23I-0298


Arctic Report Card 2019

Tuesday, 10 December
11:00 a.m.

The NOAA-led Arctic Report Card has become the authoritative, annual volume of peer-reviewed environmental observations and analysis on the Arctic, a region of the world that is undergoing dramatic and disruptive change, with global consequences. In addition to annual reporting on temperature, ice, snow cover, and both terrestrial and oceanic productivity, this year the report card will feature chapters chronicling the extraordinary and disruptive changes roiling the Bering Sea, and the dislocation of important fisheries in the Bering and Barents Seas, as well as an essay from indigenous peoples whose livelihoods are presently and directly threatened by climate change.

Matthew Druckenmiller, National Snow and Ice Data Center, Boulder, Colorado, United States
Retired Navy Rear Adm. Tim Gallaudet, Assistant Secretary of Commerce for Oceans and Atmosphere, Washington, District of Columbia, United States
Mellisa Johnson, Bering Sea Elders group, Anchorage, Alaska, United States
Donald Perovich, Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire, United States

Presentations: B44E-08, C13D-1337, C21C-06, C23D-1579C23D-1580C23D-1581, C33A-01, C51D-1328


What controlled the rise of oxygen on Earth?

Tuesday, 10 December
1:30 p.m.

Research is breathing new life into the contentious debate about what led to the oxygenation of Earth’s atmosphere and oceans. In this briefing, researchers will discuss new findings that challenge leading ideas on the source of Earth’s well-documented ‘oxygenation events’ which began two billion years ago. Researchers will also discuss what these findings mean for our understanding of the history of oxygen on Earth – and the implication for planets other than our own.

Joshua Krissansen-Totton, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, United States
Benjamin Mills, University of Leeds, Leeds, United Kingdom
Noah Planavsky, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut, United States

Presentations: B22B-05, PP53B-04



Postcards from the edge of space: New images, new phenomena, and new insights

Tuesday, 10 December
2:30 p.m.

In this briefing, scientists will present new images from Earth’s ionosphere, bringing color to processes that have widespread implications for the part of space closest to home. This collection of photos will span the first images ever captured by NASA’s ICON spacecraft — just launched in October 2019 — and the first science discoveries from NASA’s GOLD mission, along with observations of a never-before-studied type of aurora.

Jennifer Briggs, Pepperdine University, Malibu, California, United States
Richard Eastes, University of Colorado Boulder, Boulder, Colorado, United States
Thomas Immel, University of California Berkeley, Berkeley, California, United States

Presentations: SA11A-01, SM51G-3219


Geoscience Grab Bag 2: Mountain limits and earthquake teleconnections

Tuesday, 10 December
3:30 p.m.

Unlike traditional press conferences that focus on one topic or mission, this Geoscience Grab Bag will highlight three unrelated research presentations in the field of geology being presented at Fall Meeting 2019. This Grab Bag briefing will include:

  • Surprising discoveries about what limits the height of mountains on Earth
  • New insights into the connection between earthquakes in Cascadia, the Northern San Andreas fault and San Francisco
  • New results about how faraway earthquakes impact the Australian continent

Chris Goldfinger, Oregon State University, Corvallis, Oregon, United States
Anna Riddell, University of Tasmania, Hobart, Tasmania, Australia
Anne Voigtländer, Helmholtz Centre Potsdam GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences, Potsdam, Germany

Presentations: EP51F-2175, G43B-0751, OS54A-03


Geoscience Grab Bag 3: Rock arches, alien rain, and kidney stones

Wednesday, 11 December
9:00 a.m.

Unlike traditional press conferences that focus on one topic or mission, this Geoscience Grab Bag will highlight three unrelated research projects across Earth and space science being presented at Fall Meeting 2019. This Grab Bag briefing will include:

  • Surprising discoveries about how infrasound can damage geologic features
  • New insights into raindrop size, shape, and falling speed on different planets
  • New results on the structure of human kidney stones

Riley Finnegan, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah, United States
Kaitlyn Loftus, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts, United States
Matthew Wielicki, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, Alabama, United States 

Presentations: GH43C-1225, P14A-05, S23D-0679


New science from NASA’s Parker Solar Probe mission

Wednesday, 11 December
10:00 a.m.

As Parker Solar Probe zipped closer to the Sun than any spacecraft has gone before, it made groundbreaking observations of various Sun-driven events that can affect humans and technology in space. In this panel, speakers will present new findings from the mission based on data gathered from within the Sun’s atmosphere. This includes closer-than-ever measurements of coronal mass ejections and particle events that cannot be observed with near-Earth spacecraft.

Karl Battams, United States Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, D.C., United States
Tim Horbury, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom
Kelly Korreck, Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, Cambridge, Massachusetts, United States
Nathan Schwadron, Princeton University/University of New Hampshire, Princeton, New Jersey, United States
Nicholeen Viall, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland, United States

Presentations: SH12A-01, SH13C-3432, SH13C-3434, SH13C-3443, SH51A-01


Press workshop: Get ready to face the Sun with Solar Orbiter

Wednesday, 11 December
11:00 a.m.

