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Atmospheric and Space Electricity Early Career Award

Information on the Award

The Atmospheric and Space Electricity Early Career Award is presented biennially in even years and recognizes significant contributions to atmospheric and space electricity science from honorees within 10 years of receiving their Ph.D. degree. Notable contributions can include the awardee’s high research impact, innovative interdisciplinary work, educational accomplishments such as teaching, mentoring, or course development, or positive societal impact. This award also serves to acknowledge the awardee’s exceptional promise for sustained contributions and continued leadership in atmospheric and space electricity.

The award is presented at the Atmospheric and Space Electricity Business Meeting during Fall Meeting.

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Award Benefits

AGU is proud to recognize our Section honorees. Recipients of the Atmospheric and Space Electricity Early Career Award will receive the following benefits with the honor:

  • 1
    Award plaque and certificate
  • 2
    Recognition in Eos
  • 3
    Recognition at the AGU Fall Meeting during the award presentation year
  • 4
    Complimentary meeting registration the year the award is presented
  • 5
    An invitation to present a talk in the general session for the Section at the AGU Fall Meeting during the award presentation year.
  • 6
    Two complimentary tickets to the Atmospheric and Space Electricity Business Meeting that occurs in the year of the award. (This event is currently not ticketed and free to Section members).

Eligibility

To better understand eligibility for nominators, supporters and committee members, review AGU’s Honors Conflict of Interest Policy.

  • The nominee is required to be an active AGU member.
  • The nominee must be within 10 years of receiving their Ph.D. or the highest equivalent terminal degree. Exceptions to this requirement for unusual circumstances may be considered on a case-by-case basis by the committee.
  • The following individuals are not eligible to be candidates for the award during their terms of service:
    • AGU President;
    • AGU President-elect;
    • Council Leadership Team members;
    • Honors and Recognition Committee members;
    • Atmospheric Space and Electricity Early Career Award Committee members; and
    • All full-time AGU staff

  • Nominators are required to hold an active AGU membership.
  • The following individuals are not eligible to be nominators for the award during their terms of service:
    • AGU President;
    • AGU President-elect;
    • Council Leadership Team members;
    • Honors and Recognition Committee members;
    • Atmospheric Space and Electricity Early Career Award Committee members; and
    • All full-time AGU staff

  • Individuals who write letters of support for the nominee are not required to be active AGU members.
  • The following individuals are not eligible to be supporters for the award during their terms of service:
    • AGU President;
    • AGU President-elect;
    • Council Leadership Team members;
    • Honors and Recognition Committee members;
    • Atmospheric Space and Electricity Early Career Award Committee members; and
    • All full-time AGU staff

The following relationships need to be identified and communicated to the Award Committee but will not disqualify individuals from participating in the nomination or committee review process. These apply to committee members, nominators, and supporters:

  • Current dean, departmental chair, supervisor, supervisee, laboratory director, an individual with whom one has a current business or financial relationship (e.g., business partner, employer, employee);
  • Research collaborator or co-author within the last three years; and/or
  • An individual working at the same institution or having accepted a position at the same institution.

Individuals with the following relationships are disqualified from participating in the award nomination process as a nominator or supporter:

  • Family member, spouse, or partner.
  • A previous graduate (Master’s or Ph.D.) and/or postdoctoral advisor, or postdoctoral fellow may not write a nomination letter but may write a supporting letter after five years of terminating their relationship with the nominee beginning on 1 January after the year the relationship was terminated.
  • A former doctoral or graduate student, or a former postdoctoral fellow may not write a nomination letter for a former advisor but may write a supporting letter after five years of terminating their relationship with the nominee beginning on 1 January after the year the relationship was terminated.

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Nomination Package

Your nomination package must contain all of the following files, which should be no more than two pages in length per document. Learn how to successfully submit a nomination package or read our guide on how to submit a successful nomination.

  • A nomination letter that states how the nominee meets the selection criteria. It should include details about significant contributions to atmospheric and space electricity research, education, or outreach activities for the benefit of science, colleagues, and society at large. Nominator’s signature, name, title, institution, and contact information are required, and letterhead is preferred.
  • A curriculum vitae for the nominee.
  • A selected bibliography stating the total number, the types of publications and the number published by AGU.
  • At least one, and up to three, letters of support. Supporter’s signature, name, title, institution, and contact information are required, and letterhead is preferred. We encourage letters from individuals not currently or recently associated with the candidate’s institution of graduate education or employment.

