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Donald L. Turcotte Award

Information on the Award

The Donald L. Turcotte Award is presented annually to an early-career or postdoctoral scientist in recognition of outstanding dissertation research that contributes directly to nonlinear geophysics. Notable contributions can include the awardee’s impact or potential impact of the research on the field of nonlinear geophysics.

The award is presented at the Nonlinear Geophysics section ticketed event during the AGU Fall Meeting.

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Award Benefits

AGU is proud to recognize our section honorees. Recipients of the Donald L. Turcotte Award will receive the following benefits with the honor:

  • 1
    Award certificate
  • 2
    $200 monetary prize
  • 3
    Recognition in Eos
  • 4
    Recognition at the AGU Fall Meeting during the award presentation year
  • 5
    An invitation to present a talk about the dissertation topic at the AGU Fall Meeting during the award presentation year
  • 6
    Complimentary ticket to the Nonlinear Geophysics section ticketed event at the AGU Fall Meeting during the award presentation year

Eligibility

To better understand eligibility for nominators, supporters and Turcotte Award Committee members, review AGU’s Honors Conflict of Interest Policy.

  • The nominee is not required to be an active AGU member.
  • Completion of requirements for the award of Ph.D. degree (or highest equivalent terminal degree) during the 12-month period prior to the nomination deadline (15 April 2020–15 June 2021). Exceptions to this requirement for unusual circumstances may be considered on a case-by-case basis by the committee.
  • The following individuals are not eligible to be candidates for the award during their terms of service:
  • AGU President;
  • AGU President-elect;
  • Council Leadership Team members;
  • Honors and Recognition Committee members;
  • Nonlinear Geophysics section leadership;
  • Turcotte Award Committee members; and
  • All full-time AGU staff.

  • Nominators must be the nominee’s research advisors.
  • Nominators are not required to hold an active AGU membership.
  • The following individuals are not eligible to be nominators for the award during their terms of service:
  • AGU President;
  • AGU President-elect;
  • Council Leadership Team members;
  • Honors and Recognition Committee members;
  • Nonlinear Geophysics section leadership;
  • Turcotte Award Committee members; and
  • All full-time AGU staff.

  • Individuals who write letters of support for the nominee are not required to be active AGU members.
  • The following individuals are not eligible to be supporters for the award during their terms of service:
  • AGU President;
  • AGU President-elect;
  • Council Leadership Team members;
  • Honors and Recognition Committee members;
  • Nonlinear Geophysics section leadership;
  • Turcotte Award Committee members; and
  • All full-time AGU staff.

  • The following relationships need to be identified and communicated to the award committee but will not disqualify individuals from participating in the nomination or committee review process. These apply to committee members, nominators, and supporters:
  • Current dean, departmental chair, supervisor, supervisee, laboratory director, an individual with whom one has a current business or financial relationship (e.g., business partner, employer, employee);
  • Research collaborator or co-author within the last three years; and/or
  • An individual working at the same institution or having accepted a position at the same institution.
  • Individuals with the following relationships are disqualified from participating in the award nomination process as a nominator or supporter:
  • Family member, spouse, or partner.
  • A former doctoral or graduate student, or a former postdoctoral fellow may not write a nomination letter for a former advisor but may write a supporting letter after five years of terminating their relationship with the nominee beginning on 1 January after the year the relationship was terminated.

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Nomination Package

Your nomination package must contain all of the following files, which should be no more than two pages in length per document. Learn how to successfully submit a nomination package or read our guide on how to submit a successful nomination.

  • A nomination letter from the nominee’s research advisor stating how the nominee meets the selection criteria. It should include details about the nominee’s research in the field of nonlinear geophysics. Nominator’s signature, name, title, institution, and contact information are required, and letterhead is preferred.
  • The nominee’s dissertation. For a dissertation written in English, a five-page summary is required and should discuss the context for the dissertation, as well as the major findings and significance. For non-English dissertations, an extended summary in English is required for every chapter, as well as a discussion of the dissertation’s context, major findings, and significance.
  • At least one, and up to three, letters of support from other members of the thesis committee or scientists familiar with the research. Supporter’s signature, name, title, institution, and contact information are required, and letterhead is preferred.
  • A curriculum vitae for the nominee (optional).
  • A selected bibliography stating the total number, the types of publications and the number published by AGU (optional).

Submission Process

Submissions are reviewed by the Turcotte Award Committee. Nominations should be submitted online.
SUBMIT
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Recipients

Riddhi Bandyopadhyay

2020

Vera Melinda Galfi

2019

Veronica Prush

2019

Meredith Plumley will receive the 2018 Donald L. Turcotte Award at AGU’s Fall Meeting 2018, to be held 10–14 December in Washington, D. C. This award is given annually to a recent Ph.D. recipient for “outstanding dissertation research that contributes directly to nonlinear geophysics.”