The countdown to the launch of the European Space Agency’s Solar Orbiter mission from NASA’s Kennedy Space Center on 5 February 2020 has begun. In this briefing, panelists will present the key goals of the mission, which include capturing the first-ever images of the Sun’s poles and studying how activity observed at the Sun connects with conditions closer to Earth. They will also explain how the Solar Orbiter and NASA’s Parker Solar Probe will collect complementary data sets to maximize the science return of the two missions.

Holly Gilbert, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland, United States
Daniel Mueller, European Space Agency, Villanueva De La Cañada, Spain
Marco Velli, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California, United States

 

Presentations: SH21D-3292, SH24A-01, SH53B-3376


RESCHEDULED: Microplastics in unexpected places

Wednesday, 11 December
12:00 p.m.

Plastic debris has accumulated in ecosystems around the world and is an increasing environmental concern. Many studies have focused on microplastic pollution in the ocean, but little is known about how microplastics are transported through the environment and where they end up. In this briefing, researchers will present new findings related to microplastic pollution, including new information about microplastics in remote environments, how clothing sheds microfibers during the washing process, and movement of microplastics through agricultural land. 

Julia Davidson, Desert Research Institute Reno, Reno, Nevada, United States
Emmerline Ragoonath-De Mattos, Columbia University, Palisades, New York, United States
Meredith Sutton, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia, United States

Presentations:H42D-04H43O-2277H43O-2284



Geoscience Grab Bag 4: Lunar dust, Congo fish, illegal fishing, and collapsing tunnels

Thursday, 12 December
9:00 a.m.

Unlike traditional press conferences that focus on one topic or mission, this Geoscience Grab Bag will highlight four unrelated research projects across Earth and space science being presented at Fall Meeting 2019. This Grab Bag briefing will include:

  • Surprising discoveries about the relationship between rover wheels and lunar dust
  • New insights into evolution in one of Earth’s most extreme freshwater habitats
  • New methods for detecting illegal maritime activities
  • First results from an unusual method to find hidden cavities behind railway tunnels that may be at risk of collapse

Melanie Stiassny, American Museum of Natural History, New York, New York, United States
Patrick Stowell, University of Sheffield, Sheffield, United Kingdom
James Watson, Oregon State University, Corvallis, Oregon, United States
Li Hsia Yeo, University of Colorado Boulder, Boulder, Colorado, United States

Presentations: EP53A-04, IN51C-05, NS43B-0833, P33C-10


X marks the spot: NASA’s OSIRIS-REx sample collection site announcement

Thursday, 12 December
11:00 a.m.

OSIRIS-Rex, NASA’s first asteroid sample return mission, has spent the last year studying asteroid Bennu. The mission team visually, spectrally and topographically mapped Bennu in order to better understand the asteroid and to choose the optimal site for sample collection. The team is now ready to reveal its final primary and back-up sample collection sites. They will also discuss the mission’s plans for the next year leading up to the sampling event, which is scheduled for summer 2020.

Daniella DellaGiustina, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona, United States
Lori Glaze, NASA Headquarters, Washington, D.C., United States
Dante Lauretta, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona, United States
Michael Moreau, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland, United States

Presentations: P51A-02, U54A-02


RESCHEDULED: Another giant polar cyclone discovered: Juno science results since jumping Jupiter’s shadow

Thursday, 12 December
1:30 p.m.

This briefing will include information about a brand new (and massive) polar cyclone on Jupiter as well as the latest findings on the gas giant’s magnetic field, infrared auroral mapping, lightning, and latest science results and new breathtaking Jovian imagery from JunoCam.

Scott Bolton, Southwest Research Institute, San Antonio, Texas, United States
Candice Hansen, Planetary Science Institute, Tucson, Arizona, United States
Steve Levin, NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California, United States
Cheng Li, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California, United States
Alessandro Mura, National Institute for Astrophysics, Rome, Italy

PresentationsP21G-3454P44A-03P42A-06ED14A-01


Media availability: Recent fires in the Amazon, California and around the globe

Thursday, 12 December
2:30 p.m.

Experts will give brief remarks about their research on fires in the Amazon and California and answer questions about fire activity in these regions and around the world.

Paulo Artaxo, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil
Mercedes Bustamante, University of Brasília, Brasília, Brazil
Mark Cochrane, University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science, Cambridge, Maryland, United States
Jim Randerson, University of California-Irvine, Irvine, California, United States
Divino Silvério, Amazon Environmental Research Institute, Belém, Brazil
Danielle Touma, University of California Santa Barbara, California, United States

Roundtable descriptions

Enhanced geothermal systems R&D: Harnessing an untapped source of renewable electricity

Tuesday, 10 December
9:00 a.m.

Geothermal energy currently makes up less than 1% of total U.S. energy generation. However, according to a recent report by the U.S. Department of Energy, advancements in technology could lead to a 26-fold increase—an added 60 gigawatts—of electric generation from geothermal systems by 2050. Join our roundtable to learn from scientists engaged in enhanced geothermal systems research, funded by DOE, to move these engineered geothermal systems safely, reliably and sustainably toward industrial scale.