Submission Process

Submissions are reviewed by the Atmospheric and Space Electricity Early Career Award Committee. Nominations should be submitted online.
SUBMIT
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Recipients

Field Photo:

Keri Nicoll Field Photo 1

 

 

Eric C. Bruning will receive the 2018 Atmospheric and Space Electricity Early Career Award at AGU’s Fall Meeting 2018, to be held 10–14 December in Washington, D. C. The award recognizes “outstanding early career contributions to atmospheric and space electricity.”

This is the first year the Atmospheric and Space Electricity (ASE) section’s Early Career Award will be presented. This award was created to recognize the outstanding contributions of early-career scientists who are primarily or secondarily affiliated with ASE. The award will be biennial, occurring in opposite years from the Benjamin Franklin Lecture, which is presented by an honored senior scientist within ASE. With this new award, we are very proud to continue the advancement of ASE science by promoting a culture that identifies and supports talent throughout all career stages.

—Timothy J. Lang, President, Atmospheric and Space Electricity section, AGU

Citation

Eric Bruning’s research has combined his observational studies with innovative theoretical methods to provide new insights into the processes by which storms produce lightning, particularly in relating lightning size and rates to turbulent storm structure and dissipated electrostatic energy and in clarifying processes causing anomalously electrified storms. His insights are presented in 23 peer-reviewed papers in such journals as Journal of Geophysical Research, Atmospheric Research, and Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences.

Recognizing that progress in our science is inextricably linked to new observations, Eric has obtained essential observations using his West Texas Lightning Mapping Array and other Texas Tech University observing systems. He also helped plan and carry out the extensive Deep Convective Clouds and Chemistry (DC3) experiment and the Verification of the Origins of Rotation in Tornadoes Experiment–Southeast (VORTEX-SE) and the field program to verify performance of the GOES-16 Geostationary Lightning Mapper.

Eric is well recognized for his research achievements, for generously sharing his expertise and resources with students and colleagues, and for scientific leadership. He has advised, served, or chaired several national and international science organizations. He also chaired the Eighth Conference on Meteorological Applications of Lightning Data, developed a training course for the National Weather Service, and gave tutorials on lightning and analysis tools to students and colleagues. He did all this while maintaining a full teaching and advising load at Texas Tech, having advised 11 M.S. students and two Ph.D. students.

In summary, Eric has generously contributed to the infrastructure of our science and has combined his solid foundation in both meteorology and mathematics to make significant advances in our understanding of thunderstorm electrification.

On behalf of the AGU Atmospheric and Space Electricity section, I am pleased to present our section’s 2018 Early Career Award to Dr. Eric Bruning.

—Donald MacGorman, National Severe Storms Laboratory, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Norman, Okla.

Response

It is an honor to receive the AGU Atmospheric and Space Electricity (ASE) Early Career Award. AGU and ASE have been a crucial part of my professional growth from the earliest days. I’m especially grateful to Drs. W. David Rust (whom I very much miss) and Donald MacGorman of the National Severe Storms Laboratory for providing an opportunity to engage in research with the ASE community as an undergraduate and throughout my time at the University of Oklahoma, to Dr. Michael Biggerstaff for his guidance and advising, and to Dr. Paul Krehbiel for numerous clarifying conversations. Each of these individuals has been a committed educator who provided valuable mentoring and research training while humanely conveying high standards for professional work. Without them I would not have understood the horizon of opportunity. More recently, I am grateful to Dr. Steven Goodman for connecting me to the GOES-R Geostationary Lightning Mapper program at the University of Maryland and to Texas Tech University and my colleagues and graduate students there for providing a fertile home for an independent research program.

The citation notes my work on lightning and the turbulent structure of clouds, neither of which is highly regarded for its tractability as a physical system. Nevertheless, I was attracted to lightning’s coupling to the worst of nonlinear fluid dynamics because the beauty of the data, at least to my eye, was in the complexity of lightning flashes as a multitude of variously sized, space-filling fractal objects. I see work on this problem as a microcosm of the challenges that are present across studies of the Earth system and its plethora of coupled, nonlinear systems. AGU brings the study of those systems together, and I look forward to future discoveries alongside my colleagues as we continue to observe and characterize eddies and electricity in the atmosphere.

—Eric C. Bruning, Texas Tech University, Lubbock

Honors Contacts

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Artesha Moore

Vice President, Affiliation, Engagement & Membership

202-777-7530 | [email protected]

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Leah Bland

Program Manager, Honors

202-777-7389 | [email protected]

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Rosa Maymi

Director, Engagement and Membership

202-777-7322 | [email protected]

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Hannah Hoffman

Honors and Affiliation Program Coordinator

202-777-7515 | [email protected]