 

Citation

Meredith Plumley received her B.A. in mathematics in 2011 from Washington University in St. Louis. She joined the applied mathematics department at the University of Colorado Boulder for her graduate work, earning her Ph.D. in 2018 under the supervision of Keith Julien and Michael Calkins. Her research topics include fluid dynamics, planetary magnetic fields, and model reduction techniques. She is currently working as a postdoctoral researcher with Andrew Jackson at ETH Zürich in the Department of Earth Sciences.

 

Prachanda Subedi will receive the 2017 Donald L. Turcotte Award at the 2017 American Geophysical Union Fall Meeting, to be held 11–15 December in New Orleans, La. This award is given annually to a recent Ph.D. recipient for “outstanding dissertation research that contributes directly to nonlinear geophysics.”

 

Citation

Prachanda Subedi received his B.S. degree in physics from East Central University in Ada, Okla. After completing his bachelor’s degree, he enrolled at the University of Delaware, where he received a Ph.D. in space physics in 2017. His Ph.D. work was done under the supervision of William Matthaeus. His research interests include turbulence, space plasma, magnetohydrodynamics, and transport theory.

 

Yavor Kamer will receive the 2016 Donald L. Turcotte Award, given annually to recent Ph.D. recipients for outstanding dissertation research that contributes directly to the field of nonlinear geophysics.

 

Citation

Yavor received his B.S. in control engineering in 2007 from Istanbul Technical University and an M.Sc. in control and automation engineering from the same university in 2010, the same year he started an earthquake engineering Ph.D. at Bogazici University. In 2012, he enrolled in ETH Zürich where he received a Ph.D. in earthquake forecasting in 2015. His Ph.D. work was done under the supervision of Didier Sornette, Guy Ouillon, and Edi Kissling. His research interests include statistical seismology, pattern recognition, multifractal analysis, and data-driven model parameterization.

 

Jezabel Curbelo will receive the 2015 Donald L. Turcotte Award, given annually to recent Ph.D. recipients for outstanding dissertation research that contributes directly to the field of nonlinear geophysics.

 

Citation

Jezabel received her B.S. in mathematics from Universidad de la Laguna in 2009 and a M.Sc. in mathematics and applications from Universidad Autónoma de Madrid (UAM) in 2010. She received a Ph.D. in mathematics from the Universidad Autónoma de Madrid in 2014. Her Ph.D. work was done under the supervision of Ana M. Mancho at the Instituto de Ciencias Matemáticas, a joint research initiative of Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas and three universities in Madrid (UAM, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid). Her research interests include convection, instabilities and bifurcations, dynamical systems, and numerical methods for problems in geophysical fluid dynamics.

 

Behzad Ghanbarian-Alavijeh will receive the 2015 Donald L. Turcotte Award, given annually to recent Ph.D. recipients for outstanding dissertation research that contributes directly to the field of nonlinear geophysics.

 

Citation

Behzad Ghanbarian-Alavijeh received his B.S. in water engineering from Isfahan University of Technology in 2005 and a M.Sc. in irrigation and drainage from the University of Tehran in 2007. He received his Ph.D. in environmental sciences from Wright State University under the supervision of Allen Hunt in 2014. He is currently working as a postdoctoral research fellow in the Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering Department, University of Texas at Austin. His research interests include analytical and numerical modeling of fluid flow and solute transport in disordered porous media.

 

Woosok Moon was awarded the 2014 Donald L. Turcotte Award, given annually to recent Ph.D. recipients for outstanding dissertation research that contributes directly to the field of nonlinear geophysics.

 

Citation

Woosok Moon was awarded the 2014 Donald L. Turcotte Award, given annually to recent Ph.D. recipients for outstanding dissertation research that contributes directly to the field of nonlinear geophysics. He gave an invited talk and was formally presented with the award at the 2014 American Geophysical Union Fall Meeting, held 15–19 December in San Francisco, Calif. Woosok received his B.S. in atmospheric science from Seoul National University in 2000 and a M.Sc. in meteorology from the Pennsylvania State University in 2008. He received a Ph.D. in geophysics under the supervision of J. S. Wettlaufer at Yale University. His research interests include Arctic sea ice thermodynamics, geophysical fluid dynamics, and stochastic dynamical systems applied to climate dynamics.

 

Jonathan F. Donges was awarded the 2013 Donald L. Turcotte Award, given annually to recent Ph.D. recipients for outstanding dissertation research that contributes directly to the field of nonlinear geophysics. Donges’s Ph.D. thesis is entitled “Functional network macroscopes for probing past and present Earth system dynamics.” He gave an invited talk and was formally presented with the award at the 2013 AGU Fall Meeting, held 9–13 December in San Francisco, Calif.

 

Citation

Jonathan received his M.Sc. in physics from the University of Potsdam in Germany, in 2009 and a Ph.D. in theoretical physics under the supervision of Jürgen Kurths from Humboldt University in Berlin, Germany, in 2012. He is currently working as a postdoctoral researcher at the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research in Potsdam, Germany, and Stockholm Resilience Centre in Stockholm, Sweden. His research interests include complexity in past and present climate dynamics as well as human interactions with the Earth system on a global scale.