Pat Dobson, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California, United States
Susan Hamm, Geothermal Technologies Office, U.S. Department of Energy, Washington D.C., United States
Tim Kneafsey, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California, United States
Paul Schwering, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico, United States

Presentations:

Centennial - SWIRL, H14D-08, MR21B-0074, GC23E-03


Two rovers on Mars again

Tuesday, 10 December
10:00 a.m.

NASA's Curiosity rover will soon be joined by Mars 2020. Though they look virtually the same, they have different instruments and collect very different kinds of science. This moderated roundtable discussion will be an essential backgrounder on each mission's adventure and how the public will be brought along for the ride.

Jim Bell, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona, United States
Katie Stack Morgan, NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California, United States
Ashwin Vasavada, NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California, United States


Five new NASA science flight campaigns for 2020

Tuesday, 10 December
2:00 p.m.

Starting in January, NASA flies and dives into five corners of the United States to probe different corners of the Earth system. From intense snowstorms along the U.S. East Coast to swirling ocean eddies off the coast of San Francisco and eroding wetlands of the Mississippi River delta, researchers will embark on new field campaigns to tackle critical science questions. Lead scientists from each of these NASA Earth Venture missions will introduce reporters to the scientific challenges they are tackling and the field reporting opportunities available throughout 2020.

Kenneth Bowman, Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas, United States
Lynn McMurdie, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, United States
Ernesto Rodriguez, NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California, United States
Marc Simard, NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California, United States
Armin Sorooshian, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona, United States

 


What can Antarctica’s past tell us about its future?

Wednesday, 11 December
2:00 p.m.

Over the past two years, the International Ocean Discovery Program (IODP) has undertaken four research cruises to Antarctic waters on their flagship, the JOIDES Resolution. They have recovered kilometers of sediment and rock core that provide the first long-term continuous records in previously underexplored areas of Antarctica. Ongoing scientific analysis of these unique records will tell scientists about Antarctica’s past and the data will be used in models to predict the icy continent’s future. One of the co-chief scientists from each of these Antarctic expeditions will give an overview of their work in Antarctica and explain what results will come from these unique records.

Robert McKay, Antarctic Research Centre, Victoria University, Wellington, New Zealand
Mike Weber, University of Bonn, Bonn, Germany
Julia Wellner, University of Houston, Houston, Texas, United States
Gisela Winckler, Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, Columbia University, Palisades, New York, United States


A look ahead with AGU journal editors (Round 1)

Wednesday, 11 December
3:00 p.m.

Editors from AGU journals will give reporters a look ahead at new research they expect in their journals and fields of study in the coming year. Topics may include exciting new projects just getting started in the editorss fields of study; expected results on current research by the editors or their colleagues; upcoming expeditions or missions; or questions researchers are hoping to address in the coming months.

Rose Cory, Editor, Geophysical Research Letters, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, United States
Gabriel Filippelli, Editor-in-Chief, GeoHealth, Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis, Indianapolis, Indiana, United States
Laurent Montesi, Editor-in-Chief, Journal of Geophysical Research: Planets, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland, United States
Valerie Trouet, Editor, Geophysical Research Letters, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona, United States
Ben van der Pluijm, Editor-in-Chief, Earth's Future, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, United States


Is desalination the answer to our water woes?

Thursday, 12 December
10:00 a.m.

Desalination is a decades-old technology that is getting a fresh look with a $100-million investment by the U.S. Department of Energy, the largest federal investment in water treatment research in 50 years. The National Alliance for Water Innovation, which has been selected by DOE to lead this effort, aims to achieve nothing less than a revolution in how we source and use our water. The speakers will discuss how desalination technologies can play a role in achieving a “circular water economy” and can answer questions on the DOE water hub, the role of science, and the role of industry, as well as California-specific water issues.

Peter Fiske, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and the National Alliance for Water Innovation, Berkeley, California, United States
Meagan Mauter, Stanford University, Palo Alto, California, United States


A look ahead with AGU journal editors (Round 2)

Thursday, 12 December
3:00 p.m.

Editors from AGU journals will give reporters a look ahead at new research they expect in their journals and fields of study in the coming year. Topics may include exciting new projects just getting started in the editorss fields of study; expected results on current research by the editors or their colleagues; upcoming expeditions or missions; or questions researchers are hoping to address in the coming months.

Suzana Camargo, Editor, Geophysical Research Letters, Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, Columbia University, Palisades, New York, United States
Kris Karnauskas, Editor, Journal of Geophysical Research: Oceans, University of Colorado Boulder, Boulder, Colorado, United States
Olga Sergienko, Editor, Journal of Geophysical Research: Earth Surface, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey, United States

Fall Meeting media contacts

AGU Staff Headshot Bompey

NANCI BOMPEY

Director, Media Relations

202.777.7524 | [email protected]

Headshot for Liza Lester

LIZA LESTER

Senior Specialist, Media Relations

202.777.7494 | [email protected]

Headshot for Lauren Lipuma

LAUREN LIPUMA

Program Manager, Media Relations

202.777.7396 | [email protected]