 

Asim Biswas has been awarded the Donald L. Turcotte Award, given annually to recent Ph.D. recipients for outstanding dissertation research that contributes directly to the field of nonlinear geophysics. Asim’s Ph.D. thesis is entitled “Multi-scale controls on spatial patterns of soil water storage in the hummocky regions of North America.” He gave an invited talk and was formally presented with the award at the 2012 AGU Fall Meeting, held 3–7 December in San Francisco, Calif.

 

Citation

Asim received his B.Sc. in agriculture from Bidhan Chandra Krishi Viswavidyalaya, India, in 2004 and a M.Sc. in soil science from the University of Agricultural Sciences, Bangalore, India, in 2006. He received his Ph.D. in soil physics under the supervision of Bing Si from the University of Saskatchewan, Canada, in 2011. He is currently working as a postdoctoral fellow at the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization in Canberra, Australia. His research interests include soil physics, spatial variability, soil hydrology, and quantitative nonlinear geophysics.

 

Ian Grooms has been awarded the AGU Donald L. Turcotte Award, given annually to recent Ph.D. recipients for outstanding dissertation research that contributes directly to the field of nonlinear geophysics. Grooms’s thesis is entitled “Asymptotic and numerical methods for rapidly rotating buoyant flow.” He presented an invited talk and was formally presented with the award at the 2011 AGU Fall Meeting, held 5–9 December in San Francisco, Calif.

 

Citation

Grooms received his B.S. in mathematics from the College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, Va., in 2005. He received a Ph.D. in applied mathematics in 2011 under the supervision of Keith Julien at the University of Colorado at Boulder. His research interests include asymptotic and numerical methods for multiscale problems in geophysical fluid dynamics.

 

Sabine Lennartz has been awarded the Donald L. Turcotte Award, given annually to a recent Ph.D. recipient for outstanding dissertation research that contributes directly to the field of nonlinear geophysics. Lennartz’s thesis is entitled “Correlation and trend analysis in short records: Applications in climatology and seismology.” She is scheduled to present an invited talk in the Nonlinear Geophysics General Contributions session (NG01) during the 2010 AGU Fall Meeting, 13–17 December in San Francisco, Calif. Lennartz will be formally presented with the award at the Nonlinear Geophysics focus group reception on 14 December 2010.

 

Citation

Lennartz received her M.S. in theoretical physics from the University of Cologne, Cologne, Germany, in 2005. In 2009 she received a Ph.D. in theoretical physics under the supervision of Armin Bunde at the Justus Liebig University, Giessen, Germany. Her research interests include seismology and climatology, in particular, the effect of long-term memory on extreme events and the detection of unnatural (anthropogenic) trends.

 

Jerome Neufeld has been awarded the Donald L. Turcotte Award, given annually to recent Ph.D. recipients for outstanding dissertation research that contributes directly to the field of nonlinear geophysics. Neufeld’s thesis is entitled “Solidification in the fast lane: Flow-induced morphological instability in geological systems.” He was formally presented with the award at the Nonlinear Geophysics Focus Group reception during the 2009 AGU Fall Meeting, held 14–18 December in San Francisco, Calif.

 

Citation

Jerome received his B.A.S. in engineering science from the University of Toronto in 2001, and a Ph.D. in geophysics from Yale University in 2008, under the supervision of J. S. Wettlaufer, on the impact of oceanic currents on the formation of sea ice. He is currently a fellow at the Institute of Theoretical Geophysics, University of Cambridge, working on the fluid dynamics of geophysical systems including carbon dioxide sequestration, the influence of flow on the crystal structure of mushy layers, and the evolution of icicles.

 

Citation

 

Irina Rypina has been awarded the Donald L. Turcotte Award, given annually to recent Ph.D. recipients for outstanding dissertation research that contributes directly to the field of nonlinear geophysics. Rypina’s thesis is entitled “Lagrangian coherent structures and transport in two-dimensional incompressible flows with oceanographic and atmospheric applications.” She will be formally presented with the award at the Nonlinear Geophysics Focus Group Reception during the 2008 AGU Fall Meeting, which will be held 15–19 December in San Francisco, Calif.

 

Citation

Irina received her B.S. in plasma physics from Nizhny Novgorod State University, in Russia, in 2002, an M.S. in physics from the University of Louisiana at Lafayette in 2003, and a Ph.D. in applied marine physics from the University of Miami in 2007. She is currently working as a postdoctoral investigator at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. Her research interests include dynamical systems theory, transport and mixing processes in oceanic and atmospheric flows, Hamiltonian dynamics, underwater acoustics, and magnetic confinement of plasmas.

 

Honors Contacts

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Artesha Moore

Vice President, Affiliation, Engagement & Membership

202-777-7530 | [email protected]

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Leah Bland

Program Manager, Honors

202-777-7389 | [email protected]

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Rosa Maymi

Director, Engagement and Membership

202-777-7322 | [email protected]

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Hannah Hoffman

Honors and Affiliation Program Coordinator

202-777-7515 | [email protected]